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A SUNDAY TIMES, TELEGRAPH, ROUGH TRADE, PITCHFORK AND UNCUT MUSIC BOOK OF THE YEAR Art Sex Music is the autobiography of a musician who, as a founding member of the avant-garde group Throbbing Gristle and electronic pioneers Chris & Cosey, has consistently challenged the boundaries of music over the past four decades. It is the account of an artist who, as part of COUM Trans A SUNDAY TIMES, TELEGRAPH, ROUGH TRADE, PITCHFORK AND UNCUT MUSIC BOOK OF THE YEAR Art Sex Music is the autobiography of a musician who, as a founding member of the avant-garde group Throbbing Gristle and electronic pioneers Chris & Cosey, has consistently challenged the boundaries of music over the past four decades. It is the account of an artist who, as part of COUM Transmissions, represented Britain at the IXth Biennale de Paris, whose Prostitution show at the ICA in 1976 caused the Conservative MP Nicholas Fairbairn to declare her, COUM and Throbbing Gristle 'Wreckers of Civilisation' . . . shortly before he was arrested for indecent exposure, and whose work continues to be held at the vanguard of contemporary art. And it is the story of her work as a pornographic model and striptease artiste which challenged assumptions about morality, erotica and art. Art Sex Music is the wise, shocking and elegant autobiography of Cosey Fanni Tutti.


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A SUNDAY TIMES, TELEGRAPH, ROUGH TRADE, PITCHFORK AND UNCUT MUSIC BOOK OF THE YEAR Art Sex Music is the autobiography of a musician who, as a founding member of the avant-garde group Throbbing Gristle and electronic pioneers Chris & Cosey, has consistently challenged the boundaries of music over the past four decades. It is the account of an artist who, as part of COUM Trans A SUNDAY TIMES, TELEGRAPH, ROUGH TRADE, PITCHFORK AND UNCUT MUSIC BOOK OF THE YEAR Art Sex Music is the autobiography of a musician who, as a founding member of the avant-garde group Throbbing Gristle and electronic pioneers Chris & Cosey, has consistently challenged the boundaries of music over the past four decades. It is the account of an artist who, as part of COUM Transmissions, represented Britain at the IXth Biennale de Paris, whose Prostitution show at the ICA in 1976 caused the Conservative MP Nicholas Fairbairn to declare her, COUM and Throbbing Gristle 'Wreckers of Civilisation' . . . shortly before he was arrested for indecent exposure, and whose work continues to be held at the vanguard of contemporary art. And it is the story of her work as a pornographic model and striptease artiste which challenged assumptions about morality, erotica and art. Art Sex Music is the wise, shocking and elegant autobiography of Cosey Fanni Tutti.

30 review for Art Sex Music

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tosh

    I have never been a fan of Throbbing Gristle. My sense of aesthetic is entirely the opposite of this band. First of all, I hate their name. It's funny, but I don't think they met it as being funny. It seems Chris (and Cosey's half) always hated the band's name, and I can understand why. There is something juvenile about the TG aesthetic that just makes me feel tired. Saying that I respect them for what they do and all of that, but for me, never an essential band or art group. On the other hand, I have never been a fan of Throbbing Gristle. My sense of aesthetic is entirely the opposite of this band. First of all, I hate their name. It's funny, but I don't think they met it as being funny. It seems Chris (and Cosey's half) always hated the band's name, and I can understand why. There is something juvenile about the TG aesthetic that just makes me feel tired. Saying that I respect them for what they do and all of that, but for me, never an essential band or art group. On the other hand, Cosey Fanni Tutti's memoir is a fun and gossipy read. In no way or fashion can a TG fan ignore this book. Cosey is a fascinating person. I have heard of artists being in the sex adult market before their careers in music/films, but she is the first to have a career of stripping, sex work - while making music and being in a major band like TG. Her writings about the life as a stripper are entertaining but also fascinating, with respect to her interest in making art at the same time. The one thing that becomes upsetting to me, and frankly tires me out while reading this book is the subject matter of Genesis P-Orridge. Reading Cosey's memoir, and only getting the story from her side of the world, I hate P-Orridge, her, or whatever gender he/she is or not. A terrible person. I keep yelling to the text on the page to kick Gen out of TG! She keeps coming back to him. If the narrative is correct here, Gen is not only creepy but a sadist/girlfriend beater. I have always looked at him with suspicion because I never bought his 'act.' I find Gen's work very obvious and a fan-boy-girl mentality that is obnoxious. The book is 500 pages long. It's a very long book, and I think her and the editor could have done some more editing. Beyond that, this is a book for anyone who is interested in the subject matter of Throbbing Gristle, Chris & Cosey, Coil, etc. I like Cosey a lot through this book. She goes out of the way to credit other musicians and artists, that may not be entirely known to her fan base or readers. I sense she's a generous person. But I really can't take any more of Genesis.

  2. 4 out of 5

    julieta

    Although I enjoyed reading this book, I have to say I am happy to be done with it. It is exceptionally long, at 500 pages, I think I would have gotten the idea at half its pages, since it becomes repetitive, with things that really, I got before the first 100 pages. Cosey is a wonderful character, working into art and music for most of her life, but clearly her troubles with Genesis P-Orridge, with whom she had a relationship, and one of the members of Throbbing Gristle, one of her bands, seems Although I enjoyed reading this book, I have to say I am happy to be done with it. It is exceptionally long, at 500 pages, I think I would have gotten the idea at half its pages, since it becomes repetitive, with things that really, I got before the first 100 pages. Cosey is a wonderful character, working into art and music for most of her life, but clearly her troubles with Genesis P-Orridge, with whom she had a relationship, and one of the members of Throbbing Gristle, one of her bands, seems a bad presence for her, and she speaks about him through the whole book. At one point she mentions that her reason for writing this book is to "set the record straight" which I would say is one of the worst reasons to write a book, since she basically talks about every single situation where Gen was a jerk. I had never heard their music, and I loved Chris & Cosey much more than TG. Anyway, she has had a fascinating life and I wish someone had done a bit more editing to get at her work, and what she seems most interesting to me for, which is her art and music, but she gets more into mundane experiences that end up making it feel like an eternal book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Karl

    It appears that the limited hardcover is sold out as of Sunday, February 19, 2017 please note: http://www.coseyfannitutti.com/ The Limited edition went on sale Feb. 1 and was sold out on Feb 2. From the publisher, It appears that the limited hardcover is sold out as of Sunday, February 19, 2017 please note: http://www.coseyfannitutti.com/ The Limited edition went on sale Feb. 1 and was sold out on Feb 2. From the publisher,

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shannon L.

