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Rethinking Possible: A Memoir of Resilience

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Becky Galli was born into a family that valued the power of having a plan. With a pastor father and a stay-at-home mother, her 1960s southern upbringing was bucolic--even enviable. But when her brother, only seventeen, died in a waterskiing accident, the slow unraveling of her perfect family began. Though grief overwhelmed the family, twenty-year-old Galli forged onward w Becky Galli was born into a family that valued the power of having a plan. With a pastor father and a stay-at-home mother, her 1960s southern upbringing was bucolic--even enviable. But when her brother, only seventeen, died in a waterskiing accident, the slow unraveling of her perfect family began. Though grief overwhelmed the family, twenty-year-old Galli forged onward with her life plans--marriage, career, and raising a family of her own--one she hoped would be as idyllic as the family she once knew. But life had less than ideal plans in store. There was her son's degenerative, undiagnosed disease and subsequent death; followed by her daughter's autism diagnosis; her separation; and then, nine days after the divorce was final, the onset of the transverse myelitis that would leave Galli paralyzed from the waist down. Despite such unspeakable tragedy, Galli maintained her belief in family, in faith, in loving unconditionally, and in learning to not only accept, but also embrace a life that had veered down a path far different from the one she had envisioned. At once heartbreaking and inspiring, Rethinking Possible is a story about the power of love over loss and the choices we all make that shape our lives --especially when forced to confront the unimaginable.


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Becky Galli was born into a family that valued the power of having a plan. With a pastor father and a stay-at-home mother, her 1960s southern upbringing was bucolic--even enviable. But when her brother, only seventeen, died in a waterskiing accident, the slow unraveling of her perfect family began. Though grief overwhelmed the family, twenty-year-old Galli forged onward w Becky Galli was born into a family that valued the power of having a plan. With a pastor father and a stay-at-home mother, her 1960s southern upbringing was bucolic--even enviable. But when her brother, only seventeen, died in a waterskiing accident, the slow unraveling of her perfect family began. Though grief overwhelmed the family, twenty-year-old Galli forged onward with her life plans--marriage, career, and raising a family of her own--one she hoped would be as idyllic as the family she once knew. But life had less than ideal plans in store. There was her son's degenerative, undiagnosed disease and subsequent death; followed by her daughter's autism diagnosis; her separation; and then, nine days after the divorce was final, the onset of the transverse myelitis that would leave Galli paralyzed from the waist down. Despite such unspeakable tragedy, Galli maintained her belief in family, in faith, in loving unconditionally, and in learning to not only accept, but also embrace a life that had veered down a path far different from the one she had envisioned. At once heartbreaking and inspiring, Rethinking Possible is a story about the power of love over loss and the choices we all make that shape our lives --especially when forced to confront the unimaginable.

30 review for Rethinking Possible: A Memoir of Resilience

  1. 5 out of 5

    Luanne Castle

    Rethinking Possible, Rebecca Faye Smith Galli’s memoir, is told in a voice that is hers: direct, focused, prepared, smart, communicative, tough, and with a spark of humor. Galli’s memoir is a must read. It touched my heart, and I have a hard time writing about it. It’s not like writing about a book, per se. It’s writing about someone’s heart and soul right out there on paper. Galli is a competitive type-A personality, driven to be perfect and nearly reaching it. But God has other plans for her li Rethinking Possible, Rebecca Faye Smith Galli’s memoir, is told in a voice that is hers: direct, focused, prepared, smart, communicative, tough, and with a spark of humor. Galli’s memoir is a must read. It touched my heart, and I have a hard time writing about it. It’s not like writing about a book, per se. It’s writing about someone’s heart and soul right out there on paper. Galli is a competitive type-A personality, driven to be perfect and nearly reaching it. But God has other plans for her life than what she has envisioned or set up in her personal PowerPoint presentation (metaphor, not actually). In literature, I have never seen a person’s life so beset by one tragedy after another, except in war literature. And yet Galli was prepared for this—prepared by the best. Her pastor father was a marvelous mentor to other pastors, a newspaper columnist, and a clear thinker. He shielded Galli throughout her upbringing with the strength of his wonderful advice. That’s why, when I turned the page and encountered a chapter entitled “Farewell to My Father,” I burst completely and utterly into tears. I could provide you the litany of losses in Galli’s life, but really, what is the point. Please take my word for it and read the book. I travelled through the darkest days with Galli in this book and at the end I am not sad. Amazed, certainly. Gobsmacked, for sure. I am not sad because watching how Galli’s family was transformed has left me in awe of what family is and can be. Galli's memoir will be going to film. I wonder who will play Galli. I can’t write about this book without tearing up, but I also can’t wait to see the movie when it eventually happens!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Liane

