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All Darling Children

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All boys grow up, except one. On the tenth anniversary of her mother's death, fourteen-year-old Madge Darling’s grandmother suffers a heart attack. With the overbearing Grandma Wendy in the hospital, Madge runs away to Chicago, intent on tracking down a woman she believes is actually her mother. On her way to the Windy City, a boy named Peter Pan lures Madge to Neverland, a All boys grow up, except one. On the tenth anniversary of her mother's death, fourteen-year-old Madge Darling’s grandmother suffers a heart attack. With the overbearing Grandma Wendy in the hospital, Madge runs away to Chicago, intent on tracking down a woman she believes is actually her mother. On her way to the Windy City, a boy named Peter Pan lures Madge to Neverland, a magical place where children can remain young forever. While Pan plays puppet master in a twisted game only he understands, Madge discovers the disturbing price of Peter Pan's eternal youth.


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All boys grow up, except one. On the tenth anniversary of her mother's death, fourteen-year-old Madge Darling’s grandmother suffers a heart attack. With the overbearing Grandma Wendy in the hospital, Madge runs away to Chicago, intent on tracking down a woman she believes is actually her mother. On her way to the Windy City, a boy named Peter Pan lures Madge to Neverland, a All boys grow up, except one. On the tenth anniversary of her mother's death, fourteen-year-old Madge Darling’s grandmother suffers a heart attack. With the overbearing Grandma Wendy in the hospital, Madge runs away to Chicago, intent on tracking down a woman she believes is actually her mother. On her way to the Windy City, a boy named Peter Pan lures Madge to Neverland, a magical place where children can remain young forever. While Pan plays puppet master in a twisted game only he understands, Madge discovers the disturbing price of Peter Pan's eternal youth.

30 review for All Darling Children

  1. 4 out of 5

    Heidi The Reader

    All Darling Children asks the question: what if something corrupted the 'boy-who-never-grew-up'? Peter Pan is one of my favorite fairy tales and it has featured in quite a few beautiful re-tellings. (Tiger Lily is one.) But, All Darling Children is a masterful, twisted take on a literary classic. I loved this for its horror filled examination of the spiritual cost of eternal youth and the strong female lead. From her first moments in Neverland, Madge, the grandaughter of Wendy, can tell that som All Darling Children asks the question: what if something corrupted the 'boy-who-never-grew-up'? Peter Pan is one of my favorite fairy tales and it has featured in quite a few beautiful re-tellings. (Tiger Lily is one.) But, All Darling Children is a masterful, twisted take on a literary classic. I loved this for its horror filled examination of the spiritual cost of eternal youth and the strong female lead. From her first moments in Neverland, Madge, the grandaughter of Wendy, can tell that something isn't right: "Neverland. It seemed a hodgepodge of landscape ripped from a dream. Or maybe a nightmare. On one side, lush forest grew dense with heat and energy. Flowers bloomed in a rainbow of colors. They shuddered as Madge gazed at them, and then, as Pan looked in their direction, shriveled to pale, dry nothings." loc 525, ebook. This is not Disney's version of Neverland. Peter and his Lost Boys are dangerous in this world. Immature and wild, they try to force the traditional gender role of 'mother' on Madge (because they don't know how to handle girls otherwise) and she resists: "Outsiders aren't supposed to know how to find the tree house until they've been initiated." "Initiated?" Madge's stomach fell. "What's that mean?" "It means you're in the club, not that you'd ever get in, being a girl and all." loc 692. I never questioned the 'Father'/'Mother' roles of Peter and Wendy from the original book but, if the authority of the position was abused... it gets so creepy very quickly. Madge's story is told in-between entries from Wendy's old diary. Here's one of the passages: "I've learned much about (Peter), and while he is erratic and inconsistent in most ways, in one he is steadfast. Predictable. Peter must always be forced to try harder. If one gives in, he loses interest. I will never give in." loc 921. The back and forth from the story that the reader thinks she knows that is presented in Wendy's diary, to the new story that Monroe is weaving with Madge, is awesome. There are enough similar elements drawn in from the original that the whole thing feels chillingly familiar- a mirror version of the classic. Peter's bragging about his exploits is presented as charming in Barrie's version- Monroe takes a far more modern view: "Who wants to hear the story of how I cut off Captain Hook's hand?" The boys whooped and smacked the table. Madge paled. He'd cut off someone's hand? What was worse, he was bragging about it? Psycho." loc 973 If you like twisted fairy tale re-tellings, you may love All Darling Children. I did. Another one that you've got to pick up if you liked this is Alice by Christina Henry. It's an incredibly dark re-imagining of Alice in Wonderland and it's also amazing. Thank you to NetGalley and Red Adept Publishing for a free, digital ARC and to my Goodreads friend, Rosemarie Short for writing a fantastic review that convinced me that I just had to read All Darling Children. You can see her review here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kit (Metaphors and Moonlight)

