Hot Best Seller

The Edge Chronicles 6: Midnight Over Sanctaphrax: Third Book of Twig

Availability: Ready to download

Twig Verginix has gained a formidable reputation as the young sky pirate captain who dared to sail over the Edge. But far out in open sky a storm is brewing. In its path lies Sanctaphrax – the great floating city tethered to the land by a massive chain. Twig has learned of the approaching danger, but a perilous voyage destroys his sky ship, hurling his crew into and beyond Twig Verginix has gained a formidable reputation as the young sky pirate captain who dared to sail over the Edge. But far out in open sky a storm is brewing. In its path lies Sanctaphrax – the great floating city tethered to the land by a massive chain. Twig has learned of the approaching danger, but a perilous voyage destroys his sky ship, hurling his crew into and beyond the Deepwoods and robbing Twig of his memories. The race against the storm begins, as Twig struggles to reach Sanctaphrax and save its inhabitants before it is too late . . . Midnight Over Sanctaphrax is the third book of the Twig Saga – second trilogy in The Edge Chronicles, the internationally best-selling fantasy series, which has featured on the UK and the New York Times best-seller lists and sold more than 3 million copies. There are now 13 titles and four trilogies in the series, but each book is a stand-alone adventure, so you can read The Edge Chronicles in any order you choose.


Compare

Twig Verginix has gained a formidable reputation as the young sky pirate captain who dared to sail over the Edge. But far out in open sky a storm is brewing. In its path lies Sanctaphrax – the great floating city tethered to the land by a massive chain. Twig has learned of the approaching danger, but a perilous voyage destroys his sky ship, hurling his crew into and beyond Twig Verginix has gained a formidable reputation as the young sky pirate captain who dared to sail over the Edge. But far out in open sky a storm is brewing. In its path lies Sanctaphrax – the great floating city tethered to the land by a massive chain. Twig has learned of the approaching danger, but a perilous voyage destroys his sky ship, hurling his crew into and beyond the Deepwoods and robbing Twig of his memories. The race against the storm begins, as Twig struggles to reach Sanctaphrax and save its inhabitants before it is too late . . . Midnight Over Sanctaphrax is the third book of the Twig Saga – second trilogy in The Edge Chronicles, the internationally best-selling fantasy series, which has featured on the UK and the New York Times best-seller lists and sold more than 3 million copies. There are now 13 titles and four trilogies in the series, but each book is a stand-alone adventure, so you can read The Edge Chronicles in any order you choose.

30 review for The Edge Chronicles 6: Midnight Over Sanctaphrax: Third Book of Twig

  1. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte May

    The Edge Chronicles have been an absolute gem of a find! A fantastic third instalment of the Twig trilogy! Sanctaphrax is in danger - its walls are falling apart piece by piece and the high academics have no idea why. "In our madness we are devouring each other." Meanwhile Twig and his crew on board the sky ship Edgedancer have gone in search of Cloud Wolf, Twig's father. What follows is a non-stop adventure filled with the most imaginative creatures and characters I've ever come across with some The Edge Chronicles have been an absolute gem of a find! A fantastic third instalment of the Twig trilogy! Sanctaphrax is in danger - its walls are falling apart piece by piece and the high academics have no idea why. "In our madness we are devouring each other." Meanwhile Twig and his crew on board the sky ship Edgedancer have gone in search of Cloud Wolf, Twig's father. What follows is a non-stop adventure filled with the most imaginative creatures and characters I've ever come across with some of the best world building. I would recommend these books to anyone with a taste for adventure and fantasy! "Follow your heart, and I will follow mine."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mikayla

    Another great read from Paul Stewart and wonderful art as always. Though up to now I've figured that the first and/or second books in each trilogy is usually better than the third (just with my experience). Still a fantastic book though, love the series so far and give 4 stars.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Charlyn