    Despite facing multiple tragedies and seemingly insurmountable challenges, Rebecca Galli has written one of the most powerful, positive and life affirming books I’ve read in a long time. I was riveted. Brava, Becky!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Wong

    Most of us plan, or at least envision, how our lives will go. "Rethinking Possible" confirms the adage that "life isn't fair". At first, we learn about the author's almost idyllic childhood. Rebecca (Becky) Faye Smith Galli's parents are wise and loving; her two siblings share a close relationship with her. This is a healthy, close-knit family. Her preacher father's words of wisdom and support are woven throughout the chapters. I am certain that this upbringing was in large part responsible for Most of us plan, or at least envision, how our lives will go. "Rethinking Possible" confirms the adage that "life isn't fair". At first, we learn about the author's almost idyllic childhood. Rebecca (Becky) Faye Smith Galli's parents are wise and loving; her two siblings share a close relationship with her. This is a healthy, close-knit family. Her preacher father's words of wisdom and support are woven throughout the chapters. I am certain that this upbringing was in large part responsible for giving Becky the inner strength to later survive a string of devastating blows, each of which causes her to "rethink" her expectations. This was easier said than done, and the reader is privy to Becky's frustrations, anger, pain, and sorrow throughout these tragedies. It seemed as though Becky was targeted by an angry deity, and I kept wondering: "What are the ODDS?", and then: "This is TOO MUCH!" What initially interested me in this book was the author's involvement as a founding member of "Pathfinders for Autism", as I am conservator for my autistic brother, and was interested to read what she had to say. However, I found the subject of autism to be just "the tip of the iceberg" in Becky's story. I couldn't put the book down, hoping for some kind of resolution in each chapter - a light at the end of each tunnel. After her understandable reactions to the sheer number of assaults she endured, Becky learns to "rethink possible" by dealing with life as it is, and not what it was planned to be. Inspirational and insightful.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Manterfield

    This book had me turning the pages and going to my desk late each morning, so I could read one more chapter with my coffee. Galli writes with incredible frankness and clarity about her paralysis, the deaths of her brother and son, and the family challenges that unraveled her marriage. There is no self-pity in her writing, nor is there the upbeat “every cloud has a silver lining” attitude. Even as the daughter of a beloved pastor, Galli debunks platitudes such as “everything happens for a reason” This book had me turning the pages and going to my desk late each morning, so I could read one more chapter with my coffee. Galli writes with incredible frankness and clarity about her paralysis, the deaths of her brother and son, and the family challenges that unraveled her marriage. There is no self-pity in her writing, nor is there the upbeat “every cloud has a silver lining” attitude. Even as the daughter of a beloved pastor, Galli debunks platitudes such as “everything happens for a reason” and “God only gives you what you can handle.” Instead, her resulting philosophy isn’t a saccharin “when life gives you lemons, make lemonade” but more “life happens, so you’d better figure out how to make it work, even if it’s far from perfect.”

  5. 5 out of 5

    Diane Pomerantz

    What a powerful testimony Rethinking Possible is to the power of spirit and resilience in the face of what could be for some insurmountable adversity but as demonstrated here, it does not have to be the title says it all!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jena