    3.5 Stars Full Review: *I received an ecopy of this book via NetGalley. This has not influenced my review.* The author and I must’ve had very similar thoughts while reading Peter Pan because this book was exactly what I have been wanting from a Peter Pan inspired story. To be fair, this was the first book inspired by the original that I’ve ever read, but to also be fair, most of the ones I’ve come across are all “Peter is awesome!” and seem to be based on the Disney version, and that’s not what I w 3.5 Stars Full Review: *I received an ecopy of this book via NetGalley. This has not influenced my review.* The author and I must’ve had very similar thoughts while reading Peter Pan because this book was exactly what I have been wanting from a Peter Pan inspired story. To be fair, this was the first book inspired by the original that I’ve ever read, but to also be fair, most of the ones I’ve come across are all “Peter is awesome!” and seem to be based on the Disney version, and that’s not what I want to read. See, I was shocked when I read Peter Pan for the first time by how terrifying Peter’s character was. The original story has a lot of darkness in it, and Peter does horrible things, like maim and kill his own boys, so I loved that Katrina Monroe actually used the darker side of Peter’s character for her version of him and referenced a lot of those horrifying things. Also awesome was that Hook was a good guy! Well, kind of. He was still a pirate who probably did plenty of bad things in his time, but even he didn’t condone the slaughter of innocents just for fun. I loved his character in the original, so it made me happy to see he wasn’t villainized, even though he didn’t play very much of a part this time. I also liked how the author stayed true to the story by *SPOILER ALERT (not for this book, but for the original)* (view spoiler)[making Hook a ghost, since this one took place after he was killed. (hide spoiler)] *END SPOILER ALERT* Another great thing, Madge had a much more realistic and suitable reaction to a strange boy showing up and talking about flying and pixie dust and Neverland than Wendy did. She thought he was just a whackadoo and wanted him to leave her alone. And then her happy thoughts (since you need to think happy thoughts to fly) were about punching him lol. Madge was, however, a little too mature, jaded, and street-smart for her age. It’s not entirely impossible for a 14-year-old to already know things about the horrors of the world, depending on their life, but I’m not sure her strictly sheltered life with her grandma would’ve given her that kind of knowledge. I also felt like the depths of the characters were never really explored, but that was something I could overlook since I don’t think that was really the point. It was more of a plot-driven book. One other issue I had was that I noticed a few logic flaws. *SPOILER ALERT* (view spoiler)[(How did Hook help Madge get off of Skull Rock if he was incorporeal and incapable of touching anything? How did no one in the city notice a flying ship above their heads? How did the ship fly period, since Madge replaced Peter’s pixie dust with shell powder? Why did Jane go back and abandon Madge when she was the one who refused to let Wendy send her to an orphanage?) (hide spoiler)] *END SPOILER ALERT* One last thing to note, the author really didn’t romanticize anything in this book. Everything was very gritty and realistically disgusting and disturbing. Even though the protagonist is 14, this is not something I’d consider a YA book (and it’s not listed as one). That’s not a bad thing at all though, just something to take into consideration. So to summarize, a dark story based on the original rather than the Disney version was what I wanted, and I’m happy to say that was exactly what I got! Recommended For: Anyone who wants a dark take on Peter Pan based on the original rather than the Disney version. Original Review @ Metaphors and Moonlight

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sade

    Katrina Monroe spins a sinister tale of Peter Pan, the lost boys, Neverland and the Darling Family. In this Peter Pan retelling, the characters are as far away as possible from the happy Darling's created by Disney. I enjoyed this book somewhat but it really didn't blow me away. I would have felt if you're going to take such artistic liberites with classic novels at least give some background. It was never really explained why Peter was the way he was or why (view spoiler)[he killed the pan (hid Katrina Monroe spins a sinister tale of Peter Pan, the lost boys, Neverland and the Darling Family. In this Peter Pan retelling, the characters are as far away as possible from the happy Darling's created by Disney. I enjoyed this book somewhat but it really didn't blow me away. I would have felt if you're going to take such artistic liberites with classic novels at least give some background. It was never really explained why Peter was the way he was or why (view spoiler)[he killed the pan (hide spoiler)] did he just snap? why were the lost boys giving food to the pirates. Also if the lost boys and Peter couldn't grow up and for all intents and purposes they were boys and peter only took children (view spoiler)[how did Jane get pregnant? (hide spoiler)] . On characters i was intrigued with what we had read about the younger Wendy Darling. She was a right bitch who would do anything for Peter. Madge Darling wasn't really convincing as a stong heroine but in retrospect it could be that she felt in over her head. I don't feel other characters were developed enough except to just push this particular story along. There were allusions to sex in the book which was disturbing to say the least, This story bares a passing resemblance to Lord of the Flies with the whole children going blood mad when they're alone (I wonder why this seems to be a recurring theme). All in all i felt the story was unfinished, the author just put in the gore just for the sake of having gore in the book and she could have done more to make the story her own.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rosemarie Short

