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Trump Revealed: The Definitive Biography of the 45th President

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Authoritative, timely, and provocative, likely the most complete and nuanced life of Donald Trump thus far (The Boston Globe) provides a complex portrait of the man who despite broad skepticism could be the next president of the United States. Who is Donald J. Trump? Despite decades of scrutiny, many aspects of his life are not well known. To discover Trump in full, The Wa Authoritative, timely, and provocative, likely the most complete and nuanced life of Donald Trump thus far (The Boston Globe) provides a complex portrait of the man who despite broad skepticism could be the next president of the United States. Who is Donald J. Trump? Despite decades of scrutiny, many aspects of his life are not well known. To discover Trump in full, The Washington Post assembled award-winning reporters and researchers to delve into every aspect of Trump s improbable life, from his privileged upbringing to his astonishing 2016 rise to the Republican candidacy. Written by Washington Post investigative political reporter Michael Kranish and senior editor Marc Fisher, this comprehensive book documents Trump s fascinating family roots, his aggressive efforts to make a name for himself in New York social circles, and his penchant for big bets on real estate, branded businesses, and, ultimately, on himself. Useful, vigorously reported (The New York Times), Trump Revealed explores how Trump s life has informed his bold statements on the economy, immigration, race, global trade, terrorism, and women. The authors scrutinize everything from his youthful alliance with the power broker Roy Cohn to his alleged dealings with organized crime and his controversial projects in New York City, Florida, Scotland, and Azerbaijan. They examine Trump s wealth, the evolution of his political beliefs, and his peculiar identity as a businessman, celebrity, global brand, television star, and now politician. Trump Revealed offers the most thorough and wide-ranging examination of Donald Trump s public and private lives to date. Any voter who is not already devoted to Trump s cause will find plenty of reason to think long and hard about whether to support him after reading this book...The best of investigative reporting is brought to bear on a man who could potentially lead the free world Voters can t say they weren t warned (USA TODAY)."


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Authoritative, timely, and provocative, likely the most complete and nuanced life of Donald Trump thus far (The Boston Globe) provides a complex portrait of the man who despite broad skepticism could be the next president of the United States. Who is Donald J. Trump? Despite decades of scrutiny, many aspects of his life are not well known. To discover Trump in full, The Wa Authoritative, timely, and provocative, likely the most complete and nuanced life of Donald Trump thus far (The Boston Globe) provides a complex portrait of the man who despite broad skepticism could be the next president of the United States. Who is Donald J. Trump? Despite decades of scrutiny, many aspects of his life are not well known. To discover Trump in full, The Washington Post assembled award-winning reporters and researchers to delve into every aspect of Trump s improbable life, from his privileged upbringing to his astonishing 2016 rise to the Republican candidacy. Written by Washington Post investigative political reporter Michael Kranish and senior editor Marc Fisher, this comprehensive book documents Trump s fascinating family roots, his aggressive efforts to make a name for himself in New York social circles, and his penchant for big bets on real estate, branded businesses, and, ultimately, on himself. Useful, vigorously reported (The New York Times), Trump Revealed explores how Trump s life has informed his bold statements on the economy, immigration, race, global trade, terrorism, and women. The authors scrutinize everything from his youthful alliance with the power broker Roy Cohn to his alleged dealings with organized crime and his controversial projects in New York City, Florida, Scotland, and Azerbaijan. They examine Trump s wealth, the evolution of his political beliefs, and his peculiar identity as a businessman, celebrity, global brand, television star, and now politician. Trump Revealed offers the most thorough and wide-ranging examination of Donald Trump s public and private lives to date. Any voter who is not already devoted to Trump s cause will find plenty of reason to think long and hard about whether to support him after reading this book...The best of investigative reporting is brought to bear on a man who could potentially lead the free world Voters can t say they weren t warned (USA TODAY)."

30 review for Trump Revealed: The Definitive Biography of the 45th President

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jill Meyer

    As a political junkie, I enjoy reading well-written biographies of political figures. Now, I am not a Trump fan, but I appreciated the clear writing and non-sensationalism in "Trump Revealed: An American Journey of Ambition, Ego, Money, and Power" by Washington Post reporters Michael Kranish and Marc Fisher. Their book is not a hatchet-job by either pro-Trump or anti-Trump agenda writers. The reporters have interviewed both major and minor characters in Donald Trump's rise to wealth and power. P As a political junkie, I enjoy reading well-written biographies of political figures. Now, I am not a Trump fan, but I appreciated the clear writing and non-sensationalism in "Trump Revealed: An American Journey of Ambition, Ego, Money, and Power" by Washington Post reporters Michael Kranish and Marc Fisher. Their book is not a hatchet-job by either pro-Trump or anti-Trump agenda writers. The reporters have interviewed both major and minor characters in Donald Trump's rise to wealth and power. People who I wouldn't think to be associated with Trump, had indeed been part of his life. Whether Donald Trump wins or loses in November, there will be many, many books written about this presidential election. As a life-long Democrat and, as I said, political junkie, I will probably read most of them. But this book, well-written and presenting the facts of Donald Trump, will, I think, be one of the best. I also realised that Michael Kranish was the author of an extremely well-written book on Mitt Romney in 2012.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ingrid457

    (Note: I'm not hiding this because of spoilers, because it's a biography....how could a biography have spoilers? But you've been forwarned!) I went into this book thinking it would be a salacious accounting of Donald Trump's life and campaign. Far from the truth! It's a balanced biography of the man, with detailed reporting on the "deals" he's made over the years, his personality and his goals. There were no comments from the authors on the material; it was presented factually with substantial ba (Note: I'm not hiding this because of spoilers, because it's a biography....how could a biography have spoilers? But you've been forwarned!) I went into this book thinking it would be a salacious accounting of Donald Trump's life and campaign. Far from the truth! It's a balanced biography of the man, with detailed reporting on the "deals" he's made over the years, his personality and his goals. There were no comments from the authors on the material; it was presented factually with substantial backup documentation and interviews. His deals caused my head to spin. His Achilles' heel, evidently, is questioning his net worth. It sets him off. His deals all smack of a hint of corruption. His "empire" (what's left after 5 bankruptcies) sits on a shaky foundation. When something goes wrong with a project, he blames everyone else around him, except himself. (Most notably, he blamed 3 casino execs who were killed in a helicopter crash -- one of whom he counted as a friend -- for the failure of the casinos after they were killed.) I didn't expect to feel any sympathy for this man, since he brings all manner of bad things to fall on his head by his own doing. However, he couldn't think of a single friend, outside of business, that he could just talk to about things. That's just plain sad. His drive to succeed, to be the best of everything, to wheel and deal, to sell his brand for whatever he can get -- all of that destroyed two marriages and several businesses. If you're serious about voting for Donald Trump, read this book. It's an eye opener and shows you the basic personality of a man who is driven to succeed no matter the cost, and a man whose temperament can't allow him to take responsibility for any failure. A scary, balanced view of Donald Trump.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Silvanna

    So Trump threw stones at a neighbor’s baby when he was a kid. What a b*stard. He hasn’t changed at all.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brook Glover

    A must read for the knuckle draggers that are planning on voting for this narcissistic clown. Unfortunately, like Orange Grandpa, few of them read. What a douchebag!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Steven Z.

