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For generations Blackwood Bay, a quaint village in northern England, has been famous only for the smuggling that occurred along its coastline centuries ago, but then two local girls disappear bringing the town a fresh and dark notoriety. When Alex, an ambitious documentary filmmaker, arrives in Blackwood Bay, she intends to have the residents record their own stories as he For generations Blackwood Bay, a quaint village in northern England, has been famous only for the smuggling that occurred along its coastline centuries ago, but then two local girls disappear bringing the town a fresh and dark notoriety. When Alex, an ambitious documentary filmmaker, arrives in Blackwood Bay, she intends to have the residents record their own stories as her next project. But instead of a quaint community, Alex finds a village blighted by economic downturn and haunted by a tragedy that overshadows every corner. Alex pushes on with her work, but secrets old and new rise to the surface, raising tensions and suspicions in a town already on edge. Alex’s work takes her to dark places and uncomfortable truths which threaten to lead to a deadly unravelling.


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For generations Blackwood Bay, a quaint village in northern England, has been famous only for the smuggling that occurred along its coastline centuries ago, but then two local girls disappear bringing the town a fresh and dark notoriety. When Alex, an ambitious documentary filmmaker, arrives in Blackwood Bay, she intends to have the residents record their own stories as he For generations Blackwood Bay, a quaint village in northern England, has been famous only for the smuggling that occurred along its coastline centuries ago, but then two local girls disappear bringing the town a fresh and dark notoriety. When Alex, an ambitious documentary filmmaker, arrives in Blackwood Bay, she intends to have the residents record their own stories as her next project. But instead of a quaint community, Alex finds a village blighted by economic downturn and haunted by a tragedy that overshadows every corner. Alex pushes on with her work, but secrets old and new rise to the surface, raising tensions and suspicions in a town already on edge. Alex’s work takes her to dark places and uncomfortable truths which threaten to lead to a deadly unravelling.

30 review for Final Cut

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sandy *The world could end while I was reading and I would never notice*

    EXCERPT: I lay on the bed staring at the ceiling, my open phone heavy in my hand. I'd found only one number in the memory. It seemed simple. If I wanted to find out who I was, all I had to do was dial it. So why couldn't I do it? ABOUT THIS BOOK: For generations Blackwood Bay, a quaint village in northern England, has been famous only for the smuggling that occurred along its coastline centuries ago, but then two local girls disappear bringing the town a fresh and dark notoriety. When Alex, an am EXCERPT: I lay on the bed staring at the ceiling, my open phone heavy in my hand. I'd found only one number in the memory. It seemed simple. If I wanted to find out who I was, all I had to do was dial it. So why couldn't I do it? ABOUT THIS BOOK: For generations Blackwood Bay, a quaint village in northern England, has been famous only for the smuggling that occurred along its coastline centuries ago, but then two local girls disappear bringing the town a fresh and dark notoriety. When Alex, an ambitious documentary filmmaker, arrives in Blackwood Bay, she intends to have the residents record their own stories as her next project. But instead of a quaint community, Alex finds a village blighted by economic downturn and haunted by a tragedy that overshadows every corner. Alex pushes on with her work, but secrets old and new rise to the surface, raising tensions and suspicions in a town already on edge. Alex’s work takes her to dark places and uncomfortable truths which threaten to lead to a deadly unravelling. MY THOUGHTS: I loved Second Life by S.J. Watson, it earned a glorious five stars from me. But Final Cut? I struggled to finish it. Had I been given this book with no previous experience of the author, I would have said that it was a debut novel, and not a very good one at that. There is a lot of dialogue, far too much, and far too many questions, endless questions. These two things killed what little suspense there was for me. And there was very little of that. Occasional flashes of brilliance shine through - like the grave on the moors. I got excited at that point, certain that all was going to come right and that this was going to be the great read I had been expecting. That didn't happen. Instead, the storyline seemed to get bogged down in itself and I lost interest. I even thought about not finishing it, but read on in the hope that my faith in this author would be justified. There is nothing new in this plot. We have a young woman with amnesia, drawn back to her home town. Missing teenage girls - of whom 'Alex' is one. But no one recognizes her (there's a reason for that which just didn't gel for me), and she doesn't seem to recognize many people in the village either. Her mother is conveniently no longer living there. And no mention is made of people she may have gone to school with . . . So, we have an unreliable narrator, a mysterious man living in an isolated house, an abandoned caravan, three missing girls, and strange behaviour by the villagers. It sounds enticing, doesn't it? Like it should be a good suspenseful mystery. But it's not. It flounders. And it has one of those endings that I just hate - where all is 'explained' in a conversation, this one between 'Alex' and her psychiatrist. 🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️ #FinalCut #NetGalley THE AUTHOR: S.J. Watson was born in the UK, lives in London, and worked in the NHS for several years. DISCLOSURE: Thank you to Random House, Transworld Publishers via Netgalley for providing a digital ARC of Final Cut by S.J. Watson for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions. A lot of other readers love this book. Reading is a very personal subjective experience, and not every book is for every reader. So, if you enjoyed the extract, and the plot summary interests you, please do read Final Cut by S.J. Watson. I hope that you are one of the many who love this book. For an explanation of my rating system please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the about page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com This review and others are also published on Twitter, Amazon, Instagram, and my webpage https://sandysbookaday.wordpress.com/...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ceecee