    Very few dark re-tellings actually live up to the dark part for me. Let me warn you now; All Darling Children is dark. It’s brutal and hateful and absolutely wondrous. I’ve never been a fan of Peter Pan or of the subsequent re-tellings. However this not only has done away with my Pan aversion; it’s easily one of the best re-tellings I’ve ever read. Our protagonist is Madge; she’s a tough orphan who lives with her Grandma Wendy. Wendy keeps her prisoner in her own home, thwarting Madge’s multiple Very few dark re-tellings actually live up to the dark part for me. Let me warn you now; All Darling Children is dark. It’s brutal and hateful and absolutely wondrous. I’ve never been a fan of Peter Pan or of the subsequent re-tellings. However this not only has done away with my Pan aversion; it’s easily one of the best re-tellings I’ve ever read. Our protagonist is Madge; she’s a tough orphan who lives with her Grandma Wendy. Wendy keeps her prisoner in her own home, thwarting Madge’s multiple attempts to escape to find her Mother (whom she doesn’t believe is really dead, as Wendy always told her). Madge is a great heroine in that she isn’t perfect. She’s stubborn and headstrong but she’s also inherently good – the perfect combination for a girl willing to do anything to take down Pan. If you’re a Peter / Wendy fan this probably isn’t the book for you. I always preferred a bad guy so my interest always gravitated towards Hook – who is featured here in a new and interesting way; neither good nor bad but still playing a part. I also loved the way Tiger Lily was written – a brave and fearless warrior who is trying to balance keeping her people alive with the need to stand up to Pan. This isn’t for the faint-hearted. The writing is perfect; the simplicity with which Monroe tells the story suits the brutality of the subject matter perfectly. However there are some scenes which will probably make you squirm. No taboo is sacred and that’s probably what made me love the book so much. However if you have triggers it’s probably best to tread with caution. This is a must read for fans of retellings – if not for all the reasons above then most certainly for that ending. Pass the fairy dust Katrina Monroe – because I’m hooked.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Did you find the story of Peter Pan strange, and slightly creepy? Did you find his games to be weird? Did you wonder why anyone would want to never grow up? Then this book will appeal to you as not quite so much a retelling, but an extending of the story of Peter Pan and his island of lost boys. In this telling, the daughter of Jane is taken away to Neverland, but not totally willingly, and so she is not happy with this. And her grandmother, Wendy, has been trying to keep this from happening her Did you find the story of Peter Pan strange, and slightly creepy? Did you find his games to be weird? Did you wonder why anyone would want to never grow up? Then this book will appeal to you as not quite so much a retelling, but an extending of the story of Peter Pan and his island of lost boys. In this telling, the daughter of Jane is taken away to Neverland, but not totally willingly, and so she is not happy with this. And her grandmother, Wendy, has been trying to keep this from happening her entire life, but we what we think of as why is not really why. This is a dark version of Peter, and yet true to the original story. Giving too much away, I feel, spoils it, but I feel this is quite a good extension of the story, and wraps some things up. I would recommend it to those who loved the original, and those, like me, who thought there was something not quite right with Peter Pan. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Karen Mace

    I am always intrigued by re tellings of fairy tales so when I saw that this was all about Peter Pan and Neverland my interest was captured and what a dark, twisted, fun read it has been! I've always thought the character of Peter Pan was one of the most complicated and this reworking just adds to the complex and evil character that he really seems to be! This is based around the Darling children, mainly Madge who is a very unhappy teenager under the rule of Grandma Wendy. She tries many times to I am always intrigued by re tellings of fairy tales so when I saw that this was all about Peter Pan and Neverland my interest was captured and what a dark, twisted, fun read it has been! I've always thought the character of Peter Pan was one of the most complicated and this reworking just adds to the complex and evil character that he really seems to be! This is based around the Darling children, mainly Madge who is a very unhappy teenager under the rule of Grandma Wendy. She tries many times to run away but is always thwarted, but one night she manages to break free and is determined to head to Chicago where she is sure her mother Jane is, despite her Grandma telling her she was dead. But she soon ends up a long way from Chicago and is immersed in the world of Neverland that seems to attract all the generations of Darling children The Darling link with Neverland and Pan is fully explored in this dark adventure, and the current story is also littered with extracts from Wendys' diary of her time in Neverland and how her time there was definitely no Disney fairy story! All the favourite characters are involved in this story -Hook, Smee, The Lost Boys - and I really loved the fresh approach to the story and how you are often left wondering just who to trust and believe as many of the characters have such dark sides! There is violence and swearing so be warned if you are easily offended by such goings on! A fabulously entertaining read! I voluntarily reviewed an advance reader copy of the book courtesy of the publishers and NetGalley.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michelegg

