Hot Best Seller

The Mystery of the Brass-Bound Trunk

Availability: Ready to download

A trunk that Nancy receives from her father for a trip to Buenos Aires becomes the center of a mystery.


Compare

A trunk that Nancy receives from her father for a trip to Buenos Aires becomes the center of a mystery.

30 review for The Mystery of the Brass-Bound Trunk

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jessaka

    This was not one of my favorites. I couldn't even find a mystery in it,

  2. 4 out of 5

    Moonkiszt

    Not my favorite of the series. . . .luggage switches, jewelry stolen, misplaced love, and an interesting moment where you almost think Nancy has taken up matchmaking. Whoever is the primary writer on Team Nancy, they have a decided prejudice that is shining through, and it continues in this edition, as well. 3 stars for good enough, but not the best of the set IMHO. Steaming ahead!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dean Cummings

    “The mysterious is the very ground of our being – our hope and our destiny. No one ever knows the simplest thing unless one also feels that there is more that has not been explained.” – Richard Gilbert As the story opens, we see Nancy Drew, her friend George Fayne and George’s cousin Bess Marvin all leaning on the rail of the cruise ship, Winschoten, leaving the port of Rotterdam holland, bound for New York City. The three young ladies are waving, even though we are told that they knew no one on “The mysterious is the very ground of our being – our hope and our destiny. No one ever knows the simplest thing unless one also feels that there is more that has not been explained.” – Richard Gilbert As the story opens, we see Nancy Drew, her friend George Fayne and George’s cousin Bess Marvin all leaning on the rail of the cruise ship, Winschoten, leaving the port of Rotterdam holland, bound for New York City. The three young ladies are waving, even though we are told that they knew no one on the pier. Suddenly, Nancy notices a man on the deck using sign language, apparently sending a message to someone on board. The narrator tells us that Nancy had previously learned the entire finger alphabet and much to her surprise, the man on the deck was signaling the following: N-a-n-c-y -- D-r-e-w. She watches carefully as the man repeats the message once again. This time she catches even more: e-w-a-r-e – N-a-n-c-y – D-r-e-w – and – Ne- Bess and George, we’re told, were looking the other way, oblivious to the clandestine messaging. As for Nancy, she’s understandably intrigued. She turns back to the crowd of passengers to pick out a party that might be signaling back, but the crowd at the rail blocks her view. As we know of Nancy, she will not miss an opportunity to solve a puzzle, but in this instant, she has only seconds to spot a clue… She leans further out on the rail, craning her neck to see past the throng, in hopes of getting a glimpse… As I read this, I immediately recalled a similar circumstance, he frustration of seeing someone on the other side of a crowded room. I either want to talk to that person or catch up with them. I don’ know what it is about those situations, but it seems like when this happens, every possible obstacle suddenly appears. Either the crowd seems unwilling to part so I can pass, or a certain person will see me and wish to engage in a conversation right at that moment. It’s not rational, but sometimes it seems like the crowd is working against you. Nancy’s situation, it turns out, is different, and more dangerous. She leans forward so far that she nearly topples over the railing. Luckily Bess turns and notices, yanking her friend back to safety while chiding her for giving her a fright. Breathlessly, Nancy explains what she saw to the other two girls. George quickly comes up with a plan, the three will split up, each taking one of the three decks, in search of any apparently deaf persons or parties who may still be on the deck, conversing in sign language. They split up, and Nancy, finding no evidence of an such passengers, decides to return to her cabin and wait for her friends. She arrives at her stateroom, open the door and to her shock, another young lady is sitting on one of the beds. “I’m Nelda Detweiler, niece of the captain,” she begins by way of introduction. She goes on to explain to Nancy that she was from Johannesburg, South Africa and was rather suddenly accepted to a college in the United States. She had to make hasty travel arrangements and that the last bed her uncle could arrange was in the very cabin. Would she mind if she bunked with her and her friends? Nancy agrees, while wondering about the girl’s first name, “Could Ne- refer to Nelda?” “Was this charming stranger a spy?” She’ll be watching her closely, she decides. George and Bess arrive back at the room where Nancy introduces them to Nelda. Just then the cabin steward knocks and is let into the room. His eyes land on each of the girls, a little longer on Nelda. ‘Was here any significance to his?’ Nancy asks herself. The steward leaves a brass-bound trunk in the cabin, each girl assuming it’s the property of one of the others, until Nancy notices the N.D. initials and asks Nelda if it is hers. Nelda confirms it is not. Nancy dashes down the hall to catch up with the steward, but he is gone. She returns to the room where all four girls ponder the mystery trunk. There are no stickers affixed on it anywhere, why? The very presence of this trunk, and Nelda’s confession that part of the reason she’s leaving Johannesburg is because she was mistakenly accused of participating in a jewel heist, all lead to one harrowing experience after another. George is knocked unconscious in the ship’s hold; the girls encounter two thugs disguised as plumbers and they find their cabin has been tossed. And the menacing encounters are not just experienced by the four young ladies, as the captain and purser find out. But this particular Nancy Drew mystery was not without its farfetched plot moments. One that stood out for me was when the ship’s assistant purser wrote up a permission slip for Nancy and George to give to the man in charge of the cargo hold so that the two might search for Nancy’s lost luggage trunk. The purser hands the note to Nancy, gives them direction to the hold, then the two young ladies hurry off toward the hold. This is how the walk from the cabin to the hold is described in the story: “They found the door leading down steep iron steps toward the boiler room. The place fascinated them, not only because of the huge fire pits, but also because of the pipes and myriad of electrical wires leading to every part of the ship. Nancy and George had to walk carefully because of the small puddles of oil here and there, which dripped from the machinery. George grinned, ‘We’d be a mess if we fell here,’ she commented…” I had to laugh as I read this. I simply couldn’t imagine a responsible cruise line employee sending two passengers, unaccompanied, into sections of the ship that would certainly be cordoned off for operations staff only. Not to mention the safety hazards of the steep dangerous stairs, open fire pits and oily floors where one could slip rather easily. But these occasional stretches of the possible did little to dampen my enthusiasm for this, Nancy Drew’s seventeenth mystery. And as with many of the Nancy Drew book covers, I was drawn by the exquisite work of the painter, a man named Rudi Nappi. In this 1976 cover, the painter portrays Nancy wearing what the story describes as a “South African native’s costume.” The background is a cocoa colored, featuring an assortment of images including a cache of jewels, a brass-bound trunk and a barely lit ghost ship that seems to be emerging from the shadows. I enjoyed reading the “Mystery of the brass-bound Trunk”, it holds its own as part of this this iconic series of the world’s finest “part-time investigator.”