    Alex is a documentary film maker. She is commissioned by Channel 4 to make a fly on the wall type film about Blackwood Bay, a small Yorkshire coastal village. Alex travels there with a heavy heart as the village has an unsettling past. Several girls have gone missing over the last ten years, one of them, a girl called Daisy is reputed to have committed suicide. Alex knows the place but how and why? Over the following few days, Alex begins to have some perturbing partial memories which haunt her. Alex is a documentary film maker. She is commissioned by Channel 4 to make a fly on the wall type film about Blackwood Bay, a small Yorkshire coastal village. Alex travels there with a heavy heart as the village has an unsettling past. Several girls have gone missing over the last ten years, one of them, a girl called Daisy is reputed to have committed suicide. Alex knows the place but how and why? Over the following few days, Alex begins to have some perturbing partial memories which haunt her. She starts to ask a lot of questions to make sense of this and her feelings that something bad is happening is further reinforced by some of the film clips villagers send her. What is the truth? What happens to the girls? Alex is determined to find out. Alex tells the story which is interspersed with news and case reports from a few years ago. The premise is good as is the first half of the book which has a sense of mystery, intrigue and a ghostly element. The setting is very atmospheric with the steep streets, quaint shops, surrounded by the North York Moors and enclosed with secrets. I imagine somewhere like Robin Hoods Bay which helps me to get a vision in my head! There are some intriguing elements that bind the missing girls together and Alex’s returning memories are interesting as a lot of these are raw and show she sank low at one point. The characters are good with a mix of likeable, unlikeable and untrustworthy. Unfortunately, about half way through the storyline flatlines and is never shocked back into life. It goes round and round in circles, with pointless questions and oh boy, are there ever a lot of questions, there’s too much navel (and star) gazing, the plot wears thin, so much becomes obvious so the element of surprise is gone and it goes on and on with no resolution in sight. The tension and menace of the first half diminishes and the conclusion is so melodramatic I just didn’t buy it. This is such a pity as the first half I’d rate a four star and the second is sadly a two star, hence the meet in the middle three. Overall, this was shaping up to be a good read but the momentum disappears which is disappointing. With thanks to NetGalley and Penguin Random House for the ARC.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Javier

    Alex is a film maker going back to shoot her latest documentary to Blackwood Bay, her hometown, a seaside town where in the last ten years a girl committed suicide and another two went missing. When she was young she suffered some kind of trauma that caused her dissociative amnesia so when she goes back she intends to find out what happened to her and the other girls. While not being the most original premise it started strong enough with a MC with an intriguing backstory, a good set of character Alex is a film maker going back to shoot her latest documentary to Blackwood Bay, her hometown, a seaside town where in the last ten years a girl committed suicide and another two went missing. When she was young she suffered some kind of trauma that caused her dissociative amnesia so when she goes back she intends to find out what happened to her and the other girls. While not being the most original premise it started strong enough with a MC with an intriguing backstory, a good set of characters (maybe too many) and an atmosferic setting that added to that sense of menace. But it came a point where the story started to stall, going aroung in circles and not getting anywhere. It felt like Alex was in a hamster wheel! We get a lot of "I can't tell you", "you better get out of here", "it's better you don't know" and loaded glances and silences. Come on! What's the point of having Alex investigate if no one is telling her anything. Communicate, people, COMMUNICATE! Alex running around Blackwood Bay trying to solve something It's not till the last 25% that it picks up some pace again, but the ending felt a bit contrived and the big twist wasn't so surprising as I've recently read another book with the exact same one, so I saw it coming from afar. Not a bad book per se, but for fans of psychological suspense one we've already read dozens of times. Thanks to Netgalley and Random House UK/Transworld Publishers for providing an eARC in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mandy White

    Well, SJ Watson has done it again with Final Cut. His first book, Before I Go To Sleep, is one of my favourite books (the movie not so much) and I was so excited to read his new book. As always, his characters are real and flawed, his settings are dark and creepy and the story was twisty and enthralling. I was not disappointed and recommend this to mystery book lovers. It is a slow burn, with alot of scene setting, background on characters and jumping between the past and present. I devoured it o Well, SJ Watson has done it again with Final Cut. His first book, Before I Go To Sleep, is one of my favourite books (the movie not so much) and I was so excited to read his new book. As always, his characters are real and flawed, his settings are dark and creepy and the story was twisty and enthralling. I was not disappointed and recommend this to mystery book lovers. It is a slow burn, with alot of scene setting, background on characters and jumping between the past and present. I devoured it over a few nights and was sad when it was over. I love the way SJ Watson writes, it is very visual. I was lucky enough to attend an online chat with him and Anna Downes a few weeks ago. It is always interesting to hear how writers get their ideas and get them from their head to the final book. Our main character is Alex, a young documentary maker. She returns to Blackwood Bay, a village in the north of England to film a fly on the wall special about the town. Little do the residents realise that she grew up here, but she has changed so much since then. But her memory is foggy at best. Alex isn't the only one with secrets, it seems that everybody has something to hide. There are missing girls and the suicide of another teenage girl in the towns dirty laundry. Nobody wants to talk about that, but Alex wants to know what happened and why. Fragments of her memory start to come back to her during her investigation and soon she finds that the past is coming back to haunt her. Absolutely fantastic book. All the stars!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Pauline

    Alex is sent to make a film in her home town of Blackwood Bay. She hasn’t been home for a long time because of an incident that happened to her that she has little memory of. Two girls have gone missing and the town is suspicious of people arriving asking questions. A slow moving psychological thriller. Thank you to NetGalley and Random House UK, Transworld Publishers for my e-copy in exchange for an honest review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Farshana ❤️rainnbooks❤️

    Many thanks to Net Galley, Random House UK, Transworld Publishers and the author for the ARC of this book. #FinalCut #NetGalley Let me begin with an apology to the author S J Watson, for having kept his phenomenally successful Before I Go To Sleep in the mountainous TBR pile for few years now. After reading Final Cut, I am cursing myself for not having gobbled up every work that the author has published. I have raised my head from the kindle, walked around quite a bit and gave it a day before I cou Many thanks to Net Galley, Random House UK, Transworld Publishers and the author for the ARC of this book. #FinalCut #NetGalley Let me begin with an apology to the author S J Watson, for having kept his phenomenally successful Before I Go To Sleep in the mountainous TBR pile for few years now. After reading Final Cut, I am cursing myself for not having gobbled up every work that the author has published. I have raised my head from the kindle, walked around quite a bit and gave it a day before I could calm my heart to write this review. Of course, the burning eyes also needed a respite after that intense concentration to keep going and going and going in the race to finish and find the truth. Alex Young is in Blackwood Bay, the last place she wants to be for a documentary film. The quiet fishing village harbors dark secrets with 2 girls missing and 1 having committed suicide, but Alex, suffering from a traumatic past that has left her with dissociative amnesia is determined to unravel the past and the reasons for her fugue state. The past seems to be holding sway even in the present as Alex finds out about young 13 and 14 yr old girls being lured by drugs and booze for causes unknown. As Alex delves further into the mystery, clueless about whom to trust and battling her own fractured mind, the story becomes more murkier like the black waters surrounding the village. Many characters get introduced into the story and there’s quite a bit of going round and round with almost all the people refusing to confide in Alex and talk about the missing girls but the final part of the story was cracking with menace, the atmospheric feel in the story adding to the chill factor. As fans of psychological thrillers, the twists and turns can be fairly guessed at, but still the book was extremely compelling and riveting enough that I had a real hard time keeping it down for even a sec. Well deserved 4.5 stars!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Liz Barnsley

