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Everything Change: An Anthology of Climate Fiction

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A collection of gripping stories that explore a range of possible futures for Earth and humanity transformed by climate change. Featuring contributions from renowned science fiction authors Kim Stanley Robinson and Paolo Bacigalupi, along with 12 stories from Arizona State University's 2016 Climate Fiction Short Story Contest. A collection of gripping stories that explore a range of possible futures for Earth and humanity transformed by climate change. Featuring contributions from renowned science fiction authors Kim Stanley Robinson and Paolo Bacigalupi, along with 12 stories from Arizona State University's 2016 Climate Fiction Short Story Contest.


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A collection of gripping stories that explore a range of possible futures for Earth and humanity transformed by climate change. Featuring contributions from renowned science fiction authors Kim Stanley Robinson and Paolo Bacigalupi, along with 12 stories from Arizona State University's 2016 Climate Fiction Short Story Contest. A collection of gripping stories that explore a range of possible futures for Earth and humanity transformed by climate change. Featuring contributions from renowned science fiction authors Kim Stanley Robinson and Paolo Bacigalupi, along with 12 stories from Arizona State University's 2016 Climate Fiction Short Story Contest.

30 review for Everything Change: An Anthology of Climate Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    David H.

    This is a worthy effort from the Imagination and Climate Futures Initiative at Arizona State University, and I'm glad that this exists. That said, I think what the editors were looking for in story submissions and what I was hoping for were not the same thing, since I ended up disappointed or befuddled by several of the stories. My favorites, however, were Shauna O'Meara's "On Darwin Tides" about a "sea gypsy" girl trying to make her way in Malaysia; the sappy but heartwarming "Wonder of the Worl This is a worthy effort from the Imagination and Climate Futures Initiative at Arizona State University, and I'm glad that this exists. That said, I think what the editors were looking for in story submissions and what I was hoping for were not the same thing, since I ended up disappointed or befuddled by several of the stories. My favorites, however, were Shauna O'Meara's "On Darwin Tides" about a "sea gypsy" girl trying to make her way in Malaysia; the sappy but heartwarming "Wonder of the World" by Kathryn Blume, and Matthew S. Henry's "Victor and the Fish" took a rather dark turn that weirdly made me happy. However, that was basically it for this book. I did really enjoy the interview with Paolo Bacigalupi at the end, though; I still need to read The Water Knife.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Treesong Treesong

    Everything Change is an innovative and compelling climate fiction anthology. There are several gems in here that will capture the imagination of anyone who loves good fiction, regardless of past familiarity with the genre. If you’re already an avid climate fiction reader, though, you’re in for a real treat! One of the great strengths of this anthology is its diversity of style and content. A good anthology must strike a balance between choosing stories that embody the anthology’s theme and storie Everything Change is an innovative and compelling climate fiction anthology. There are several gems in here that will capture the imagination of anyone who loves good fiction, regardless of past familiarity with the genre. If you’re already an avid climate fiction reader, though, you’re in for a real treat! One of the great strengths of this anthology is its diversity of style and content. A good anthology must strike a balance between choosing stories that embody the anthology’s theme and stories that demonstrate the wide range of possibilities available within that theme. This anthology is an excellent example of that delicate balance. Climate fiction is generally dystopian in nature due to the current catastrophic trajectory of the climate crisis in real life. Any well-crafted narrative that speaks to the ominous realities of the crisis we all face must almost necessarily contain at least some hints of dystopian elements — cities flooding, wildfires burning, families torn asunder by forces beyond their control. The stories contained within this anthology are no exception. However, what does vary considerably from story to story is the tone with which these realities are addressed. Some adopt the grim and gritty realism that one would expect. Others, however, are at times quite explicit in their emphasis on enduring hope, innovation, resilience, and even good cheer in the face of otherwise dire circumstances. Most are somewhere in between — an exploration of deeply human struggles at the all-too-real intersection between hope and despair. The title of this anthology, Everything Change, is derived from a quote by Margaret Atwood: “I think calling it climate change is rather limiting. I would rather call it the Everything Change.” One of the other great strengths of this anthology is that it captures the spirit of this quote and this vital perspective on the nature of climate change. Many people — even people who are quite concerned and informed about the issue — unintentionally adopt a narrow understanding of what climate change is and what the climate crisis means for the present and future of human and non-human life on Earth. This anthology does an excellent job of breaking out of that box by showing a variety of different people, in a variety of different situations, dealing with the challenges they face in a variety of different ways. Taken individually, each story is “just” the story of one or several characters dealing with their particular set of circumstances and struggles. When taken collectively, however, they paint an elaborate picture of “everything change” that is more complex and comprehensive than any one short story can paint. This picture is both an exceptional artistic achievement and an excellent fulfillment of the vital role that fiction plays in helping us to understand the major questions and concerns of life and the world we live in, including but not limited to the climate crisis. I recommend this anthology to anyone and everyone who enjoys good fiction. As with almost any anthology, some pieces are stronger overall than others, and some readers with a narrow preference in tone or style will prefer some stories over others for those reasons. However, there’s something in this book for just about everyone. I especially recommend this to everyone with any interest in the emerging genre of climate fiction. There’s a growing body of literature out there that could be classified as climate fiction, either because the author or publisher classifies it as such or because climate disruptions and the climate crisis are prominent themes. This anthology will fit nicely with the rest of these offerings and will surely serve as a fine introduction to the genre for many new readers. I hope that it will reach a broad audience and thus broaden awareness of — and appreciation for — climate fiction.