    "For a family who knew so much - whose faith was so deep, love so abiding, and minds filled with mottos designed to keep us focused on the possibilities that were surely ahead - we knew nothing that could have prepared us for that kind of loss." Rethinking possible is listed as a memoir. A reflection of one woman's journey into readjusting her expectations after life decided it wasn't going to go along with her plans. But more than a story of her journey, there is a message of resilience and opti "For a family who knew so much - whose faith was so deep, love so abiding, and minds filled with mottos designed to keep us focused on the possibilities that were surely ahead - we knew nothing that could have prepared us for that kind of loss." Rethinking possible is listed as a memoir. A reflection of one woman's journey into readjusting her expectations after life decided it wasn't going to go along with her plans. But more than a story of her journey, there is a message of resilience and optimism that is stunning to read. Becky Galli was raised as a preacher's kid in the South. With two strong parents determined to raise their children with a sharp focus only on the possibility of life and a knack for finding the silver lining in any situation, her childhood was full of predictability and hope. Their family motto was 'what's planned is possible' and they firmly believed it. Even after an accident put her brother in the hospital, she believed he would make it, that he would achieve everything he planned. The shock of his death forever changed their family, tearing it from the solid unit they were to something different. "I was in a life that wasn't my own. Didn't even have the wardrobe for it." It's easy to get up after getting knocked down once, though, and life progressed for Becky according to her now revised plan. After graduating, she married and began to work on her career. With two type A personalities focusing on their life goals, they were determined that nothing would stand in their way. She even gave birth, on schedule, after Joe received his MBA and before she was 30. Everything was right on track. Until it wasn't. Galli faces several devastating hits when she learns two of her four children are disabled, and one developmentally delayed. The struggle of facing the extraordinary challenges in raising a family like that is remarkable, but had it's costs. In her case, it was her marriage. As if divorce isn't devastating enough, she was hit with a rare inflammation that left her paralyzed from the waist down. Nine days after her divorce finalized. "After all we'd been through, adventure had become our family's euphemism for plans with uncertain outcomes. Forget plans; we mostly clung to possibility. Our lives had become one steady stream of rethinking possible." The most remarkable thing about this memoir isn't the amount of tragedy in Rebecca Galli's life, although she gets more than her fair share. The thing that moved me the most is that she isn't a saint and she isn't a victim. She does the best she can every day. Some days are good, and some days aren't. But every day she does the best with what she has. "You allow yourself the luxury of wallowing in your own self-pity. You are entitled. Go ahead, experience your pain. But don't stay down there too long because you can drown, I've learned." Often when I read memoirs, I can feel a bit chastised. Not because of anything that the author did, or wrote, but because of the way they present their attitudes on life. Some days I throw myself giant pity parties of one. I try not to, but I do. And then you read about someone's life and how optimistic, or cheerful, or stoic they can be about tragedy and trauma. Sometimes it's inspiring, and sometimes it's a bit of a punch to the gut. But Galli lets you see the good and the bad. She vents. She questions. She wallows. And then she gets up. She finds a new perspective. She moves forward. I get that. I relate to it. I identify with it. She doesn't always show herself in the best possible light, and so she feels real to me. She's the woman I would want to call when life gets a little shaky. She may not have the answers, but you know she's going to at least listen and try. She isn't going to judge your pain or minimize how you feel. "Life in all it's unfairness can never take your attitude. That alone is yours to keep and change. No one does that for you. That is power." Life can often feel overwhelming. It can feel hard and big and just too much. There is laughter and happiness and the thousands of tiny moments worth living. But there is also pain, and with pain can come suffering. Galli was hit with a lot of pain, both physical and emotional. But she weathered each storm, and managed to accomplish some impressive feats regardless of the difficulty. She learned acceptance, and she learned that sometimes we have to accept things more than once. "I found a new motto: 'Pain is inevitable; suffering is optional'." This book came to me at a time when I really needed it the most. Life can sometimes feel like you've been thrown into a cage match with no training or warning and are expected to somehow survive. You get up only to get knocked right back down. It is a constant barrage of learning, and adjusting, and accepting. It isn't easy. But rather than make your struggles feel trivial in comparison to hers, Galli makes them relatable. She makes you feel understood. And because she writes about her journey in such an honest way, you find that she makes you feel like you've just received the pep talk you needed. Her revelations about her own struggles are pointed and clear. Reading through this book, I felt like I was being cheered on, even though this wasn't about my life. Galli gives you permission to accept life day by day, to be kind to yourself, and to realize that no matter what, you may never have all the answers. This is a quick read. I was shocked at how fast I read through it. Though the subject matter is heavy, Galli writes with a skilled levity that brings light and warmth to even the toughest of passages. Sometimes the only thing you can do is laugh, even when you want to cry. Regardless of what you're going through in your life, or have gone through, this is a book that will reach everyone. You'll laugh, you'll cry, you'll stop and ponder the wisdom she offers. I know I will be thinking about her words for a long time. Thank you Booksparks and She Writes Press for sending me a copy to read and review!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Janice Richardson