    How wonderful it is to hear history in Cosey's voice. As a fan of Throbbing Gristle, Chris & Cosey and having a fascination and respect for the ahead of its time performance art that Coum was doing, it was lovely to finally hear a complex history from Cosey. For years and years Gen has been metaphorically pulling the mic away and telling the story of Coum and TG on everyone's behalf. I wanted to hear to hear the rest of the group's story. I've always known that Gen was a strong personality and How wonderful it is to hear history in Cosey's voice. As a fan of Throbbing Gristle, Chris & Cosey and having a fascination and respect for the ahead of its time performance art that Coum was doing, it was lovely to finally hear a complex history from Cosey. For years and years Gen has been metaphorically pulling the mic away and telling the story of Coum and TG on everyone's behalf. I wanted to hear to hear the rest of the group's story. I've always known that Gen was a strong personality and confrontational, but it was disheartening to learn to what extent. I believe every word. I feel that it was necessary after years of having all of her hard work not always being attributed to her, that I was necessary to tell her story. And I thank her for it. I most loved reading about Cosey's long and impressive career in art. I knew less about it and was so amazed and inspired by what she has accomplished and her approaches to everything. She sees the art and beauty in things that others tend to overlook. I was especially moved by the piece for her friend Xeni. Finding the poetic and giving a voice to the pain. I enjoyed all 500 pages. Cosey has always been a huge inspiration and reading this during a time of great pain and artistic status personally has been further inspiring. It's the best memoir I've read in quite a long time.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mason Jones

    I'd like to be able to give this a higher rating, but just can't. I'm a big fan of Throbbing Gristle and a long-time industrial/noise musician myself, and was fairly knowledgeable about the story of Coum and TG, but I was very curious to read Cosey's own perspective. Huge respect to her as an artist and just all-around person but the book is a pretty dry read, and while there are plenty of emotional moments they seem to drift by quickly amidst the day-to-day. At about 500 pages, the book would h I'd like to be able to give this a higher rating, but just can't. I'm a big fan of Throbbing Gristle and a long-time industrial/noise musician myself, and was fairly knowledgeable about the story of Coum and TG, but I was very curious to read Cosey's own perspective. Huge respect to her as an artist and just all-around person but the book is a pretty dry read, and while there are plenty of emotional moments they seem to drift by quickly amidst the day-to-day. At about 500 pages, the book would have been better-served by heavy editing to allow the more personal and significant moments to expand and provide more depth. Fans and those who are already invested in her work may still find this a worthwhile read, but it can't be recommended for anyone else I'm afraid. I won't get into the question of the relationship she and Chris had with Gen, and how badly Gen comes off in the book. Especially with Sleazy gone, we'll never know the full story and that's probably okay at this point.

  6. 4 out of 5

    ElwYckE

    When I was 18 I did a painting of Ms. Fanni Tutti and sent it to her, she responded with a wonderful letter on special Cosey notepaper, I was thrilled! Years later when the internet had been invented I contacted her by email and mentioned the painting and she replied that she had the photograph of the painting on her desk.....so that's my Cosey connection. This exceptional autobiography delivers on every front. It's completely fascinating and reveals the world behind the performances, the art and When I was 18 I did a painting of Ms. Fanni Tutti and sent it to her, she responded with a wonderful letter on special Cosey notepaper, I was thrilled! Years later when the internet had been invented I contacted her by email and mentioned the painting and she replied that she had the photograph of the painting on her desk.....so that's my Cosey connection. This exceptional autobiography delivers on every front. It's completely fascinating and reveals the world behind the performances, the art and that astonishing, disruptive music. Cosey Fanni Tutti is of a generation of artists who lives their art. It's not something one goes off to do like an office job, it's lived 24 hours a day. This is what I have found so enormously inspiring and influential from my formative years to this very day. Thank you.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rachelle

    Lived it like a rebel, wrote it like a shopping list.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Laura Brower

    This book is about a time when artists didn't use irony as a defence mechanism. It makes me want to listen to lots of Throbbing Gristle even a lot of it sounds like gloriously mean sandpaper rubbed over my tiny mind. Cosey comes across as very funny and likeable. This book is about a time when artists didn't use irony as a defence mechanism. It makes me want to listen to lots of Throbbing Gristle even a lot of it sounds like gloriously mean sandpaper rubbed over my tiny mind. Cosey comes across as very funny and likeable.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kiran

    Best music memoir of the year, easily.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Goff

    I've been a fan of Throbbing Gristle for awhile. I haven't really listened to them much for a long time so this autobiography was a good way for me to reconnect with the band. Tutti's life has certainly not had a lot of dull moments. In piecing this together, you would assume that TG was the most important thing in her life and I felt like some things may have gotten brushed off in favor of detailing every single happening of the group. Maybe Cosey was letting the audience read what she thought I've been a fan of Throbbing Gristle for awhile. I haven't really listened to them much for a long time so this autobiography was a good way for me to reconnect with the band. Tutti's life has certainly not had a lot of dull moments. In piecing this together, you would assume that TG was the most important thing in her life and I felt like some things may have gotten brushed off in favor of detailing every single happening of the group. Maybe Cosey was letting the audience read what she thought they wanted to read. Two revelations came through in this book for me. One, what an inspiration Cosey is as a strong woman musician, artist, writer. She has succeeded in every thing she has ever tried against horrible odds and abusive relationships. And two, what an absolute maniac Genesis P-Orridge is. To be honest the draw for me in TG's music was always the music as the vocals always kept me from them being one of my favorite groups. I always thought their music was strong and experimental and the vocals were a little weak so I have never been the biggest fan of Genesis but that was just for artistic reasons. I have no reason to believe that Cosey's words are true and Genesis is rightly portrayed as a heinous, abusive, narcissistic maniac. It's amazing Cosey came out of all of this it appears for the better. A well written history and a great achievement.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    She certainly led an interesting life, worth finding out about. But! The book just wasn't great. Too long, too much name dropping, too many mundane details. The editor should have cut this in half by removing information about types of grants and specifics of equipment and what nots. Maybe if you're a die hard fan, then the details are relevant, but for me they were just paragraphs to skip... She certainly led an interesting life, worth finding out about. But! The book just wasn't great. Too long, too much name dropping, too many mundane details. The editor should have cut this in half by removing information about types of grants and specifics of equipment and what nots. Maybe if you're a die hard fan, then the details are relevant, but for me they were just paragraphs to skip...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    A long slow settling of scores. I had hoped for a lengthy TG section, but as with most bands it degenerates into animosity and lengthy grudge bearing.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Crippled_ships