  3. 4 out of 5

    John Majerle

    This was a reasonably entertaining anthology musing over the lives of folks in the near future when ocean levels have risen to the point where significant populations have are permanently displaced. I only gave it 3 stars because all of the stories felt like first drafts to me instead of finished work.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Darrell

    "It's not climate change- it's everything change." -Margaret Atwood This is an anthology of science fiction that deals with climate change, or cli-fi as it's sometimes called. These stories take place all over the world and demonstrate different ways global warming will change human lives in the future. Some of the stories have hopeful endings, some are depressing. In the first story, "Sunshine State" (by Adam Flynn and Andrew Dana Hudson), Ramses is a negotiator for insurance companies trying to "It's not climate change- it's everything change." -Margaret Atwood This is an anthology of science fiction that deals with climate change, or cli-fi as it's sometimes called. These stories take place all over the world and demonstrate different ways global warming will change human lives in the future. Some of the stories have hopeful endings, some are depressing. In the first story, "Sunshine State" (by Adam Flynn and Andrew Dana Hudson), Ramses is a negotiator for insurance companies trying to convince people to move from areas prone to flooding. It starts out strong with rich descriptions. I liked the detail that club goers wear mosquito nets over their skimpy clothing. However, it feels like they tried to pack in too much information. It's full of info dumps and the ending felt rushed, more like an outline than a proper story towards the end. It would have been much better if it were a longer story. "Shrinking Sinking Land" by Kelly Cowley takes place in a drowning version of England. Our main character is Flea, who is trying to fish her mum out of a sinkhole. They not only have to deal with super storms in this world, but also mutant rats. I loved the irony that right after we're told Flea never lets her guard down, she's surprised by a squirrel. I think a better title for this would be "Three Ways an Umbrella Can Save Your Life" as that's the most memorable theme in the story. It's very funny, but also heart breaking. My favorite story in this collection. "Victor and the Fish" by Matthew S. Henry takes place in the western United States where wild fires have become common place. It's a world in which any life, including invasive species, is precious. It's a bit depressing that the characters are used to this, but people can adapt to anything. Our main character wants to bring cutthroat trout back from extinction which I can relate to since I often went fishing with my dad growing up. In "Acqua Alta" by Ashley Bevilacqua Anglin, Venice is now underwater, but a replica of it has been built for tourists to visit. I like the description of hair "that wants to move like we're underwater even when it's dry." One minor complaint is that we're told the narrator is eleven years old, although she acts like she's older than this. In "Wonder of the World" by Kathryn Blume, snow is a danger because it happens so rarely, people don't know how to handle it. This is one of the optimistic stories. We're told one bright side to the apocalypse is our lives would be less complex and we wouldn't have to worry about working long hours, commuting, and paying the bills. "Masks" by Stirling Davenport takes place in Beijing, where wearing masks to protect against air pollution is part of daily life. Also, dogs have become scarce because people use them for meat. "On Darwin Tides" by Shauna O'Meara takes place in Malaysia where American tourists come to see the coral reef before it's gone. The main character is a Sama Dilaut, or sea gypsy. With dwindling resources, people ignore no fishing zones. After all, who wants to save an endangered species if it means you'd starve to death? They resent orangutans since Americans send money to save their lives, but not the lives of people. "Standing Still" by Lindsay Redifer takes place in Madagascar. The children have a hard time trying to picture things like guitars and televisions since they don't have them anymore. A good story, although I found it to be a bit too preachy in places. "Into the Storm" by Yakos Spiliotopoulos takes place in Ottawa and predicts the U.S. will have a reality TV star for President. There's an interview with Paolo Bacigalupi at the end which makes some good points. Here's one of his quotes: "Our marketplaces often solve the wrong problems. They don't tend to be interested in solving root causes. They tend to put Band-Aids on symptoms. That's why you see people wearing dust masks in Beijing and other heavily polluted cities. You don't get rid of the factories or deal with the air pollution. You give everybody dust masks, and you sell them and then you accessorize them and then you make them a brand name item and you make a lot of money off of them. That's kind of what capitalist markets do." This book can be read for free here: https://climateimagination.asu.edu/everything-change/