    I'm a fan of S J Watson's writing and storytelling generally speaking and Final Cut was again a well written and well plotted novel so as far as quality goes, excellent. The story is a fairly standard psychological thriller- girl returns to town she fled years ago, lacking memory of reasons for trauma, the town is hiding secrets and we have plenty of twisty happenings. It is very readable and entertaining, I got through it in two large bites and enjoyed it for the most part. I guess my one littl I'm a fan of S J Watson's writing and storytelling generally speaking and Final Cut was again a well written and well plotted novel so as far as quality goes, excellent. The story is a fairly standard psychological thriller- girl returns to town she fled years ago, lacking memory of reasons for trauma, the town is hiding secrets and we have plenty of twisty happenings. It is very readable and entertaining, I got through it in two large bites and enjoyed it for the most part. I guess my one little bugbear is that despite the authors very obvious talent the story itself is probably one of the most predictable I've read in a while. That is subjective of course and I do read this type of book a lot so am used to the various tropes of the genre -that plays into the predictability or lack thereof in any that I read. But you know this is, at the heart of it, a book you may well feel you've read multiple times already. That said it didn't stop me liking it. The characters were intriguing and well drawn and it was a good read to while away an afternoon with.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lou

    Final Cut is a captivating psychological thriller in which SJ Watson explores themes of memory and identity as a young documentary filmmaker travels to a quiet fishing village to shoot a new film, only to encounter a dark mystery surrounding the disappearance of a local girl. For generations Blackwood Bay, a quaint village in northern England, has been famous only for the smuggling that occurred along its coastline centuries ago, but then two local girls disappear bringing the town a fresh and d Final Cut is a captivating psychological thriller in which SJ Watson explores themes of memory and identity as a young documentary filmmaker travels to a quiet fishing village to shoot a new film, only to encounter a dark mystery surrounding the disappearance of a local girl. For generations Blackwood Bay, a quaint village in northern England, has been famous only for the smuggling that occurred along its coastline centuries ago, but then two local girls disappear bringing the town a fresh and dark notoriety. When Alex, an ambitious documentary filmmaker, arrives in Blackwood Bay, she intends to have the residents record their own stories as her next project. But instead of a quaint community, Alex finds a village blighted by economic downturn and haunted by a tragedy that overshadows every corner. Alex pushes on with her work, but secrets old and new rise to the surface, raising tensions and suspicions in a town already on edge. Alex's work takes her to dark places and uncomfortable truths which threaten to lead to a deadly unravelling. Shifting seamlessly between past and present-day to create a fully rounded narrative, we are treated to an intense slow-burn thriller with a tense and oppressive atmosphere which continues the whole way through. Blackwood Bay is almost afforded cult-like status in the book and it was described in such a way that, let's just say, you'll want to avoid visiting. It's the same small-town case of secrets, lies and skeletons awaiting escape from the closet and certain individuals who will do anything to stop the truth from emerging. As with most close-knit community, many residents know exactly what is or has gone on but carry on with their lives and ignore it. That said, there are the local busybody's who enjoy nothing better than gossiping in the street about other peoples business. Main protagonist, Alex, is a likeable yet mysterious character and it becomes clear later in the book that she is more involved than we initially realised. All in all, a riveting and gripping story in which nothing is what it appears. Many thanks to Doubleday for an ARC.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sandy *The world could end while I was reading and I would never notice*

    EXCERPT: I lay on the bed staring at the ceiling, my open phone heavy in my hand. I'd found only one number in the memory. It seemed simple. If I wanted to find out who I was, all I had to do was dial it. So why couldn't I do it? ABOUT THIS BOOK: For generations Blackwood Bay, a quaint village in northern England, has been famous only for the smuggling that occurred along its coastline centuries ago, but then two local girls disappear bringing the town a fresh and dark notoriety. When Alex, an am EXCERPT: I lay on the bed staring at the ceiling, my open phone heavy in my hand. I'd found only one number in the memory. It seemed simple. If I wanted to find out who I was, all I had to do was dial it. So why couldn't I do it? ABOUT THIS BOOK: For generations Blackwood Bay, a quaint village in northern England, has been famous only for the smuggling that occurred along its coastline centuries ago, but then two local girls disappear bringing the town a fresh and dark notoriety. When Alex, an ambitious documentary filmmaker, arrives in Blackwood Bay, she intends to have the residents record their own stories as her next project. But instead of a quaint community, Alex finds a village blighted by economic downturn and haunted by a tragedy that overshadows every corner. Alex pushes on with her work, but secrets old and new rise to the surface, raising tensions and suspicions in a town already on edge. Alex’s work takes her to dark places and uncomfortable truths which threaten to lead to a deadly unravelling. MY THOUGHTS: I loved Second Life by S.J. Watson, it earned a glorious five stars from me. But Final Cut? I struggled to finish it. Had I been given this book with no previous experience of the author, I would have said that it was a debut novel, and not a very good one at that. There is a lot of dialogue, far too much, and far too many questions, endless. These two things killed what little suspense there was for me. And there was very little of that. Occasional flashes of brilliance shine through - like the grave on the moors. I got excited at that point, certain that all was going to come right and that this was going to be the great read I had been expecting. That didn't happen. Instead, the storyline seemed to get bogged down in itself and I lost interest. I even thought about not finishing it, but read on in the hope that my faith in this author would be justified. There is nothing new in this plot. We have a young woman with amnesia, drawn back to her home town. Missing teenage girls - of whom 'Alex' is one. But no one recognizes her (there's a reason for that which just didn't gel for me), and she doesn't seem to recognize many people in the village either. Her mother is conveniently no longer living there. And no mention is made of people she may have gone to school with . . . So, we have an unreliable narrator, a mysterious man living in an isolated house, an abandoned caravan, three missing girls, and strange behaviour by the villagers. It sounds enticing, doesn't it? Like it should be a good suspenseful mystery. But it's not. It flounders. And it has one of those endings that I just hate - where all is 'explained' in a conversation, this one between 'Alex' and her psychiatrist. 🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️ #FinalCut #NetGalley THE AUTHOR: S.J. Watson was born in the UK, lives in London, and worked in the NHS for several years. DISCLOSURE: Thank you to Random House, Transworld Publishers via Netgalley for providing a digital ARC of Final Cut by S.J. Watson for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions. A lot of other readers love this book. Reading is a very personal subjective experience, and not every book is for every reader. So, if you enjoyed the extract, and the plot summary interests you, please do read Final Cut by S.J. Watson. I hope that you are one of the many who love this book. For an explanation of my rating system please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the about page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com This review and others are also published on Twitter, Amazon, Instagram, and my webpage

