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Moby Dick

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On a previous voyage, a mysterious white whale had ripped off the leg of a sea captain named Ahab. Now the crew of the Pequod, on a pursuit that features constant adventure and horrendous mishaps, must follow the mad Ahab into the abyss to satisfy his unslakeable thirst for vengeance. Narrated by the cunningly observant crew member Ishmael, Moby-Dick is the tale of the hun On a previous voyage, a mysterious white whale had ripped off the leg of a sea captain named Ahab. Now the crew of the Pequod, on a pursuit that features constant adventure and horrendous mishaps, must follow the mad Ahab into the abyss to satisfy his unslakeable thirst for vengeance. Narrated by the cunningly observant crew member Ishmael, Moby-Dick is the tale of the hunt for the elusive, omnipotent, and ultimately mystifying white whale—Moby Dick. On its surface, Moby-Dick is a vivid documentary of life aboard a nineteenth-century whaler, a virtual encyclopedia of whales and whaling, replete with facts, legends, and trivia that Melville had gleaned from personal experience and scores of sources. But as the quest for the whale becomes increasingly perilous, the tale works on allegorical levels, likening the whale to human greed, moral consequence, good, evil, and life itself. Who is good? The great white whale who, like Nature, asks nothing but to be left in peace? Or the bold Ahab who, like scientists, explorers, and philosophers, fearlessly probes the mysteries of the universe? Who is evil? The ferocious, man-killing sea monster? Or the revenge-obsessed madman who ignores his own better nature in his quest to kill the beast? Scorned by critics upon its publication, Moby-Dick was publicly derided during its author’s lifetime. Yet Melville’s masterpiece has outlived its initial misunderstanding to become an American classic of unquestionably epic proportions. Includes unique illustrations


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On a previous voyage, a mysterious white whale had ripped off the leg of a sea captain named Ahab. Now the crew of the Pequod, on a pursuit that features constant adventure and horrendous mishaps, must follow the mad Ahab into the abyss to satisfy his unslakeable thirst for vengeance. Narrated by the cunningly observant crew member Ishmael, Moby-Dick is the tale of the hun On a previous voyage, a mysterious white whale had ripped off the leg of a sea captain named Ahab. Now the crew of the Pequod, on a pursuit that features constant adventure and horrendous mishaps, must follow the mad Ahab into the abyss to satisfy his unslakeable thirst for vengeance. Narrated by the cunningly observant crew member Ishmael, Moby-Dick is the tale of the hunt for the elusive, omnipotent, and ultimately mystifying white whale—Moby Dick. On its surface, Moby-Dick is a vivid documentary of life aboard a nineteenth-century whaler, a virtual encyclopedia of whales and whaling, replete with facts, legends, and trivia that Melville had gleaned from personal experience and scores of sources. But as the quest for the whale becomes increasingly perilous, the tale works on allegorical levels, likening the whale to human greed, moral consequence, good, evil, and life itself. Who is good? The great white whale who, like Nature, asks nothing but to be left in peace? Or the bold Ahab who, like scientists, explorers, and philosophers, fearlessly probes the mysteries of the universe? Who is evil? The ferocious, man-killing sea monster? Or the revenge-obsessed madman who ignores his own better nature in his quest to kill the beast? Scorned by critics upon its publication, Moby-Dick was publicly derided during its author’s lifetime. Yet Melville’s masterpiece has outlived its initial misunderstanding to become an American classic of unquestionably epic proportions. Includes unique illustrations

30 review for Moby Dick

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    Hallelujah! Finished! Finally! Not that it wasn't a good book, but it was also extremely tedious at times. Melville had no grievances about doing the research and then pouring every bit of research into the novel. EVERYTHING is explained, from the 'crow's nest' to the type of rope they use on the line. This is where it gets tedious. The story, however, is fantastic and though the book is massive, the chapters are very short, making it a tad easier. So, if Melville devotes an entire chapter to th Hallelujah! Finished! Finally! Not that it wasn't a good book, but it was also extremely tedious at times. Melville had no grievances about doing the research and then pouring every bit of research into the novel. EVERYTHING is explained, from the 'crow's nest' to the type of rope they use on the line. This is where it gets tedious. The story, however, is fantastic and though the book is massive, the chapters are very short, making it a tad easier. So, if Melville devotes an entire chapter to the face of the whale, you can rest easy that it will only last 2-4 pages. Ishmael is an extremely lovable narrator. He and Queequeg made the story for me, as well as second mate Stubb. Ahab is a total bad ass mofo. All in all, tough read but great story.