    I finished this book and wanted to rub my hands together and cackle with glee. It was fabulous. Dark and violent and absolutely not Disney's version of Peter Pan in any way shape or form, and definitely not a version you'd want your kids to read. Madge, Wendy Darling's granddaughter, goes in search of her mother, and winds up in Neverland with Peter Pan. We meet Hook and Smee, Tiger Lily, the Mermaids and of course the Lost Boys. But none are the sweet characters of our childhoods. This Neverlan I finished this book and wanted to rub my hands together and cackle with glee. It was fabulous. Dark and violent and absolutely not Disney's version of Peter Pan in any way shape or form, and definitely not a version you'd want your kids to read. Madge, Wendy Darling's granddaughter, goes in search of her mother, and winds up in Neverland with Peter Pan. We meet Hook and Smee, Tiger Lily, the Mermaids and of course the Lost Boys. But none are the sweet characters of our childhoods. This Neverland is violent and gory and very scary. And I loved every minute of it. We also get to spend some time reading Wendy's journal about her time in Neverland and we meet her brother Michael and discover what happened in their lives once they came home from adventuring with Peter Pan. What a fascinating book and I can't even imagine what must go on in this authors head, she's simply brilliant to write a version of Peter Pan that most would never dream of. And I loved that. I highly recommend this book to lovers of scary adventure and those who don't mind their favorite childhood movies becoming dark and a little horrific. Oh and that twist and the ending? Pretty much the best things ever.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bandit

    Ok, so I almost didn't read it, dismissing it as a YA novel, but then again I wasn't able to resist a twist on my all time favorite stories and I'm glad I didn't, because this was kind of awesome. Sort of YA at first maybe, but definitely not as the book progresses, it's a story about kids, but it may be too dark for kids...like all the best fairy tales, at least in their original renderings. Monroe reimagines Neverland in a distinctively sinister light and its most famous resident ever more so Ok, so I almost didn't read it, dismissing it as a YA novel, but then again I wasn't able to resist a twist on my all time favorite stories and I'm glad I didn't, because this was kind of awesome. Sort of YA at first maybe, but definitely not as the book progresses, it's a story about kids, but it may be too dark for kids...like all the best fairy tales, at least in their original renderings. Monroe reimagines Neverland in a distinctively sinister light and its most famous resident ever more so as a young charming lethal sociopath, obsessed with the eponymous Darling children. Disturbing in the best possible way, with love, revenge and a notable feminist twist, this was tons of fun to read. I'm not sure the ages of the Darling women works logistically, especially Wendy's, but that really isn't all that salient in the book where so many things did work. Very enjoyable, particularly for fans of the original. Recommended. Thanks Netgalley.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Pop Bop

    The Great God "Pan" As A Sinister, Malevolent Narcissist This is the ultimate book for anyone who, like me, thinks that J. M. Barrie's "Peter Pan" is a creepy book loaded with disturbing undercurrents. If you harbor fond memories of the Disney Peter Pan or of Mary Martin's happy zippy Peter Pan, then be warned. This book moves us from the pagan pastoral, natural, and seductive God Pan to the post-Christian demonic Pan, with a vengeance. I'll try to avoid plot spoilers while getting across a more i The Great God "Pan" As A Sinister, Malevolent Narcissist This is the ultimate book for anyone who, like me, thinks that J. M. Barrie's "Peter Pan" is a creepy book loaded with disturbing undercurrents. If you harbor fond memories of the Disney Peter Pan or of Mary Martin's happy zippy Peter Pan, then be warned. This book moves us from the pagan pastoral, natural, and seductive God Pan to the post-Christian demonic Pan, with a vengeance. I'll try to avoid plot spoilers while getting across a more impressionistic sense of the book. So, think "Lord of the Flies" meets a handbook about recovering from domestic partner abuse. Or, think about that Twilight Zone episode, ("It's A Good Life"), in which Billy Mumy can disappear anyone who displeases him, just by thinking them away. The plots aren't the same, but the general sense of dread, fear and loathing is. The author does a magnificent job of redrawing all of the Barrie characters as victims of Pan and of Neverland. There have been a number of books recently that reposition Hook as a sympathetic figure, and indeed Hook emerges here as a noble, if wryly detached, figure. So, too, are Tiger Lilly, the Redmen, the pirates, and even the Lost Boys, reimagined. The conflict revolves around Pan and three generations of Darling women, with Wendy just the tip of the generational iceberg, but with her brothers Michael and John always present figures as well. This is a violent book that doesn't shy away from the grim and gruesome. Indeed, with a central character who is basically a psychotic, manipulative and dangerously unbalanced madman it's pretty hard to see how the book could have been constructed otherwise. That said, though, this is not simply a slasher or horror story. The tale is carefully crafted; the suspense ratchets up precisely, and the pacing alternates among the rueful, the sad, action, heartbreaking loss, despair, courage, and touches of both light and dark. There are both effective set pieces and recurring themes that drive the book forward as secrets are revealed and the past is uncovered, so it's also a bit of a mystery. The one thing it assuredly is not, though, is a happy theme park romp. At bottom, Peter Pan is such a conflicted and unusual character, and the whole idea of Neverland is so unbalanced and vaguely disquieting, it makes sense that someone decided finally to pull out all of the stops. Well, this is it, and it's a ripper. (Please note that I received a free advance ecopy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Schmitz

