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HBR's 10 Must Reads for New Managers

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Develop the mindset and presence to successfully manage others for the first time. If you read nothing else on becoming a new manager, read these 10 articles. We've combed through hundreds of Harvard Business Review articles and selected the most important ones to help you transition from being an outstanding individual contributor to becoming a great manager of others. Th Develop the mindset and presence to successfully manage others for the first time. If you read nothing else on becoming a new manager, read these 10 articles. We've combed through hundreds of Harvard Business Review articles and selected the most important ones to help you transition from being an outstanding individual contributor to becoming a great manager of others. This book will inspire you to: - Develop your emotional intelligence - Influence your colleagues through the science of persuasion - Assess your team and enhance its performance - Network effectively to achieve business goals and for personal advancement - Navigate relationships with employees, bosses, and peers - Get support from above - View the big picture in your decision making - Balance your team's work and personal life in a high-intensity workplace. This collection of articles includes "Becoming the Boss," by Linda A. Hill; "Leading the Team You Inherit," by Michael D. Watkins; "Saving Your Rookie Managers from Themselves," by Carol A. Walker; "Managing the High-Intensity Workplace," by Erin Reid and Lakshmi Ramarajan; "Harnessing the Science of Persuasion," Robert B. Cialdini; "What Makes a Leader?" by Daniel Goleman; "The Authenticity Paradox," by Herminia Ibarra; "Managing Your Boss," by John J. Gabarro and John P. Kotter; "How Leaders Create and Use Networks," by Herminia Ibarra and Mark Lee Hunter; "Management Time: Who's Got the Monkey?" by William Oncken, Jr., and Donald L. Wass; and BONUS ARTICLE: "How Managers Become Leaders," by Michael D. Watkins.


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Develop the mindset and presence to successfully manage others for the first time. If you read nothing else on becoming a new manager, read these 10 articles. We've combed through hundreds of Harvard Business Review articles and selected the most important ones to help you transition from being an outstanding individual contributor to becoming a great manager of others. Th Develop the mindset and presence to successfully manage others for the first time. If you read nothing else on becoming a new manager, read these 10 articles. We've combed through hundreds of Harvard Business Review articles and selected the most important ones to help you transition from being an outstanding individual contributor to becoming a great manager of others. This book will inspire you to: - Develop your emotional intelligence - Influence your colleagues through the science of persuasion - Assess your team and enhance its performance - Network effectively to achieve business goals and for personal advancement - Navigate relationships with employees, bosses, and peers - Get support from above - View the big picture in your decision making - Balance your team's work and personal life in a high-intensity workplace. This collection of articles includes "Becoming the Boss," by Linda A. Hill; "Leading the Team You Inherit," by Michael D. Watkins; "Saving Your Rookie Managers from Themselves," by Carol A. Walker; "Managing the High-Intensity Workplace," by Erin Reid and Lakshmi Ramarajan; "Harnessing the Science of Persuasion," Robert B. Cialdini; "What Makes a Leader?" by Daniel Goleman; "The Authenticity Paradox," by Herminia Ibarra; "Managing Your Boss," by John J. Gabarro and John P. Kotter; "How Leaders Create and Use Networks," by Herminia Ibarra and Mark Lee Hunter; "Management Time: Who's Got the Monkey?" by William Oncken, Jr., and Donald L. Wass; and BONUS ARTICLE: "How Managers Become Leaders," by Michael D. Watkins.

30 review for HBR's 10 Must Reads for New Managers

  1. 4 out of 5

    Amy Neftzger

    I had been reading different books on management, communication, and influence when I stumbled across this volume. There are a number of topics covered and each of these are nice reminders for both experienced as well as new managers, so I chose the book for a discussion group of business professionals. The diversity of the topics includes everything from work life balance to influence and communication. These articles are written by experts and provide a great framework for expanding an individ I had been reading different books on management, communication, and influence when I stumbled across this volume. There are a number of topics covered and each of these are nice reminders for both experienced as well as new managers, so I chose the book for a discussion group of business professionals. The diversity of the topics includes everything from work life balance to influence and communication. These articles are written by experts and provide a great framework for expanding an individual's knowledge on basic management topics.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Liz Gabbitas