  2. 4 out of 5

    James Dunlap

    This has replaced the Great Gatsby as my all-time favorite. The language is advanced (which is off-putting to some people, but I love learning new words), -and when Melville describes the sea, he does so with breathtaking eloquence. This is one of the few novels out there that, when reading it, you can tell that the author poured his soul out onto the pages, putting everything he had into it (it took Melville 4 years to write this magnum opus). What a great tragedy that it was panned in his life This has replaced the Great Gatsby as my all-time favorite. The language is advanced (which is off-putting to some people, but I love learning new words), -and when Melville describes the sea, he does so with breathtaking eloquence. This is one of the few novels out there that, when reading it, you can tell that the author poured his soul out onto the pages, putting everything he had into it (it took Melville 4 years to write this magnum opus). What a great tragedy that it was panned in his life, and didn't achieve widespread acclaim until "rediscovered" in the 1920's! One of the chapters toward the end, when Ahab is lamenting and pondering on why he is the way he is, and a single solitary tear falls from his eye (consequently indicating in a brilliant moment of writing that were it not the White Whale, Ahab would be seeking to give vent to his wrath on some other Ahab-imagined manifestation of God's Will, for it was simply in his stubborn nature) was so beautiful, so haunting, and all around magnificent. This book inspired me to write again after several years of writers block, and for that I am forever indebted to Melville. He gave life to my own creativity. I highly recommend this book to anyone brave enough to plod through this wordy, highly-detailed "myth-in-the-guise-of-a-novel." If you love language, you won't regret it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Branden Meyers

    Is this book long-winded? Absolutely. Pretensions of classical epic and Shakespearean tragedy? Definitely. Does it live up to what it wants to be? Does it ever. The tale is such an epic one that it would be impossible to tell it any other way. The incredibly long explanations of the whaling technique and culture are there, but once the jargon has been served up to you less than one third of the way through the book, you can safely read the rest without wondering what they are talking about. And s Is this book long-winded? Absolutely. Pretensions of classical epic and Shakespearean tragedy? Definitely. Does it live up to what it wants to be? Does it ever. The tale is such an epic one that it would be impossible to tell it any other way. The incredibly long explanations of the whaling technique and culture are there, but once the jargon has been served up to you less than one third of the way through the book, you can safely read the rest without wondering what they are talking about. And some of the explanation chapters actually raise interesting philosophical questions. The book also offers a commentary on the racial beliefs of the time, as well as religion. It is even still culturally relevant today, having been made into several movies, and a really good Mastodon album.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    I thought this book would have a story... but it was literally about whales. All about whales. The types, their bodies, their skin, what they eat, their anatomy, their blow holes... Not enjoyable. And SPOILER ALERT: they spend the whole freaking book hunting this whale (500 pages) and you finally meet the whale in the last 100 pages and THE WHALE LIVES AND THEY ALL DIE. WHAT THE FUCK. Very well written but never again...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kitteh

    Is this book one of those long, heavy, and deep metaphors? It doesn't matter. I enjoyed it and it was a nice quick read. I'm not going to write a deep-understanding review because I'm stupid. And I didn't actually quite grasped the meaning. And have I ever mentioned that I'm an stupid? I love whales. 3 out of 5. Too much water. Is this book one of those long, heavy, and deep metaphors? It doesn't matter. I enjoyed it and it was a nice quick read. I'm not going to write a deep-understanding review because I'm stupid. And I didn't actually quite grasped the meaning. And have I ever mentioned that I'm an stupid? I love whales. 3 out of 5. Too much water.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Vaseekaran

    The whale was a metaphor for the book itself. I was Ahab trying to conquer this beast. Twas long.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bettielee