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I wanted to love this and was so excited about a new novel by Watson but I wasn’t bowled over by this novel. It felt very formulaic and predictable from the get go and it felt like an over told idea. Watson still writes well and builds up tension perfectly but it just wasn’t very exciting or unique for me. Sorry!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mogsy (MMOGC)

    3.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2020/08/25/... S.J. Watson’s debut Before I Go to Sleep was a book I read early in my blogging days, and as I recall, I was quite taken with its rather unusual handling of the good old amnesia plot. Thus I was quite intrigued when I found out about his new book Final Cut, another psychologically-driven suspense mystery dealing with memory loss. Alex Young is the protagonist of this novel, who over the years has made quite a name for her 3.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2020/08/25/... S.J. Watson’s debut Before I Go to Sleep was a book I read early in my blogging days, and as I recall, I was quite taken with its rather unusual handling of the good old amnesia plot. Thus I was quite intrigued when I found out about his new book Final Cut, another psychologically-driven suspense mystery dealing with memory loss. Alex Young is the protagonist of this novel, who over the years has made quite a name for herself as an award-winning documentary filmmaker specializing in covering hard-hitting social issues. To keep at the top of her game though, she’ll need a new angle, and in spite of herself, she knows there’s a good story in the small dreary village of Blackwood Bay tucked away along the northern English coast. A town with a notorious history of smuggling, it’s also where teenage girls have a disturbing tendency to disappear without a trace. The last decade alone saw multiple reports of missing victims, and while some say they ran away, at least one is believed to be dead, having committed suicide by hurling herself off the cliffs. But while there’s no doubt Blackwood Bay is a haunted place, that doesn’t fully explain the feelings of dread that come over Alex when she arrives in town. For she herself has a dark past that she doesn’t like to talk about, that she can’t even remember. Something terrible happened to her when she was a girl, something which led her to develop dissociative amnesia. However, lately the memories have begun slowly trickling back, and being in the strangely familiar environment of Blackwood Bay has somehow made them worse and more confusing. As Alex begins her investigation by conducting interviews and collecting stories about the missing girls, she begins to develop a sinking suspicion that she might have been one of them, and that maybe she had run away from this place to escape something terrible. I’ll give the novel this—it had an intriguing premise. But as you can probably tell from my rating, I wasn’t completely blown away. Books like this are starting to make me wonder if thrillers and mysteries about amnesia and memory loss are even worth picking up anymore, because they always end up reusing the same formulaic plot lines and devices, not to mention the heavy dependence on the unreliable narrator trope. I had thought Final Cut might be different because of the interesting perspectives presented to us in Before I Go to Sleep, but in this case I might have let my expectations get the better of me. Still, that’s not to say this was a bad book. I thought it had a good solid plot, even if everything was fairly predictable. Watson does a great job building suspense, though, by creating a soul-draining kind of bleakness around the setting, and one method by which he achieved this was through painting a downright unpleasant history for Blackwood Bay. Some places are said to have bad karma, and surely this seaside village is a good example. The crimes and abuses revealed to have taken place here were just plain awful, and over the years these evils appear to have poisoned the entire town including its residents, who all seem to go about their miserable lives with a demoralized, resigned air. That said, in spite of the abundance of atmosphere, the story does start losing its steam after a while. Keep in mind that while Alex is busy figuring out her past, readers are also seeing the world through her eyes and putting all the pieces together, getting ever closer to figuring out the final twist. Eventually, I think the author realized it was getting a little too obvious and decided to send the protagonist off running in circles or chasing dead-end leads, all in a thinly-veiled attempt to stall for time and throw us off the scent. Personally, I didn’t think it worked out too well. The result is a moody mystery that reads more like a drama than true suspense, much less a psychological thriller, and yes, in some ways this was disappointing because I had expected the latter. Nevertheless, I wouldn’t write off the novel completely, especially if you find the premise interesting. Although I found the thriller aspect and final twist to be a bust, if you enjoy mystery noir stories with their hopelessly flawed and troubled protagonists and gloomy atmospheric settings, you will probably find a lot to like in Final Cut. Audiobook Comments: Multiple narrators made this audiobook a fuller experience, and they all delivered great performances, bringing the various people in the story to life. Alex’s parts were particularly well done, with the reader’s voice giving emotional weight to the character’s quest to investigate the disappearances in Blackwood Bay and solve the mystery of her past.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Danni The Girl

    Thank you to Netgally for the Arc. So I felt a bit hit and miss with this author. I loved Before I go to sleep it's one of my favourite books ever, the second book Second life, not so much. I thought I'd give this a go, as it sounded along the same lines as Before I go to sleep, it filled me with promise. It didn't fulfill those promises. I actually lost count how many questions are asked in this book. I think every other scripted part is a question. There are never any answers. I think he was tr Thank you to Netgally for the Arc. So I felt a bit hit and miss with this author. I loved Before I go to sleep it's one of my favourite books ever, the second book Second life, not so much. I thought I'd give this a go, as it sounded along the same lines as Before I go to sleep, it filled me with promise. It didn't fulfill those promises. I actually lost count how many questions are asked in this book. I think every other scripted part is a question. There are never any answers. I think he was trying to build up the suspense and mystery, and I felt it was just dragged out with these constant questions, I just got fed up. It felt like they were trying too hard to make it mysterious. The ending was predictable. I'd already guessed towards the beginning. I'm glad it's over. It was a try hard that fell flat. I think maybe if you haven't read this author before you might enjoy it with fresh eyes. It just wasn't for me.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shalini