    I was very sad that this book had to end; it was so wonderful to listen to her tell stories from her life ...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Adam Williams

    An exceptional book of an intriguing, boundary-breaking artist, who dealt with appalling sexism and prejudice as an artist and musician. The life lived that she describes is utterly fascinating at all points, and if you only know her from her music, there is a whole lot more to learn. It is also fair to say that other people described in her story don't come out well, either, and my view of Genesis P-Orridge in particular is now rather different. If you have any interest in the origins of industr An exceptional book of an intriguing, boundary-breaking artist, who dealt with appalling sexism and prejudice as an artist and musician. The life lived that she describes is utterly fascinating at all points, and if you only know her from her music, there is a whole lot more to learn. It is also fair to say that other people described in her story don't come out well, either, and my view of Genesis P-Orridge in particular is now rather different. If you have any interest in the origins of industrial music, in particular, this is an essential read, from one of the originators of it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Helm

    For all the interesting things in this book it was surprisingly boring. Kind of like reading 40 years of someone's day planners. For all the interesting things in this book it was surprisingly boring. Kind of like reading 40 years of someone's day planners.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    3.5 stars. Interesting but maybe a little too exhaustive--I would have appreciated more editing.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lisastrawberry

    Fantastic. She sets the record straight and is just such an all around bad ass you have to love her. And I do, and have, since the early 80's when I first became aware of her. If you're not a fan, you're probably not picking up the book anyway, so she goes on the premise that you are quite interested in every art show and gig she's done and that's as it should be, given that this is her damn book! :) I have to say that I now see Gen from TG totally differently. Ugh. I have always thought of Chris Fantastic. She sets the record straight and is just such an all around bad ass you have to love her. And I do, and have, since the early 80's when I first became aware of her. If you're not a fan, you're probably not picking up the book anyway, so she goes on the premise that you are quite interested in every art show and gig she's done and that's as it should be, given that this is her damn book! :) I have to say that I now see Gen from TG totally differently. Ugh. I have always thought of Chris and Cosey as what my husband and I would do if we were to form a musical group. I love her love story with Chris. It's beautiful and such a partnership. Really glad they found each other. My husband and I saw Chris and Cosey perform at PS 1 in New York in 2014 and it blew us away. Inside a geodesic dome, no less. They performed Desertshore and I introduced myself to Cosey after the show. She was so sweet and gave me a hug. I just found out she has done the soundtrack to the new Delia Derbeyshire documentary and I must find a way to see it! The trailer looks incredible. Love and freaky love to Cosey always.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Niklas Pivic