    All Darling Children reads like Peter Pan meets Dark Shadows. It’s more than a little twisty and picks up many years after Pan takes the Darling children to Neverland. This time he takes Madge Darling, Wendy’s granddaughter and the story unravels her mysterious lineage and dysfunctional family (Rumors of Wendy killing one brother while the other became an alcoholic). Madge is a street-tough girl with a mouth and the desire to get away. When she finally succeeds at escaping the clutches of her vi All Darling Children reads like Peter Pan meets Dark Shadows. It’s more than a little twisty and picks up many years after Pan takes the Darling children to Neverland. This time he takes Madge Darling, Wendy’s granddaughter and the story unravels her mysterious lineage and dysfunctional family (Rumors of Wendy killing one brother while the other became an alcoholic). Madge is a street-tough girl with a mouth and the desire to get away. When she finally succeeds at escaping the clutches of her villainous family she is whisked away by an odd boy to can fly. All the important figures are present in the book, along with the tension and relationship drama one would expect from a YA novel. Excerpts from the diary of Wendy Moira Angela Darling bare wide the sometimes bipolar mood swings of Peter (and his narcissism, too,) and the depths of Wendy’s pining (and both of their ignorance to romance—it certain feels authentic in that regard). One thing is certain as Madge spends time with Peter and his tribe: Madge is not Wendy. Katrina Monroe’s writing is tight and engaging. The dark overtones and subterfuge interweaving Barrie’s original ideas updates them with the right amount of flair so that the story is not merely derivative, but wholly her own. As a big fan of the original I was pleased that she had done such a good job with the material.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kate Moretti

    I never read the Barrie version of Peter Pan, so my knowledge comes from Disney only and OH WOW, I HAD NO IDEA. This book is so smartly written, so chilling. It made me want to go back and read the original Pan, and had a real Lord of the Flies feel to it. All these feral, lawless children and how quickly they turn evil. The end just threw me, I had to close the book, sit for a few minutes until it hit me: OH MY GOD. Warning: there is some gore, which never bothers me but if you're expecting a fa I never read the Barrie version of Peter Pan, so my knowledge comes from Disney only and OH WOW, I HAD NO IDEA. This book is so smartly written, so chilling. It made me want to go back and read the original Pan, and had a real Lord of the Flies feel to it. All these feral, lawless children and how quickly they turn evil. The end just threw me, I had to close the book, sit for a few minutes until it hit me: OH MY GOD. Warning: there is some gore, which never bothers me but if you're expecting a fairy tale, you should be forewarned. It's not gratuitous or over the top, but sensitive readers might be bothered. Overall, a dark, disturbing, yet adroitly written, tale that may or may not have ruined my childhood and I will certainly be thinking of this book next time I'm at Disney World and waiting in line for Peter Pan's Flight.

  12. 4 out of 5

    L.F. Falconer

    Occasionally I come upon a book that compels me to keep reading even when life's responsibilities forbid it. This is one of those books. What a delightfully dark and wicked take on the Peter Pan story. It takes everything you thought you knew about Never Never Land and turns it upside down and inside out. The ending elicited from me a satisfied, twisted little chuckle, appealing well to my darker side, and I'll never look at Peter Pan quite the same again. This is a story that will live on in my Occasionally I come upon a book that compels me to keep reading even when life's responsibilities forbid it. This is one of those books. What a delightfully dark and wicked take on the Peter Pan story. It takes everything you thought you knew about Never Never Land and turns it upside down and inside out. The ending elicited from me a satisfied, twisted little chuckle, appealing well to my darker side, and I'll never look at Peter Pan quite the same again. This is a story that will live on in my mind for a long time to come. Kudos! An excellent read for those who enjoy dark fiction!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Not your kiddies’ Peter Pan. This is the sinister version of Peter Pan—the version that is only for grownups. The wild romp starts with runaway, Madge—yes Madge, being bewitched by Peter and carried off into the night to Never, Neverland. But little in Neverland is what you remember if you are basing it on the tame Disney version of the tale. Dangers lie in wait everywhere. There was just a little too much gore for this sensitive stomach. However, those with a stronger constitution will probably Not your kiddies’ Peter Pan. This is the sinister version of Peter Pan—the version that is only for grownups. The wild romp starts with runaway, Madge—yes Madge, being bewitched by Peter and carried off into the night to Never, Neverland. But little in Neverland is what you remember if you are basing it on the tame Disney version of the tale. Dangers lie in wait everywhere. There was just a little too much gore for this sensitive stomach. However, those with a stronger constitution will probably love this dark version! Thanks to Red Adept Publishing and Netgalley for the ARC.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Toni Owen-Blue