    I swear to almighty Ahab, I feel like I've gone after the whale, slaughtered it, and then had to cook and eat it all in one setting. This was the most painful thing I have ever gone thru, reading this damn book. Not that it didn't have its moments. However, this is not the seafaring adventure they try to sell you in high school. I admit, I've said I read this book but I "read" it in high school: ie: I just followed along in class. I didn't actually read it. Now I can say that I have. Now that I I swear to almighty Ahab, I feel like I've gone after the whale, slaughtered it, and then had to cook and eat it all in one setting. This was the most painful thing I have ever gone thru, reading this damn book. Not that it didn't have its moments. However, this is not the seafaring adventure they try to sell you in high school. I admit, I've said I read this book but I "read" it in high school: ie: I just followed along in class. I didn't actually read it. Now I can say that I have. Now that I have, I'm not sure how I feel about it. I didn't enjoy it. Or much of it. I enjoyed a little of some of it. I don't know what to say. I feel wounded. Like I've climbed a mountain and now i"m all exhausted and everyone wants me to tell them how I feel about climbing the mountain. I just want to go to sleep. Basically, this is a great novel but not such a great book. If you were to take the actual story and plot of the book it would be 1/3 of the length. Most of the book goes on and on about whaling, whales, fishing, Nantucket....when something exciting happens (which is given a sentence or two) we break away and go on and talk about whaling for five or six chapters. And despite starting out "call me Ishmael" the books does not keep to first person - it rambles around, sometimes giving first person pov to the first mate, the harpooners, etc, then it goes to third person omniscient. And sometimes it reads like a play, with stage directions. It's weird. It's almost like reading a first draft mixed up with a bunch of research and at the end, Melville just went frack it, I'm sending the book in like this. The thing I don't understand - I read lots of classical novels. I love the novels of this period - I read Hardy, Dickens, the Brontes, Ann Radcliffe, etc. What I am saying is that I read far and wide in this era. However - I cannot understand many of the sentences. They seriously make no sense. My eyes start to glaze over. I just found it really hard to follow and I don't have that problem with other novels. so A: too long B: reads like a fractured mess and C: made me feel stupid. There you go. The only reason I even read it was to tick one more off of my "BBC reading list."

  8. 5 out of 5

    Josh Ricker

    If there was an abridged version that spanned maybe 30 pages, then this book would be worth it. Until then, read a synopsis unless you're really interested in hundreds of pages about the intricacies of how to sail and kill whales.

  9. 4 out of 5

    John

    Documentary about whaling & whales. (a short story about moby dick included, which referring to human greed) Documentary about whaling & whales. (a short story about moby dick included, which referring to human greed)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Christina Rothfusz

    All I can say is that it is over! Wow, I've forgotton how classical writers can take days to work up to a plot.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bibiana Krall

    It's a classic for a reason. If you have not... you should. Man vs nature, man vs himself and many other other important themes are prevalent. When you read this book you will realize that some of the struggles we experience today are exactly the same ones as the current issues we face. Just call me Ishmael. My next boat might be called the Pequod, but it will have a self-inflating life raft.