    Twig knows his father's ship has gone beyond the Edge and that's where he must travel if he wants to find his father. Now the captain of his own sky ship, Twig has the vessel tethered to a caterbird, following his father into the vortex of a horrid storm. His crew is a group of devoted followers who trust their young captain with their lives. Twig finds his father who, before he disappears, imparts to Twig the importance of saving Sanctaphrax. Twig and his crew are tossed from their ship by the Twig knows his father's ship has gone beyond the Edge and that's where he must travel if he wants to find his father. Now the captain of his own sky ship, Twig has the vessel tethered to a caterbird, following his father into the vortex of a horrid storm. His crew is a group of devoted followers who trust their young captain with their lives. Twig finds his father who, before he disappears, imparts to Twig the importance of saving Sanctaphrax. Twig and his crew are tossed from their ship by the terrible explosion and each is catapulted back to the Edge. Twig is rescued and brought to Sanctaphrax, but he cannot remember his father's admonitions. He only knows that, if he is safe, then he must find each of the other crew members of his ship. That search across the treacherous regions of the Deepwoods with its formidable beasts makes up the balance of the book. Adventure and suspense abound in the third volume of the Edge Chronicles, but I would advise readers to complete Book 2 before joining Twig on his travels here.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Brilliant, as always.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Maddie

    Flew through this book just as much as the other books :) Love the illustrations, they just add so much to the story. I love all of the different characters, especially Cowlquape because he's rather relatable with his scaredy-cat ways. Twig's just grown so much throughout this trilogy, it's been so great to see!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jacky

    The last book of the Twig-Saga :( I'm a little sad, I got to looove love everyone and can't wait to read all the other sagas! But what a great finale!!!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Connor

    Loved it!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sanja_Sanjalica

    It was entertaining and suspenseful, but maybe my least favorite of the Twig trilogy. Still, a great read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Justyn Rampa

    Paul Stewart and Chris Riddell continue to win my heart in book three of "The Edge Chronicles". This book concludes "The Twig Saga" and what a conclusion! Although things did not work out quite as I had predicted, I very much loved this book! If "Stormchaser" was concerned with urban infrastructure, then "Midnight over Sanctaphrax" is concerned with slavery and the evils therein. Pretty heavy commentary for a "children's book" in my opinion. I don't mean to give the impression that this is a fict Paul Stewart and Chris Riddell continue to win my heart in book three of "The Edge Chronicles". This book concludes "The Twig Saga" and what a conclusion! Although things did not work out quite as I had predicted, I very much loved this book! If "Stormchaser" was concerned with urban infrastructure, then "Midnight over Sanctaphrax" is concerned with slavery and the evils therein. Pretty heavy commentary for a "children's book" in my opinion. I don't mean to give the impression that this is a fictionalized treatise on the matter, but I believe that Paul and Chris manage to introduce some fairly complicated concepts into children's literature which I appreciate. As to the story itself, well, we certainly go deeper. A creation myth in introduced, a new POV character is introduced, and there is a quest which I found incredibly compelling that dominates most of the book. Also, the growth of Twig as a character was a remarkable journey to watch. To see him start as a frightened whiny little boy in his mother's lap in "Beyond the Deepwoods" to where he ends up in "Midnight over Sanctaphrax" is incredible! In particular, one scene for me really hit home just how much he has grown. There continue to be great nods to previous events which make the reading even more rewarding for those who are working their way through the series. I have no idea what Book 4 will bring, but I have a feeling there are some unresolved issues that will be addressed later. I may take a wee break before beginning Book 4 so I can address some Book Club reading before beginning "The Quint Saga".