    It can be very difficult reading re-tellings, re-interpretations or re-masterings of books, because you never know (especially with a new author) If they’re capable of doing the old tale justice and there’s always the risk that your favourite classic can be forced to undergo the equivalent of that reverse bear trap the Saw franchise is so fond of. I felt relatively safe from that with All Darling Children since, even though I read Peter Pan when I was younger, it never grabbed me in the way the L It can be very difficult reading re-tellings, re-interpretations or re-masterings of books, because you never know (especially with a new author) If they’re capable of doing the old tale justice and there’s always the risk that your favourite classic can be forced to undergo the equivalent of that reverse bear trap the Saw franchise is so fond of. I felt relatively safe from that with All Darling Children since, even though I read Peter Pan when I was younger, it never grabbed me in the way the Little Princess and The Tales of Narnia did, so I felt my childhood nostalgia glasses would remain untainted at least, and I’d be able to go on and give Neverland fans the answer to the question ‘Is it safe to read?’ In short: Probably Not. But not because Monroe can’t write, on the contrary, she can (very well, I’m going to be keeping an eye on her work), but if you were a fan of Pan as a child then be prepared for your much-loved fiction to get a serious going over on the spanking saddle. You see; we’re going back to Neverland, this time with Wendy’s Granddaughter, Madge, and it seems that Wendy dearest was not the most reliable narrator and the immortality of the island is more of an insidious corruption than the wonderful anti-ageing aid it was in Barrie’s original. However, if the reasoning I just gave doesn’t bother you then the answer to the second most important question of ‘Is it fun to read?’, gets a resounding ‘Yes.’ There’s not much I can say plot wise because it would ruin it for those who do want to read this book, which, assuming my warning hasn’t frightened you off, I would recommend that you do. The only thing I can really add is that Monroe’s done a great job of mixing up the roles and adapting the narrative for an older audience by giving Neverland more shades of grey than an unmentionable fan fiction publication. All the characters from the original make a reappearance cast in different ways and, if nothing else it’s interesting to see a new bent on Hook and Tiger Lily and see how they’ve been cast here. So what’s been borrowed from the original fiction has been remixed in a satisfying way that kept me interested throughout (Monroe knows how to throw a curve ball or six if nothing else). The original characters work interestingly with Monroe’s new original inserts, but strangely, that’s because they don’t mesh at all. This seems to be a theme in and of itself though and more to do with book’s questions about the struggle between new and old ideas that evolve with generations. I’m not sure how I feel about sacrificing narrative style for theme, but the books not really long enough for it to be an issue. That said I did like the new characters, Madge and Slightly (Yes, not an original character, but honestly he’s had more work done here than Pamela Anderson, he might as well be) both conflicted, engaging and, interestingly, not the main characters because they were ‘nicer’ people than everyone else, which is something I can appreciate. They don’t try to rise above and take high roads, they just do what has to be done. The writing, as I’ve already mentioned, is solid, although the short-sentence style is not a favourite of mine, I can see when it’s being done well. For those who worry about indie books being unreadable due to grammar and formatting errors fear not here, this books is flawless in that regard. Although as I side note I feel I must add that I found the more “gritty” imagery and swearing to add very little, I can’t explain it past saying that it read like it shouldn’t really be there, and the book would have been fine without it. You can probably tell I’m struggling with this review. That’s because it’s impossible to talk about the content without spoiling everything. All I can really say is; I found it an interesting read, that original characters go to unexpected places, it’s not overlong, it’s very well paced and there’s no shortage of original ideas. If you can make peace with the idea Peter Pan as anything other than a childhood hero then I can guarantee you’ll find this fascinating if nothing else.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tricia

