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Killing Poetry: Blackness and the Making of Slam and Spoken Word Communities

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Winner of the 2019 Lilla A. Heston Award Co-winner of the 2018 Ethnography Division’s Best Book from the NCA In recent decades, poetry slams and the spoken word artists who compete in them have sparked a resurgent fascination with the world of poetry. However, there is little critical dialogue that fully engages with the cultural complexities present in slam and spoken wor Winner of the 2019 Lilla A. Heston Award Co-winner of the 2018 Ethnography Division’s Best Book from the NCA In recent decades, poetry slams and the spoken word artists who compete in them have sparked a resurgent fascination with the world of poetry. However, there is little critical dialogue that fully engages with the cultural complexities present in slam and spoken word poetry communities, as well as their ramifications.   In Killing Poetry, renowned slam poet, Javon Johnson unpacks some of the complicated issues that comprise performance poetry spaces. He argues that the truly radical potential in slam and spoken word communities lies not just in proving literary worth, speaking back to power, or even in altering power structures, but instead in imagining and working towards altogether different social relationships. His illuminating ethnography provides a critical history of the slam, contextualizes contemporary black poets in larger black literary traditions, and does away with the notion that poetry slams are inherently radically democratic and utopic.   Killing Poetry—at times autobiographical, poetic, and journalistic—analyzes the masculine posturing in the Southern California community in particular, the sexual assault in the national community, and the ways in which related social media inadvertently replicate many of the same white supremacist, patriarchal, and mainstream logics so many spoken word poets seem to be working against. Throughout, Johnson examines the promises and problems within slam and spoken word, while illustrating how community is made and remade in hopes of eventually creating the radical spaces so many of these poets strive to achieve. 


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Winner of the 2019 Lilla A. Heston Award Co-winner of the 2018 Ethnography Division’s Best Book from the NCA In recent decades, poetry slams and the spoken word artists who compete in them have sparked a resurgent fascination with the world of poetry. However, there is little critical dialogue that fully engages with the cultural complexities present in slam and spoken wor Winner of the 2019 Lilla A. Heston Award Co-winner of the 2018 Ethnography Division’s Best Book from the NCA In recent decades, poetry slams and the spoken word artists who compete in them have sparked a resurgent fascination with the world of poetry. However, there is little critical dialogue that fully engages with the cultural complexities present in slam and spoken word poetry communities, as well as their ramifications.   In Killing Poetry, renowned slam poet, Javon Johnson unpacks some of the complicated issues that comprise performance poetry spaces. He argues that the truly radical potential in slam and spoken word communities lies not just in proving literary worth, speaking back to power, or even in altering power structures, but instead in imagining and working towards altogether different social relationships. His illuminating ethnography provides a critical history of the slam, contextualizes contemporary black poets in larger black literary traditions, and does away with the notion that poetry slams are inherently radically democratic and utopic.   Killing Poetry—at times autobiographical, poetic, and journalistic—analyzes the masculine posturing in the Southern California community in particular, the sexual assault in the national community, and the ways in which related social media inadvertently replicate many of the same white supremacist, patriarchal, and mainstream logics so many spoken word poets seem to be working against. Throughout, Johnson examines the promises and problems within slam and spoken word, while illustrating how community is made and remade in hopes of eventually creating the radical spaces so many of these poets strive to achieve. 

44 review for Killing Poetry: Blackness and the Making of Slam and Spoken Word Communities

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    This is a really interesting work. It exists in a strange gray area between academic text and personal history in its attempt to explain and question slam and spoken word poetry. At times the mix works perfectly; at times it seems the author may be too close to the subject. It teaches much, though, and certainly invites further investigation.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mary

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Beverly

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lars Avis

  5. 4 out of 5

    Darrell

  6. 4 out of 5

    kevi

  7. 5 out of 5

    Layla Faraj

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    Alycia Calvert

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    Corrine

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    Niah

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sammy M.

  13. 5 out of 5

    M.R. Graham

  14. 5 out of 5

    Becky

  15. 4 out of 5

    Spencer Hendrixson

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    Sara

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    Abby N Lewis

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    Myles Curtis

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    Diyonah

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    Colin

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    Katt

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    Tiffany

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    Bobbieshiann

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    Jen Appell

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    Tracy

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    Charlotte Miner

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    Raha

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    Ambrose Miles

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    Kireja

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    Alan Nunez

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    Phelixus

  32. 5 out of 5

    Robert Valencia

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    Vivian

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    John Willis

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    Michael Jones

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    Ruth Feathers

  37. 5 out of 5

    Emily Emmons

  38. 4 out of 5

    Allie

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    Jose Castellanos

  40. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Betancourt Salas

  41. 5 out of 5

    Jam

  42. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  43. 5 out of 5

    Dj

  44. 4 out of 5

    Ronnie Stephens

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