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mimi

    Not only is my edition old enough that pieces of the pages were crumbling off while I was reading, but it is apparently the original plot instead of a re-vamped one. Delightful, fun re-read. Definitely hit the spot. In case you are wondering, this book is about two minutes shorter to read that the time it takes to play a Little League baseball game :)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Simone S.

    It started out pretty slow. And I cheated on this book by reading like 2 others over the time it took to read this. This started with Nancy Drew returning from her fabulous vacation in South Africa! La-de-da-da! Sees a man using the deaf's sign-language. Has credible knowledge of the deaf's sign language. Sees HER name being spelled. Shares cabin with important character (who is also charming and reasonable, and not in any way suspicious or evil. Receives a **Mysterious brass-bound trunk** ident It started out pretty slow. And I cheated on this book by reading like 2 others over the time it took to read this. This started with Nancy Drew returning from her fabulous vacation in South Africa! La-de-da-da! Sees a man using the deaf's sign-language. Has credible knowledge of the deaf's sign language. Sees HER name being spelled. Shares cabin with important character (who is also charming and reasonable, and not in any way suspicious or evil. Receives a **Mysterious brass-bound trunk** identical to her own. Despite ridiculous locks and warnings NOT TO OPEN THE TRUNK! she opens it anyway. Taps the walls and bottom because - secret panels right!? SURPRISE!!!!!!!! International jewel-thieves!!!!!!! Which is about the scariest type of bad guy we can have in a Nancy Drew right? Oh look a big bag of jewels! Let's put them in the captain's safe because he just so happens to beeeee.... Nelda's uncle!!! And also a handsome young man to practically cheat on Ned with! how lucky that we have so many people on our side!!! Uh-oh! We get thrown over board! Good thing we are excellent swimmers right!? And that our friends followed us out here just in time to see our attackers! And just when we find the suspects and we need to find a way to nab them.... FBI are waiting at the port to question Nancy and Nelda who was wrapped up in a jewelry stealing scandal (she is completely innocent too!). When they approach them Nancy Drew uses her fancy father to get riiiight out of a fix. Again. "Gentlemen. I am Nancy Drew. You may have heard of my father? Carson Drew, totally badass lawyer with enough money to buy a small island? Yes you also may of heard of me in the newspapers, I am in every social function there is. Haha yes, and I'm also an amateur sleuth, haven't lost a case yet." Introduces Nelda as her close and personal friend. "Respect her 'cause I said so. Also I found some jewel thieves you two might want to arrest. Yes, yes I planned this down to the 't' he has all the evidence within a 10-foot pole. And also this exactly ties in with Nelda's accusation on stealing a diamond bracelet. Oh look! a new secret panel that I didn't check yet! There's the bracelet! Yay Nelda! You're free! How many mysteries have I solved this week? How many? That's right 4! Woo-hoo, and I still had time to work on my tan! Now where's Ned? We need to make out a little before the book ends because he's Nancy Drew's boyfriend. Sell this!" And that's what happened - pretty much. Thanks for reading!!! ~Simone