    4.5 stars THANK YOU Katrina Monroe for bringing some LOST GIRL magic into this story! Peter Pan is one of my favorite stories! I usually quite like most of the retellings and alternate versions of the tale too. So I guess it comes as no surprise that I enjoyed this one as well. BUT one of the really cool and unique things about this book was the very prominent strong female factor. I have to admit, I was always slightly disappointed that there weren't any lost girls, and I think Monroe did an 4.5 stars THANK YOU Katrina Monroe for bringing some LOST GIRL magic into this story! Peter Pan is one of my favorite stories! I usually quite like most of the retellings and alternate versions of the tale too. So I guess it comes as no surprise that I enjoyed this one as well. BUT one of the really cool and unique things about this book was the very prominent strong female factor. I have to admit, I was always slightly disappointed that there weren't any lost girls, and I think Monroe did an awesome job at filling this gap in All Darling Children. Even if some of these girls weren't technically thought of as such throughout most of the story. The girls in this book were fierce and cunning, and not all of them were entirely likeable, but they were keen and ferocious.     I loved the depiction of Peter Pan in this story! One thing that is common in any Peter Pan tale, new, old, or in between...he is arrogant through and through. I like how Monroe took that and twisted it into a new darker perspective. This Peter was familiar in many ways, the crowing, the games, boyish charm, and such. But everything about this book was darker. Peter was something to be feared. Everything about him was feral, a brutal savage whose selfish, bloodthirsty desires are grim enough to shape the world around him, and its inhabitants.     I found the Darling family so interesting! I kind of loved that they were a mess. I had never really thought much about their time after Neverland, and as disturbing as it could be at times, I thought Monroe came up with a super fascinating story line for them. I only wish we would have got a tiny glimpse at what Neverland would have looked like after a brief time after the end of this book. Not going to be spoilery here, but it's driving me a little mad not knowing if the atmosphere changed there after time, or if everything Madge went through and her new role in the world changed her in ways that we've seen before. History repeating itself and such. Part of me hopes for the former, but wouldn't the latter be such a wickedly delicious and fitting continuation of this story??!!     I received a copy of this book from the author in exchange for an honest review.      

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kira

    2.5 stars Defining the genre for this was difficult. There was a YA vibe to it, but it was interspersed with moments of sex, violence, and swears. The sex and violence was glossed over, so it wasn't graphic. It was dark enough that it kind of like horror, but OTOH it wasn't gory or terrifying in any way. So dark fantasy may define it better than horror, but at the same time the dark parts were only mild. It was fantasy for sure but all other labels are debatable. The beginning was interesting. We 2.5 stars Defining the genre for this was difficult. There was a YA vibe to it, but it was interspersed with moments of sex, violence, and swears. The sex and violence was glossed over, so it wasn't graphic. It was dark enough that it kind of like horror, but OTOH it wasn't gory or terrifying in any way. So dark fantasy may define it better than horror, but at the same time the dark parts were only mild. It was fantasy for sure but all other labels are debatable. The beginning was interesting. Wendy Darling turned into a bitter bitch in her old age and treated her granddaughter who she took care of like shit. Wendy was heartless enough that I didn't really care how she became the way she was. It doesn't matter how unfair life has been because it doesn't give someone the right to treat someone else like crap for things that are out of their control. The more I learned about Wendy the less I liked her. Wendy's granddaughter Madge (I hate that name) was the MC. I liked her at first. Life wasn't easy for her with a drunk uncle and cruel grandmother. Her character lacked depth. Some screwed up things happened but strong emotional reactions weren't there. Peter Pan was a psycho. It was clear from the start that he was selfish and cruel. I didn't give a shit about him. He wasn't intriguing at all. All of the characters were so one dimensional. Some of the world building was interesting. I never read the original Peter Pan, so IDK how much the world building deviated from it. It was obvious Pan needed to be taken down since he was a murderous bastard, but the ending was anticlimactic. I wish more details had been included about what happened to some of the Darlings. It doesn't matter in the grand scheme of things but why was Madge's last name Darling? Her mom never married, but her name wouldn't have been Darling either since Wendy had been married. Chances are her husband didn't have the name Darling as well. Back them women didn't keep their last names. I did get bored about half way through. I don't regret reading it, but chances are I'll barely remember this a month from now. I received this from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    All Darling Children was a well-written look at a Peter Pan who was a murdering tyrant. It suggests that Wendy's daughter and grand-daughter wind up in Neverland and there's tons of potential rape threats, violence and post-watershed bad words. Madge is a delinquent teen living with an improbably aged Wendy and Michael. Improbable, because Wendy went to Neverland at the age of 12-13 ish (maybe a little older) in 1904, She had a daughter, which even if you think she had the child late, should hav All Darling Children was a well-written look at a Peter Pan who was a murdering tyrant. It suggests that Wendy's daughter and grand-daughter wind up in Neverland and there's tons of potential rape threats, violence and post-watershed bad words. Madge is a delinquent teen living with an improbably aged Wendy and Michael. Improbable, because Wendy went to Neverland at the age of 12-13 ish (maybe a little older) in 1904, She had a daughter, which even if you think she had the child late, should have been born at the latest by 1920. Madge is kicking about in the early 2000's. Still leaving the time discrepancy aside, Madge is in a bad place, cos Grandma Wendy hates her guts, and she's sure her mommy is still alive. Running away, she decides to follow a clearly deranged Pan to Neverland and all the ensuing gore. Don't get me wrong, this book is well-written and flows quite well. The main character is frustrating and slow on the uptake. All the original book characters, like Tootles, Tiger-Lily are poor shadows of themselves, despite being given extra pagetime. Pan himself is the ultimate baddie, massacring people, sacrificing his boys and thankfully he doesn't keel into cartoonish villainy. I think the reason this book doesn't get more stars, is because it feels as if the plot occurs because it does. There is no organic feel to this book. Wendy is a prize bitch because (view spoiler)[her daughter wound up preggers with Pan's kid.. How this occurred with her daughter and not Wendy, is not explained (hide spoiler)] Madge goes to Neverland for no freaking reason. Honestly, a young boy flies out of the dark and tells an embittered, delinquent that he knows her supposedly dead mom, and the girl goes, tell me more freak as she flies off with him. Madge never really does anything when she gets to Neverland, the entire cast revolve around her as some kind of goddess, but she never actually does anything until the end. A good read, but I won't read it again.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    This takes the Disney version of Peter Pan and mixes in a big dollop of The Lord of the Flies. And if you think that sounds like a mix that shouldn't work, you'd be right. Reading about the cheesiness of Tinkerbell and Smee one minute, and then sacrificing Lost Boys to ensure the survival of the Island's magic the next is disconcerting. Madge is the granddaughter of Wendy Darling. Though how that works when Wendy Darling was 12 or 13 in the early 1900s, and Madge is 14 in the present day, I have This takes the Disney version of Peter Pan and mixes in a big dollop of The Lord of the Flies. And if you think that sounds like a mix that shouldn't work, you'd be right. Reading about the cheesiness of Tinkerbell and Smee one minute, and then sacrificing Lost Boys to ensure the survival of the Island's magic the next is disconcerting. Madge is the granddaughter of Wendy Darling. Though how that works when Wendy Darling was 12 or 13 in the early 1900s, and Madge is 14 in the present day, I have no idea. Anyway, she goes to Neverland with Peter Pan searching for her lost mother and the truth about her family. Once there she realises that Peter Pan is a dictator, ruling through fear and murdering anyone who stands against him. Madge is a very underdeveloped character. She never shows any personality of her own, her only conversations with other people involve her sneering at them. Supposedly she is trying to find the truth about her family, but never displays any actual motivation towards doing anything about it. Pan himself is much more interesting, but for me the best character in the book is the lovely Slightly. A sweet, charming boy, he is Madge's only potential ally in the Lost Boys. I wasn't convinced by the story in this - there was a lot alluded to but never fully explained and Madge just ran around reacting to things and generally being unpleasant. Even her own hunger she is only aware of because Pan hears her stomach growling! The story never got going and the battle at the end was a big anticlimax. I received a free copy from the publisher in return for an honest review.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bert