  12. 5 out of 5

    MJ Robertson

    Pretty good book adaptation of metal gear solid 5, very long

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    "Ego non baptizo te in nomine patris, sed in nomine diaboli!" - Ahab I finished Moby-Dick last night. What maddening, passionate, horrifying, and beautiful poetry lies within those pages. What wonder and philosophy is lodged within that spine, what secrets to life rest their heads upon ink pillows. Moby-Dick is a masterpiece of American literature and is unrivaled. Yes, there are good books in American literature. Yes, there are even great ones. But how many wake day to day, upon the sea, their h "Ego non baptizo te in nomine patris, sed in nomine diaboli!" - Ahab I finished Moby-Dick last night. What maddening, passionate, horrifying, and beautiful poetry lies within those pages. What wonder and philosophy is lodged within that spine, what secrets to life rest their heads upon ink pillows. Moby-Dick is a masterpiece of American literature and is unrivaled. Yes, there are good books in American literature. Yes, there are even great ones. But how many wake day to day, upon the sea, their heads swaying amongst the sails, the sounds of hammers beating and bashing at molten-bright iron ringing through their ears, with sea foam as their breakfast, supper, and dinner? How many stand amongst the yardarms, perched within their crows rest, and see the natural wonders of their world? How many can state their own observations with such rigor and such passion that all other speeches those their meaning, that all great things in life should take place upon the sea, and rightfully so; for it is the sea from which all life was founded and it is there in that house of Neptune does all the last great mysteries of our world lie unsolved, unseen, and undreamed. And it is there that we face our devils and ye Gods, some being the same entity, with nothing but the sweat of our brows, the strength in our backs, and the harpoon, whose irons are baptized not in water, as of all Godly and christian things, but with the blood of faithful pagans, who care not for the promises of gold but rather simply for the adventure of the quest itself; and it is with that fiendish weapon that we seek to find that thing of madness, that beast which haunts our dreams, that foul thing that stalks our everything waking moments, and then to end him upon the very floor of his home. And even more it is here that we find that despite our passions, despite our choices, are we not but the pawns of bigger things, the pieces of a machine much greater and all knowing that us? And if such is the case, then how else could we do but that which we are so impassioned to do? "What is it, what nameless, inscrutable, unearthly thing is it; what cozening, hidden lord and master, and cruel, remorseless emperor commands me; that against all natural lovings and longings, I so keep pushing, and crowding, and jamming myself on all the time; recklessly making me ready to do what in my own proper, natural heart, I durst not so much as dare? Is Ahab, Ahab? Is it I, God, or who, that lifts his arm? But if the great sun move not of himself; but is as an invisible power; how then can this one small heart beat; this one small brain think thoughts; unless God does that beating, does that thinking, does that living, and not I. By heaven, man, we are turned round and round in this world, like yonder windlass, and Fate is the hand-spike."

  14. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Do not bother unless you are studying whales. This is more of a creative scientific study on whales and whale ships than it is an actual novel. Theres maybe 10 pages of actual plot related events. About 80-90% of the book could be cut without any damage to the very non-existent plot. Writing would be beautiful if the author wasn't so damn determined to show off his whale based boating knowledge. If ever there was a book that should have been lost to history and does nothing to deserve its acclaim, Do not bother unless you are studying whales. This is more of a creative scientific study on whales and whale ships than it is an actual novel. Theres maybe 10 pages of actual plot related events. About 80-90% of the book could be cut without any damage to the very non-existent plot. Writing would be beautiful if the author wasn't so damn determined to show off his whale based boating knowledge. If ever there was a book that should have been lost to history and does nothing to deserve its acclaim, it's this one. Would give zero stars if I could. It took more time to read than a single page was worth, and I fell asleep reading it due to the sheer exhaustive dudgery I had to force myself through in hope's that at some point, some redeeming feature would occur...and none ever did. I regret reading it. I will never again read it. I recommend that everyone who wants to read it expecting some kind of whaling pirate epic to reconsider because all they will get is not very interesting, incredibly long biology lesson in whales (he spends several chapters listing every whale in the bloody whale genus) and for anyone thinking it might be like a David attenborough documentary with lovely calm explanations and imagery...you would not be more wrong, you get pages and chapters of very bland but very scientific explanations about very tiny facts that make it clear the author just wanted to show off his knowledge. The author also cannot make up his mind about style, he switches between something akin to stage play, to novel, to scientific journal, to poetry etch and it is not done smoothly or well, it is just a mess of random styles, as though he would write it in bursts with the intent to transcribe the non-prose into the novel and just never bothered. Not a single word of editing has been done. His storytelling (when it happens) is confusing-with near deaths, randomly bringing people you assume are dead back only to fling them back into the abyss again a page later. He doesn't give you enough time to actually get to know the cast- despite prattling on about Wales sperm and rope for 1000+pages- and so names are essentially meaningless as you imagine the crew as one faceless machine rather than individuals, so when they are injured or killed, personally I didn't really care because they were just part of the ship, like furniture. Any metaphors for man vs God are swept under the information on whales that he batters you over the head with. Moby Dick is only actually present for like 20 or so pages, it is ridiculous. I do not understand how the reviews are so high, or why it is so successful and has endured for so long.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Leeie

