Hot Best Seller

The Education of Arnold Hitler

Availability: Ready to download

At once a chess master, a linguist, an athlete and an innocent in love, Arnold passes through the racial tensions of Mansfield, Texas (home of the author of Black Like Me) in the 1950s, the anti-war movement at Harvard, and both the Upper East Side and the Bowery, meeting Noam Chomsky, Al Gore, and Leonard Bernstein in the process, and finally learning the meaning of meani At once a chess master, a linguist, an athlete and an innocent in love, Arnold passes through the racial tensions of Mansfield, Texas (home of the author of Black Like Me) in the 1950s, the anti-war movement at Harvard, and both the Upper East Side and the Bowery, meeting Noam Chomsky, Al Gore, and Leonard Bernstein in the process, and finally learning the meaning of meaning.


Compare

At once a chess master, a linguist, an athlete and an innocent in love, Arnold passes through the racial tensions of Mansfield, Texas (home of the author of Black Like Me) in the 1950s, the anti-war movement at Harvard, and both the Upper East Side and the Bowery, meeting Noam Chomsky, Al Gore, and Leonard Bernstein in the process, and finally learning the meaning of meani At once a chess master, a linguist, an athlete and an innocent in love, Arnold passes through the racial tensions of Mansfield, Texas (home of the author of Black Like Me) in the 1950s, the anti-war movement at Harvard, and both the Upper East Side and the Bowery, meeting Noam Chomsky, Al Gore, and Leonard Bernstein in the process, and finally learning the meaning of meaning.

30 review for The Education of Arnold Hitler

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    One of my very favorites. Estrin has a talent for the manipulation of history and archetype into something wholly new- Arnold is the classically earnest golden boy (with a bit of depth beyond his football technique and blonde good looks), and the vision and scope of his life is an incredibly pleasurable experience (albeit one that'll probably evoke a slight twinge of envy for those of us who aren't at Harvard in the '60s). One of my very favorites. Estrin has a talent for the manipulation of history and archetype into something wholly new- Arnold is the classically earnest golden boy (with a bit of depth beyond his football technique and blonde good looks), and the vision and scope of his life is an incredibly pleasurable experience (albeit one that'll probably evoke a slight twinge of envy for those of us who aren't at Harvard in the '60s).

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jim Leckband

    "Rose is a rose is a rose." That was one of the only quotes about naming that wasn't used in this book. Arnold Hitler does not like his name. I know, Arnold is a bit passe in these times, like Mildred or Melvin. But maybe it's his last name that everyone seems to be hung up on. This fun book takes a lot of ways Estrin can think of to illuminate that the signifier is not the signified. We have a blond football loving quarterback that is 1/4 Jewish and not in the least fascist. A stripper (Evelyn "Rose is a rose is a rose." That was one of the only quotes about naming that wasn't used in this book. Arnold Hitler does not like his name. I know, Arnold is a bit passe in these times, like Mildred or Melvin. But maybe it's his last name that everyone seems to be hung up on. This fun book takes a lot of ways Estrin can think of to illuminate that the signifier is not the signified. We have a blond football loving quarterback that is 1/4 Jewish and not in the least fascist. A stripper (Evelyn Brown) who is a feminist disaster artist holed up in a bunker with Arnold to fight against the signifiers. That the score is not the music (in the Lenny Bernstein section), the score is not the game (in the football section), the skin is not the person, and that ontogeny does not have to let that old fascist phylogeny dictate everything, that we are as free as we want to be. There are many nods to Estrin's forebears (his phylogeny so to speak) which he recapitulates. I see V. in the New York section (along with V-dub - a Pynchonian character if ever there was one outside of Pynchon and Wallace). Kafka and the ancient bildung Romans of Dickens and Dostoyevsky as Hitler becomes educated in the world. As one negative reviewer on GoodReads does mention, there is a Forrest Gump quality as Arnold seems to encounter various historical situations - but I took those as they come and they are usually well done.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Stacia

    Words and names are powerful. frequently i don't think about the assumptions made based on only a person's name. this was a stark reminder of the impact of perceptions and long term life changes made as a result. Words and names are powerful. frequently i don't think about the assumptions made based on only a person's name. this was a stark reminder of the impact of perceptions and long term life changes made as a result.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rock

    This was kind of like the counterculture Forrest Gump. Which is only part of the reason it was so terrible.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Christina Sadler

    Excellent book. The character of Arnold is so interesting and likable. I loved the references to realy people and events of history. Highly recommended.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ralph Sorensen

    Try going through life with a name like this! Arnold does it and relives periods of my own life. His prolonged encounter with Leonard Benstein is remarkable.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

  8. 5 out of 5

    Surekha

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tonstant Weader

  10. 5 out of 5

    Christine Kim

  11. 4 out of 5

    Peter Williamson

  12. 5 out of 5

    Edith

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brian S.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Farmer

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sandee

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kates365

  17. 4 out of 5

    Therese Young

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

  20. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

  21. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  22. 5 out of 5

    Chris Juhnke

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sean

  25. 5 out of 5

    Vonn New

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chad

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Bessette

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bill

  30. 4 out of 5

    Megs

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.