    The book started fine with a documentary shooting, an amnesic main characters and suspense in the village. then it started to lose its steam and meandered through the midway, and I began to lose interest in it too. I skim read parts of it to get to the end. An okay read

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Read most of it ... gave up ..... disappointed!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Renny Barcelos

    This was a huge disappointment, although I should have known better after this author's second book, which I did not like at all. I loved Before I go to Sleep, but perhaps it's time to part ways with S. J. Watson, since clearly the other novels were not for my taste. ***Be aware of minor spoilers ahead*** What we have here is another drama that resembles more a soap opera than a psychological thriller, full of cliches (I swear, I can't anymore with the fugue states and dissociative memories. It's This was a huge disappointment, although I should have known better after this author's second book, which I did not like at all. I loved Before I go to Sleep, but perhaps it's time to part ways with S. J. Watson, since clearly the other novels were not for my taste. ***Be aware of minor spoilers ahead*** What we have here is another drama that resembles more a soap opera than a psychological thriller, full of cliches (I swear, I can't anymore with the fugue states and dissociative memories. It's been done and redone so, but so many times by now, please authors, just stop!) and weak characters that can't hold the flimsy plot. We can see almost all the supposed twists from the beginning and the first person narration does not help matters at all.. I also did not like the dialogue, and was never really engaged with the story. All in all this was not the novel for me but I can imagine others liking it since the trope of "unreliable narrator girl who has to come back to her small town where she suffered so much she even blocked some memories but now she'll solve everything and finally she'll be happy" seems to be in yet... I'd like to thank NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an ARC of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mary Picken

    Alex is a documentary film-maker, whose first film garnered her some excellent praise, but she’s struggled to find a new idea that inspires her and the commissions are not rolling in. An idea she has pitched to a production company has merit and they’re keen for her to proceed with it, but they want it attached to a place with a story to give the film a real hook. So Alex arrives in Blackwood Bay, a place that she never wanted to be. Once a pretty enough place with a bit of a tourism industry, no Alex is a documentary film-maker, whose first film garnered her some excellent praise, but she’s struggled to find a new idea that inspires her and the commissions are not rolling in. An idea she has pitched to a production company has merit and they’re keen for her to proceed with it, but they want it attached to a place with a story to give the film a real hook. So Alex arrives in Blackwood Bay, a place that she never wanted to be. Once a pretty enough place with a bit of a tourism industry, now it is run down and somewhat neglected and the atmosphere is one of distrust, especially to newcomers. That’s not surprising, since the media have crawled all over it after three young girls disappeared 10 years ago. Alex is our narrator and we quickly learn that her documentary style is to seek film and video from users wherever she is filming and she uses that to stitch together a portrait of the place she is portraying. S. J. Watson does an excellent job of building a picture of the town and its key characters and creating an atmospheric, oppressive feeling that lingers as Alex – herself struggling with being in Blackwood and showing signs of not being an entirely reliable narrator – tries to get to the bottom of who or what caused these young women to disappear. There are those who don’t want her raking up the past, understandably, and Alex is a bit quick to judge based on rumour and hearsay. What becomes clear though is that there is still a malevolent force in this town and that whoever is behind it is not taking well to Alex digging into the past. S.J. Watson does write a fabulously dark and well plotted story and on the whole I enjoyed reading this and found the many twisted moments entertaining as the plot unfurled. But if you read a lot of psychological thrillers, this plot will not stun you, and it won’t come as a complete surprise when you find out what really been going on. Final Cut has a solid pace for most of the book then ramps up towards the end as the town’s secrets start to spill out at an unstoppable rate and the tension jumps several notches for the dramatic conclusion of this psychological thriller. Verdict: Verdict: A solid and enjoyable read with a nicely claustrophobic, oppressive atmosphere and some creepy characters but which at times felt a little too guessable – but then I read an awful lot of psychological thrillers.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Etienne

    2,5/5. An entertaining when you don’t think about it too much. The first 2/3 of it was good enough, we want to go what happen, the pace is good, we turn the page and enjoy doing so. But when you close the book, get out of the ambiance, and start thinking about it, you see the unrealistic element that seem to be everywhere. Why everybody is so happy to talk about their dark history to a newcomer wanna-be filmmaker? Why does relation and intimacy go so fast? Why do the event just fit perfectly tog 2,5/5. An entertaining when you don’t think about it too much. The first 2/3 of it was good enough, we want to go what happen, the pace is good, we turn the page and enjoy doing so. But when you close the book, get out of the ambiance, and start thinking about it, you see the unrealistic element that seem to be everywhere. Why everybody is so happy to talk about their dark history to a newcomer wanna-be filmmaker? Why does relation and intimacy go so fast? Why do the event just fit perfectly together everywhere? The narrative is a bit force from time to time and we saw it easily but still when you are reading it you enjoy doing so. The last third is less fun. The forced elements are just too many and too much forced, so we go from unrealistic to just nonsense. The end was a big deception and I saw I coming from very far. So overall the book is a bit of a remake of many plots seen in the last years, lack originality and even the execution is just average. And it’s even worse since I was expecting this book a lot, waiting for it and with this author, well I had way higher expectations. If you don’t read much thriller you might enjoy it still, but if you have read a good bunch, the similarity, the tropes and the lines and glue trying to keep it together will just be too evident to just let them pass.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Joanna Park