    I loved this book. I loved the comedy in the beginning where Ishmael meets the harpooner. I loved the often horrible-- yet profound and engaging descriptions of the whaling industry in the 1800s that are such precious anecdotes of history. I enjoyed Melville's descriptions of Ahab and the rest of the crew, the humor he put into descriptions, the curiosity of this intoxicating spermaceti he describes that is no longer accessible today and for great reason. This book was often shocking to me due t I loved this book. I loved the comedy in the beginning where Ishmael meets the harpooner. I loved the often horrible-- yet profound and engaging descriptions of the whaling industry in the 1800s that are such precious anecdotes of history. I enjoyed Melville's descriptions of Ahab and the rest of the crew, the humor he put into descriptions, the curiosity of this intoxicating spermaceti he describes that is no longer accessible today and for great reason. This book was often shocking to me due to the horrors of whaling, but beloved at the same time describing the hard life and work of a whaling ship crew. Half-way through the book, I started to get frustrated at not finding Moby Dick, and this feeling continued up to the very end until well, there was the great white whale. I suppose all of the anticipation was worth it--because I got to be aboard a whaling ship! Loved this book and the old English in it--I would read it again, and again--but it's thick and I'd need to make the time!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Navy heart HamlinNBCT

    "What is a great hunter"?-In the search for raw unadulterated yarns, no one spins it as dramatically as Melville . Hark cockney eyed saviorists enter the taverns and quench the imagination with Captains loading ships, down the New England coastline recruitment and a yesteryear hiring fair ...And so begins the yearly businesses of coastline livelihoods- In the harsh, risky and competitive sport of whaling only the brave needed apply... Lines of bawdy ruffians, skilled warriors and vagabonds need "What is a great hunter"?-In the search for raw unadulterated yarns, no one spins it as dramatically as Melville . Hark cockney eyed saviorists enter the taverns and quench the imagination with Captains loading ships, down the New England coastline recruitment and a yesteryear hiring fair ...And so begins the yearly businesses of coastline livelihoods- In the harsh, risky and competitive sport of whaling only the brave needed apply... Lines of bawdy ruffians, skilled warriors and vagabonds need only apply ... I love steampunking into a text where maidenhead banter tickles our fancy...Our orator harkens us to awaken and bask in the glory of an emerging hunt for colonial doubloons to sweeten the emerging Americanas -Ah "Call me Ishmael" greets our attention ....Off the moors of time, in the hushes of a yesteryear stand the mighty seafaring men of whaling...Herman Melville baits his rod with a salty ole spun yarn of yesteryear...All aboard The Pequod....SAHNBCT2018

  17. 5 out of 5

    Karolyn

    I love to read, but this one took me all summer plus to read. Learned more about whaling in the 1800s, but have lost several months of my life as a result.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hoa Vu

    I don't know... I was attracted by the beautiful writing at the beginning, but then it got so boooooooooring. I don't even want to give it another try ever again.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia Beall

    It is cool how this person named Ahab, the captain of a ship called the Pequod, lost his leg, and got scars from this whale called Moby-Dick. This book was written by Herman Melville, and it has about 585 pages. This book has symbolism in it, because what I think, Captain Ahab is symbolized by the white whale, Moby-Dick, because Moby-Dick is strong and he has many scars, and Captain Ahab is pretty strong too, and has scars too. There is also rites of passage, because the narrator, named Ishmael, It is cool how this person named Ahab, the captain of a ship called the Pequod, lost his leg, and got scars from this whale called Moby-Dick. This book was written by Herman Melville, and it has about 585 pages. This book has symbolism in it, because what I think, Captain Ahab is symbolized by the white whale, Moby-Dick, because Moby-Dick is strong and he has many scars, and Captain Ahab is pretty strong too, and has scars too. There is also rites of passage, because the narrator, named Ishmael, was on the boat with Captain Ahab, to try to catch Moby-Dick. When he went on this boat, I think that it changed his life, by having memories of what had happened to the white whale. There were also dramatic irony, like when the people on the ship thought that the whale, Moby-Dick, went away, but little did they know, he was here. In conclusion, I think that this was an interesting book, which is great for people who like reading.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tomilayo