  10. 4 out of 5

    Marsha

    With each new venture into the Edge world, Mr. Stewart has shown us yet another corner of it. In this one, he takes Twig on a perilous journey to find his lost comrades and to the very source of life itself. Twig’s travels bring him into intimate contact with the workings of the odious slave trade, which had been mentioned in previous volumes. It’s a practice no decent sky pirate ever indulges—but, as Mr. Stewart shows, good and bad people are found everywhere and nothing is safe or certain. The With each new venture into the Edge world, Mr. Stewart has shown us yet another corner of it. In this one, he takes Twig on a perilous journey to find his lost comrades and to the very source of life itself. Twig’s travels bring him into intimate contact with the workings of the odious slave trade, which had been mentioned in previous volumes. It’s a practice no decent sky pirate ever indulges—but, as Mr. Stewart shows, good and bad people are found everywhere and nothing is safe or certain. The suddenness of how slavery can descend even on freeborn people is grimly penned. This is a thrilling adventure story, one packed with familiar and strange faces and creatures. The forging of new ties and the rebuilding of old ones form the basis for each volume. If it seems sometimes that friends and enemies are a little too quickly discarded with each new story, the introductions point out that each book is only one tale of a thousand; it makes sense that individuals get lost in the shuffle of history. These are, after all, chronicles of the Edge itself. People come and go; the land itself is what endures and Mr. Stewart’s exuberant writing keeps us coming back for more.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    note: mrs. lowery i didnt know how to get three posts on the same book for one week so i am doing them all in one post. Post 1: Twig and Cowlquape are looking around in undertown. They are looking for there lost crew members when they come across a small tavern. In this tavern there are Flat head goblins herassing the owner and are scaring the customers. Twig and Cowalquape kill the goblins and free every one. Also they find one of Twigs crew members. Post 2: Twig cowalquape and tarp are trapped i note: mrs. lowery i didnt know how to get three posts on the same book for one week so i am doing them all in one post. Post 1: Twig and Cowlquape are looking around in undertown. They are looking for there lost crew members when they come across a small tavern. In this tavern there are Flat head goblins herassing the owner and are scaring the customers. Twig and Cowalquape kill the goblins and free every one. Also they find one of Twigs crew members. Post 2: Twig cowalquape and tarp are trapped in the sewers and in somesort of mesh netting bag. It turns out that this is another two crew members trying to make a life off in the sewers. They are Wingnut Sleet and grobo. They then find out that they are glowing and are thought to be spirits. Post 3: It is back to twig and cowalquape only and they are off to the great shryke slave market. It is a terrible place that keeps inocent people locked up i cages inside hollow trees and then they are sold to the more fortunate. You must have a white cockade or you could be mistaken for a slave and sold.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I think I'm done with these books. They have been disapointing. I'm just not excited to read about the "real world" horrors they are introducing to kids. Greed, politics, environmental disasters caused by people, slavery, psychotic murderers... I find the plot detail doesn't keep up with the detail to the scenery and gruesome brutality. Somewhat main characters keep dying off only to be replaced by similar characters (three books = three banderbears). I no longer feel a sense of shock or sadness I think I'm done with these books. They have been disapointing. I'm just not excited to read about the "real world" horrors they are introducing to kids. Greed, politics, environmental disasters caused by people, slavery, psychotic murderers... I find the plot detail doesn't keep up with the detail to the scenery and gruesome brutality. Somewhat main characters keep dying off only to be replaced by similar characters (three books = three banderbears). I no longer feel a sense of shock or sadness over the deaths as I am numbed by the frequency of it. Besides all that, nothing really seems to happen. I just don't get it. I know there are a ton more of these books but ugh. I don't think I could stand to read any more. I LOVED the Far Flung Adventures. They were so fun and zany and witty. Why didn't this talented author/illustrator team write more of those?

  13. 5 out of 5

    Negin

    It’s not the book. It’s me. These days I seem to have a very difficult time focusing when it comes to certain types of books - classics, fantasy, and any fiction that’s not particularly engaging. I have to say that I’m disappointed in myself. This book, the third in the series was good. I would have enjoyed it far more if only I’d been able to focus. I’m debating whether to continue with the series or not. I’m not usually the series type (other than Harry Potter and the Ken Follett series).

  14. 4 out of 5

    Eric Ure

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. As with the first two entries in the series the setting is imaginative, but the plot lacks focus and most character motivations are difficult to buy into. This is due in part to the lack of space between the events of this book and the previous, but I believe it can largely be attributed to the overall storyline failing to take advantage of an interesting cast of characters by scattering them across the world during the first few pages. At times it overcomes its problems and becomes engaging, pa As with the first two entries in the series the setting is imaginative, but the plot lacks focus and most character motivations are difficult to buy into. This is due in part to the lack of space between the events of this book and the previous, but I believe it can largely be attributed to the overall storyline failing to take advantage of an interesting cast of characters by scattering them across the world during the first few pages. At times it overcomes its problems and becomes engaging, particularly in the last quarter.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Col