    The Final Cut is an intriguing and compelling read which had me gripped from the first page. It’s going to be a hard book to review as I don’t want to give anything away. The story is told in two parts; the now one follows Alex as she attempts to make a film at a northern sea side town while trying to solve the mystery of two girls who vanished there. The Then part of the story follows a mysterious girl who is found with minor injuries but suffering from memory loss. Both storylines were very int The Final Cut is an intriguing and compelling read which had me gripped from the first page. It’s going to be a hard book to review as I don’t want to give anything away. The story is told in two parts; the now one follows Alex as she attempts to make a film at a northern sea side town while trying to solve the mystery of two girls who vanished there. The Then part of the story follows a mysterious girl who is found with minor injuries but suffering from memory loss. Both storylines were very interesting and I enjoyed watching them develop especially as I didn’t have a favourite which was unusual for me. It was interesting to see how the two stories fit together and to discover more about what had been going on. Alex was a very interesting main character, especially as I wasn’t sure if I liked or trusted her. I did feel a lot of sympathy towards all the hardships she had experienced in her life but she seemed to be keeping a lot of secrets from everyone which made me unsure of her motives. I went between feeling irritated with her and her attitude to wanting to give her the hug I felt she needed. I thought this story was quite fast paced with lots of twists and turns that kept me guessing until the end. There was an fantastic feeling of menace and unease hanging over the story which was very intriguing and made me want to keep reading as I really wanted to know what was going to happen. The ending was absolutely brilliant as it was completely unexpected, shocking and totally original. Huge thanks to Anne Cater for inviting me onto the blog tour and to Transworld for my copy of this book via Netgalley.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Disappointing.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    What sounded like an interesting plot quickly turned out to be unrealistic and filled with obvious attempts at fooling the reader. Lots of different characters, flipping between "then" and "now", characters hiding in shadows and slinking around in the darkness, characters advising Alex not to trust others... it was all just like a poor thriller movie for me. I guessed the major twist fairly early on and found the rest of the book to be frustratingly over-complicated and not particularly well wri What sounded like an interesting plot quickly turned out to be unrealistic and filled with obvious attempts at fooling the reader. Lots of different characters, flipping between "then" and "now", characters hiding in shadows and slinking around in the darkness, characters advising Alex not to trust others... it was all just like a poor thriller movie for me. I guessed the major twist fairly early on and found the rest of the book to be frustratingly over-complicated and not particularly well written. I didn't find it at all believable that a stranger could go to a small village, start filming the locals and asking questions like she asks and the locals not be upset, offended or annoyed! Alex's character had no right to ask the questions she was asking, to visit the people she visited but she was practically welcomed in and given all the information she was asking for. This didn't feel remotely believable to me and I was increasingly annoyed by it. Final Cut was not a book I enjoyed unfortunately. I was intrigued as to how it would finish but really just wanted it to be over. The ending felt like the author was trying for a movie-worthy ending but for me it was just over the top. Thank you to NetGalley, S. J. Watson and Random House UK for the eARC in exchange for an honest review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Danni The Girl

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Thank you to Netgally for the ARC I was giving this author a second chance. Loved Before I go to sleep, I didn't like Second life and I just didn't like this one either. I felt excited when I started reading and realised that some of this is based in my home town, but that was about it. There was so much that annoyed me about this book. I thought on reading it, that the build up of all this drug stuff was maybe to deter the reader from the truth, but no. It was all a big build up to then confirm Thank you to Netgally for the ARC I was giving this author a second chance. Loved Before I go to sleep, I didn't like Second life and I just didn't like this one either. I felt excited when I started reading and realised that some of this is based in my home town, but that was about it. There was so much that annoyed me about this book. I thought on reading it, that the build up of all this drug stuff was maybe to deter the reader from the truth, but no. It was all a big build up to then confirm it was all to do with drugs. Boring. It has been done. I didn't click with the characters, and I just felt this was an alternative spin on other stories. It is just over done and didn't bring out anything new. Also with the build up, there was a lot of "mystery" it was the main character constantly asking questions, and people answering her with more questions. This in turn became very boring and very confusing. I don't think a single question got answered in this book. I did enjoy the description of the landscapes, it did create a nice imagery, but that was all I liked. I think I am going to have to say goodbye to this author.

  22. 5 out of 5

    L.A. Berry

    The author of one of my favourite books 'Before I Go To Sleep' , S. J. Watson, has presented his fans with another excellent thriller to enjoy. Once again, he has given us a main character, Alex, who suffers memory loss as the result of traumatic experiences and as the plot develops, the gaps in her recollections are revealed. I won't spoil the book for other readers by revealing some of the twists but be assured there are plenty. The pace of the story never flags and there are plenty of interes The author of one of my favourite books 'Before I Go To Sleep' , S. J. Watson, has presented his fans with another excellent thriller to enjoy. Once again, he has given us a main character, Alex, who suffers memory loss as the result of traumatic experiences and as the plot develops, the gaps in her recollections are revealed. I won't spoil the book for other readers by revealing some of the twists but be assured there are plenty. The pace of the story never flags and there are plenty of interesting characters. The ending is a thriller worthy climax.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Bridgeman

    This is a book to be read strapped into your favourite chair as it takes off at breakneck speed, and doesn;t let up. The ominious warnings are there right from the start for Alex, film maker on her last chance to really follow up her award winning doucmentary with a film that will make her career. A mysterious , unsigned postcard to her producer recommends she goes to a small costal town called Blackwood Bay. Dubious musgivings about what she can film there aside, her introduction to the town is a This is a book to be read strapped into your favourite chair as it takes off at breakneck speed, and doesn;t let up. The ominious warnings are there right from the start for Alex, film maker on her last chance to really follow up her award winning doucmentary with a film that will make her career. A mysterious , unsigned postcard to her producer recommends she goes to a small costal town called Blackwood Bay. Dubious musgivings about what she can film there aside, her introduction to the town is a dead sheep in the middle of the road which forces her to swerve and crash her car. Rescued by Gavin,. a local contact/community center film club organiser who will connect her with various locals in order to film her expose of small town life, she steps into a deeply gothic nightmare of identity, personality and abuse. The young girls of the town are being targeted in a manner that makes disappearances look like they were runaways-at least 3 in the past decade have either taken their own lives of vanished. Sadie, Daisy and Zoe have become spectres which haunt the landscape, populated by oddball characters recognisable in any small town or village pub, who regard Alex with suspicion tempered with curiousity as to how they will be portrayed. Havign set up a website where locals can submit their own films to create an honest protrait of the town, sinister occurences lead Alex to believe that she is getting closer to the truth of how teen girls are being exploited. But as her suspicions grow, so memories of her own teen years slowly trickle through the amnesia she has suffered as the result of a near drowning. Add in the mysterious Bluff House-VERY cleverly named-and it's odd inhabitant seen wandering the cliffs with binoculars, a singularly recognisable tattoo on the arms of teen girls and Alex's battle with her own sanity, and you have a recipe for a book which will keep you up all night. Playing fast and loose with the concept of amnesia. abandonment , growing up in a stultifying environment whilst examining the cutltural and societal constructs which trap you there, 'Final Cut' is about a woman finding herself whilst searching for the truth in others. Using her camera lens as a disconnect to remain impartial, what she sees and films begins seeping into her consciousness and changes Alex forever. I thoroughly enjoyed the way this book flips back and forth between a teenage diary/letters and the now of a grownup who never really understood the world going on around her. The truth and narrative of her life up to this point explode cataclysmically in a shocking denouement that will leave you breathless.