    A story of one woman's strength in the face of adversity. Well written, insightful. A story of one woman's strength in the face of adversity. Well written, insightful.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    Thank you to Booksparks for providing me with a free copy of the book in exchange for my honest review. Wow. If you want to read a book that is not what you’re expecting, this is the book for you. Let’s be honest: Galli Smith’s life was not all sunshine and roses, yet her story isn’t filled with bitterness and hate. Instead, her overarching message is one of love and finding that positive light in your “everyday”. I don’t want to say much more about Rebecca’s story because I want you to read it a Thank you to Booksparks for providing me with a free copy of the book in exchange for my honest review. Wow. If you want to read a book that is not what you’re expecting, this is the book for you. Let’s be honest: Galli Smith’s life was not all sunshine and roses, yet her story isn’t filled with bitterness and hate. Instead, her overarching message is one of love and finding that positive light in your “everyday”. I don’t want to say much more about Rebecca’s story because I want you to read it and follow along on her journey in a state of blindness like I did. Her words hit every single one of my heartstrings and held me captive through the final page. There’s a passage I read that has stuck with me and I keep hearing it throughout my daily activities, really making me think about my attitude and how I react to life. After Forest’s death, I watched my father struggle to learn how to accept the good in life while living in the shadow of the best that could no longer be. In his typical pulpit soundbit style, he had boiled down his philosophy to one simple word, “Nevertheless.” “Nevertheless,” he would explain, “implies that given a certain situation, I will behave contrary to its implications. I may not like my circumstances; nevertheless, I will find the good in them.” (p. 188) So again: go read this book. I guarantee it’s going to make you feel things.

  9. 5 out of 5

    BD

    Fantastic read - author does a wonderful job weaving her life story into relevant life lessons for all people from all walks of life. This book shows what resilience is and what it looks like. Will be a reference for me and my family for years to come.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I didn't know who Becki Galli was before I picked up her book. Intrigued by the description and on a quest for greater resilience in my own life, I anticipated receiving some motivation and tips for adding resilience to my own life. Unfortunately, this book was a disappointment. I appreciate Becki Galli's attempt at telling a story of resilience. She certainly has experienced her share of tribulations. And I'm sure her column readers, family members, friends, and acquaintances will appreciate he I didn't know who Becki Galli was before I picked up her book. Intrigued by the description and on a quest for greater resilience in my own life, I anticipated receiving some motivation and tips for adding resilience to my own life. Unfortunately, this book was a disappointment. I appreciate Becki Galli's attempt at telling a story of resilience. She certainly has experienced her share of tribulations. And I'm sure her column readers, family members, friends, and acquaintances will appreciate her story. But I never really connected with her. And in the midst of recounting her troubles, her book fails to motivate readers to be resilient. Basically, this book tells her story and offers little hope or advice for how readers can learn, discover and exercise resilience as they overcome challenges they face in their daily lives. I did like the inspirational quotes at the beginning of each chapter and included my favorites along with several insights Ms. Galli shared here. As for the future, your task is not to foresee it but to enable it. Antoine de Saint Exupery We may want one outcome, but we can get another. pursuing parallel paths prepare us for both. Don't cut what you can unravel. Dr. R.F. Smith Jr. When we long for life without difficulties, remind us that oaks grow strong in contrary winds and diamonds are made under pressure. Peter Marshall Any idiot can face a crisis; it's day-to-day living that wears you out. Clifford Odets No experience is ever wasted unless you let it be. I may not like my circumstances; nevertheless, I will find the good in them. Life expectancy will not change my expectations in life. If you're going through hell, keep going. Winston Churchhill You may have to fight a battle more than once to win it. Margaret Thatcher Unresolved anger fixates us in our point of pain. You are imperfect, you are wired for struggle, but you are worthy of love and belonging - Brene Brown Life isn't about what you've lost, but about what you've learned - and what you do with what you have left.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Reader Views