    For whatever reason, I have little memory of all the end-of-trilogy books in this series (Descenders excluded). Whether that's just due to the fact that I didn't own most of them, or something in their quality, remains to be seen. For Midnight, at least, I can clearly see why. Stewart's bloodthirst in Stormchaser was one thing, the opening of this book is quite another. We're hardly introduced to this new "cast" before they're sent packing, and we're given Cowlquape as a consolation. I'm not so p For whatever reason, I have little memory of all the end-of-trilogy books in this series (Descenders excluded). Whether that's just due to the fact that I didn't own most of them, or something in their quality, remains to be seen. For Midnight, at least, I can clearly see why. Stewart's bloodthirst in Stormchaser was one thing, the opening of this book is quite another. We're hardly introduced to this new "cast" before they're sent packing, and we're given Cowlquape as a consolation. I'm not so perturbed by the treatment of a bunch of barely introduced characters, but the disappearance of Maugin really rankles. The inclusion of the story The Stone Pilot is cold comfort . The only living link between Twig and Cloud Wolf, and she's absent for all but two chapters. In my dreams, there would be some alternate version of this book where Maugin and Twig form the main duo. Imagine the kind of drama you could wring from her personal knowledge of Cloud Wolf's deteriorating life, and the contrast with the man Twig is growing up to be. Instead, we have Cowlquape. Now, it's not that I hate him. His role as inept reader surrogate is quite funny, and he satisfies my complaints about Twig's lack of peers reasonably well. His development of some slight courage was more believable to me than Twig's transformation from bullying victim to the hero shown here. No, I think my biggest problem with Cowlquape is that he represents the primary flaw of the first three Edge books: discontinuity. For whatever reason, the authors seemed to want to keep each of these three books as self-contained as possible, which means a very small recurring cast. I'm loath to make the comparison, but Harry Potter did not dump the cast each book, and it would be a much weaker series if Rowling had. While the problem persists a little throughout, it's at its worst in the Twig books. Even the premises of Books two and three are at odds with each other. What's more, this book in particular is very uneven. The first half consists of puttering about in Sanctaphrax and Undertown. While this can make for fun reading, it really doesn't fit the apocalyptic stakes established in the opening. The only thing that stood out from these scenes was Stewart's literalization of the mind altering effects of weather, which is a great idea and fitting for the setting. Things do pick up once the Skyraider is boarded, and the latter half of this book has quite a few memorable scenes. (view spoiler)[While plausibility may be stretched with Twig finding his old village, I found it a fairly touching scene, and a good way to tie the end of the story to the beginning. Finally seeing Maugin again was nice, if all too brief. But if you were going to bring up the events of past books anyway, why the cast resets, Stewart? Argh. The fact that the kindly Professor of Darkness ended up being Twig's final "foe" also really stuck with me. How many kid's books have the hero physically fighting a frail old man who really hasn't done anything so wrong? While it goes for a note of hope with the saving of all life on the Edge and the growth of a new Sanctaphrax rock, knowing the whole context of the future sure takes the wind out of its sails. While I can't claim it's a flaw here, the tendency of the authors to smash their toys really gives an odd feeling to scenes like this, which only intensifies with the Quint and Maris books. Adding new elements to the setting with the Nightwoods and Riverrise was welcome. It's these scenes that were most vividly memorable from readings years ago. I actually find it interesting that in many ways the setting was more or less set from here on out. Even by Immortals Riverrise was the furthest border that we actually witnessed, and the authors resisted inventing some entirely new regions that weren't pictured on the initial map. From Midnight forward they stuck to adding new elements to Sanctaphrax, the Deepwoods, etc. The one thing I would never impugn is their worldbuilding creativity, so I wonder why they stopped here. A sense of shame at going back on their word that Riverrise was the end of the living world? It's also here that we get the first real treatment of what becomes one of the main recurring sub-themes of the series: slavery. In retrospect, Garble in Deepwoods was pretty clearly a slaver (and wasn't Cloud Wolf's chaining Mugbutt in the hold a little odd?), and finding three of Twig's crewmembers in Flabsweat's pet shop was a sign of things to come, but it's here that it comes into its own. Much like the brutality of the series, this was another thing that went over my head as a kid. I'd hesitate to say every book repeats this theme, but even Curse opens with Tweezel's backstory as a survivor of a slavetaking attack on his colony. It's a fairly convenient way to make the villains hateable and the heroes heroic, but the authors never really explore the topic very deeply as far as I recall. While some of the main characters are affected by slavery, none of them were actually enslaved, which is where most of the drama and horror of the subject can be mined. Still, knowing how violent Stewart is willing to get, maybe I should be glad they didn't go too deep into the subject. (hide spoiler)]