    Before each presidential election cycle the staff at the Washington Post engages in extensive research of the candidates to determine what can be expected should they take up residence at the White House. 2016 was no exception as they dove deep into the background of Donald J. Trump and the result is a deeply informative book entitled TRUMP REVEALED: AN AMERICAN JOURNEY OF AMBITION, EGO, MONEY, AND POWER by Michael Kranish and Marc Fisher. The narrative joins the plethora of books on Trump rangi Before each presidential election cycle the staff at the Washington Post engages in extensive research of the candidates to determine what can be expected should they take up residence at the White House. 2016 was no exception as they dove deep into the background of Donald J. Trump and the result is a deeply informative book entitled TRUMP REVEALED: AN AMERICAN JOURNEY OF AMBITION, EGO, MONEY, AND POWER by Michael Kranish and Marc Fisher. The narrative joins the plethora of books on Trump ranging from THE MAKING OF DONALD TRUMP by David Cay Johnston, THE TRUTH ABOUT TRUMP by Michael D’Antonio to the more recent ones since he assumed the presidency that focus on the role Russia played in the last election including COLLUSION: SECRET MEETINGS, DIRTY MONEY, AND HOW RUSSIA HELPED DONALD TRUMP WIN by Luke Harding, RUSSIAN ROULETTE: THE INSIDE STORY OF PUTIN’S WAR ON AMERICA AND THE ELECTION OF DONALD TRUMP by Michael Isikoff and David Corn, THE APPRENTICE: TRUMP, RUSSIA AND THEW SUBVERSION OF AMERICAN DEMOCRACY by Greg Miller, and HOUSE OF TRUMP HOUSE OF PUTIN: THE UNTOLD STORY OF DONALD TRUMP AND THE RUSSIAN MAFIA by Craig Unger. Others deal with the Trump White House like FEAR: TRUMP IN THE WHITE HOUSE by Bob Woodward and FIRE AND FURY: INSIDE THE TRUMP WHITE HOUSE by Michael Wolff. Recently, the Trump children have been the subjects of new books, BORN TRUMP: INSIDE AMERICA’S FIRST FAMILY by Emily Jane Fox, KUSHNER, INC.: GREED. AMBITION. CORRUPTION, THE EXTRAORDINARY STORY PF JARED KUSHNER AND IVANKA TRUMP by Vicky Ward, and lastly the focus shifts to Trump’s relationship with women in GOLDEN HANDCUFFS: THE SECRET HISTORY OF TRUMP’S WOMEN by Nina Burleigh. What is clear in all these narratives is that Trump possesses a flawed personality that dates to his dysfunctional upbringing that has created character traits that have pushed him toward actions and policies that are all to familiar with people who have paid attention the last two years. As you read Kranish and Fisher’s work William Jennings Bryan’s “Cross of Gold” speech comes to mind as Trump comes across as obsessed with money, wealth in general, his self-created brand, and gold. The authors present a detailed account of Trump’s life and career beginning with a discussion of the immigration of his paternal German grandparents and Scottish mother, through his childhood, ending with the 2016 Republican National Convention. His early years are catalogued tracing his family’s “immigrant” background reaffirming Trump’s refusal to give credit to his grandmother, Elizabeth Christ who inherited a significant sum from her husband, who died at 49, and eventually would set up the Trump Organization. Donald gave full credit for the ensuing financial success to his father Fred Trump and down played the role of his grandmother. This would be a pattern in his life as his attitude toward women seemed set at an early age as is argued by Nina Burleigh in her recent book GOLDEN HANDCUFFS: THE SECRET HISTORY OF TRUMP’S WOMEN. As the authors recount his life, we come across few close friends or humane interests. Apart from reading about himself, he opens few books and is unconcerned about literature, history, or the arts. He will exhibit little interest in foreign cultures or travel abroad, unless of course it can enhance his business interests. The result is a man who exhibits little empathy for others, except perhaps for immigrants who were “the proper white European ethnic stock” as his grandparents were. Fred Trump receives a great deal of attention because of his impact on his son’s life emotionally and financially. A distant father he ran a tight ship at home, and was absent making money in the Queens, NY real estate market during the depression and post-World War II period. His business techniques relied on bombast, publicity, beautiful women, and government programs would be copied by his son whose quality time with his father was spent at his Coney Island office. A womanizer and at times distant man, Fred Trump would always be there for his son even though he disagreed with in his approach toward the real estate market in Manhattan, and the development of casinos in Atlantic City. Despite their philosophical divergence, Fred would always co-sign loans, guarantee payments, and have his son’s back. Despite Donald’s denials his father provided him with a $1 million trust fund, as he did with all his children, which allowed him to begin his career. The Donald Trump that is portrayed in the book emerges as the person we see in the White House each day. It begins with his education from elementary school onward with early signs of attention deficit and behavioral issues that are attendant to the malady. Donald disliked reading and listening to teachers and counselors. His attitude towards classmates was one of a bully for which the authors provide evidence from his teachers. Fred decided to send Donald to the New York Military Academy where after a nasty beginning, he learned the ropes and did well. He would go on to Fordham University for two years, then transfer to the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School for business for his junior and senior year. Trump constantly points to his Ivy league education to promote his brand and assuage his ego but comments like “perhaps the most important thing I learned at Wharton was not to be overly impressed by academic credentials….the other important thing I got from Wharton was a Wharton degree. In my opinion, that degree doesn’t prove much, but a lot of people I do business with take it very seriously” is evidence of what type of person he is. The authors do a good job integrating Trump’s own statements and those of others who impacted his life throughout the book in deriving an accurate picture of his personality, approach to business and people, and events surrounding his career. Donald’s relationship with his father is key as in 1971, Trump is made president of Trump Management and his father remained as Chairman. A major turning point is developed in a chapter that deals with Fred Trump’s unscrupulous approach to government housing programs and racial bias in his properties. Though Fred would escape any prosecution after Senate and New York State investigations, the Justice Department filed one of the most significant racial cases of the era against the Trumps in October 1973 with United States of America v. Fred C. Trump, Donald Trump, and Trump Management, Inc. This came at a bad time for Donald as he was about to enter the Manhattan real estate market, but the result is important as the family decided to fight the federal government and not give in even though the Justice Department offered an extremely lenient settlement. The key in the process was the beginning of the relationship between Roy Cohn and Donald Trump. Cohn, a notorious figure who earned his spurs chasing after Alger Hiss, serving as counsel for Joseph McCarthy and escaping numerous federal charges dealing with tax evasion and other unscrupulous activities would become Donald’s surrogate father, a mentor who he would learn from and mirror during his career. Cohn preached, never settle, always threatened lawsuits, never settle a lawsuit, and employ the art of the counter attack. The authors take the reader through a detailed analysis of the case and its importance in Donald’s development – a mirror into his tactics on the news each night. A second prominent individual who influenced Trump was Norman Vincent Peale, the Protestant minister who in 1977 officiated at his first wedding. Peale was the author of the 1952 bestseller THE POWER OF POSITIVE THINKING and predicted that Trump would become the “greatest builder of our time.” Trump saw Peale as another mentor, who taught him “to win by thinking only of the best outcomes.” As one engages the narrative, no matter what difficulty Trump found himself in, particularly in business he would always spin any outcome in a positive fashion, and to his credit in the end he would emerge on top, usually employing unethical tactics that I do not believe Peale would approve of. Trump makes much of his wealth and the authors point out his ability to manipulate the media and develop his own “brand.” As early as 1973 the New York Times put out a description of Trump which was a publicist’s dream, but it also stated that Trump’s net worth was $200 million at a time when his income was reported to be $24,594 paying taxes of $10,832. Despite the “lies” told about his income and wealth, Trump’s bombast and manipulation of the media which was in the midst of tabloid wars in New York, “the Donald” was able to feed the public any information he desired, even acting as his own publicist, John Barron a totally fictitious character that Trump mimicked in phone calls to reporters. I find it fascinating that he named his son, “Baron!” Trump is addicted to publicity and name recognition, his focus has always been to get his name on products, buildings, and news stories. His obsession with his wealth is well documented whether it is $200 million or the $3 through $9 billion that Trump has reported depending on his mood, and other factors. For decades he would begin his day reviewing stories about himself that appeared in the previous days news cycle and if he was not satisfied with what he read he would threaten to sue the offending newspaper, magazine, or author. All told in over thirty years, Trump and his companies filed more than 1900 lawsuits! The author’s follow Trump’s acquisitions of real estate thoroughly from his purchase of the Commodore Hotel, Bonwitt Teller’s building in Manhattan, developing casinos in Atlantic City, raising the Trump logo on all his properties, i.e.; Trump Tower etc. They delve into how he financed his real estate empire in detail and