    There’s been a lot of times when you’ve not been able to judge a book by its cover, but this one says a lot, and only in good ways. ‘No. No, it was an accident,’ I explained. ‘The car is automatic and I’d left it in drive.’ He didn’t believe me. ‘Right!’ he shouted, and rushed into the house. Fizzy was stood in the doorway with tears in his eyes. ‘Go quick,’ he said. ‘Good luck.’ All I could say was, ‘Sorry, I have to do this. I have to go.’ Then Fizzy was pushed aside as Gen came flying through the d There’s been a lot of times when you’ve not been able to judge a book by its cover, but this one says a lot, and only in good ways. ‘No. No, it was an accident,’ I explained. ‘The car is automatic and I’d left it in drive.’ He didn’t believe me. ‘Right!’ he shouted, and rushed into the house. Fizzy was stood in the doorway with tears in his eyes. ‘Go quick,’ he said. ‘Good luck.’ All I could say was, ‘Sorry, I have to do this. I have to go.’ Then Fizzy was pushed aside as Gen came flying through the door wielding a nine-inch knife with ‘KILL’ burned into the wooden handle, blazing, staring eyes, screaming and heading for me. Fizzy grabbed hold of him, took the knife and dropped it on the floor of the car so Gen couldn’t snatch it back. ‘Go! Go!’ he shouted. I drove off at breakneck speed down Beck Road, turning on to Mare Street so fast I lost two hubcaps as I scraped the kerb. I wasn’t going to stop. This is mainly a memoir from Cosey Fanni Tutti’s days in Throbbing Gristle, a band that is considered one of the pioneers of industrial music. With their punk attitude to all they did, they hammered the music scene in the mid-1970s when very few others were up to what they did. Cosey was together with Genesis P-Orridge, a wayward man who wanted to practice free sex, communal living, creating beyond barriers, and severely abusing her. This book often reads like that of a diary by a person who’s mistreated to the extreme levels where she cannot fathom leaving their beloved, even when very little has to do with love. Gen introduced me to the life and works of Aleister Crowley, and his mantras became ‘Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law’ and ‘Love is the law, love under will’. I bought into that; I believed we all had our own spiritual core self, that everyone should have the freedom to find and be themselves, and to live their lives accordingly. I came to realise, though, that the freedom this implied applied to Gen but not to me and other close friends – their actions to discover their True Will were more often than not ‘guided’ by Gen and subject to his approval and judgement. It was an unexpected twist on my father’s house rule of ‘Do as I say, not do as I do’. As is mostly the case, the breakdown of a psyche happens gradually. Cosey was subject to an insanely stringent and abusive father. She was thrown out of her house at a young age and briskly excommunicated from her family. I cannot fathom the throes that a young person must find itself in under those circumstances. 31 March 1970 Well I go in hospital tomorrow, I had to go and ring the hospital and see how long I’d be in. They said about 4 or 5 days because I’m … The sentence should have finished ‘16 weeks pregnant’. I had conceived within two months of meeting Gen. The book is naturally not strewn only with abuse and trauma. This book is more than that: Cosey does a fantastic job at painting a very broad picture of what she and her cohorts in art-collective COUM came up with. We were happily ensconced in our own building and Gen began putting COUM philosophy into practice. I’ve often been asked what COUM meant – to explain it. The definition of COUM was intentionally elusive. That allowed for total freedom of expression and interpretation (including by the ‘audience’), which was a core value of COUM and created a forum for debate and sometimes brought new members. COUM was not just a ‘group’ but also more of a movement, a collective family of diverse people from all walks of life, each of us exploring and living out our fantasies or obsessions with the aim of achieving creative and self-awareness, and confidence as artists regardless of, and in opposition to, the conventional skill sets and criteria by which ‘artists’ are defined. COUM was about giving free rein to ideas, about not being limited by rules or self-doubt – which lead to some confrontational situations as we challenged and broke established rules and cultural and social conventions. Many of the tidbits from the book paint a picture of how society viewed Cosey and those near to her. Much to my mum’s (and the dole office’s) delight, I decided to get a job. The notes on my unemployment records make for interesting reading: 18 February 1970 Not very enthusiastic about work. Very modern dress – wearing long boots, old fur coat and black velvet & lace creation. Not at all suitable for office work in view of appearance … 6 May 1970 Usually attends employment section with boyfriend who dresses most peculiarly. Still seeking clerical work but appearance has deteriorated. Untidy and extremely mod. clothing. Not fit for submission. Would reclassify except for good G.C.E. ‘O’ levels and it would be a waste of a good education if this girl did factory work. 3 June 1970 Miss Newby is so changeable in appearance, can look extremely attractive or dirty and shabby. Nice girl to talk to and I think she is under the bad influence of her boyfriend who is a freelance artist. He always attends with her and they both live in a derelict house shared by several hippy type characters. Together with not only P-Orridge, Cosey set off to explore inner and outer worlds in different ways. She created art, pornography, and music. I’d been ‘guided’ into group sex by Gen and also by my interest in Aleister Crowley and the subtext that our relationship was ‘open’. Although I was initially reluctant to indulge (I was happy with Gen as my lover), my interest in Crowley and enjoyment of sex with other guys awakened a curiosity and triggered a desire to explore my sexuality. Whether Gen realised that it would have this effect on me, I don’t know, but inevitably I tended to compare one lover to another. Some were, let’s say, more skilled at certain things than others. A person’s touch, skin and body evoke their own distinct sexual responses and enjoyment … or not. Consequently, when future chances were presented to me for repeat indulgences with someone I felt good with, or fancied, I didn’t need Gen’s persuasive tactics. But it was best all round to let him think he was in charge. The sex aspects of the book are definitely not there to shock. It’s sobering and delightful to read a book where its author is not out to shock nor to use sexuality as a weapon – except in art. It’s obvious that Cosey has worked very hard throughout her life. Gigs, sorting out massive art exhibitions, managing a record label, etc. And all of this while living under the thumb of Genesis P-Orridge, who currently denies accusations of violence against Cosey. Our routine changed. I’d wake him each morning and make him breakfast before starting my day. Him working nine till five doubled my workload, as he wasn’t around to do anything. In addition to the everyday chores and sewing damn boxer shorts, I took on more of the grant and bookings correspondence and travel arrangements, phone calls and meetings, repairing and maintaining Doris, as well as organising any modelling jobs that came through. I was constantly knackered and ill but more worried about Gen getting tired and overdoing things, as he’d go to the studio in the evenings to catch up on stuff. As the letter-writing to artists for the book increased, I was called on to relieve some of the strain. I squeezed it in between everything else. I’d thought St James would do Gen good but Collette’s constant cigarette-smoking in the small office space was bad for Gen’s asthma, but more than that Gen resented the job taking time away from his own work. When the book was published in 1977, Gen had an entry under his own name, with a half-page photograph of me and him doing our 1976 COUM action in Milan. Neither COUM nor myself were listed in the book. The book goes from a fervent pace to a waddle cum half-of-the-book; that is where Throbbing Gristle disbands for the first time. Incredibly, they reunite, with all the mad and different types of roller-coaster drama that come with having to do with somebody who seems to be like P-Orridge is portrayed as. There are a lot of things to be said for P-Orridge, which, thankfully, others have done for us, here and here. There are lovely words from Cosey in the book about meeting Chris Carter, who not only became the love of her life but also member of Throbbing Gristle and the man with whom she later formed musical duo Chris & Cosey: We’d set up a regular TG get-together for every weekend (all other commitments allowing) … with Sleazy not turning up as often as we all would’ve liked. Chris’s rekindled enthusiasm for music didn’t sit well with Simone, and things gradually started to get awkward. As usual, Gen began moves to have group sex. Simone wasn’t interested. Chris was happy to come with us for TG sessions and to sleep over, assuming (rightly) there’d be sex. Both Gen’s sex-game play and Simone’s indifference to Chris backfired. Me and Chris both fancied each other: he was beautiful in body, mind and spirit, and wasn’t at all shy. Our making love for the first time ignited such passion and lust between us that neither of us could go back – or wanted to accept anything less than what we felt for each other. It far exceeded anything either of us had experienced before. We were faced with a dilemma as we were both in relationships and committed to TG. Was it love or lust? It was both, and we decided to keep TG on track and our emotions in check. Well, we tried, but Gen’s partiality for watching us have sex just fed our desire for each other and our resistance waned, especially when opportunities arose, usually when Gen went to sleep with other women. There are plenty of musical interludes here, jabs at some members from The Slits, reminisces of big shows, plans for reissues, more drama, having kids, more drama, etc. If I have to compare this book to another of the same ilk, it would have to be Viv Albertine’s glowing 'Clothes, Clothes, Clothes. Music, Music, Music. Boys, Boys, Boys'. I just wish that the contents of this book and its rhythm, for the lack of a better word, were just there more. Everyone’s a critic, right? It’s an interesting book and a highly eventful life to dip into. A film is being made from it and Cosey will release her second autobiographical book in Spring of 2022.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Phizacklea-Cullen

    When the first official biography of industrial pioneers Throbbing Gristle was published in 1999, founder Cosey Fanni Tutti wrote in her diary 'I'm determined to get a book out that puts the record straight'. By her own admission, this is the result, a charmingly written account of her extraordinary life starting out in late-1960s Hull with the iconoclastic collective COUM Transmissions in romantic and artistic partnership with countercultural icon Genesis P-Orridge, to her work as a striptease When the first official biography of industrial pioneers Throbbing Gristle was published in 1999, founder Cosey Fanni Tutti wrote in her diary 'I'm determined to get a book out that puts the record straight'. By her own admission, this is the result, a charmingly written account of her extraordinary life starting out in late-1960s Hull with the iconoclastic collective COUM Transmissions in romantic and artistic partnership with countercultural icon Genesis P-Orridge, to her work as a striptease artist and adult film star, to going on to invent industrial music with P-Orridge as part of TG and their turbulent career, producing some of the most confrontational and innovative music committed to vinyl, their breakup and beginning a new life with her bandmate Chris Carter, their collaborations, life changes, Throbbing Gristle's ill-fated reunion in the mid-2000s and the aftermath. It's a fascinating story and an important record of changing times and attitudes in Britain, but its main aim comes across as (quite rightly) exposing the abuse Tutti suffered from P-Orridge throughout their relationship, and whilst this is understandable - they did put her through hell at times - the character excoriation comes across as vindictive towards the end rather than vindicating. An index would also have been helpful, but a fascinating story nonetheless.