    They weren't joking with the title "Must Reads." These articles span the recent history of management thought with some painfully outdated and some so current I pulled quotes from every paragraph. This was a supportive and empathetic look at people in their first leadership roles, both those succeeding and those realizing they had serious weaknesses. The premise is that employees are brought into these roles because they have certain skills, but actual management requires completely different ski They weren't joking with the title "Must Reads." These articles span the recent history of management thought with some painfully outdated and some so current I pulled quotes from every paragraph. This was a supportive and empathetic look at people in their first leadership roles, both those succeeding and those realizing they had serious weaknesses. The premise is that employees are brought into these roles because they have certain skills, but actual management requires completely different skills than the ones that brought a first success. It embraces the constant learning experience that is progress and encourages new managers to look at themselves with open eyes to find ways to improve. Here was one of my big takeaways: "The skills that got you where you are may not be the requisite skills to get you to where you need to go. This doesn't discount the accomplishments of your past, but they will not be everything you need for the next leg of the journey" (p. 179). I absolutely recommend this to anyone in any sort of management role. And to anyone wondering if management or leadership fits in your future, give this book a read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tiago Giusti

    Recomendo pra quem está migrando de uma área funcional e técnica pra uma posição de liderança. Ele é básico, mas com diversos ensinamentos que vale até pra quem já ascendeu um pouco mais como gestor. O artigo que mais gostei foi o de Daniel Goleman: "O que define um líder." Recomendo pra quem está migrando de uma área funcional e técnica pra uma posição de liderança. Ele é básico, mas com diversos ensinamentos que vale até pra quem já ascendeu um pouco mais como gestor. O artigo que mais gostei foi o de Daniel Goleman: "O que define um líder."

  4. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    I am feeling largely undecided on how I should rate this book. The articles were all fairly well written, though a bit redundant at times within each article. The book definitely brought some overlooked concepts to my attention. So I feel there was at least some value in reading this book. However, I felt each article was a cursory glance at the respective topics. Given that the articles were independent, they never had a chance to build on each other as chapters in a book normally do. As a resu I am feeling largely undecided on how I should rate this book. The articles were all fairly well written, though a bit redundant at times within each article. The book definitely brought some overlooked concepts to my attention. So I feel there was at least some value in reading this book. However, I felt each article was a cursory glance at the respective topics. Given that the articles were independent, they never had a chance to build on each other as chapters in a book normally do. As a result, the book felt mildly disjointed. I think I was expecting a bit more empirical data on how the various aspects of management affected each company. Also when authors only include information about anonymous managers from anonymous organizations, it de-legitimatizes some of the information shared. Each story then becomes less memorable. This book falls somewhere between a 3 and 4 for me. I will let it soak for a few weeks to determine if I should upgrade the rating.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    Books on business tend to be theoretical, fluffy, and oftentimes not very practical. The HBR: New Manager book has a few fluffy chapters I skipped and skimmed over. I think "Saving Rookie Managers from Themselves" and "Management Time: Who's Got the Monkey" are excellent reads. The former has a few pointers on projecting confidence (something I KNOW I need to work on); the latter is the magnum opus of this collection - the monkey. The monkey is a synonym for tasks you assign to your subordinates Books on business tend to be theoretical, fluffy, and oftentimes not very practical. The HBR: New Manager book has a few fluffy chapters I skipped and skimmed over. I think "Saving Rookie Managers from Themselves" and "Management Time: Who's Got the Monkey" are excellent reads. The former has a few pointers on projecting confidence (something I KNOW I need to work on); the latter is the magnum opus of this collection - the monkey. The monkey is a synonym for tasks you assign to your subordinates. Through elusive, subtle measures subordinates (I think due to human nature) try to shift the responsibility from them to you (as you are the superior, clearly more intelligent manager whom can handle all). I think the advice in this chapter is particularly tangible and practical. 5 stars for those chapters.

  6. 5 out of 5

    E B

    This book should probably be titled "welcome to the middle" and is less about how to be a manager/leader and more of how to deal with no longer being the star player which got you to where you are and understanding that you are still just a cog in the wheel (albeit slightly higher). There are plenty of nice stories to help you imagine both bosses that you have had and some that you havent and their potential shortcomings and strengths. It will help you better understand where you may have streng This book should probably be titled "welcome to the middle" and is less about how to be a manager/leader and more of how to deal with no longer being the star player which got you to where you are and understanding that you are still just a cog in the wheel (albeit slightly higher). There are plenty of nice stories to help you imagine both bosses that you have had and some that you havent and their potential shortcomings and strengths. It will help you better understand where you may have strengths or weaknesses, but nothing about how exactly to overcome them.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cris