what emerges is “New York City sleaze” as a lack of enforcement and corruption falls easy prey to bullying, disingenuous tactics, being in bed with organized crime, all facilitating Trump’s rise. Trump has an insatiable appetite for loans with little collateral and the accumulation of debt, but banks continually support him even as it reaches a point when he is nearing bankruptcy over his three Atlantic City casinos in 1990. Perhaps the author’s best work is reported in the chapters dealing with Trump’s entrance into the Atlantic City casino market which says all we need to know about the president’s approach to business, negotiations, and the accumulation of wealth to maintain his image and brand. Seen as a savior by the Atlantic City political establishment and bureaucracy that approves casino licensing through tax relief and funding, Trump was able to cajole, bully, bullshit, coerce, blackmail his way into building three casinos, one larger than the next in a market that could not support his financing. Trump had Atlantic City leaders believing the mirage of “bait and switch” compounded by fabrication and outright lies and deception. The use of junk bonds, and threats against the Casino Control Commission were effective in getting approval of his next projects. It was clear, despite his self-created image based on his version of publicity that he was in deep trouble by the late 1980s. His need to feed his ego by controlling all gambling on the east coast meshed with Atlantic City politician’s belief that he was the economic savior of their downtrodden city helped created this catastrophe. By 1990 he was unable to pay his debts which amounted to $3.2 billion, most of which was owed to seven major banks. They would restructure the loans and allowances for Trump because he was worth more to them “alive, rather, than dead!” There were others that Trump stiffed, contractors who either did not get paid or were paid very little as compared to what was agreed to – a number of which were family businesses that eventually had to declare bankruptcy. Of the many components of Trump’s life and career presented his attitude towards women is fully played out from his three marriages, purchase of beauty pageants, his affairs, and in general treatment of the opposite sex. What emerges is a carefully crafted image designed to enhance his brand as he will become, in his own mind, the arbiter of what is beautiful in a woman. For him “as long as you’ve got a young and beautiful piece of ass” that was all that was needed to maintain your celebrity and brand. Trump wrote the script and he protected it with prenuptial and non-disclosure agreements that maintained the silence of any female who had a relationship with him. For Trump women are nothing but pawns to his ego and his brand. His wives, girlfriends, mistresses etc. had to measure up to a certain image or they were not worth his time and interest. According to the authors a major turning point that led to Trump’s run for the presidency was the reality television program, The Apprentice. Trump’s character would become his bridge to Middle America as his popularity with average citizens was enhanced. He was a person who turned from a “blowhard Richie Rich who had just gone through the most difficult decade into an unlikely symbol of straight talk, an evangelist for the American gospel of success, a decider who insisted on standards in a country that somehow slipped into handing out trophies for just showing up.” The program sold an image of the host-boss as supremely competent and confident who quickly achieved results. The transition to politics was easy and it served as a stepping stone to the White House. The authors venture into Trump’s repeated dabbling with politics until he finally goes down the escalator at Trump Tower in 2015. The primary campaign is covered in detail until he gains the Republican nomination. There is a great deal of information in the book, much of which is now known by the public. But at the time it was written it should have been an eye opener for those people who read it. The Donald J. Trump that is presented is the mirror image of the occupant of the White House. One must ask the question, based on the last two years and the background presented by the authors is what will become of the American political system if he is reelected, because it is obvious that he will not change as his personality and attitudes originated in his childhood. But what is clear is that Trump’s real estate career evolved into what can only be described as the “huckster-in-chief” as he figured out how to profit from branding, whether or not projects succeeded as long as he made a profit, even to the extreme detriment of others. Kanish and Fisher’s work is remarkable due to the three-month time table they were working under. Relying on numerous interviews representing a cross section of Trump’s life the authors have prepared an insightful and at times scary portrayal of a man who holds the destiny of the American people for the foreseeable future in his hands.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    This is a biography of Donald Trump written by two Washington Post writers covering Trump’s life through the Republican nomination. Otherwise a well written 4 star biography. I downgraded it to 3 stars because the capable authors rushed the book to press prior to the election presumably to capitalize on Trump’s candidacy. The origin portion of the biography that covers Donald Trump through the mid 1980s was superbly done. You get a sense where Trump came from and that his father played a big role This is a biography of Donald Trump written by two Washington Post writers covering Trump’s life through the Republican nomination. Otherwise a well written 4 star biography. I downgraded it to 3 stars because the capable authors rushed the book to press prior to the election presumably to capitalize on Trump’s candidacy. The origin portion of the biography that covers Donald Trump through the mid 1980s was superbly done. You get a sense where Trump came from and that his father played a big role in the business sense but that their personalities differed significantly. After the 1980’s the authors decided to cover the various projects of Trump’s manic career in separate chapters rather than chronologically. This drove me more than a little crazy. Each chapter was well written in isolation but the disjointedness did not provide any progression in the story. The evidence for rushing to print is the sparse number of pages, only about 175 pages, covering the last 20 years of Trump’s life including the campaign. Whether you despise him or love him there is a lot more relevant material for a biography than this. I would recommend this biography because the portion that covered the first half of Trump’s life is quite good. There were many revealing anecdotes about Trump as a bullying little boy punching little kids, throwing rocks at a younger neighbor and so on that eventually led an exasperated Fred Trump to send Donald to military school in 8th grade. There are also some sympathetic stories of Trump evolving to become a popular and hard working leader, effectively the go to guy for his classmates and someone that they looked up to and as supply officer he helped them with his influence.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    The book is good. Trump, not so much!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    This is an exceptionally well done biography of Donald Trump; put together by Michael Kranish and Marc Fisher, supported by the staff of the "Washington Post". The 'Post' has traditionally produced biographies of presidential candidates every four years, in an attempt to provide the electorate with timely information prior to the election. This biography covers Trump's life up through the Republican Convention in June 2016. As many reviewers have said, this book is not pro or anti Trump. It is a This is an exceptionally well done biography of Donald Trump; put together by Michael Kranish and Marc Fisher, supported by the staff of the "Washington Post". The 'Post' has traditionally produced biographies of presidential candidates every four years, in an attempt to provide the electorate with timely information prior to the election. This biography covers Trump's life up through the Republican Convention in June 2016. As many reviewers have said, this book is not pro or anti Trump. It is a clear-eyed, thorough, well-researched, and extensively annotated biography. In the spring of 2016 after he secured sufficient delegates for the Republican nomination, Mr. Trump sat for extensive interviews with the authors. Although produced in an extremely short amount of time, the book is interesting, well written, and thoughtful. I feel it is at least a 4.5 star read. Full disclosure: I am not a fan of Donald Trump. He scares me. And I'm afraid the book did not alleviate my concerns. Throughout his life, really only one thing has been important to Donald Trump: Donald Trump. Not family, not friendship, not religion, not country come before Donald Trump. Secondly, truth is a concept that eludes him. Or maybe what he says becomes the truth to him. He has no discernible ideology - he's not a fiscal conservative, he's a recent convert to some aspects of social conservatism, he's officially changed his party affiliation at least seven times, and he's evasive about his beliefs. We truly don't know who this man really is philosophically or policy-wise. Finally, he has an extremely steep learning curve in front of him and, to date, has shown very little evidence that he can be bothered with the necessary study/work the job requires. That bodes extremely ill for the nation and the world. What he is is perhaps the world's greatest showman/salesman (in the vein of P.T. Barnum). He's a genius at picking up on the mood and desires of groups and crowds and feeding them what they want. He's figured out how to sell his politics to a segment of society - a segment which he is not really part of. He may have just completed one of the greatest scams in history - I guess we'll find out. I highly recommend "Trump Revealed" by Michael Kranish and Marc Fisher.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cristobal