  6. 5 out of 5

    David Hines

    I have read over 300 Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew books, and while I realize they are children's adventures, not totally realistic, I have found most of the tales to at least be plausible. Then along came this charmer that contains the most ludicrous scene in any Hardys/Nancy book I have ever read! This book actually begins with an interesting and believable premise-- while on a cruise ship, Nancy's trunk is confused with a brass-bound trunk that is later found to be full of smuggled jewels and she I have read over 300 Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew books, and while I realize they are children's adventures, not totally realistic, I have found most of the tales to at least be plausible. Then along came this charmer that contains the most ludicrous scene in any Hardys/Nancy book I have ever read! This book actually begins with an interesting and believable premise-- while on a cruise ship, Nancy's trunk is confused with a brass-bound trunk that is later found to be full of smuggled jewels and she tries also to help a roommate who has been unjustly accused of a jewel crime. Then comes the most ludicrous scene I have ever read in either the Nancy Drew or Hardy Boys series-- I wish I was making this insanity up, but a METEOR crashes into the ocean next to their cruise liner! Amazingly, the ship is not destroyed and just continues on its merry way! This episode is so ludicrous it would make even a young child laugh, but wait, it gets worse! Later in the book, in the middle of the night, Nancy and her friend are thrown overboard while the cruise ship is in motion! Despite the ship being underway, it being night, the water cold, Nancy and her friend are heard and are easily rescued! The scene is just too unbelievable even for a children's book! It's a shame these two insane scenes are in the book, because they distract from and frankly add nothing to, an otherwise interesting and exciting storyline. This is one of the older Hardy/Nancy books that was later rewritten. I am interested in knowing if the original story was more interesting and perhaps avoided the ludicrous meteor and woman overboard scenes! The little I have read suggests the original story was much different, and compares to Hardy Boys #10 What Happened at Midnight, where the original story is essentially totally different from the more modern story of that name. But I know of no other book in either the Hardy Boys or Nancy Drew that contains something as crazy as the meteor scene in this book! The only Hardys book that comes close is #26 The Phantom Freighter where a speculative cloaking device has not had its technology age well. If you can avoid laughing over the meteor and the unlikely overboard rescue, this is essentially a good story. But it was hard for me to get past those two scenes!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    Nancy and her gal pals take a trip on the LOOOOVVE BOOOAAAAT No, it's not actually like the LOOOOVVE BOOOAAAAT; it's more like the POORLY SECURED MYSTEERRRY BOOOAAAAT Soon she'll be meeting another boy . . . The POORLY SECURED MYSTEERRRY BOOOAAAAT Seems like several times she gets thrown overboard . . . There are costumes and unmarked luggage and kidnappings and attacks with blunt Obbbjjeeects . . . There's no security onboard so Nancy must defend herself from all the suspeeeccttts . . They disguise Nancy and her gal pals take a trip on the LOOOOVVE BOOOAAAAT No, it's not actually like the LOOOOVVE BOOOAAAAT; it's more like the POORLY SECURED MYSTEERRRY BOOOAAAAT Soon she'll be meeting another boy . . . The POORLY SECURED MYSTEERRRY BOOOAAAAT Seems like several times she gets thrown overboard . . . There are costumes and unmarked luggage and kidnappings and attacks with blunt Obbbjjeeects . . . There's no security onboard so Nancy must defend herself from all the suspeeeccttts . . They disguise themselves badly and communicate by the sign language finger alphabet . . . which Nancy does not understand except for the letters of her own name . . . Luckily all the villains' plotting contains phrases like BEWARE NANCY DREW and WARN CREW and WAS BEN WED. Common phrases that all criminals use, of course! Nancy has quite a group of friends and acquaintances for this journey. She has her usual sidekicks Bess & George; they meet a new friend and roommate named Nelda; Nancy spends most of every day asking the assistant purser Rod for information that hopefully won't get her killed; AND for fun, the girls meet a fun group of bright young things, led by a real go-getter named Al. If anyone wants to coordinate a swimming race or ping pong tournament, Al is your guy! Two other major plot elements are a seemingly bottomless traveling trunk that the girls are constantly fussing over, tearing out the lining, fretting about how to put the lining back in; they literally lose sleep over this. Also, they are constantly bothered by a terror of a little boy named "Bobby" whose parents never seem to be around. I think he threw them overboard; or they threw themselves overboard because he is just that awful. If you find yourself on a cruise with Nancy Drew, you're going to need a refund if you're not dead by the end of it!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Found this one a bit on the dull side. Back and forth looking for clues, finding their room was broken into, chasing a mystery man, looking for clues, finding their room was broken into, chasing a mystery man, et cetera. Gave it an extra star for the meteor that almost crashed into their ship. I mean, you don't ignore something like this, do you? ;)