  16. 5 out of 5

    Allyson Shelton

    I think what I love most about the Edge Chronicles... The fact that it's middle grade, fun, whimsical, and almost fluffy but yet it still has this hard 'edge' (not intended but I'll take it) to it. It's dark and almost gritty at times. If it needs to have a bit of 'gore' or death it does. If bad things need to happen they happen. Everything doesn't just work out. Our characters have hard times and have to work for a 'happy ending'.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ari Fe

    Great book, recommend it to anyone who likes fantasy!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chris Whybrow

    In 'Midnight over Sanctaphrax' the Mother Storm, the ultimate source of all life on the Edge, is returning. But the floating city of Sanctaphrax blocks its path, and if the city is not unchained, everyone on the Edge is going to die. That's right. The city that Quint spent the first two books of the prequel trilogy fighting to protect must be destroyed. By his own son. I like 'Midnight over Sanctaphrax'. It's not as good as 'Stormchaser', but it provides a satisfying conclusion to Twig's arc. He In 'Midnight over Sanctaphrax' the Mother Storm, the ultimate source of all life on the Edge, is returning. But the floating city of Sanctaphrax blocks its path, and if the city is not unchained, everyone on the Edge is going to die. That's right. The city that Quint spent the first two books of the prequel trilogy fighting to protect must be destroyed. By his own son. I like 'Midnight over Sanctaphrax'. It's not as good as 'Stormchaser', but it provides a satisfying conclusion to Twig's arc. He might not be the most deep character in fiction, but he's considerably more interesting than his father was, an adventurous and honourable young man, but with a streak of ruthlessness. You couldn't imagine Quint (view spoiler)[ Selling his enemies into slavery or destroying a city filled with a few innocent people with very little hesitation. (hide spoiler)] He's not an anti-hero as much, his actions are justified by the plot, but it's a lot more morally ambiguous than before. I also think Cowlquape works well as a foil to Twig, his nervous and academic character contrasting with Twig's fearlessness and love of adventure. The plot is for the most part solid but, well, amnesia and dream visions are things that usually belong in less creative books than this one, I have to say. There wasn't any in-universe explanation for Cowlquape's prophetic dreams of Kobold the Wise, which I also think were really out of place in the story. And I also found it a bit contrived that (view spoiler)[ Woodfish lands near the village where Twig grew up and guides him back there. Just in time for his adoptive father's funeral as well. (hide spoiler)] It's a nice scene that reminds you of how far he has come, but I feel how he got there could have been improved. Expanding on my earlier point about moral ambiguity, I especially like the inclusion of Thunderbolt Vulpoon. In all the previous books the Sky Pirates have usually been portrayed as a monolithic force for good. The inclusion of this unscrupulous character reveals the truth to be a bit less black and white. Overall, this is a satisfying conclusion to Twig's trilogy, which overall I feel is a better read than the Quint trilogy. Which means the next one is the emotional gut punch that is 'Last of the Sky Pirates', where we discover the miserable fate of this world and its characters. Yay!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    "Midnight Over Sanctaphrax" marks the culmination of the Twig trilogy, sending our hero off into the horizon - but not without a few challenges first. This final installment builds off of the harrowing adventures we've seen Twig take through both the Deepwoods and Sanctaphrax itself, going even darker than its predecessors. Jumping off from where Stormchaser leaves us, Twig and his crew of sky-pirates heads over the Edge in search of his father, Cloud Wolf. Out in open sky, they discover that th "Midnight Over Sanctaphrax" marks the culmination of the Twig trilogy, sending our hero off into the horizon - but not without a few challenges first. This final installment builds off of the harrowing adventures we've seen Twig take through both the Deepwoods and Sanctaphrax itself, going even darker than its predecessors. Jumping off from where Stormchaser leaves us, Twig and his crew of sky-pirates heads over the Edge in search of his father, Cloud Wolf. Out in open sky, they discover that the Mother Storm is returning to the the Edge to refill the waters of Riverrise -- but only if Sanctaphrax doesn't stand in its way. This crucial information is lost to temporary amnesia upon Twig's return to the Edge, and the quest becomes one to find his separated crew members while the clock continues ticking steadily in the background towards the storm's arrival. Whimsical, but tough, the world of the Edge continues to prove a challenging place. This time out our heroes face slavery, violent gladiatorial battles, further death by wig-wig, the seedy underbelly of Undertown, self-sacrifice and the understanding that who we are might mean we end up on different paths from those we love - deep stuff for a middle school reader, but wrapped as ever in Chris Riddell's fantastic illustrations, the hard-hitting punches are cushioned with fantasy.