    Everything this man's done and said. Everyone he's offended and he's still going to get over 40% of the popular vote. He's the symptom of a greater illness. This is the real issue and uncomfortable fact. Everything this man's done and said. Everyone he's offended and he's still going to get over 40% of the popular vote. He's the symptom of a greater illness. This is the real issue and uncomfortable fact.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Vaishali

    A balanced but flimsy compilation from Washington Post journalists... with very little journalism, since 20% of the content is straight from Art of the Deal. So if you're looking for a data-driven analysis of the man, look elsewhere. Interesting quotes : -------————- “On the same day that he first agreed to be interviewed for this book, he told the New York Post that the project was ‘ridiculous.’” “Donald Trump has lived by the credo that all attention - fawning, critical, or somewhere in between - A balanced but flimsy compilation from Washington Post journalists... with very little journalism, since 20% of the content is straight from Art of the Deal. So if you're looking for a data-driven analysis of the man, look elsewhere. Interesting quotes : -------————- “On the same day that he first agreed to be interviewed for this book, he told the New York Post that the project was ‘ridiculous.’” “Donald Trump has lived by the credo that all attention - fawning, critical, or somewhere in between - accrues to his benefit.” “The man who would be president is far more complex than his simple language might indicate.” “ ‘He was head-strong and determined,’ said Anne Tries, a teacher who monitored students in the cafeteria. ‘He would sit with his arms folded, with this look on his face, I’ll use the word surly, almost daring you to say one thing or another…’ ” “He found success in the gymnasium and on the ball field, where his athletic prowess was unmistakable. ‘The Trumpet was always the last man standing’, remembered Chrisman Shirf, a classmate…” “By 6th grade, Donald’s ability as a right-handed hitter was fearsome enough that opponents shifted toward left field to defend against him. ‘If he had hit the ball to right, he could have had a homerun, because there was no one there,’ said Nicholas Kass… ‘But he always wanted to hit the ball through people. He wanted to overpower them.’ ” “‘ He was fearless,’ Peter Brant recalled. ‘If he stole a base, he came in all guns ablazing.’ ” “For all his wealth, Fred did not want to spoil his children, encouraging them to earn money by collecting empty White Rock soda bottles… A workaholic, Fred would take Donald with him to construction sites.” “Fred always told his son that he was a king, and that he needed to become a killer in anything he did.” “Trump quickly added Ivana to his executive staff, putting her to work as a vice president…” “City planners had grown leary of new skyscrapers… Trump’s deal-making won out. City officials did trim his design from 63 to 58 stories. But Trump got the last word, simply renumbering the 58-storied tower’s floors so they extended up to 68.” “Trump Tower was a hit. Its 266 condos, which went on sale in late 1982 and started at $500,000 for a 1-bedroom apartment, sold for a combined $277 million, enough to pay off the entire building even before the first tenant moved in.” “For decades, Trump’s daily morning routine included a review of everything written or said about him in the previous 24 hours. The clippings were culled by Norma Forderer, for 2 decades Trumps’ ever-present chief assistant.” “If Trump failed, he might bring down much of Atlantic City with him. Trump had bet on the city, but it had also bet on him.” “Some of the executives felt sympathy for Ivana, having learned that Trump was having an affair with Marla Maples… In the end, Trump removed Ivana from the casino, and dispatched her back to New York to run his newly-acquired Plaza Hotel.” “My big mistake with Ivana was taking her out of the role of wife. The problem was, work was all she wanted to talk about. When I got home at night, rather than talking about the softer subjects of life, she wanted to tell me how well the plaza was doing… I will never again give a wife responsibility within my business.” “President Jimmy Carter’s administration turned the property… over to the private Post Foundation, saying it was too expensive to maintain. Trump wanted it, and offered $28 million. Not enough, the foundation said. Trump didn’t raise his offer; he lowered it. He decided to play hardball. Through a third party, he bought the beach-front property directly in front of Mara Lago, and threatened to erect a hideous home to block the Post Estates’ ocean view. ‘That drove everybody nuts’, Trump said. ‘They couldn’t sell the big house because I owned the beach, so the price kept going down and down.’ In the end, Trump bought the landmark for a bargain $5 million…” “He failed to make payments on his yacht, yet he convinced the bank to pay for the insurance… Trump missed so many payments on his 5 helicopters, that bankers clamored to claim them… Trump nonetheless still radiated star power. When he and Bollinbach were in Atlantic City, they strolled now and then… Crowds followed along, eager to get close, talk to him, touch him. The more time Bollinbach spent with Trump, the more he was struck by Trump’s unshakeable faith that his empire would endure intact.” “For months after Trump had worked things out with his bankers, he was required to meet with a group of them every Friday morning, to report what he had spent and what progress he had made…” “Some thought it odd that Trump kept referring to himself as being not Scottish, but Scotch, like the whisky.” “ ‘Whoever said less is more, never had more’ boasted the marketing material for the 70-story complex of hotel rooms, condos, restaurants, offices, and a casino - all part of the tallest most unapologetically Trumpian building in Central America.” “Even as he warned of the dangers of Indian gambling in New York, he pushed for an Indian casino in Connecticut. Trump had a stake in that project, partnering with the Pawcatuck Indians.” Frank Sanzillo, Trump’s lobbyist in New York in the late 1990s and early 2000’s, says ‘Trump was privately dismissive about politicians. He laughed about them, like ‘Let’s give his campaign $25,000. That’ll shut him up.’ And it was our job to translate that to the politician as ‘He loves you.’ Trump was also loathe to attend political fundraisers, often asking Sanzillo ‘How much more do I have to give not to show up?’ “ “By the end of 2015, Trump’s rivals understood they were now operating in a world defined by the renegade candidate…. That summer, Trump dominated the news. He was a ratings machine…. Trump rules made the old-fashioned ways seem quaint… ‘Virtually every question you were asked by the media had the words Donald Trump in them’ said Donny Diaz, Bush’s campaign manager. " “To prove he had Lindsay Graham’s personal cellphone number, he read it aloud at a rally.” “His father, who had warned him of being a nothing, was gone and never got to see this astonishing American journey to its conclusion.” .