  9. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    One of the more dated Nancy Drew books, but cruise ships and mysteries do tend to go hand in hand.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Literary Strawberry

    Adding an extra star for the sake of nostalgia and the fact that I /am/ a bit older than the target demographic now, but my goodness, was this bad. Random events, clues that are brought up immediately before they're necessary rather than being woven in/foreshadowed naturally throughout, things brought up for drama only to be immediately resolved (e.g. near the end one of the characters lost her beloved bracelet given to her by her dead grandmother, which was never mentioned once before, only for Adding an extra star for the sake of nostalgia and the fact that I /am/ a bit older than the target demographic now, but my goodness, was this bad. Random events, clues that are brought up immediately before they're necessary rather than being woven in/foreshadowed naturally throughout, things brought up for drama only to be immediately resolved (e.g. near the end one of the characters lost her beloved bracelet given to her by her dead grandmother, which was never mentioned once before, only for it to be returned a page later; literally the only contribution this made to the plot was so they could go "Oh, what a nice man returning that bracelet, I can't believe we used to suspect him, this definitely proves he has nothing to do with this" even though we already pretty much knew who the actual culprit was by now so we didn't really need to confirm that it //really wasn't this guy//), Nancy as usual being incredibly perfect at everything she's ever done... And bits like this: [the last paragraph of chapter 25] '"No. But one of the passengers came to me with a briefcase that wouldn't open. It had a most unusual lock on it. This is what I wanted to tell you. The lock was the same kind as the one on the brass-bound trunk you asked me to open for you!"' [the very first sentence of chapter 26] "'What a great clue!" Nancy thought upon hearing that the man had asked Lou to open a briefcase that had the same type of lock as the one on the mystery trunk!"' Oh, Nancy.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    First of all, I love the cover on this volume. I love the fashionable 1940 clothing the girls are wearing. This book has intrigued me since I was in about 6th grade. I dreamed that I bought this book. It was so real. When I awoke the next AM I couldn't find the book and was so disappointed. It was several years until I actually obtained this book. I really enjoyed reading this original version of the story. My only complaint was that Nancy and friends didn't board the ship for Buenos Aires until First of all, I love the cover on this volume. I love the fashionable 1940 clothing the girls are wearing. This book has intrigued me since I was in about 6th grade. I dreamed that I bought this book. It was so real. When I awoke the next AM I couldn't find the book and was so disappointed. It was several years until I actually obtained this book. I really enjoyed reading this original version of the story. My only complaint was that Nancy and friends didn't board the ship for Buenos Aires until page 110. Several of the things that happened to her prior to that were probably unnecessary to the plot, although in retrospect, they did build up to the finale when all was revealed. When we think of trunks we imagine treasure. This title was attention-grabbing.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    It's Nancy Drew, so of course I enjoyed it. However there was one thing that I cringed over the entire time I read the book; it was a bit painful to be honest. That thing is the lack of understanding over how American Sign Language works. Of course, I think that is due largely in part to the decade in which this book was written, but it still bothers me. Because they only talked about the alphabet, which in ASL is only used for fingerspelling words that do not have signs. Also, you don't sign ever It's Nancy Drew, so of course I enjoyed it. However there was one thing that I cringed over the entire time I read the book; it was a bit painful to be honest. That thing is the lack of understanding over how American Sign Language works. Of course, I think that is due largely in part to the decade in which this book was written, but it still bothers me. Because they only talked about the alphabet, which in ASL is only used for fingerspelling words that do not have signs. Also, you don't sign every English word; that is SE (Signed English) and is only used to teach Deaf children the English language. I tried to keep my spiel/rant short. As someone who is going into performance interpreting, this really bothered me. Other than that, I enjoyed the story.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ethan Nahté