  20. 5 out of 5

    B.S. Casey

    I just re-read this after reading it as a child, and I can definitely say it's quite dark and heavy considering it's a children's book - but it was still quite enjoyable even now. I read this book before the first one in the series, which still works because whilst they're all interlinked, each book works perfectly as a standalone as well. The illustrations are amazing, and the universe the story takes place in is full of danger and wonder. I think the setting is my favourite part of this book. I just re-read this after reading it as a child, and I can definitely say it's quite dark and heavy considering it's a children's book - but it was still quite enjoyable even now. I read this book before the first one in the series, which still works because whilst they're all interlinked, each book works perfectly as a standalone as well. The illustrations are amazing, and the universe the story takes place in is full of danger and wonder. I think the setting is my favourite part of this book. Twig, the sky pirate, is thrown from this ship in a storm and robbed of his memories, including the memory that the storm is headed for the floating city of Sanctaphrax. It's well written, with a quick pace. And whilst it has a fun, quirky style it's also got a dark edge to it that makes it a good read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Severind

    Another adventure with Twig and friends. I expected more of it to take place on a sky ship, but I was not disappointed. Twig has really come into his own here. And although there are times where he is uncertain and you are reminded of just how young he is, he is honorable and constantly learning and growing. He is no longer just a scared little boy. He's the captain of the Edgedancer and he's on a mission to save his crew and all of The Edge. Although this is the end of Twig's story, The Edge Ch Another adventure with Twig and friends. I expected more of it to take place on a sky ship, but I was not disappointed. Twig has really come into his own here. And although there are times where he is uncertain and you are reminded of just how young he is, he is honorable and constantly learning and growing. He is no longer just a scared little boy. He's the captain of the Edgedancer and he's on a mission to save his crew and all of The Edge. Although this is the end of Twig's story, The Edge Chronicles continue. At some point, I will continue with them. For this world is remarkable. It's so much bigger than it appears on the surface, and I know there is so much more to explore and enjoy.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nic Sully

    The way these trilogies transition into the next and the farewells we are forced to give our favourite protagonists is both wonderful and passionately heartbreaking as the generations unfold. There are so many things left unanswered, but the author does a great job of satisfying those questions in later novels, through unexpected links and twists. I found myself lost in this world for years and I would recommend starting with the Twig trilogy and then circling back to Quin’s as if it were a preq The way these trilogies transition into the next and the farewells we are forced to give our favourite protagonists is both wonderful and passionately heartbreaking as the generations unfold. There are so many things left unanswered, but the author does a great job of satisfying those questions in later novels, through unexpected links and twists. I found myself lost in this world for years and I would recommend starting with the Twig trilogy and then circling back to Quin’s as if it were a prequel, it allows for the story to flow with more mystery and revelation