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlyn Concilio

    I think this biography does a remarkably even-handed job of presenting the facts about Donald Trump. The difference in opinion about him largely rests on how you read into those facts. Trump is unabashedly concerned with one person: Donald Trump. This does not make him unique or scary or terrible: It simply is his primary motivation. It seems different and strange because a) he never says so directly, choosing instead to rely on his salesman's instincts to read the mood and close the sale, and b I think this biography does a remarkably even-handed job of presenting the facts about Donald Trump. The difference in opinion about him largely rests on how you read into those facts. Trump is unabashedly concerned with one person: Donald Trump. This does not make him unique or scary or terrible: It simply is his primary motivation. It seems different and strange because a) he never says so directly, choosing instead to rely on his salesman's instincts to read the mood and close the sale, and b) this hyperfocused narcissism never faded or tempered the way we expect it to once a person reaches a certain level of success. It seems especially odd to us since politicians who run for president almost by definition have the same level of self-confidence, but they've learned it's better electorally to obfuscate any self-interest - or at the very least it gets filtered by staff and handlers. This book is unlikely to clear up any mysteries for you in terms of who you want to be president! You will likely find the right information to push you one way or the other in whatever direction you were already leaning. Nonetheless, it's worth the read if you're interested in the "why" of why Donald Trump does/did anything. I'll even give you a clue as his motivation: Because Donald Trump thought that doing that thing was the best for Donald Trump.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    - Great reporting job by my colleagues at The Post. - Overall, I learned some new tidbits... - Nothing terribly surprising, though. - I wish more people read this! - Figure I will read parts again in four years.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dan Keefer

    Like most educated people who aren't filled with hatred or guided by a sociopathic "win at all costs" outlook on life, from the start of Trump's run for the presidency, I couldn't believe what I was seeing and hearing. The worst part was I couldn't believe how many people actually think this egomaniac could be good for them and the country. Some wishful thinkers thought his bombastic "act" would become more "presidential" eventually. It's not an act, folks. Come on, is that really a spoiler? Read t Like most educated people who aren't filled with hatred or guided by a sociopathic "win at all costs" outlook on life, from the start of Trump's run for the presidency, I couldn't believe what I was seeing and hearing. The worst part was I couldn't believe how many people actually think this egomaniac could be good for them and the country. Some wishful thinkers thought his bombastic "act" would become more "presidential" eventually. It's not an act, folks. Come on, is that really a spoiler? Read the book. It's well-written and as objective as it can be considering it's meant for people that can read. I drove my wife crazy with a lot of, "You've got to hear this one"s. The major take-away from this book? "Wow, he's been doing these thing his entire life and getting way with it!!" Remember when Trump told the public that his father ONLY gave him around a million dollars to get started? Well, during The Donald's Atlantic City period, Trump was near total financial collapse. He was desperate to find investors, who Trump hadn't already burned, to bail him out. However, investors had to go through a approval process and time was running out. Along comes daddy. Through a surrogate, Daddy Trump bought over 3 million dollars of chips from one of sonny's casino and just stored them way, circumnavigating the rules for investing in casinos in New Jersey. Depending on a person's own moral compass, one can either admire their ingenuity or shake one's head with disgust. After all, if you can get away with something, why not do it? Right? Warren Harding is hoping Trump gets elected!