    The Nancy Drew books are definitely a sign of their times, when information wasn't readily available and the majority of the youth population was a little more naive and easily thrilled. The books may still appeal to MG/YA. As an adult, stories such as The Mystery of the Brass-bound Trunk are a bit obvious and the situations in which Nancy Drew and friends find themselves barely holds up in this era. Nancy's new brass-bound trunk and another girl's trunk are caught up in a confusing shuffle from The Nancy Drew books are definitely a sign of their times, when information wasn't readily available and the majority of the youth population was a little more naive and easily thrilled. The books may still appeal to MG/YA. As an adult, stories such as The Mystery of the Brass-bound Trunk are a bit obvious and the situations in which Nancy Drew and friends find themselves barely holds up in this era. Nancy's new brass-bound trunk and another girl's trunk are caught up in a confusing shuffle from train to ship to Argentina that has Nancy trying to solve another case where missing high-priced jewelry and extremely rude adults all fit into the mix. Written in 1940, some of the mystery to this story would be somewhat unusual and adventurous to readers of the day. In modern times, the characters and hiding places for the stolen cache are old hat. Like The Hardy Boys and some of the other adventure/mystery books of the mid-20th century, the stories don't hold up as well for an adult. Possibly, a young teen might find the books still of interest. There are also many parts of the plot where something exciting is happening, (i.e. An oncoming train is about to meet head-on with the train Nancy is on, yet it's all wrapped up in a short paragraph with no exciting details.) I'm sure the bullpen of writers that made up the stories under the name Nancy Drew had a tight word count and a treatment to follow, so some exciting that would probably make it into a book nowadays are simply put to the side. Not an awful read, but not a great detective or detective story, The Mystery of the Brass-bound Trunk is a little old and tarnished.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Faye

    so, I think that I have the original 1940's version by Grosset and Dunlap and the story line is similar to the plot that is outlined here on Goodreads but...there is no South African roommate and they are going to South America not South Africa. They meet a friend on board named Nestrelda Darlington whose trunk is also labeled with the initials N.D. hence the mixup with the trunks. Nestrelda's mother is the one who is implicated with stealing the jewelry not some roommate. Very curious about the so, I think that I have the original 1940's version by Grosset and Dunlap and the story line is similar to the plot that is outlined here on Goodreads but...there is no South African roommate and they are going to South America not South Africa. They meet a friend on board named Nestrelda Darlington whose trunk is also labeled with the initials N.D. hence the mixup with the trunks. Nestrelda's mother is the one who is implicated with stealing the jewelry not some roommate. Very curious about the different story line. I'm not sure if I have the original version or if mine is the updated version. The only publishing date in my book is 1940 and there is no other date (eg. like second release/version date).Simon and Shuster are not listed as the publisher. NOTE: I have found out that my edition is the original 1940's story line. The cover is different than the one shown above. They changed the story line when they re-issued it again in 1972 which is the story line accompanying the shown edition.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tamara Vallejos

    The version I read is the revised one, about Nancy and friends on cruise liner from Holland to NYC. Which is what made it so interesting because this is the first time in 17 books that Nancy has been in a life threatening situation in which she legitimately could have died a horrible death. It lasted just for a couple pages but you can certainly feel the stakes ramping up as the series goes on. Plus, this is the first book that mentions the girls getting kisses from the trio of boys (when they a The version I read is the revised one, about Nancy and friends on cruise liner from Holland to NYC. Which is what made it so interesting because this is the first time in 17 books that Nancy has been in a life threatening situation in which she legitimately could have died a horrible death. It lasted just for a couple pages but you can certainly feel the stakes ramping up as the series goes on. Plus, this is the first book that mentions the girls getting kisses from the trio of boys (when they are welcomed back in NYC), and the first one I think to use the word "boyfriend" and not "special friend" or "steady date." I love it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I wanted to read one of the Nancy Drew series again because I loved them as a kid and there's a new Nancy Drew movie coming out. I really don't understand what I liked to much about these books when I was younger. The mystery wasn't that tough to figure out, nothing too complicated. I was really surprised at how much I didn't like it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    My first classic Nancy Drew book since I was little, and I am presented with a random meteor that almost kills everyone on a cruise ship! This also has absolutely nothing to do with the story! Also, every chapter has to end with an exclamation!!! Ah, Nancy Drew. I still love you.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jentry

    This Nancy was silly. I loved how this one ended.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Josiah

    Such a fun and exciting book!!! Love how it’s a little more intense than the other books since the bad guy is on the same ship as Nancy!!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Emily V

    I love this book! It’s an exciting adventure and mystery!! I love how you don’t really know who the bad guy is until the end! Definitely recommended!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Connie N.