    Good collection of articles on how to be a better manager. What sticked with me: - When inheriting a team: 1) assess the dynamics, 2) reshape the team to meet goals by looking at the sense of purpose, direction, operating models and behavior patterns according to the business problems you face 3) plan for early wins and plan to secure them - how to work on the 6 pillars of persuasion - the importance of emotional intelligence - how to build networks to get results - how to manage your time and yo Good collection of articles on how to be a better manager. What sticked with me: - When inheriting a team: 1) assess the dynamics, 2) reshape the team to meet goals by looking at the sense of purpose, direction, operating models and behavior patterns according to the business problems you face 3) plan for early wins and plan to secure them - how to work on the 6 pillars of persuasion - the importance of emotional intelligence - how to build networks to get results - how to manage your time and your boss

  8. 4 out of 5

    Angel

    I read this for my business course, Organizational Behavior. It's a compilation of HBR essays, and honestly much more useful than I thought it would be. Even if you don't see yourself becoming a manager or leader in the workplace sometime in the future, I think it's still a worthwhile read. I'm not sure how much I'll use my business degree, but this book is definitely something useful I'm glad I took away from it. I read this for my business course, Organizational Behavior. It's a compilation of HBR essays, and honestly much more useful than I thought it would be. Even if you don't see yourself becoming a manager or leader in the workplace sometime in the future, I think it's still a worthwhile read. I'm not sure how much I'll use my business degree, but this book is definitely something useful I'm glad I took away from it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    KayJay

    HBR had done a good job combining past articles on the subject. I think many parts of the book resonated well with me, perhaps because I went through many of the described scenarios as a newly promoted manager. This book needs to be re read again to allow the concepts to sink well. Whether you are a newly promoted manager or a curios onlooker, this is a good a material to read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rini Srivastava

    It covers the challenges faced by new managers and provides principles which can be practically followed. Initially it would appear too academic and boring however as and when you move forward you would actually be able to relate with the real world problems. Some of the articles are very old however still seems relevant.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Heng

    For those of us without an MBA and find themselves wearing a manager's hat, these fundamentals are very handy and helpful. Being fundamentals, I guess those are also good reminders for experienced managers. HBR book piles their articles together. The chapters are all standing alone, not connected at all. So there is no obligation to start and finish them in sequence. I also found the books by each of the authors interesting for future readings. For those of us without an MBA and find themselves wearing a manager's hat, these fundamentals are very handy and helpful. Being fundamentals, I guess those are also good reminders for experienced managers. HBR book piles their articles together. The chapters are all standing alone, not connected at all. So there is no obligation to start and finish them in sequence. I also found the books by each of the authors interesting for future readings.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cat

    Good crash course on all the aspects of management. Good primer to debunk the most common myths of management for complete first-timers. Management is more of a science than an art, and this book was a decent "Sparknotes" before stepping into the laboratory. Good crash course on all the aspects of management. Good primer to debunk the most common myths of management for complete first-timers. Management is more of a science than an art, and this book was a decent "Sparknotes" before stepping into the laboratory.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cai

    Insigtful

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlin Oujo

    I’d recommend this book to just about anyone working in a corporate environment, particularly those at the mid level.

  15. 4 out of 5

    LynnDee (LynnDee's Library)

    Some of this was a little redundant, but still valuable advice.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Yanal

    This book is filled with plenty of insights on management so you can't go wrong with having it on your shelf. This book is filled with plenty of insights on management so you can't go wrong with having it on your shelf.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Josie Zhang

    I enjoyed the breadth of this collection. There are authors I have read and familiar with, and also authors whose ideas are new and inspiring to me.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alanna

    Good selection of articles on management basics

  19. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    A good collection of essays, with 2-3 really important (on networking, on delegation, and persuasion).

  20. 4 out of 5

    Doug Bradbury

    Audio format is not great for this kind of content.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lauryn

    Good points, wasn't wowed by anything in particular but I would recommend to any new managers out there to re-focus their efforts. Good points, wasn't wowed by anything in particular but I would recommend to any new managers out there to re-focus their efforts.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Pedro Gonzalez

    Como é uma coletânea de artigos, alguns são bastante interessantes, porém outros nem tanto. Gostei do formato do livro com resumos e aplicações práticas de cada artigo.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ahmed Azab

    improve management skills

  24. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Some articles are better than others or more relevant but I found this book helpful as a frame to think about management.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nick Annan

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sagar Das

  27. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  28. 5 out of 5

    Justin Taylor

  29. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Bellis

  30. 5 out of 5

    Keith Trnka

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