    Reviewed by Kimberly Luyckx for Reader Views (4/18) “Rethinking Possible : A Memoir of Resilience,” is a story of how one woman stays grounded in her family values and resources to bounce back each time life’s misfortunes come her way. As a preacher’s kid, Rebecca Faye Smith Galli admires her commanding father but dislikes the fact that the parish community often requires the bulk of his attention. Despite the on call emergencies and thanks to her mother’s penchant for planning, the family still m Reviewed by Kimberly Luyckx for Reader Views (4/18) “Rethinking Possible : A Memoir of Resilience,” is a story of how one woman stays grounded in her family values and resources to bounce back each time life’s misfortunes come her way. As a preacher’s kid, Rebecca Faye Smith Galli admires her commanding father but dislikes the fact that the parish community often requires the bulk of his attention. Despite the on call emergencies and thanks to her mother’s penchant for planning, the family still manages to reserve Saturday as a sacred day to be together. Throughout her account, Galli reflects on these planned family times with gratitude and happiness. So, when her kid brother dies from a freak water skiing accident, Galli is filled with grief, not only for her brother but for her entire family unit. As the author marries and begins her own family, she is faced with two miscarriages and the birth of two special needs children. Abandoning her full-time career, Galli attempts to manage her life but realizes that this enormous task splinters her from personal goals and the life she has built with her husband. Once divorced and struggling with being a single working mom, Galli’s own health takes a turn for the worse. She contracts a rare flu that terminates in a paralysis defined as Transverse Myelitis; a condition that the author hopes will be temporary. Truly memoir-worthy, Galli’s story is full of obstacles. Just when you think she receives more difficulties than one person can handle, another giant roadblock appears. Through it all, and unfortunate as her tale is, Galli’s memoir reads like a gripping novel. It is filled with dialog, yet contains plenty of description to put the reader inside the narrative. Each chapter’s excitement propels you on to the next. As Galli herself explains, “If I were to write an autobiography I know they would put it in the fiction section!” The drama of Galli’s life is certainly a page-turner. She begins to document her saga or “wheel chair escapades” in an email addressed to a long-lost friend. Her tales eventually extend out to other friends and family. Copying and pasting message after message, Galli conveys to a large blog-like audience the daily news and thoughts that, ultimately, lead to this book’s publication. Galli’s cast of characters, who are integral to her survival and sanity, are genuinely portrayed: from her youngest son/cheerleader to the loyal ex-husband who vows to never leave her alone. Each connection makes the memoir more endearing and truthful. Galli’s storytelling is genuinely heartfelt and provides a greater impact than many other life chronicles. Her writing flows effortlessly and accurately leaving no moments for second-guessing or eyebrow-raising gaps for wondering. Rebecca Faye Smith Galli’s dilemmas teach her readers to stay positive, goal-focused and keep their wits about them - even when encountering those who have no tolerance for the misfortunes of others. In “Rethinking Possible: A Memoir of Resilience,” the author provides many words of wisdom. In reading her story, we discover how to reinterpret life’s misfortunes as adventures and to rethink what is possible. We process grief along with Galli and learn, with a good dose of humor, to accept, forgive and hope. In the end, the biggest lesson her book teaches us is that love is larger than any obstacles we may face.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Story Circle Book Reviews

    "Everything happens for a reason." Ugh! I've often thought I would create a book of myths and this one would be the first one I attack. The second would be, "God doesn't give you more than you can handle." I've heard them all, dozens of times in dozens of circumstances from Forest's death, to Matthew's seizures, to Madison's autism, to my divorce, to my paralysis. How many of us who have gone through difficult times have heard those same platitudes, and wanted to scream? If this section of a lett "Everything happens for a reason." Ugh! I've often thought I would create a book of myths and this one would be the first one I attack. The second would be, "God doesn't give you more than you can handle." I've heard them all, dozens of times in dozens of circumstances from Forest's death, to Matthew's seizures, to Madison's autism, to my divorce, to my paralysis. How many of us who have gone through difficult times have heard those same platitudes, and wanted to scream? If this section of a letter author Rebecca Faye Smith Galli shares in her book Rethinking Possible: A Memoir of Resilience, sounds slightly bitter, there is good reason. Loss permeated an otherwise idyllic life when her seventeen-year old brother died in a waterskiing accident when Rebecca was a junior in college. "If I were to write an autobiography I know they would put it in the fiction section," Rebecca wrote to her friend Gibson years later. By then, one of her children had been diagnosed with a degenerative disease, another was autistic, and Rebecca was confined to a wheelchair, having survived transverse myelitis. Her divorce had been finalized just nine days before the illness that left her paralyzed from the waist down. I love reading memoir, particularly stories of transformation, faith, and redemption, and this book has aspects of all three. Galli could, indeed, have become bitter with all that transpired in her life, but instead, she shares her struggle to become a better person, remembering the words her brother had written the day before his accident "I would change nothing.. "I would change nothing.. Despite continued pain and loss in her life, Galli is determined that her life will live up to those words. Considering that her father is a pastor, I expected faith to take center stage in this dramatic memoir, but Galli managed to write an inspirational book without making it a blatantly "Christian" one. I found that refreshing after reading a few too many books that incorporate Bible verses in a somewhat forced way, as if the author was instructed to include a certain number of verses in each chapter. A single caveat; I wondered at the author's repeated references to the abs she'd garnered through exercise shortly before the illness. It seemed an odd thing to concentrate on when her life was in such turmoil, but then, perhaps because those hard-earned muscles later turned flabby, they were just one more thing to mourn. by Mary Potter Kenyon for Story Circle Book Reviews reviewing books by, for, and about women