  14. 5 out of 5

    ElaineY

    Fairly interesting but left me feeling stressed. I wonder how anyone can stay sane living the way some people, like Trump, do.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mary Ann

    This is a very good book about a bad person (my characterization, not the authors'). On August 29, I wrote: "Ordinarily I wouldn't get near a bio of Donald Trump, but I'd seen interviews of these authors a number of times over the past few weeks. They seemed pretty balanced and neutral about Donald Trump. In spite of Trump's immediately denouncing the final product on publication date (August 23) as "boring," he apparently cooperated with the team's research and gave them at least twenty hours of This is a very good book about a bad person (my characterization, not the authors'). On August 29, I wrote: "Ordinarily I wouldn't get near a bio of Donald Trump, but I'd seen interviews of these authors a number of times over the past few weeks. They seemed pretty balanced and neutral about Donald Trump. In spite of Trump's immediately denouncing the final product on publication date (August 23) as "boring," he apparently cooperated with the team's research and gave them at least twenty hours of interview time. The work is neither a hatchet job nor a panegyric of Mr. Trump, and the overall tone, so far, is fundamentally factual reporting and non-judgmental, allowing the reader to draw his or her own conclusions. The authors offer no opinion or commentary. The narrative is drawn primarily from public documents and court records, direct statements of Mr. Trump and his associates (pro and con), and personal interviews; all are carefully annotated. I found the family history of his immigrant parents and his relationship with Roy Cohn most interesting." I have no reason to alter my initial impressions. Trump's story only gets more alarming as the authors delve meticulously into the substantial record of Mr. Trump's financial and business dealings spanning more than three decades and which continue to the present. The mainstream media has done the public a great disservice by not reporting more extensively on this story. The information is all out there in contracts and lawsuits and settlements. The only person who has consistently benefited from underhanded, fraudulent, and corrupt practices is Donald Trump. I realize financial stories are difficult to cover in a two-minute segment on television (and make for difficult reading in this book) and are not as sexy or popular as extramarital affairs, conspiracy theories, or Hillary's emails, all of which we are treated to endlessly on a daily basis. But the press regularly proclaims piously that its duty is to report news that the public needs to know; Mr. Trump's business history is an important story that reveals much about the man. Kudos to these authors for telling it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Harrison Hill

    A clear, detailed overview of DT's career. The book practically bursts with appalling, outlandish, psychopathic behavior -- but that's to be expected. What's more startling is the picture of Trump in the post-"Apprentice" landscape. The authors expertly demonstrate how, over and over, Trump managed to make major bucks on deals that ultimately lost money. How? By licensing his name. The risk fell to other developers; for putting his name on their building, Trump got handsomely paid, no matter how A clear, detailed overview of DT's career. The book practically bursts with appalling, outlandish, psychopathic behavior -- but that's to be expected. What's more startling is the picture of Trump in the post-"Apprentice" landscape. The authors expertly demonstrate how, over and over, Trump managed to make major bucks on deals that ultimately lost money. How? By licensing his name. The risk fell to other developers; for putting his name on their building, Trump got handsomely paid, no matter how badly things turned out -- and they often turned out *really* badly. Again and again, Trump comes out "winning" even when his associates flail. The Republican Party is the latest of these victims. Let's hope America isn't next. FUN FACTS: In 1999, Trump floated the possibility of running for President with OPRAH AS A RUNNING MATE! Also, Trump Tower was built by undocumented Polish immigrants. YUP.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stewart

    There are three excerpts from this book that I believe tell you everything you need to know about Donald Trump. 1. Regarding the working conditions when building the infamous Trump tower: “The work was done by hundreds of undocumented Polish immigrants known as the “Polish brigade.” The men toiled through spring and summer of 1980 with sledgehammers and blowtorches, but without hard hats, working twelve- to eighteen-hour days, seven days a week, often sleeping on Bonwit Teller’s floors. They we There are three excerpts from this book that I believe tell you everything you need to know about Donald Trump. 1. Regarding the working conditions when building the infamous Trump tower: “The work was done by hundreds of undocumented Polish immigrants known as the “Polish brigade.” The men toiled through spring and summer of 1980 with sledgehammers and blowtorches, but without hard hats, working twelve- to eighteen-hour days, seven days a week, often sleeping on Bonwit Teller’s floors. They were paid less than $5 an hour, sometimes in vodka. Many went unpaid and were threatened with deportation if they complained.” 2. On black people: “I’ve got black accountants at Trump Castle and at Trump Plaza—black guys counting my money!” Trump said, according to O’Donnell’s memoir, Trumped! “I hate it. The only kind of people I want counting my money are short guys that wear yarmulkes every day. Those are the kind of people I want counting my money. Nobody else. . . . Besides that, I’ve got to tell you something else. I think that the guy is lazy. And it’s probably not his fault because laziness is a trait in blacks. It really is; I believe that. It’s not anything they can control.” 3. Lastly, a point which you may have surmised from the first two, on his abilities: “As Barrett, one of his biographers, put it, “He was born with bullshit capabilities beyond what you and I could possibly imagine.” What else is there to say? I read this for two reasons: I hoped the credibility of the research would reveal to me some sort of redeeming quality, some opportunity to be hopeful. If you find yourself of a similar mindset — abandon, hope, ye who enter, etc. This team deserves respect for putting this together so quickly. However, I found myself tiring of the middle section of this biography, which is concerned with just endless examples of his slimy business practices. It's important to report on it, but man is it overwhelming. I'd hoped for a bit more insight into the man himself, but nothing I found here surprised me in the slightest. To close, I wanted to share what is possibly one of my new favorite quotes of all time, from a pastor (Norman Vincent Peale) who performed his (second? I forget) marriage and whom Trump has admitted is a mentor of his: “I know that with God’s help, I can sell vacuum cleaners.”