  20. 4 out of 5

    J.

    Yes, as other reviews have noted, it's almost a bit TOO thorough, but Cosey's determination to acknowledge every supportive person she & Chris collaborated with is hardly a fault. I've not listened much to TG in my life (odd as I'm so synth-obsessed), so I wasn't coming at this from a "fan" point of view, rather she just seemed like an interesting character and YES she is. A true innovator & brave spirit, I've felt more inspired & fearless in my own life since I started reading. I'm really glad Yes, as other reviews have noted, it's almost a bit TOO thorough, but Cosey's determination to acknowledge every supportive person she & Chris collaborated with is hardly a fault. I've not listened much to TG in my life (odd as I'm so synth-obsessed), so I wasn't coming at this from a "fan" point of view, rather she just seemed like an interesting character and YES she is. A true innovator & brave spirit, I've felt more inspired & fearless in my own life since I started reading. I'm really glad I read this book!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    This has to be the best autobiography by a musician I've read, which arguably hasn't been very many. As a fan of Throbbing Gristle, Chris & Cosey, and Carter Tutti this had a lot of promise for me right at the start, but I was quite surprised at just how much else CFT had been up to for so long. Her story is incredible, and sometimes difficult to stomach, but told with lots of introspection and personality. Listening to Time to Tell will never be the same again, and that's a good thing. This has to be the best autobiography by a musician I've read, which arguably hasn't been very many. As a fan of Throbbing Gristle, Chris & Cosey, and Carter Tutti this had a lot of promise for me right at the start, but I was quite surprised at just how much else CFT had been up to for so long. Her story is incredible, and sometimes difficult to stomach, but told with lots of introspection and personality. Listening to Time to Tell will never be the same again, and that's a good thing.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bethan

    I aspire to one day be as diplomatic and majestic as Cosey. Art Sex Music is a funny, moving and addictive read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bianca

    Phew! 500 pages later... finally finished reading the Encyclopedia of Cosey Fanni Tutti. Thoroughly enjoyed this very detailed memoir.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Had high hopes but it devolves into just a chronological list of brags and grievances.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Corvus