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mary Kenyon

    “’Everything happens for a reason.’ Ugh! I’ve often thought I would create a book of myths and this one would be the first one I attack. The second would be, “God doesn’t give you more than you can handle.’ I’ve heard them all, dozens of times in dozens of circumstances from Forest’s death, to Matthew’s seizures, to Madison’s autism, to my divorce, to my paralysis.” How many of us who have gone through difficult times have heard those same platitudes, and wanted to scream? If this section of a le “’Everything happens for a reason.’ Ugh! I’ve often thought I would create a book of myths and this one would be the first one I attack. The second would be, “God doesn’t give you more than you can handle.’ I’ve heard them all, dozens of times in dozens of circumstances from Forest’s death, to Matthew’s seizures, to Madison’s autism, to my divorce, to my paralysis.” How many of us who have gone through difficult times have heard those same platitudes, and wanted to scream? If this section of a letter author Rebecca Faye Smith Galli shares in her book Rethinking Possible: A Memoir of Resilience, sounds slightly bitter, there is good reason. Loss permeated an otherwise idyllic life when her seventeen-year old brother died in a waterskiing accident when Rebecca was a junior in college. “If I were to write an autobiography I know they would put it in the fiction section,” Rebecca wrote to her friend Gibson years later. By then, one of her children had been diagnosed with a degenerative undiagnosed disease, another was autistic, and Rebecca was confined to a wheelchair, having survived transverse myelitis. Her divorce had been finalized just nine days before the illness that left her paralyzed from the waist down. I love reading memoir, particularly stories of transformation, faith, and redemption, and this book has aspects of all three. Galli could, indeed, have become bitter with all that transpired in her life, but instead, she shares her struggle to become a better person, remembering the words her brother had written the day before his accident “I would change nothing.” I would change nothing. Despite continued pain and loss in her life, Galli is determined her life will live up to those words. Considering her father is a pastor, I expected faith to take center stage in this dramatic memoir, but Galli managed to write an inspirational book without making it a blatantly “Christian” one. I found that refreshing after reading a few too many books that incorporate Bible verses in a somewhat forced way, as if the author was instructed to include a certain number of verses in each chapter. A single caveat; I wondered at the authors repeated references to the abs she’d garnered through exercise shortly before the illness. It seemed an odd thing to concentrate on when her life was in such turmoil, but then, perhaps because those hard-earned muscles later turned flabby, they were just one more thing to mourn. This review originally printed on Story Circle Reviews: http://www.storycirclebookreviews.org...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elise Larson