    #17 in the Nancy Drew Mystery series As with all the Nancy Drew books that I'm rereading as an adult, I find it entertaining but simplistic. But they're middle-grade books, after all, and I remember enjoying them greatly as a child. This time Nancy and her friends are taking a cruise ship from Holland to New York. But when Nancy's trunk is misplaced, she ends up with a different trunk with the initials "ND" and finds more than she bargained for. There are also some mysterious men who are using Am #17 in the Nancy Drew Mystery series As with all the Nancy Drew books that I'm rereading as an adult, I find it entertaining but simplistic. But they're middle-grade books, after all, and I remember enjoying them greatly as a child. This time Nancy and her friends are taking a cruise ship from Holland to New York. But when Nancy's trunk is misplaced, she ends up with a different trunk with the initials "ND" and finds more than she bargained for. There are also some mysterious men who are using American Sign Language (which she refers to as finger language) to communicate without being overheard. Their roommate for the trip helps with some of the sleuthing, but Nancy is persistent and finds several helpful clues that lead to a successful conclusion, recovering missing jewels and some stolen government papers. Pleasant, quick, and enjoyable read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    Nancy and her friends change it up a little bit by going on an ocean cruise. But of course they still stumble on a mystery to solve, this time involving a mysterious brass bound trunk that is mistakenly delivered to their room. The usual Nancy Drew drama then ensues, which includes Nancy getting thrown overboard off of the cruise ship. But of course she survives and is rescued, and she solves the mystery of stolen jewels and her detective work leads to the arrest of the jewel thieves.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Having just read the 1940 version of this title I decided to read the 1976 version. It's a whole 'nother story! In this version Nancy and chums are leaving Amsterdam for NY. The entire book takes place on the ship, except for the very end when the thieves are arrested on the dock. Both versions involve jewelry thieves, travel on a ship, and two trunks both bearing the initials ND. It's hard to say which version I like best. They are both excellent stories.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

    An okay mystery, but automatic one-star reduction for cultural appropriation.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Oh holy shit. Nancy's going to fuckin' South America y'all! Because her dad has business in Salt Lake City and doesn't want her to be home alone! Carson, seriously, go home, you're drunk. That makes zero sense. So: -Mrs. Purdy, a cute Buenos Aires lady, anonymously gives Nancy Snowball, a big ol' fluffy white cat. Nancy apparently saved her from being swindled at some point in the past that we didn't get to read about. She figures out who gave her the gift, though. -Mrs. Joslin, who is a grade-A BIT Oh holy shit. Nancy's going to fuckin' South America y'all! Because her dad has business in Salt Lake City and doesn't want her to be home alone! Carson, seriously, go home, you're drunk. That makes zero sense. So: -Mrs. Purdy, a cute Buenos Aires lady, anonymously gives Nancy Snowball, a big ol' fluffy white cat. Nancy apparently saved her from being swindled at some point in the past that we didn't get to read about. She figures out who gave her the gift, though. -Mrs. Joslin, who is a grade-A BITCH, tells Nancy that she ain't fuckin' going on this trip because guess what her darling daughter is not going to associate with a DETECTIVE. Nancy's like WTF, I'm a good girl, and Mrs. Joslin's like I WILL BURN YOUR HOUSE TO THE GROUND. Not really but practically yes. Bess and George are the ones who say "I bet she's acting that way because she is ENGAGED IN CRIMINAL ACTIVITY!" and it turns out they're right. Also Nancy likes being sassy about it. She decides to give in to the demand, but she still sails on the same boat, just not as a member of the group in question. -Carson has a brand-new brass-bound trunk delivered (bet you wouldn't have guessed that) for Nancy, and it's just a total nightmare. Someone breaks in and steals most of Nancy's clothes (and then just dumps them in the backyard when Nancy startles him, so natch). Effie, who apparently has started doing meth since her last appearance, is totally worthless and manages to pack Nancy's passport IN the trunk, even though it's going to be delivered to the ship before Nancy, and she needs the damn passport to get on board, Effie you're the worst. And she re-hems one of Nancy's skirts so it makes her look slutty. Nancy discovers a doppelganger for her trunk, and of course it keeps popping up; she figures out it belongs to Mrs. Joslin's darling daughter Nestrelda, and girl that is a "I'm gonna tell your fortune" name if I ever heard one. Someone steals Nancy's trunk thinking it's Nestrelda's. Nancy eventually figures out the other girl's trunk has smuggled stolen jewelry hidden inside, but that takes a while. -Carson asks Nancy to talk to Doris Trenton on the way. Her dad wants her to marry Henry Washburn, the son of his deceased partner. Doris is like THE HELL WITH THAT SHIT. Nancy, bless her, says "If she doesn't want to marry him, why would I do anything to try to change her mind? It's her decision." Also it turns out Doris's dad isn't doing so well at his business, and he's selling shitty merchandise, thanks to Nestrelda's evil stepfather, but it all works out at the end. -Nancy's car is rear-ended by another car, and the other driver, a wispy redheaded man, just tosses $100 at Nancy (about $1700 now) and drives off. Ned comes up and offers to help her get her car to a garage; he also eats dinner with her and her father, and takes Nancy to a farewell steak cookout (during which Nancy almost gets hit by a tree struck by lightning), and goes with her to New York to see her off on the ship. He also brings some of his college buddies to a dinner with her in New York and is super pissed when one of them definitely becomes enamored with her. And he doesn't want to look girly while carrying Nancy's cat around. I was 1000% on board with him carrying Nancy after she passes out at the cookout, though. -The girls go stay with Bess's aunt Helen Miller again, so that's nice continuity. -Nancy name-drops her father a bunch. A jewelry store clerk accuses her of stealing a bracelet Mr. Joslin actually stole, and she's like MY DAD IS CARSON DREW AND HE WOULD NOT APPROVE OF THESE SHENANIGANS. She also fuckin name drops her dad in Buenos Aires (which she refers to as "B.A.," which I find hilarious, like it's L.A.) and one of the cops in question is like "I mean, yeah, but..." -The girls stop in Rio on the way (yay for that coming up in the Files later). -Nancy decides to leave the trunk in question behind unlocked doors as bait to lure the thieves in... but doesn't think it through, because once they arrive she has no plan to really catch them. She knows her trunk has a doppelganger but seems to forget it pretty often. She spends A LOT of the book trying to track down the red-headed hit-and-run guy to return the cash she had left over from fixing her car... and then figures out it was actually Doris. (Holy cross-dressing plot twist, Batman!) Doris was just trying to hide from Henry, and to investigate her dad's shady business dealings. -Nestrelda and Henry fall for each other, but Nancy's like "eh, it's just a crush," based on not a lot of evidence. But Henry does marry Doris, so I guess it all worked out. Anyway, there was A LOT going on here. I wish Ned had stowed away on the boat, but that still wouldn't have involved Ned hanging out in their room and making out with Nancy, so... sigh.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Anais Roriguez