    I know for a fact that I posted my own review when we wrote this in 2017, but it no longer exists. I don't know what happened to it and only noticed when I had to recommend this book in a different thread. Irritating how often goodreads does that. So, here's our tandem review. (Strigiform is me, Anarchiteuthis is my (mostly defunct now) music blog co-author.) ___ Chatty review of Cosey Fanni Tutti's new memoir: Art Sex Music Tutti, Cosey Fanni. 2017. Art sex music. Faber And Faber. If you're readin I know for a fact that I posted my own review when we wrote this in 2017, but it no longer exists. I don't know what happened to it and only noticed when I had to recommend this book in a different thread. Irritating how often goodreads does that. So, here's our tandem review. (Strigiform is me, Anarchiteuthis is my (mostly defunct now) music blog co-author.) ___ Chatty review of Cosey Fanni Tutti's new memoir: Art Sex Music Tutti, Cosey Fanni. 2017. Art sex music. Faber And Faber. If you're reading this, you presumably already know who Cosey Fanny Tutti is: a remarkable artist and musician who's been churning out important, challenging, and hashtag controversial work for nearly half a century as part of, and also apart from, Throbbing Gristle. Now she's blessed us with her memoirs. This book is 502 pages, but I read it in 4 days (busy days at that!). The publisher was kind enough to provide Strig with a review copy last month, but I only read library books. It took my library long enough to buy it, but here we all are. Cosey is a lifelong diarist, and she drew upon these materials to write her life as she lived it, when she lived it. Here's a video from her publisher wherein she describes her methodologyBelow is a condensed, edited conversation Strigiform and I conducted across emails and gchat. Anarchiteuthis: I was kinda astonished that she started this incredibly active independent life in art and music at age 18. Strigiform: Yes! I lived a really rowdy rockstar sex/drugs/rocknroll life at a very young age, but I did not keep it together AT ALL in any way even close to the way she did. Ana: She credits much of her toughness and her approach to brutal logistical and emotional situations to being from Yorkshire. She admits that her family was doing economically better than most of their neighbors, but also she describes playing in bombed out sites, engaging in hooliganism, mischief, and petty crime. During her teen and early adult years she vividly describes the scene in Hull- or rather, the array of scenes. She acquaints you with everyone from the skinheads and Hell's Angels to the radical feminists and gay liberation movements. She said she felt more in line with gay liberation than with feminism. Even though she's a straight woman, I wasn't mad, cuz she doesn't strike me as the kinda straight girl who is annoying at gay bars. Strig: Agreed. A: Gay liberation was more party-themed, raucous, and its message was more fun and inclusive (in message if not in practice). Meanwhile one of the defining features of feminism of this era was its prescriptivism and trying to identify, define, and enforce the "Politically Correct" way of life (yes, you can blame lesbians for this. On behalf of lesbians, I apologize). S: A femme dyke friend of mine was kicked out of a feminist bookstore for wearing lipstick and I knew others who had to keep their strap-ons on the down low because they were a no-no in those communities then. So, I agree with you, that some feminists of that era likely made her feel unwelcome as they did other feminists, women, queers, lesbians, etc. A: Also she put on "phony lesbian" shows for money, hashtag ally. S: LOL. I admit there were some cringy straight person things in there. But I mean, she's a straight person, so... haha no higher standard deserved than anyone else. A: But Cosey's theme in life is just like, don't fucking tell me what to do. I don't blame her for feeling alienated from feminism, particularly as it was practiced then. I wouldn't wanna hang out with Sheila Jeffreys either. Plus Cosey's all about the practice (praxis?). She doesn't have time for idle theory when she's got shit to do. Meanwhile, her compassion for animals is another theme. S: When she applies for a job at an animal laboratory right out of high school, the researchers ask her if she likes animals. She says she "adores" them. They, of course, deny her the job. There are also many stories about various animals that Cosey adopted throughout her life that are unfortunately in danger in proximity to Genesis, which we will discuss more later. A: But also when Wax Trax! assumes she and Chris are vegetarian and send them a request for a track along with animal exploitation literature. And she's like, "well, we weren't, but after that we were!" waxtrax2.jpgwaxtrax.jpg Image: The front and back cover of the vinyl for the compilation album "Animal Liberation." The front is a young macaque monkey held in a restraining device shot from the torso up. She is staring tensely off to the left side. The border is red and the top says "Animal Liberation" in white uppercase letters on a black background. The back cover of the album shows an image of a battery cage chicken concentration exploitation facility. Some chickens stretch their heads through the wires atop their cages while others are buried below. All are white with yellow debeaked beaks and reddish orange wattles. One chicken stares into the camera in the foreground. In red and white letters are the credits for the musicians on the album. S: I love that they were assumed veg and turned veg by Wax Trax! A: But also where she hides and ultimately gives away her childhood rabbit cuz her asshole dad threatened to eat the creature? And she didn't even have the top tier of worst dads, but bad enough to cause enduring logistical and emotional damage throughout her life. S: Even while doing all of the domestic tasks, her art work, her sex work, other paid work, dealing with the band, and visiting friends in prison, she's also caring for, and often protecting, the animals she has taken in. A: THAT FUCKING KILLED ME. All "the boys" got to sit around making art, meanwhile she's out quomodocunquizing, busting her ass at factory work, breathing noxious fumes, taking in piece work, doing office work, sex work, and generally selling her time, labor, and precious energy to keep the band living indoors, eating, and making art. Then she goes home and has to cook food for everyone, do their shopping, wash their goddamn clothes, clean up after them, and basically be everyone's live in maid. AND she's making art on top of all this, which no one would even acknowledge at the time. Even now, she is robbed of credit for so much of her life's work. She writes, "Home didn't feel like home but like more work." S: The image of her lugging the cart of laundry up a hill in cold weather is in my head forever. Most of us who have ever struggled know what that is like, but to be doing it alone while an entire group of adults leaves you to it? A: The "pram" that she uses to haul their laundry gets turned into art and then she's like, "but how do I laundry now?" S: YES. JEEZ. I know Cosey doesn't want us to be sitting here portraying her as some helpless victim so I hope that is not how this all is coming across. A: This would be a good time to quote some things she says in a really good Jezebel interview that asks basically everything I wanted to know while reading. Asked about events she describes in her book that a 21st century reader would freely describe as abusive, she all but dismisses it: "I felt strong enough to deal with it. It wasn’t a huge problem to me. It was upsetting at times and I couldn’t understand it, but it wasn’t something that I couldn’t deal with. [...] My problem was making sure I could carry on." S: I think her approach to modeling and sex work was fascinating. It is interesting because her sex work WAS work. Like, she had very little money and was fiercely independent, so it wasn't some sort of poverty tourism for art. Yet she simultaneously was utilizing the experiences to create art. A: She doesn't say when she left the sex industry. She just says she resumed stripping 5 months after the birth of her son. I don't know about you, but I pulled up all the songs she mentioned stripping to. It gave me great amusement to imagine how a spooky 70s art lady would dance to those tracks. S: Oh my. I didn't think to do that! I don't even remember what they were. A: Just check this one. S: Amazing. Reading this book and this stuff about Gen I was thinking "Jesus Christ, what a tool! I wonder if everyone else is also a massive tool including my beloved members of Coil." And I'm ok with the truth. Like, even if the truth ruins my two Coil tattoos for me, I still wanna know. In short, I was very relieved when we get to meeting Peter Christopherson (who got his nickname Sleazy FROM COSEY) and he becomes one of her old dear friends. I do think Sleazy should have done a way better job, as I believe all of the people around Gen should have, in standing up to that twerp, but we'll get into Gen later. As far as I am concerned, Chris, Cosey, and Sleazy were Throbbing Gristle's core, and Genesis was the part time singer and stage performer- an important part that Gen was good at, but one that audiences tend to give way too much credit. A: I uphold your assessment. Photo by Linda Nylind for the Guardian, which did a great piece on her. Image: Cosey sits on the floor, one leg out in front of her, the other bent underneath her, her hands folded on the ground in front of her. She is wearing a black button-down shirt and geometric black and white leggings. Next to her is a guiter leaning against a dresser and behind and beside her are many kinds of music equipment with lots of knobs I am not educated enough on the topic to describe. S: To have a glimpse into those things was really good for me as a huge Coil fan. And also understanding just how bad John's alcoholism was. Near the end of the book, Cosey details her experiences at the funerals of both John Balance (Geff Rushton) and Sleazy (Peter Christopherson) and I read these parts with tears in my eyes. These accounts were beautiful. The Coil song played at John's funeral, Going Up, has been a song that has meant more to me than I can really express. I got really into Coil shortly after John had died. Ironically, I got into them right after I got clean, which is funny to me. And it was somewhat sad to know I could never meet them or see them live. But I have watched lots of videos thank you internet. But any time it looks like cool people are cool and together, everything is probably terrible for them too. Because everything is terrible and the world is terrible. A: Yup! Speaking of which HOW WERE WE INSULATED FROM GEN'S SHITTINESS FOR SO LONG?! S: Because: 1. Gen fronts bands and is therefore near immune to criticism 2. Music culture lifts up shittastic abusive behavior as does most popular culture. 3. Gen is a whiny baby narcissist who wanted the spotlight while the other members were more interested in the art. 4. Narcissists and abusers often make themselves out to be victims and make people care for them while they abuse. A: Also Gen is merely a minor cult icon, so information is scarcer than it might be for, like, Christian Bale or Johnny Depp and other celebrated famous men who hit women for fun. Without giving too much away for anyone who hasn't read it yet, Cosey describes violent, manipulative, and generally despicable behavior from Gen, including the use of self-harm/suicide threats as manipulation, cat throwing, and at least two events Strig and I recognize as attempted murder. I can't say that any of it really surprised me once I read it, but JEEZUS FUCK. S: Her story shows how people in abusive relationships are often forced to choose between abuse and dissolution of everything in their life. Basically she had to choose between leaving Gen and losing all the art shit with COUM, TG, etc., or staying there and getting to be present with that stuff. A: As she responds to Jezebel, "What was I supposed to do, give everything up? [...] It was an extremely complicated situation and I was out there on my own. I had no family or anything. That relationship was my family, so I protected it." No reason to believe Gen will ever change. Gen slapped Cosey & Chris with a frivolous lawsuit in 2013. And in 2006 Gen was publicly taking credit for all of Cosey's modeling and tampons! S: Oh yes, the lawsuits! And the tampons. Seriously. SERIOUSLY TAMPONS. Gen believed they owned Cosey's body so much that Gen literally owned the cotton used to mop up menstrual blood. Are you fucking kidding me? A: The whole thing is nauseating. The financial stuff especially infuriates me. Cosey, Chris, and Sleazy were POURING out their time, energy, and money from their own pockets to make the TG reunion work, and Gen could barely be arsed to show up. When Gen DID show up, it would be with a demand for extra special payments, clauses counter to everything the group had previously agreed to, it was just endless. S: And here's where I get angry at the other men. Sleazy and Chris and all other men- I knew you were all also under Gen's grip and manipulation, but when you see someone doing this to a woman over a period of years, how could you stand by and do nothing? I mean, at least Chris talked to Cosey and stuck up for her a little bit. But overall, they didn't do enough. That's normal, though. No one ever does enough. A: Yup! Abysmal that that's just what you get for building your life around men. S: I wish she said what heart condition it was! I want us to be heart electric abnormality friends. That doesn't sound very fun actually. A: You mentioned you saw people on the internet talking about her book? And they're all mad that she's "grudging" and "trashing" Gen? S: On goodreads there are some men on there upset by the book. They say it focuses too much on the abuse, or is "one-sided," or is "grudge" bearing, or didn't focusing on the technical aspects enough. I guess these bros wanted her to be like, "everything was good and nice! Then we plugged this synth into this thing and this other thing made noise. Then we did this, and then we made noise with this. And then we did an interview here, and then we played this show." A: LOLOLOLOL S: And yes, there was some of that, but how fucking boring would that have been without context? I don't know if they are coming from fanboyism or if they just wanted a computer science book, but I found their comments to be annoying and showing a lack of comprehension. I am annoyed by gossip when it is only for the sake of gossip or shit talk. A: I love gossip and shit talk. It's why I'm so attracted to the genre of memoir! S: But Cosey is obviously not doing this to ruin Gen's life. She did this to tell the story of these art forms and her life- her actual story that includes all the artists and the obstacles they faced. One of the biggest fucking obstacles was Genesis P-Orridge. Part of the problem with these men: Cosey is only allowed to function as a part of TG. Which is exactly what Gen wanted her as- a tool. A: And a used tampon generator. CUZ THAT WAS ALL GEN'S IDEA. S: Art Sex Music was Gen's idea, I am sure we will find out. A: "But you're my battery- I feed off you," she quotes Gen as saying when she's trying to leave their relationship. Shudder. Early into the book, it was quite obvious to me that she was trying to fairly redistribute credit and attribution for COUM and TG works wherever it was due- even for her own name. While she'd been going by Cosey, short for Gen's naming her Cosmosis, it was one of her mail art buddies who took to calling her Cosey Fanni Tutti (a reference to Mozart's 1790 comic opera Così fan tutte, which is about how you and your buddy can seduce each other's fiancees if you dress up as Albanians). S: I thought about the name a lot and I am very glad that a mail art friend rerouted Gen’s culty name bestowal. She recounts such fun exchanges between her mail art friends, in stark contrast to Genesis’ Manson-esque re-naming. A: Right? Like naming someone is generally an act of ownership. Meanwhile, you and I talked about how to reconcile Gen's lived trans-ness with a long docket of bad deeds that men do, and the fact that Cosey calls Gen "he." Indeed, everyone close to Gen I've heard or read, including Lady Jaye, called Gen "he." It's probable that Gen doesn't give a fuck. The Jezebel interviewer asks Cosey about this, to which she responds, "I know some transgender people and they’re not like Gen." I giggled, cuz basically yeah. Also this whole thing makes me feel dirty for appreciating the Ballad of Genesis and Lady Jaye documentary when I saw it, and also for attending a Psychic TV show last fall. S: As the Resident Trans Person on the Panel who speaks for all Trans people,* all trans people are different and come from different backgrounds. Some trans people have fluid genders- meaning that their gender changes throughout their life whereas other trans people have a more static gender identity. Transgender people, like all people, can also be horrifically shitty despite their marginalized status. So, I do think Cosey walks a very dangerous line by claiming Genesis cannot be X gender since Genesis was/is abusive. She doesn’t directly say this but gets close. But, there also seems to be a common thread in Genesis’ “Pandrogyne” identity that opens it up to this kind of criticism. We discuss trans people's life experiences through cisgender lenses. Often, in trying to make cis hets** and gatekeepers*** believe we are real people deserving of respect and validation, we reduce our lived experiences to shorter soundbites. Our actual experiences tend to be long ranges of nuanced events with big changes throughout that cis people don't have, even though we use their gendered narratives as our guide for validation of our genders. Gen was allowed to act that way because Gen moved through the world as a white man, facilitating, allowing, possibly motivating Gen’s abusive actions toward women. I know it is dangerous to talk about that way because Gen now moves through the world being seen as a trans feminine person. But there is no way Cosey would have been allowed to act the way Gen did in TG. That's just a fact. _______________________________________ *This is a joke alluding to the reality that randos often assume a marginalized person is representative of their entire demographic. **“Cis hets” is LGBTQ slang for “Cisgender Heterosexicals” and means people who identify with the sex and gender they were assigned at birth (for example: a woman who is not intersex who was assigned female at birth) who are straight. ***Gatekeepers are mostly medical professionals

