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The Glass Wall: Success strategies for women at work – and businesses that mean business

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Never mind the glass ceiling. In the workplace today there's a glass wall. Men and women can see each other clearly through the divide, but they don't speak the same language or have the same expectations. And as a result, women and their careers are suffering.With more women than ever in the workforce, but still too few in the boardroom, now is the time to address the ass Never mind the glass ceiling. In the workplace today there's a glass wall. Men and women can see each other clearly through the divide, but they don't speak the same language or have the same expectations. And as a result, women and their careers are suffering.With more women than ever in the workforce, but still too few in the boardroom, now is the time to address the assumptions and miscommunication holding women back. This book gives women the tools they need to master any situation. Drawing on Unerman and Jacob's own experience in male-dominated businesses, as well as over a hundred interviews with both men and women, The Glass Wall provides clear, smart and easy-to apply strategies for success. From unlocking ambition and developing resilience to nurturing creativity and getting noticed, these are the skills that everyone needs to learn to help break down that wall and create better workplaces for all.


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Never mind the glass ceiling. In the workplace today there's a glass wall. Men and women can see each other clearly through the divide, but they don't speak the same language or have the same expectations. And as a result, women and their careers are suffering.With more women than ever in the workforce, but still too few in the boardroom, now is the time to address the ass Never mind the glass ceiling. In the workplace today there's a glass wall. Men and women can see each other clearly through the divide, but they don't speak the same language or have the same expectations. And as a result, women and their careers are suffering.With more women than ever in the workforce, but still too few in the boardroom, now is the time to address the assumptions and miscommunication holding women back. This book gives women the tools they need to master any situation. Drawing on Unerman and Jacob's own experience in male-dominated businesses, as well as over a hundred interviews with both men and women, The Glass Wall provides clear, smart and easy-to apply strategies for success. From unlocking ambition and developing resilience to nurturing creativity and getting noticed, these are the skills that everyone needs to learn to help break down that wall and create better workplaces for all.

30 review for The Glass Wall: Success strategies for women at work – and businesses that mean business

  1. 4 out of 5

    Charlie

    This is an amazing book that shouldn't just be for women - men need to read this too. Each chapter has a section for advice for managers as well. The real-world examples help put the strategies into things you can visualise. It may be cheesy but this book really has changed my life. This is an amazing book that shouldn't just be for women - men need to read this too. Each chapter has a section for advice for managers as well. The real-world examples help put the strategies into things you can visualise. It may be cheesy but this book really has changed my life.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rhiannon D'Averc

    Really interesting book with good strategies. I wonder if any of the advice will change in a post-metoo world but I did find a lot of useful advice. I've started applying for jobs if I'm at least 50% qualified! My criticism is that there is a lot of repetition and the structure was quite confusing - I had to just read it like a normal book and ignore the flow chart part. Really interesting book with good strategies. I wonder if any of the advice will change in a post-metoo world but I did find a lot of useful advice. I've started applying for jobs if I'm at least 50% qualified! My criticism is that there is a lot of repetition and the structure was quite confusing - I had to just read it like a normal book and ignore the flow chart part.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Hayley Lewis

    Had mixed feelings about this book. On the whole I think it has some useful advice and tactics. The main thing that bothered me was the lack of representation and intersectional thinking - most of the roles and companies were in corporates like marketing, technology, finance etc. so not sure how applicable the advice would be in other settings. For some women it’s not just their gender at play, there’s cultural, ethnicity, health etc issues and this needs to be considered when positioning advice Had mixed feelings about this book. On the whole I think it has some useful advice and tactics. The main thing that bothered me was the lack of representation and intersectional thinking - most of the roles and companies were in corporates like marketing, technology, finance etc. so not sure how applicable the advice would be in other settings. For some women it’s not just their gender at play, there’s cultural, ethnicity, health etc issues and this needs to be considered when positioning advice. Maybe a follow up book exploring this?

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rosie Atkinson-Willes

    So inspirational I’ve insisted my whole team read it

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rai

    This book starts by stating that women shouldn’t have to simply ‘act like men’ to get by in the workplace and then takes seven chapters to explain what the men are doing and how women should do it too. Particular faves include ‘don’t cry at work’ and ‘don’t sleep with the men in your office’. Lots of ‘don’t sweat the small stuff’ in relation to toxic behaviour from men. Far too much info on how to get along with the status quo than how to change things. It’s directed towards the corporate world This book starts by stating that women shouldn’t have to simply ‘act like men’ to get by in the workplace and then takes seven chapters to explain what the men are doing and how women should do it too. Particular faves include ‘don’t cry at work’ and ‘don’t sleep with the men in your office’. Lots of ‘don’t sweat the small stuff’ in relation to toxic behaviour from men. Far too much info on how to get along with the status quo than how to change things. It’s directed towards the corporate world and mentions ‘getting to the board’ as a career goal often. Not a lot of info I could apply to my own career. The authors justified toxic masculinity in a ‘this I just the way things are’ kind of way and didn’t even suggest going to HR as an option when talking about bullying. At one point the authors describe clear sexual harassment as ‘being undermined by the chaps’. Not my fave.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mustafa Hussain