  5. 5 out of 5

    SFHelmut

    A smart, thoughtful collection of short stories tackling how climate change will affect us. Starting off with a smart introductory essay about Cli-Fi by the esteemed Kim Stanley Robinson and ending with Praying for Rain - an interview by the insightful Paolo Bacigalupi, this anthology showcases some great talent. I especially liked Diana Rose Harper's "Thirteenth Year" and "Acqua Alta" by Ashley Bevilacqua Anglin. If you have not read a collection of short stories and you are interested in clima A smart, thoughtful collection of short stories tackling how climate change will affect us. Starting off with a smart introductory essay about Cli-Fi by the esteemed Kim Stanley Robinson and ending with Praying for Rain - an interview by the insightful Paolo Bacigalupi, this anthology showcases some great talent. I especially liked Diana Rose Harper's "Thirteenth Year" and "Acqua Alta" by Ashley Bevilacqua Anglin. If you have not read a collection of short stories and you are interested in climate change, then you should read this.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Elly Call

    The message of this book is so important and I support everything about it, but I wish the plot had been better balanced with the specific climate solutions. Sci-Fy has a long history of informing future innovation and I hope this ‘Cli-Fry’ book has the same effect—but it’s hard to get past the jargon in some of these. The pacing and story structure seemed overall sacrificed in service of the scientific break-down of each environmental solution.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chris Jensen

    A mixed batch as you'd expect with an anthology, but overall I'm glad i read it A mixed batch as you'd expect with an anthology, but overall I'm glad i read it

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michael Burnam-Fink

    Everything Change is like the title says, an anthology of climate fiction based on a large contest (743 stories from all over the world), sponsored by the Center for Science and the Imagination at Arizona State University, and headed by Kim Stanley Robinson. Climate fiction, a sub-genre of science fiction concerned with climate change and adaptation, is necessarily and sadly political. In an era when a prominent climate denier just won an election, stating the truth of anthropogenic global warmi Everything Change is like the title says, an anthology of climate fiction based on a large contest (743 stories from all over the world), sponsored by the Center for Science and the Imagination at Arizona State University, and headed by Kim Stanley Robinson. Climate fiction, a sub-genre of science fiction concerned with climate change and adaptation, is necessarily and sadly political. In an era when a prominent climate denier just won an election, stating the truth of anthropogenic global warming is an act of courage. Imagining a future beyond catastrophe takes even more courage. There is a definite theme to these stories. Children, growing up in a drowning, diminished world. Adult, trying to hold on to the good parts of the past, without bitterness as the industrial civilization that got us into this mess. The stories that stuck out, Sunshine State, Acqua Alta, On Darwin Tides, were quite exceptional, the rest more middling. I couldn't shake the sense of despair, though. I could believe in the characters of these stories; I couldn't believe in the kids. The authors aren't quite Names yet, but they're above the level of talented amateurs, and many have some publishing or workshop experience in their past. I expect to see at least one of them break through in the next year. If you're looking for climate fiction, and can deal with the thematic similarities, this collection can't be beat. *Disclosure: I am an ASU PhD graduate and know the editors, but was not involved in any way with this collection.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    I didn't realize how many of these stories were going to be YA, or at least YA-level writing and... values? I guess? And then there's an interview with Bacigalupi where he hadn't heard of the word Hyperobject, apparently, yet. I dunno. Samey I didn't realize how many of these stories were going to be YA, or at least YA-level writing and... values? I guess? And then there's an interview with Bacigalupi where he hadn't heard of the word Hyperobject, apparently, yet. I dunno. Samey

  10. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    This is a good introduction to cli-fi with some great stories. Because the stories are contest winners, you can see a lot of similarities among them that could be attributed to the judges taste and preferences.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Patrick M.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Paul Harding

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kell Cowley

  14. 4 out of 5

    VexenReplica

  15. 4 out of 5

    Christy

  16. 4 out of 5

    Antonio Ceté

    Podrían ser dos o tres estrellas, yo qué sé. Es que es todo flojito y escrito regular y las ideas guays están metidas con calzador y puf.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Bradway

  18. 4 out of 5

    Laini

  19. 5 out of 5

    andrew

  20. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chris Caldwell

  22. 5 out of 5

    David Matchen

  23. 4 out of 5

    Blzb

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jim Mewkill

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mariana Scholzová

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chris Riedy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Karolina

  28. 5 out of 5

    Edie

  29. 5 out of 5

    J E Jones

  30. 4 out of 5

    Katie Ashbay

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