  26. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Cosey Fanni Tutti’s large memoir. The COUM and (2) Throbbing Gristle eras take up the bulk of the book. Art Sex Music could have used an index; it would be nice to be able to look up the bands, artists, & books she mentioned. It seems the all of the pictures of TG where Sleazy, Chris, & Cosey are smiling next to a Genesis P-Orridge who it looks has just been told to behave, and is now sullenly going through the motions of doing so accurately capture the band dynamic (e.g. the cover of 20 Jazz Fu Cosey Fanni Tutti’s large memoir. The COUM and (2) Throbbing Gristle eras take up the bulk of the book. Art Sex Music could have used an index; it would be nice to be able to look up the bands, artists, & books she mentioned. It seems the all of the pictures of TG where Sleazy, Chris, & Cosey are smiling next to a Genesis P-Orridge who it looks has just been told to behave, and is now sullenly going through the motions of doing so accurately capture the band dynamic (e.g. the cover of 20 Jazz Funk Greats). I’ve always really liked TG & their sound, but I didn’t really know much about the band itself or the members before reading this book. I was kind of surprised at how much of a normal rock n roll band they were, apart from that the music they were making consisted of soundscapes punctuated by industrial jammers. I was particularly surprised that they sat down and actually wrote & planned out as many of the songs and tracks that they did. I kind of had the idea that the forlorn lyrics to tracks such as “Weeping” & “Adrenaline” were ironic send ups of pop music, instead of heartfelt songs about how Cosey left Genesis P-O & they’re sad now. Of course, I was most surprised by how shitty Genesis P-Orridge was to Cosey, and how messed-up their relationship was until TG broke up. Genesis P-O has their own account of their relationships with Cosey & with COUM, & TG, but I would tend to believe a Cosey or a Chris over the front guy for Psychic TV, which has made some great music, but had kind of an ‘infinite monkeys with typewriters’ (or in this case, synthesizers) feel to it. Art Sex Music made the life of an avant-garde noise/performance artist in 70s England seem decidedly not fun. Maybe it is because I’m old and tired. I wonder how much of that is Cosey’s perspective looking back & how much is how she felt at the time. Meanwhile, Cosey’s depicts her life now with Chris as the square Avant-Gardes dream, making art out of tampons, doing some soundscapes, and coming home for a spot of tea in a lovely garden with lots of cats. Art Sex Music also makes me wonder how many more great American bands there would be if more Americans had the option of going on the dole. I think most bios & memoirs that cover someone’s life should follow Boswell’s lead and have as a header on each page the year & year of the subject’s life (‘Aetat’) covered by that page, but I guess this is more of a comment for the publishing industry. I also think there should have been a picture section for Chris & Cosey’s cats. Much like this review, Art Sex Music could have been better organized, had some disjointed parts, and maybe could have included more, but overall, it was a great read. I’ll have to check out Factory Floor, & the collab album with Coil & Robert Wyatt.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Am I fan of Throbbing Gristle? well sort of, I like their pop side rather than their industrial one. I like 20 Jazz Funk Greats, the single United and I think the remix album Mutant TG is fantastic and then I like the Cosey and Carter tracks. As you can see I favor their melodic side. Art Sex Music is Cosey’s autobiography and it details everything from her childhood, meeting Genesis P. Orridge, becoming a member of shock performance group COUM and it’s mutation into Throbbing Gristle, then her s Am I fan of Throbbing Gristle? well sort of, I like their pop side rather than their industrial one. I like 20 Jazz Funk Greats, the single United and I think the remix album Mutant TG is fantastic and then I like the Cosey and Carter tracks. As you can see I favor their melodic side. Art Sex Music is Cosey’s autobiography and it details everything from her childhood, meeting Genesis P. Orridge, becoming a member of shock performance group COUM and it’s mutation into Throbbing Gristle, then her solo career plus Cosey’s stints as a stripper, porn star and escort. It’s A LOT. Quite few things emerge from this bio, actually with all the detail something HAS to emerge. One is that Cosey is a strong person, despite the perception that working in the sex industry means one is submissive, Cosey shows that one can hold one’s ground and take charge of the situation, even though it is difficult, especially in the 70’s and 80’s when attitudes were worse. I thought Cosey’s descriptions of the sex industry were the highlights of the book. The second major thing that I learnt is how manipulative Genesis P. Orridge, clearly this is a person who had little remorse for those around them and would ensnare their bandmates into complex mind games. Sure in interviews they always made me laugh but reading what they did to make other people miserable just made me realise how easy it is control the human brain. Unfortunately Art Sex Music’s problem is that it is too detailed in places. There is no need to describe every single COUM performance or detail TG gigs. At points I did get tired also reading about Genesis’ constant violent temper tantrums and grooming techniques made me angry. The whole book left a sour taste, which I guess is a typical TG move (although there is a happy ending). I couldn’t help thinking that I would enjoy it more if I read it when I was younger and more impressed by these acts. Rather than read this in one chunk, I suggest reading it in sections, that way the book isn’t such a headrush. Art Sex Music is not a bad book but with more editing, as stated in the acknowledgements, that this was quite an editing job from the beginning, I would enjoyed it a bit more.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Meeo