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stephenie Streiff-Process

    I can see why the right is constantly screaming foul about all the negative press. The horrifying reality is it is all awful but unfortunately all true. The content of this book, the story of his life is damning, nauseating, unjustifiable, and nearly unbelievable. I started to read this book genuinely wanting to get a comprehensive look at the man who will lead us, to see the other side of the brash unpalatable attention whore I love to hate. There is no other side. There are not enough cups of I can see why the right is constantly screaming foul about all the negative press. The horrifying reality is it is all awful but unfortunately all true. The content of this book, the story of his life is damning, nauseating, unjustifiable, and nearly unbelievable. I started to read this book genuinely wanting to get a comprehensive look at the man who will lead us, to see the other side of the brash unpalatable attention whore I love to hate. There is no other side. There are not enough cups of coffee bought for the stranger in line after you, kind words spoken, doors held open that could bring this man's character redemption. He is quite simply a horrible human being. If a measure of someone's worth is how much money they have acquired at whatever cost necessary to do it, then he is remarkably successful. The end. I found the book fascinating. The only thing I didn't like was it jumping around chronologically so much. It made the narrative a bit tricky to follow at some times, but extremely well researched and written.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Marcus

    A thorough account that paints a picture of a man for whom the concept of truth means nothing. Some parts of the book delve into things that I'm surprised I never saw in media discussion during the campaign. The ripping-off of people buying into Trump Vitamins and Trump-licensed condo projects in Florida were unknown to me, for example. A striking theme throughout the book is how much he has able to get away with at a number of pivotal moments through his career. I found myself wondering if perhap A thorough account that paints a picture of a man for whom the concept of truth means nothing. Some parts of the book delve into things that I'm surprised I never saw in media discussion during the campaign. The ripping-off of people buying into Trump Vitamins and Trump-licensed condo projects in Florida were unknown to me, for example. A striking theme throughout the book is how much he has able to get away with at a number of pivotal moments through his career. I found myself wondering if perhaps this book project would have been more valuable to our country as a documentary film using the same deeply researched interviews obtained for the book. It's a compelling and readable book, but as a film it would likely reach and open more eyes. The authors are even-handed, but the material gathered exposes a disturbed personality.

  20. 5 out of 5

    miteypen

    It took me more than two months to finish this book, not because of its quality (it is excellent), but because I would get so worked up about some of its content I would have to take a break now and then. The authors and their team of researchers accomplished quite a feat: they put together a thorough and informative chronicle of Trump's beginning and rise to fame in time for the 2016 presidential campaign. I felt like this account was balanced; it wasn't propaganda for either side, which means It took me more than two months to finish this book, not because of its quality (it is excellent), but because I would get so worked up about some of its content I would have to take a break now and then. The authors and their team of researchers accomplished quite a feat: they put together a thorough and informative chronicle of Trump's beginning and rise to fame in time for the 2016 presidential campaign. I felt like this account was balanced; it wasn't propaganda for either side, which means it shows the positives as well as the negatives about his personal life, his career as a businessman and his temperament. No matter what your politics are, you will finish this book knowing much more about the man. I hope more books are written like it throughout and after his presidency.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jowanza Joseph

    What a thoroughly researched and well documented account. The first hand accounts, first party accounts, financial records and quotes from Trump made it an especially informative read. I will say that this book is heavy. I had a hard time getting through some parts because the narcism was just soul crushing. It is fair to criticize the book as not really trying to dig deeper into Trump's warmer moments, but based on first hand quotes from his children and wives, that wasn't really his thing. I r What a thoroughly researched and well documented account. The first hand accounts, first party accounts, financial records and quotes from Trump made it an especially informative read. I will say that this book is heavy. I had a hard time getting through some parts because the narcism was just soul crushing. It is fair to criticize the book as not really trying to dig deeper into Trump's warmer moments, but based on first hand quotes from his children and wives, that wasn't really his thing. I recommend this book to anyone curious about Trump.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Owlseyes

    I am sure Trump will say: that's a work by fake news media. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/artic... I am sure Trump will say: that's a work by fake news media. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/artic...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Martin Budd

    The fantastic Washington Post team have done a wonderful job on this revelatory book on DJT. Admittedly much of the early info was in the public domain already, however they have constructed a fast flowing and well constructed work that I found insightful and in parts humorous. They forsake long condemnatory or judgemental statements, simply letting the facts speak for themselves. The picture they reveal is of an amoral man-baby that most of us would not trust as a cat-sitter, even less running The fantastic Washington Post team have done a wonderful job on this revelatory book on DJT. Admittedly much of the early info was in the public domain already, however they have constructed a fast flowing and well constructed work that I found insightful and in parts humorous. They forsake long condemnatory or judgemental statements, simply letting the facts speak for themselves. The picture they reveal is of an amoral man-baby that most of us would not trust as a cat-sitter, even less running the most powerful nation on earth. Since the election of Trump I have developed the habit of turning a news channel on as soon as I awake just to make sure that half of the world has not been turned into a smoking ruin, with the bit I inhabit about to turn into nuclear ash any moment now. Terrifying.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gary Mundhenke

    A very good look at Donald Trump, his father and his grandfather. Whatever your political leaning is, this is a good look at a man who has changed the way a presidential campaign is run. On the anti-Trump side, this book gives a good look at his many business failings and how he often did things that while may have been ok legally, we're morally very wrong. This is a great book to read before the November election. A very good look at Donald Trump, his father and his grandfather. Whatever your political leaning is, this is a good look at a man who has changed the way a presidential campaign is run. On the anti-Trump side, this book gives a good look at his many business failings and how he often did things that while may have been ok legally, we're morally very wrong. This is a great book to read before the November election.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Fritzov

    Ok i already knew Trump is a lunatic before reading this book but it's still a good book. Great research by the authors. Ok i already knew Trump is a lunatic before reading this book but it's still a good book. Great research by the authors.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Craig

    This is a must read on the eve of the election and beyond. The authors provide an interesting peak into this man's life. Well done. This is a must read on the eve of the election and beyond. The authors provide an interesting peak into this man's life. Well done.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Anderberg

    It’s nearly impossible to write an objective book on our 45th president. Though the market was flooded with Trump books on a level not seen with any other POTUS, there’s not much middle ground to be found. In 2016, before that momentous election even took place, a couple Washington Post editors put together Trump Revealed. It’s as balanced an account as you’ll find, and you’ll realize that nothing Trump did in office was surprising if you know about his life and career up to 2016. It’s not only, It’s nearly impossible to write an objective book on our 45th president. Though the market was flooded with Trump books on a level not seen with any other POTUS, there’s not much middle ground to be found. In 2016, before that momentous election even took place, a couple Washington Post editors put together Trump Revealed. It’s as balanced an account as you’ll find, and you’ll realize that nothing Trump did in office was surprising if you know about his life and career up to 2016. It’s not only, well, revealing, but easy reading too, which is sort of a rarity in this list. To get a good picture of Trump, I would certainly recommend this book as a starting point. His years in office are so insanely polarizing that I think a book published before any of that happened is actually pretty darn useful.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jeanne