  23. 5 out of 5

    Yvonne

    Just like the previous books in this trilogy, Midnight Over Sanctaphrax is a perilous adventure in a creatively unique world. These stories written by the author-illustrator team of Paul Stewart and Chris Riddell have an old-world, late 19th century quality to them. Immensely imaginative, the books read like a cross between Charles Dickens and The Adventures of Baron Munchausen. Youngsters who appreciate improbable physics and detest sickly sweet outcomes will truly be engaged by The Edge serie Just like the previous books in this trilogy, Midnight Over Sanctaphrax is a perilous adventure in a creatively unique world. These stories written by the author-illustrator team of Paul Stewart and Chris Riddell have an old-world, late 19th century quality to them. Immensely imaginative, the books read like a cross between Charles Dickens and The Adventures of Baron Munchausen. Youngsters who appreciate improbable physics and detest sickly sweet outcomes will truly be engaged by The Edge series.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Malcolm Cox

    Tonally, this was considerably less grim than the first two books in the trilogy. There are still significant character deaths, but a lot less than previously experienced. The story itself ran smoothly, pretty much following Twig the whole time as he searches for his crew members who have been scattered across the Edge. As before, there are plenty of weird and wacky creatures to encounter as Twig learns more about his world. Chris Riddell's illustrations add to the drama of the scenes beautifully Tonally, this was considerably less grim than the first two books in the trilogy. There are still significant character deaths, but a lot less than previously experienced. The story itself ran smoothly, pretty much following Twig the whole time as he searches for his crew members who have been scattered across the Edge. As before, there are plenty of weird and wacky creatures to encounter as Twig learns more about his world. Chris Riddell's illustrations add to the drama of the scenes beautifully throughout the book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lori March

    This book is like taking a vacation to another world where the reader has the delight of discovering new laws of nature. Floating rocks, flying pirate ships, thought reading creatures, beautifully dangerous environments, and an unending supply of new characters keep interest high. Easy read because it was written with children in mind and has do-good morals. I would recommend the Twig stories to anyone looking for a bit of fun.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    This is the final book in the Twig Saga. This one really highlights how much Twig has grown since we met him in Beyond the Deepwoods. He is a loyal and committed captain, determined to find his crew. This book deals with the themes of slavery and human trafficking. The scene where Twig finds his village and meets his mother is beautiful and bittersweet. A lovely end to the Twig Saga where the take away message is to follow your heart.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cait

    These are pretty dark books. There's no guarantee that any characters will make it out alive. Cowlquape kind of annoyed me. I sort of blamed him for (view spoiler)[Spooler's death (hide spoiler)] but I like that he became (view spoiler)[the new Most High Academe (hide spoiler)] . Last in Twig sequence but I want to know what comes next for them all. These are pretty dark books. There's no guarantee that any characters will make it out alive. Cowlquape kind of annoyed me. I sort of blamed him for (view spoiler)[Spooler's death (hide spoiler)] but I like that he became (view spoiler)[the new Most High Academe (hide spoiler)] . Last in Twig sequence but I want to know what comes next for them all.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dylan Jones

    This is not a book I would recommend to other people. It contained a lot of fantasy and action,, which are both things I like, but I believe that the plot was a bit sloppy. At some moments the plot went too fast, and I couldn't keep up, and at other moments the plot was reviewing over things that weren't as important to the story. This might be because I didn't actually read the first two books in the series, I just found this on my bookshelf (I don't even know how it got there) and started read This is not a book I would recommend to other people. It contained a lot of fantasy and action,, which are both things I like, but I believe that the plot was a bit sloppy. At some moments the plot went too fast, and I couldn't keep up, and at other moments the plot was reviewing over things that weren't as important to the story. This might be because I didn't actually read the first two books in the series, I just found this on my bookshelf (I don't even know how it got there) and started reading, and since I didn't have anything else to read during the weekend I was stuck with this book. I think that the story line was great and the action of everything was pretty good, but I think everything could just be explained a little bit better.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Yushibo

    This was the book that got me into reading and I'm glad. Not only because the story was amazing, but also the characters and different creatures. I hope I'll make some time and reread all three of them.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sol

    3.5 stars A fairly satisfying conclusion to the Twig saga. I liked the adventure and the lore, especially the Slave Market. Of course, everything worked out alright in the end and easily, as well, but that's the nature of young reader books. In any case, I definitely enjoyed myself.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.