    It is sad that Cosey’s story is shadowed by GBP-o. Heard the stories of abuse by GBP-o for years and had never been a fan. Have always loved Cosey and I am thankful that she wrote this book. She teases a little with information but I respect her protection of boundaries and privacy. This book is not filled with boastful salacious stories.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nettie Grey

    Wanted to like this more than I did- a bit dry and list-filled in places. She's lead a fascinating life but it didn't quite translate to the page. Wanted to like this more than I did- a bit dry and list-filled in places. She's lead a fascinating life but it didn't quite translate to the page.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Gross

    Massively disappointing. With so much that could be written about Cosey's theory, methods, and what have you for her art and music (er, and sex), the book instead wastes page after page whinging about Genesis and other things. Gen may indeed be as toxic a person as Cosey describes, but it makes for dull reading. So much I'd love to know about COUM, Throbbing Gristle, C&C, et al, but it's not here. Cosey's editor did her a disservice by not pushing back on an obviously dull tell-all. I'm sure, ba Massively disappointing. With so much that could be written about Cosey's theory, methods, and what have you for her art and music (er, and sex), the book instead wastes page after page whinging about Genesis and other things. Gen may indeed be as toxic a person as Cosey describes, but it makes for dull reading. So much I'd love to know about COUM, Throbbing Gristle, C&C, et al, but it's not here. Cosey's editor did her a disservice by not pushing back on an obviously dull tell-all. I'm sure, based on Cosey and TG's fame / notoriety the publisher will do well with the book; too bad.

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