    A deeply affecting story that will stay with me for a long, long time. FIVE ADMIRING STARS! I'm struggling to find words to describe this incredible book. Stunning, heart-wrenching, engrossing, agonizing, uplifting, depressing, compelling . . . the list goes on, but I still cannot adequately express this story's effect on me. The "I couldn't put it down" comment is often used in book reviews, but in this case it's absolutely true--I could not stop reading this book! It reads like a novel and its A deeply affecting story that will stay with me for a long, long time. FIVE ADMIRING STARS! I'm struggling to find words to describe this incredible book. Stunning, heart-wrenching, engrossing, agonizing, uplifting, depressing, compelling . . . the list goes on, but I still cannot adequately express this story's effect on me. The "I couldn't put it down" comment is often used in book reviews, but in this case it's absolutely true--I could not stop reading this book! It reads like a novel and its "plot" is better than most novels, but the fact that it's true is just amazing. How could so many tragedies happen to one person? And how could that person not only survive, but also find the courage and resilience to go on? I am in AWE of Rebecca Smith Galli! Still, I can't help feeling that she was fortunate to belong to an affluent family, able to afford dozens of nannies and caregivers, ongoing treatments and residential care, handicapped accessible homes and van, Caribbean cruises and other trips, etc. A handicapped single mother in financially limited circumstances might find it a bit more difficult to "rethink the possible" as she struggles to provide for herself and her special-needs children. This is not a criticism in any way--just an observation. I know Becky is thankful for the help she received. I won't summarize this book, because nothing should spoil this story. Just read the book description and place this at the very top of your "to be read" list. I'm so glad I took the time to read Becky's beautifully written account of love, loss and survival. This is one that will stay with me for a long, long time.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    On a scale of cotton candy to Brussels sprouts, Rethinking Possible by Rebecca Faye Smith Galli is smoked salt-crusted pork. Strong and rich flavors soak into the meat over a long period of cooking time. The meat sticks with you and saltiness lingers on the tongue. [Copy Received. Opinions My Own.] Rethinking Possible is a memoir of the author's life as she struggles with one family tragedy after another. When her own mobility becomes a part of the story, she struggles to make sense of the story. On a scale of cotton candy to Brussels sprouts, Rethinking Possible by Rebecca Faye Smith Galli is smoked salt-crusted pork. Strong and rich flavors soak into the meat over a long period of cooking time. The meat sticks with you and saltiness lingers on the tongue. [Copy Received. Opinions My Own.] Rethinking Possible is a memoir of the author's life as she struggles with one family tragedy after another. When her own mobility becomes a part of the story, she struggles to make sense of the story. Why her? Why now? Why this? Rebecca Galli shares her life, her suffering, and the little ways that she chose to change her mindset. Reading this story was uncomfortable. Leaning into that discomfort required guts from the reader, especially because the story didn't often have cathartic moments. Challenging life things piled on to each other. But Rebecca Galli's perseverance and resilience continued to shine through every page. She handled these personal and family challenges with grace and grit. Rethinking Possible can't be termed a fun read because it pushes readers to face the reality that these heartbreaks and life struggles could happen to anyone. Sometimes there's no rhyme or reason. As a reader, I wanted more hope. I wanted to know more about how the title came into play in the author's life. If you enjoy a well-written story about human perseverance, Rethinking Possible is for you.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kitty

    What this woman has gone through... wow. The book is quite readable, and inspiring. It's not really a "happy" book, but the message is positive. I am pretty sure that what I got out of this book was not entirely what the author intended, or what most people would. My life is nothing like the author's, though I certainly have my own challenges to face. However, more than that, I think I just have a very different view about life. Instead of inspiring me to adopt this author's ideas and attitude, What this woman has gone through... wow. The book is quite readable, and inspiring. It's not really a "happy" book, but the message is positive. I am pretty sure that what I got out of this book was not entirely what the author intended, or what most people would. My life is nothing like the author's, though I certainly have my own challenges to face. However, more than that, I think I just have a very different view about life. Instead of inspiring me to adopt this author's ideas and attitude, her struggles actually made me feel more grateful for my own optimism, and methods for handling life's challenges. But that's not a bad thing.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Herbert

    I liked this book a lot even though the writing is not great. It's a true story, and each chapter begins with an appropriate quote from well known figures to give you a taste of the lesson to be learned. So much suffering happens to this family. The author leans heavily on God even when she is furious with her life and it is a great testimony to overcoming adversity. She never had to worry about money, but it sure didn't insulate her from terrible things in life. Good read if you need a kick in I liked this book a lot even though the writing is not great. It's a true story, and each chapter begins with an appropriate quote from well known figures to give you a taste of the lesson to be learned. So much suffering happens to this family. The author leans heavily on God even when she is furious with her life and it is a great testimony to overcoming adversity. She never had to worry about money, but it sure didn't insulate her from terrible things in life. Good read if you need a kick in the ass to feel some gratitude and get on with life.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eniola