  24. 4 out of 5

    peggy

    After reading the blurb for this book I could not wait to start reading. I was so disappointed. It took a really long time to get going. For most of this read it was going nowhere. I was waiting for the fireworks but all I got was a damp squib. I really struggled with this book, it had so much promise. I am sure other readers will enjoy it more just not for me. Thanks to Random House UK and Netgalley for the ARC in return for giving an honest review

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tanza Voth

    3 or 3.5. It was ok.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ray Palen

    The problem British author SJ Watson faced was that his first novel was so good it will be such a challenge to come near its acclaim with all successive issues. Of course, I am talking about BEFORE I GO TO SLEEP, which was easily one of the best psychological thrillers I read in the past 20 years and was later made into a film starring Oscar winners Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth. Now, we have his latest release FINAL CUT, which brings him straight back into heavy psychological thriller territory. The problem British author SJ Watson faced was that his first novel was so good it will be such a challenge to come near its acclaim with all successive issues. Of course, I am talking about BEFORE I GO TO SLEEP, which was easily one of the best psychological thrillers I read in the past 20 years and was later made into a film starring Oscar winners Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth. Now, we have his latest release FINAL CUT, which brings him straight back into heavy psychological thriller territory. The focus of the novel is the small seaside town known as Blackwood Bay. Blackwood Bay reminded me very much of David Lynch's Twin Peaks and is just as bizarre with its' avant-garde weirdness and complete permeation of suspicion throughout the village. There were points in the novel when I felt I was in the middle of someone else's dream and realized that is exactly what SJ Watson intended. In March 2011, the Blackwood Bay Evening Standard reported a mystery girl found on Deal Beach. She was said to have been between the ages of 12 and 15. In the present day, we meet filmmaker Alex, who is interested in a film about the missing girls of Blackwood Bay. Her first introduction to the area was in a car pick-up by a young man named Gavin who was interested in the film industry. Alex is filming a documentary about the missing girls beginning with the latest missing teenager --- a girl called Daisy. As Alex begins interviewing the residents of Blackwood Bay two things are very evident. The first is that they are clearly hiding something. The second is that they don't want her there. Things keep going back to the first missing girl, Sadie, whose very name said aloud will cause a reaction in Blackwood Bay. Even her own parents claim she merely ran away and was not killed. Alex, however, is convinced she was killed and that some bad person was behind all the other problems with these young girls. How great would it be for Alex to also solve some long-standing crimes? When the novel flips back to the passages from the past, there are some that show discussions between Alex and her psychiatrist. We also find out at one of these sessions that she created the name Alex as well as that 'character'. The question then becomes --- who is the real Alex? Being a curious sort, and knowing this was an SJ Watson novel, I made sure to read each page very carefully looking for that clue that would open the door to this novel. Alex is suspicious about a couple of different men as suspects and is also warned by more than one person to watch out for Gavin. The Documentary, Black Winter, is coming along but has no natural resolution as of yet. At one point, though, Alex begins to question who she really is and that she needs to uncover the truth between then and now. I advise you to read carefully because things come together in a bizarre fashion and will most definitely surprise you. Recently, SJ Watson wrote an article titled 'Suspense By the Sea: Six Novels That Could Only Take Place By the Seashore'. Amongst those six are classics like BRIGHTON ROCK by Graham Greene and REBECCA by Daphne du Maurier. While FINAL CUT is not in the same league as those classics it is a solid psychological thriller that will have you talking to yourself and rethinking everything you thought you knew. Reviewed by Ray Palen for Book Reporter

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Bridgeman

    This is a book to be read strapped into your favourite chair as it takes off at breakneck speed, and doesn;t let up. The ominious warnings are there right from the start for Alex, film maker on her last chance to really follow up her award winning doucmentary with a film that will make her career. A mysterious , unsigned postcard to her producer recommends she goes to a small costal town called Blackwood Bay. Dubious musgivings about what she can film there aside, her introduction to the town is a This is a book to be read strapped into your favourite chair as it takes off at breakneck speed, and doesn;t let up. The ominious warnings are there right from the start for Alex, film maker on her last chance to really follow up her award winning doucmentary with a film that will make her career. A mysterious , unsigned postcard to her producer recommends she goes to a small costal town called Blackwood Bay. Dubious musgivings about what she can film there aside, her introduction to the town is a dead sheep in the middle of the road which forces her to swerve and crash her car. Rescued by Gavin,. a local contact/community center film club organiser who will connect her with various locals in order to film her expose of small town life, she steps into a deeply gothic nightmare of identity, personality and abuse. The young girls of the town are being targeted in a manner that makes disappearances look like they were runaways-at least 3 in the past decade have either taken their own lives of vanished. Sadie, Daisy and Zoe have become spectres which haunt the landscape, populated by oddball characters recognisable in any small town or village pub, who regard Alex with suspicion tempered with curiousity as to how they will be portrayed. Havign set up a website where locals can submit their own films to create an honest protrait of the town, sinister occurences lead Alex to believe that she is getting closer to the truth of how teen girls are being exploited. But as her suspicions grow, so memories of her own teen years slowly trickle through the amnesia she has suffered as the result of a near drowning. Add in the mysterious Bluff House-VERY cleverly named-and it's odd inhabitant seen wandering the cliffs with binoculars, a singularly recognisable tattoo on the arms of teen girls and Alex's battle with her own sanity, and you have a recipe for a book which will keep you up all night. Playing fast and loose with the concept of amnesia. abandonment , growing up in a stultifying environment whilst examining the cutltural and societal constructs which trap you there, 'Final Cut' is about a woman finding herself whilst searching for the truth in others. Using her camera lens as a disconnect to remain impartial, what she sees and films begins seeping into her consciousness and changes Alex forever. I thoroughly enjoyed the way this book flips back and forth between a teenage diary/letters and the now of a grownup who never really understood the world going on around her. The truth and narrative of her life up to this point explode cataclysmically in a shocking denouement that will leave you breathless.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Marc Bougharios