    The reason why I gave this book a 4 star rating is because this book is based on a girl that has been wanting to find the mystery behind the Brass-Bound Trunk. This book is not scary at all, it's just a mystery themed book. The main reason why I gave this book a 4 star rating is because I think the book could have been little better in my opinion. BUT overall this is a really good book for you to read.I highly recommend this book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Raven Reviewer

    Another mystery finds Nancy, Bess and George when they embark on an ocean voyage on the Winschoten and a brass-bound trunk is delivered to their room. This might be an older writing style written for younger readers but it sure is an entertaining, fast read. The most remarkable characteristic of this plot-driven, action-packed mystery adventure is readers are on a need-to-now basis. If readers do not need to know something, it is not in the book. There are many characters but we are not told thei Another mystery finds Nancy, Bess and George when they embark on an ocean voyage on the Winschoten and a brass-bound trunk is delivered to their room. This might be an older writing style written for younger readers but it sure is an entertaining, fast read. The most remarkable characteristic of this plot-driven, action-packed mystery adventure is readers are on a need-to-now basis. If readers do not need to know something, it is not in the book. There are many characters but we are not told their eye color or whether the lips were full or not. We are told they are in a cabin on an ocean liner but not the color of the bedspread or any other superfluous details. There is hardly any introspection, reflection, or inner monologues on what characters are thinking and feeling. The simple, yet plausible and realistic story stands out, coming front and center. A character goes here, does this and then that. Nearly everything is shown, not told. I know it is a middle grade book written for a younger audience. Yet, this classic is a refreshing read, a great example of no-nonsense story-telling. The meticulous editing and seasoned mechanics shows. With awkward phrases like "the captain and we" handled so smoothly, the grammar here is pretty perfect. It does have a cheesy quality that comes with the era, naming items "clues" and phrases like doing "some more sleuthing". Some interesting words choices show an older dialect ("finger language" versus "sign language") and have obviously changed over the years, but not to an unrecognizable level. Every chapter ends with a cliffhanger. I could almost hear "duh duh dum" music. From reading comments from other readers, I can see that while I have read the updated, rewritten version of this story, that is a good thing. In the older version portrayed Nancy as a rich snob with an unhealthy interest in her clothes. In the version I read Nancy Drew was a strong female character ahead of her time, a role model for young girls. She shows readers that not every woman has to stay at home to cook and clean, but can be out working. Nancy also showed girls there is more out there in fiction to read than romance and gory violence. There are mysteries! I remember why this series drew me to books in the first place. I recommend this for readers of all ages. Of course, I would. Disclaimer: All books reviewed by me have been received via purchase, lending, or given to me by an author or publisher for the purposes of an honest review. No reviews are purchased. They are my own opinion. For more reviews such as this, please visit my site or Google "Raven Reviews".