    I decided to try reading some of the American classics this year. This one was a mistake. I should say, I know quite a bit now about whales, way more than I ever expected to know. Did you know that sharks love to dine on whale? Those bastards wait for a whale to be harpooned and once they see that blood, they circle around the whale and some start eating it even as its bleeding. Did you know that a sperm whale can't see in its front? Its eyes are on the side so its brain actually does some compu I decided to try reading some of the American classics this year. This one was a mistake. I should say, I know quite a bit now about whales, way more than I ever expected to know. Did you know that sharks love to dine on whale? Those bastards wait for a whale to be harpooned and once they see that blood, they circle around the whale and some start eating it even as its bleeding. Did you know that a sperm whale can't see in its front? Its eyes are on the side so its brain actually does some computer vision magic, the same thing our cars do now, to figure out what is in front of it. Did you know that a male whale is about 3 times as big as a female sperm whale. She's about 20 - 30 ft, the size of two cars, he's about the size of a tractor trailer. Damn!! And one male whale can herd over 30 female whales.

  21. 4 out of 5

    McKay Argyle

    Ishmael is wanting to go on a waling ship. The ships caption, Captain Ahab, is very straight forward and is obsessed with finding the white whale. They get some whales and they spot the white whale and go chasing after it but it distoryes there row boats. Ahab is taken over bored of the row boat and dies because of Moby Dick. Ishmael changes the most because at the beginning of the book he did not know much about the wales. he learned lots about them and how to catch them. He all so changes to n Ishmael is wanting to go on a waling ship. The ships caption, Captain Ahab, is very straight forward and is obsessed with finding the white whale. They get some whales and they spot the white whale and go chasing after it but it distoryes there row boats. Ahab is taken over bored of the row boat and dies because of Moby Dick. Ishmael changes the most because at the beginning of the book he did not know much about the wales. he learned lots about them and how to catch them. He all so changes to not like Ahab. He all so becomes friends with a head hunter witch is on of the harpooners. As humans we tend to get to obsessed with stuff. If we get to obsessed with stuff it can lead to bad consequences. We need to make sure we don't do that. In life we all so tend to do some thing before we know what it is. I like to learn knew things about nature. I have always wanted to read Mobly Dick. I loved that it was very action packed. I liked that good always defeats the evil.

  22. 5 out of 5

    tim Thornton

    It not one of my best books out there but I got to say it took me a month to read it was a read boom on the kindle book store so I want to read and see what every one was reading about. It had some good points am d bad points to the book, but at the end I could say to people that it an okay book if it the type of reading you`re looking for. I got to say it long and some chapter are boarding but I just want to read it once and say that I readed and say i never open this book again. So hope you wa It not one of my best books out there but I got to say it took me a month to read it was a read boom on the kindle book store so I want to read and see what every one was reading about. It had some good points am d bad points to the book, but at the end I could say to people that it an okay book if it the type of reading you`re looking for. I got to say it long and some chapter are boarding but I just want to read it once and say that I readed and say i never open this book again. So hope you want to read this long book!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emanuel

    This book is amazing, funny, sad when the captain gets eaten but HI-LARI-OUS YOU HAVE GOT TO READ THIS BOOK!!!!! I AM IN MY GOLD CHAINS - - 0 0 U - - - - - -

  24. 4 out of 5

    Pauly Morphous

    This one is worthy of its billing as a classic. In reading it you are likely to: - enrich your vocabulary - exercise your discipline and patience - behold an epic tale that will broach the subjects of spirituality, human behaviour, causality, race relations and the world of whaling/seafaring among a great many other things. A fantastic read and I reckon most readers would find multiple aspects to enjoy about this one.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kana

    I personally did not enjoy the book very much because it was all about whaling and captain Ahab and his whaling crew trying to hunt down the white whale, Moby Dick who had taken one of his legs and was a very gigantic and humongous whale which no one was able to kill but Ahab was determined to kill if it was the last thing he did.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Henry

    This book is a challenging book which made to rethink and recheck the vocabularies to see if I am on the right track. I recommend this book to people who want to challenge their grammar and vocabulary skills.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Christine Georgiou

    Nature and Humankind - an extraordinary book to learn about nature's power, human limits and respect!!! Strongly proposed to young people - great book to grow up with!!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chris Hartman

    I read this book in college and loved it!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Paul R Robinette

    Large paragraphs listing genus and species of whales. Horrible.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Beth Petty

    Ridiculously long, but such a great classic. Vibrant characters!

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