    Full disclosure: I am not a Trump fan – nor are the authors of Trump Revealed, Michael Kranish and Marc Fisher; nonetheless, they do give him credit when deserved. However, as my husband concluded, the book could be summarized as, "How Trump cheated these people this time [and this time and this]." I would add, "...and justified it." I chose to read this book because I have liked the Washington Post's coverage of Trump and hoped to get a better understanding of who the man is. Unfortunately, the Full disclosure: I am not a Trump fan – nor are the authors of Trump Revealed, Michael Kranish and Marc Fisher; nonetheless, they do give him credit when deserved. However, as my husband concluded, the book could be summarized as, "How Trump cheated these people this time [and this time and this]." I would add, "...and justified it." I chose to read this book because I have liked the Washington Post's coverage of Trump and hoped to get a better understanding of who the man is. Unfortunately, the picture they paint is only somewhat less two-dimensional than that portrayed on The Apprentice. Although Kranish and Fisher attempt to paint a nuanced portrait, he is not a nuanced kind of guy. Kranish and Fisher described many of the contradictions between Trump's real and public selves. Trump has flip-flopped between parties seven times in this century. He has been both pro- and anti-abortion. He has frequently misrepresented himself – as Swedish rather than German, as worth far more than he probably is (reports in 2005 ranged between $1.7 and $9.5 billion), and as not involved/not remembering being sued or having embarrassing conversations. He and his companies have filed more than 1,900 lawsuits and have been defendants in an additional 1,450. Trump seems to have been competitive and frugal, aggressive and impulsive from the very beginning. His relationship with Roy Cohn, who defended him in the housing discrimination suit, fostered his approach to the law: "when attacked, counterattack with overwhelming force" (loc. 1120). Trump followed the letter of the law in his business dealings rather than its spirit – avoiding taxes, finagling loans and tax incentives, and "cleverly us[ing]" the advantages he had to meet his own goals. His morals appear to be skin-deep and expedient: What serves Donald Trump? He often negotiated deals where he received positive outcomes with no investment and little risk ¬– others fronted the money and carried the risk. When Trump's casino and other business dealings went under, for example, he observed, "for myself these were all good deals...I wasn't representing the country. I wasn't representing the banks... I was representing Donald Trump. So for myself, they were all good deals" (loc. 3505). Why has Trump been a phenomenon this election cycle? "Trump, like American Idol's Simon Cowell, could be simultaneously inspiring and negative – a politically incorrect truth teller" (loc. 3775). He paints a dangerous world and favors law and order (despite crime dropping since the 1990s). He attributes problems to The Other: Mexicans, illegal aliens, Muslims, Blacks, foreigners. Kranish and Fisher attribute his attractiveness to "how disaffected many voters were" (loc. 3775), that "voters are anxious and feel a loss of control" (loc. 5497). They like his strength, his stance on law and order, his aggressiveness, and his "honesty" (despite both Politifact and the Washington Post reporting that Trump has the worst record for truth-telling of all presidential candidates in this election cycle). I wish that Trump Revealed had been less a biography and contained more analysis. It is a good list of Trump's misdeeds with a sprinkling of more positive actions (please don't ask me to name three), but I really would have liked a stronger portrait of who he is – or why the American public has willingly accepted his bad behavior. Kranish and Fisher observe that it's difficult to draw such conclusions without greater distance. I think they sell themselves short here. P.S. I think I would have rated this book more positively if the subject had been more positive.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Austin Barselau

    Michael Kranish and Marc Fisher, both reporters at the Washington Post, have written a penetrating exposé of the life of Republican nominee Donald Trump. Kranish and Fisher’s biography should be noted for its scope and intensive research. Over the span of three months, the Post assigned more than twenty reporters and numerous fact-checkers and editors to make sure they got the story right. Their findings are the basis of Kranish and Fisher’s book. Trump Revealed chronicles several stages of Trump Michael Kranish and Marc Fisher, both reporters at the Washington Post, have written a penetrating exposé of the life of Republican nominee Donald Trump. Kranish and Fisher’s biography should be noted for its scope and intensive research. Over the span of three months, the Post assigned more than twenty reporters and numerous fact-checkers and editors to make sure they got the story right. Their findings are the basis of Kranish and Fisher’s book. Trump Revealed chronicles several stages of Trump’s life. It starts with his boyish days in the military academy, continuing through his assimilation into his father’s real estate company and the development of his personal brand. The authors do a tremendous job of flushing out one of Trump’s most characteristic of characteristics: his personal branding. Every business venture and friendship was conducted out of his need to flaunt his own status and material wealth. From his stint on the Celebrity Apprentice to his licensing of his name to commercial products, Trump has a knack for building an empire. He has mastered the art of getting attention by generating controversy and sensation, knowing the cameras will be there to pick it up. Here is one of his more memorable quotes about media coverage the authors reproduce from Trump’s The Art of the Deal: One thing I’ve learned about the press is that they’re always hunting for a good story, and the more sensational the better....The point is that if you are a little different, or a little outrageous, or if you do things that are bold or controversial, the press is going to write about you.... Sometimes they write positively and sometimes they write negatively. But from a business point of view, the benefit of being written about have far outweighed the drawbacks.... The final key to the way I promote is bravado. I play to people’s fantasies. People may not always think big themselves, but they can still get very excited by those who do.... I call it truthful hyperbole. It’s an innocent form of exaggeration- and a very effective form of promotion. Kranish and Fisher also do an impeccable job at revealing Trump’s ambition, shaped by his father’s admonition that only “killers” can survive in the world. Trump’s ruthless business practices, combined with his larger-than-life persona, contribute to his image in popular media. The successes, along with multiple failures in the casino business among others, have led him to become a billionaire, but not the ten billion dollar one he claims to be. His ambition is noted by the authors early in Trump’s life, undoubtedly sowing the seeds of his presidential run. Trump toyed with the idea of running for political office for several decades. It came to fruition only recently; he filed a patent on the slogan Make America Great Again, only twelve days after Mitt Romney lost in 2012. Trump knew back then what everyone else didn't and couldn't ever imagine: he would run for president and win. Trump Revealed is a testament to shoe-leather reporting, an intensively documented window into the life of Donald Trump. It provides necessary context for his political aspirations, and for any other grandiose undertaking he might have in the future.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sylvia

    After the election of Donald Trump as next president of the United States I wanted to know some more of his life and his rise as a real estate manager and his ambition to become president.

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