    3.75 stars Content warning: This novel may include some scenes that may be uncomfortable for readers. I remember reading Before I Go To Sleep a long time ago and loving it. So when I heard that Watson was coming out with a new novel, I knew I had to get my hands on it. The premise is of the story is about a woman named Alex going to a small town called Blackwood Bay to shoot a documentary. But this town has its own sinister history where two girls went missing and one died a while back. The more A 3.75 stars Content warning: This novel may include some scenes that may be uncomfortable for readers. I remember reading Before I Go To Sleep a long time ago and loving it. So when I heard that Watson was coming out with a new novel, I knew I had to get my hands on it. The premise is of the story is about a woman named Alex going to a small town called Blackwood Bay to shoot a documentary. But this town has its own sinister history where two girls went missing and one died a while back. The more Alex digs, the more danger she puts herself in and the more secrets are revealed. What actually happened to those girls? The setting was probably one of the strongest parts of the story. It was atmospheric and creepy in a way that would bring shivers down your spine and goosebumps all over your body, but in the good way. Watson describes the town in detail and the darkness becomes its own character in the town, hiding its own secrets. I always enjoy reading novels that give more than just characters and a plot, but make the setting feel like its not just a place, it's something more. Watson delivers in this one. The story itself seemed to flow pretty well. I finished this one in there sittings and even though the premise sounds like it's something that has been done before, Watson writes this one in a very different way. That's the thing about authors and their writing style, even though the plots may be similar to one another, every author weaves their web in a way that makes it their own. At times, the story did feel a little flat since there were a lot of questions that were being asked, but it never fell short for me and remained interesting. The plot was one of my favourite things about the story, especially the ending. It was complex, twisty, full of secrets and lies; all the ingredients that make a wonderful thriller. I'm usually one to figure out things before the novel ends, but I kept alternating between characters and I honestly did not know who I could trust. The ending reveals a very heart-breaking truth that was hidden about the town and it's just so upsetting to read. Although this is not based off a true story, I do believe that these things are actually happening around the world and it's very sad, but it's also important to acknowledge things like these. Overall, this was a wonderful creepy novel with a small town with some big secrets. Watson did not disappoint with this one and I cannot wait to see what he whips us next. Thank you to HarperCollins Canada and Harper Books for providing me with an advanced copy of this novel in exchange for my honest review.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Juliet Bookliterati

    Reading The Final Cut is like getting on a runaway train that gradually gains speed until you are hurtling towards an unknown, but frightening ending. From the opening chapter I was hooked as the plot split between ‘Then’ and ‘Now’. Now is narrated by Alex, who has gone to Blackwood Bay to get background for her film, but finds hostility from some of the locals, especially as she wants to find out more about the missing girls. ‘Then’ follows the story of a young girl, a runaway, frightened and s Reading The Final Cut is like getting on a runaway train that gradually gains speed until you are hurtling towards an unknown, but frightening ending. From the opening chapter I was hooked as the plot split between ‘Then’ and ‘Now’. Now is narrated by Alex, who has gone to Blackwood Bay to get background for her film, but finds hostility from some of the locals, especially as she wants to find out more about the missing girls. ‘Then’ follows the story of a young girl, a runaway, frightened and scared who has lost her memory. I love the way this plot gathered pace whilst at the same time building layers gradually, leading the reader into a false sense of security then blowing it completely up in the air. The blurred lines between reality and memory, then and now, add to the mystery of the plot; what is true and what is not, which left me reeling with the tension. Add to this the underlying menacing atmosphere, that increased the sense of fear and you have one amazingly brilliant thriller. Alex is a fascinating and complex character, and the perfect protagonist in that she is damaged, and her memories of the past blur those of the present. She has so many layers, both hidden and obvious, that mean she continuously developing and changing right until the very end. Her time in Blackwood Bay sees her re-evaluate her life and face her past head on. I admired her strength in the face of adversity and her drive to improve her life, after a difficult start, and a past that continues to haunt her. S.J Watson explores so many different themes in this book, from a small town mentality, with mistrust of outsiders, addiction, prostitution, and suicide, all dealt with sensitively and with honesty. He explores how the past effcects the present, and how memory can’t always be trusted. His writing drew me in with a plot that twisted and turned, was thrilling and menacing and utterly compelling. I almost wanted to read the last few chapters from behind my fingers such was the building sense of fear and malevolence, and there are very few writers who have that effect on me. The Final Cut is a phenomenal psychological thriller. Atmospheric, dark and full of suspense with a flawed narrator, this book blew me away. S.J Watson is a masterful author, bringing all the pieces to the table and some extra just for good measure; delectably dark and disturbing, I loved it!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bridget

    A young documentary filmmaker travels to a quiet fishing village to shoot a new film, only to encounter a dark mystery surrounding the disappearance of a local girl. For generations the northern English village of Blackwood Bay has been famous only for the smuggling that occurred along its coastline centuries ago. When two local girls disappear, it brings fresh and dark notoriety to the area. When Alex arrives in Blackwood Bay, all of her intentions go awry and she finds a village blighted by ec A young documentary filmmaker travels to a quiet fishing village to shoot a new film, only to encounter a dark mystery surrounding the disappearance of a local girl. For generations the northern English village of Blackwood Bay has been famous only for the smuggling that occurred along its coastline centuries ago. When two local girls disappear, it brings fresh and dark notoriety to the area. When Alex arrives in Blackwood Bay, all of her intentions go awry and she finds a village blighted by economic downturn and haunted by tragedy. As Alex forges on with her work, secrets surface, raising tensions and suspicions. Alex's assignment leads her to dark places that could result in deadly revelations. In Final Cut themes of memory and identity are explored. In a seamlessly moving narrative between past and present day, the reader is regaled with a wonderfully oppressive slow-burn thriller. Amongst the lies, skeletons in closets, concealed truths and local gossips, lurks affable though mysterious protagonist, Alex. S.J. Watson's descriptions of Blackwood Bay are brilliantly atmospheric, and I don't think I will be adding it to my list of places to visit! A captivating, and very highly recommended, intense psychological thriller. I received a complimentary copy of this novel at my request from Doubleday via NetGalley, and this review is my unbiased opinion.

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