    Couldn’t put this down A cocktail of all the emotions you can ever think of is beautifully captured in this real life story. Not wanting to give away anything, the power of resilience is depicted in this author’s story which makes you smile, cry, wonder, sigh and most importantly, hopeful. You will not regret buying/reading this book. If there were 20 stars, that’s the rating it’ll get.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Quotable I'm not sure what I expected from this book, but other than some great quotes, I didn't really connect with it. It's about great losses, how that family endured is their strength as family. She persevered even through all the trials, but it leaves a hollow sorrow for a reader, and a sadness for their losses. It's a story of strength of character, family, and life itself. I can't say I enjoyed the book, although I did highlight certain quotes I thought were notable. Quotable I'm not sure what I expected from this book, but other than some great quotes, I didn't really connect with it. It's about great losses, how that family endured is their strength as family. She persevered even through all the trials, but it leaves a hollow sorrow for a reader, and a sadness for their losses. It's a story of strength of character, family, and life itself. I can't say I enjoyed the book, although I did highlight certain quotes I thought were notable.

  20. 4 out of 5

    donna sigmon

    Inspiring compelling life story Becky's life story is very encouraging for everyone who reads it. She writes well. Her story could of been a "sob story" but instead it teaches us to keep going because that's all any of us have. Friends and family can offer support when someone is going though tragedy but it is the spirit deep inside that decides if you are going to make it. Inspiring compelling life story Becky's life story is very encouraging for everyone who reads it. She writes well. Her story could of been a "sob story" but instead it teaches us to keep going because that's all any of us have. Friends and family can offer support when someone is going though tragedy but it is the spirit deep inside that decides if you are going to make it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Susan Mills

    Interesting autobiography This author has told her life story to help others who struggle with personal problems and tragedy. Some episodes are similar to what many of us experience. Thank goodness she had the finances to buoy her up and relieve her burdens. The book is well-written. I didn't agree with some of her choices, but everyone is different. Interesting autobiography This author has told her life story to help others who struggle with personal problems and tragedy. Some episodes are similar to what many of us experience. Thank goodness she had the finances to buoy her up and relieve her burdens. The book is well-written. I didn't agree with some of her choices, but everyone is different.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rosemary

    Perseverance! Rebecca, the author is just an amazing person who has truly made lemonade out of lemons. No matter what came her way, she always found just that little bit of hope to keep her going. Faith, hope and love that is what I live my life by too. Thank you Rebecca for sharing your life story, you are an inspiration.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Linda Hudak

    Captivating and inspiring There were so many times while reading this that it was too painful or exhausting to continue. I cannot fathom the sadness and tragedy that Becky has been through and to be able to find the courage and optimism to keep going. This hurt to read but I am glad I did.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Diane Balding

    Overcoming and not letting it get you down I chose my rating because here is a woman who lost her brother 1st , then her dad, then her mom and her son in the same day. While she is paralyzed doing what she can for her family. And dirvorce from her husband. And still have faith in God. Not blaming God for nothing. She overcome alot!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ginger Bouchard

    Incredible journey The author of this memoir endured so much grief. Very well written and captivating. However, one good fortune she had was financial help. I'm not sure the story would have ended as well without it. But a great message to stay positive. Incredible journey The author of this memoir endured so much grief. Very well written and captivating. However, one good fortune she had was financial help. I'm not sure the story would have ended as well without it. But a great message to stay positive.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Oudith

    Never Ending Everytime I think ok the author will move on some thing else happens it’s a compelling and depressing yet hopeful and loving read. I wish her nothing but the best she’s a TROOPER!! and a HERO...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kathi

    Wow! I was partway through the book when I realized I knew the story about her brother, I had read her father's book about dealing with his death. Loved finding out the rest of the story, though the author and her family have dealt with so much! Wow! I was partway through the book when I realized I knew the story about her brother, I had read her father's book about dealing with his death. Loved finding out the rest of the story, though the author and her family have dealt with so much!

  28. 4 out of 5

    KyBunnies

    Rating 1 star for author contacting me about book via social media.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ron Frampton

    A strong book of love over loss and choices we make that shape our lives.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    Moving, Becky is amazing in all that she had to endure and overcome.

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