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Eeee, Nancy! I love the old books. The Mystery of the Brass-Bound Trunk was ALWAYS my favourite as a child. I think I read it about fourteen times. I guess now I know why I'm obsessed with cruise ships. Things I adore about this novel (some serious, some not-so-much): 1. The fact that Ned is MIA. He was so unutterably boring, and as a kid, I used to ask my Mother why Nancy was with him. His name was Ned Nickerson for crying out loud. She deserved much better. 2. Nancy's cheatin' ways. I love how sh Eeee, Nancy! I love the old books. The Mystery of the Brass-Bound Trunk was ALWAYS my favourite as a child. I think I read it about fourteen times. I guess now I know why I'm obsessed with cruise ships. Things I adore about this novel (some serious, some not-so-much): 1. The fact that Ned is MIA. He was so unutterably boring, and as a kid, I used to ask my Mother why Nancy was with him. His name was Ned Nickerson for crying out loud. She deserved much better. 2. Nancy's cheatin' ways. I love how she's constantly cheating on Ned (this time with the Purser on the ship... I think his name was Rod? If his name was any indication of sexual prowess, lucky Nancy!). It's hilarious. Ned would have peaced out long ago. But she's like, "Yeah, no big deal, let's go make out by the squash courts." 3. Nancy, Bess and George's constant traveling. This fascinated me as a child. They were always flitting off this way and that. This time it's Holland, and they're returning to the United States on a cruise ship. The mystery begins when Nancy is being her usual snoopy self and eavesdrops on someone using sign language. SHOCK HORROR she hears her name and must get to the bottom of it! I think she even gets pushed off the ship at this point ... 4. How Nancy turns every vacation into a mystery SHE MUST SOLVE. Relaaaax. 5. The story itself is just really interesting. I don't remember too much about it, except it involves a misplaced trunk, priceless jewels, a mysterious South African passenger and lots of parties. Fun!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stef

    There's a mix-up with a -- you guessed it -- brass-bound trunk, which now that I think about it, doesn't make much sense (why was the jewel thief saying "Beware Nancy Drew" as the ship pulled out of harbor, before the mix-up happened?), but perhaps that's no surprise. George gets a mysterious head wound that's never properly explained, although it's made to seem meaningful. There's even a plot hole where the thief admits, "Oh, no, that message had nothing to do with this," and then is NEVER FURT There's a mix-up with a -- you guessed it -- brass-bound trunk, which now that I think about it, doesn't make much sense (why was the jewel thief saying "Beware Nancy Drew" as the ship pulled out of harbor, before the mix-up happened?), but perhaps that's no surprise. George gets a mysterious head wound that's never properly explained, although it's made to seem meaningful. There's even a plot hole where the thief admits, "Oh, no, that message had nothing to do with this," and then is NEVER FURTHER EXPLAINED. Half of the book is Nancy and Co. rummaging through the brass-bound trunk, finding yet another secret compartment, and then calling the ship's captain, who has nothing better to do than run to Nancy's room whenever she calls. Still, it was a fun before-bed read. Nacny even gets tossed overboard, and who wouldn't love that? ..."Nelda"?

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Brand

    I recently recieved a whole load of books back from a young friend of mine, ranging from Babysitters Club books to rather battered Nancy Drew novels. This was one of them, but apparently I'd leant this book out unread! I'm glad I got it back as it was a really cute little book which I enjoyed. I particularily liked the part where Nancy had her skirts "taken up" in the summer and "let down" in the winter - so quaint! I'm now trying to get some more Nancy Drew books and build up a little collectio I recently recieved a whole load of books back from a young friend of mine, ranging from Babysitters Club books to rather battered Nancy Drew novels. This was one of them, but apparently I'd leant this book out unread! I'm glad I got it back as it was a really cute little book which I enjoyed. I particularily liked the part where Nancy had her skirts "taken up" in the summer and "let down" in the winter - so quaint! I'm now trying to get some more Nancy Drew books and build up a little collection as I'm sure that when I have daughters, they'll enjoy them just as much as I did. 9/10

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.