    The book starts really well, outlining the issues about only a small number of women reaching boardroom level. However I feel this book demonstrates how far things have come in the workplace over the last 10-15yrs. Yes there is gender bias & pay inequality - but if you watch reality shows like the apprentice, women are very competitive & do succeed. The advice & strategies provided, are all standard stuff from leadership & motivational books. But I’m a bloke, writing this review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lilian

    This books picks up right where Sheryl Sandberg's Lean In ends. Detailed review to follow soon. This books picks up right where Sheryl Sandberg's Lean In ends. Detailed review to follow soon.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Abigail Elent

    Really tough read. At first I thought it would be inspiring but it quickly turned into a ‘how to be a man’ guide. I feel more behind the glass wall than I did before.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte Woffindin

    Great advice and suggestions for women at work. The case studies are really relate-able and the advice easy to apply

  10. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    This book really makes you think about yourself and what is going on around you, it gives lots of practical advice for women in the work place but really covers life in the workplace and inclusivity. This book is for everyone, it is not just because you are having problems, although it does give tips and advice on this too. I am lucky at work but I still intend to carry out some of this advice and be more brave and make mistakes and let others around me do the same. The advice in the book makes This book really makes you think about yourself and what is going on around you, it gives lots of practical advice for women in the work place but really covers life in the workplace and inclusivity. This book is for everyone, it is not just because you are having problems, although it does give tips and advice on this too. I am lucky at work but I still intend to carry out some of this advice and be more brave and make mistakes and let others around me do the same. The advice in the book makes you think about being a better version of yourself. I highly recommend reading this.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Obi

    This book refers to the differences between men and women in how they communicate, think and behave. The book looks at this divide and how it prevents women from achieving their full potential in the work place. It really makes you think about yourself and what is going on around you, it gives lots of practical advice for women in the work place but really covers life in the workplace and inclusivity. It presents 41 (some overlapping) strategies that are a satisfying mixture of modifying your beh This book refers to the differences between men and women in how they communicate, think and behave. The book looks at this divide and how it prevents women from achieving their full potential in the work place. It really makes you think about yourself and what is going on around you, it gives lots of practical advice for women in the work place but really covers life in the workplace and inclusivity. It presents 41 (some overlapping) strategies that are a satisfying mixture of modifying your behaviour and being true to yourself. Depending on each reader type, strategies are split over 7 chapters that represent areas of the male-female divide, usually supported by well-grounded studies. However, only one thing I disliked about the book was the beginning scene is too long. In fact there are foreword, preface and then intro sections. I literally felt like loosing patience waiting for the book to start giving me actual strategies. All in all, the book was definitely an addictive, fun and relatable read. Must read for any working woman or leaders who are looking at boosting inclusivity in their organisations.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Ashong-quinn

    This book has become my new bible for navigating the corporate male dominated environment. It's written in a matter of fact style that gets straight to the point and easy to use for quick reference. This book has become my new bible for navigating the corporate male dominated environment. It's written in a matter of fact style that gets straight to the point and easy to use for quick reference.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Fundamentally I enjoyed this... as much as you can enjoy a leadership and management book! The personal stories bring it to life and the way the chapters are laid out make the key messages land. I found the focus on working Mothers a little much, not all working women are Mums (yet) but I guess my view of that will change one day. As a middle/ senior level manager I found the insights ‘on the way up’ and ‘from the top’ helpful. I think I’ll come back to it when difficult scenarios arise. I am gl Fundamentally I enjoyed this... as much as you can enjoy a leadership and management book! The personal stories bring it to life and the way the chapters are laid out make the key messages land. I found the focus on working Mothers a little much, not all working women are Mums (yet) but I guess my view of that will change one day. As a middle/ senior level manager I found the insights ‘on the way up’ and ‘from the top’ helpful. I think I’ll come back to it when difficult scenarios arise. I am glad I read it and think I learned a lot.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Anasuya Das

    Really good. The case studies are great ways to showcase what theyre actually talking about. The short summaries regarding key takeaways are very helpful

  15. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  16. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alice

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dana Alkandari

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dee

  20. 4 out of 5

    Angelika Kim

  21. 5 out of 5

    Roberta Ronzitti

  22. 5 out of 5

    Liberty

  23. 5 out of 5

    Leah Phillips

  24. 4 out of 5

    Miranda Gowlland

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lindi

  26. 5 out of 5

    Taisiya Merkulova

  27. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hollie O'Sullivan

  30. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Lawson

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