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Even though I haven't read the J. M. Barrie original story, and only having seen Disney's version (and then the movie Hook), I went into this book knowing it was a reimagining and tried not to connect it too much to the movies or assume things. Having said that, I found this book to be amazing. Great characters, great storyline, and an ending...well, I don't want to spoil it. Not only is it well written, but just when I thought it couldn't get any darker at moments, it did. It took me by surprise. Even though I haven't read the J. M. Barrie original story, and only having seen Disney's version (and then the movie Hook), I went into this book knowing it was a reimagining and tried not to connect it too much to the movies or assume things. Having said that, I found this book to be amazing. Great characters, great storyline, and an ending...well, I don't want to spoil it. Not only is it well written, but just when I thought it couldn't get any darker at moments, it did. It took me by surprise. I've read some reviewers mention time/age issues with the characters, but that didn't bother me. The characters are interesting and you can't decide if you love some of them or hate them. And some of those that you love, you probably shouldn't. I loved the main character Madge, you knew her personality from the start, anger at being kept in the dark about her past, anger at being essentially kept in a cage by her grandmother, and just wanting answers. Overall, a great read. I couldn't put it down. I hope there's a continuation to the story someday.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Carol Peace

    I didn't know what to expect with this book and what I got was something so dark it totally turned the way I thought about Peter Pan. Gone was the friendly but rather lost little boy and in flies this dark and threatening character. Madge lives with her grandmother Wendy who keeps her locked away and will not tell her anything about her mother so when Wendy is taken to hospital Madge takes her chance to go find her mother who she has been told is dead but she doesn't believe that. Pan then glides I didn't know what to expect with this book and what I got was something so dark it totally turned the way I thought about Peter Pan. Gone was the friendly but rather lost little boy and in flies this dark and threatening character. Madge lives with her grandmother Wendy who keeps her locked away and will not tell her anything about her mother so when Wendy is taken to hospital Madge takes her chance to go find her mother who she has been told is dead but she doesn't believe that. Pan then glides in and takes her to Neverland but not the sweet place we all know and love this is a dark and mysterious place. The characters are all there Hook , Smee and Tiger Lily but not they way they are in the disney film. I felt a bit unsure the whole way through as it was hard to imagine the characters so 'lord of the flies' but it was worth a read and it was well written with a totally fresh look at the story. Thank you to NetGalley for my advanced copy of the book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elke

    Reading this book, I alternated in equal parts between enthusiasm, surprise, boredom and disappointment. The original concept of the story immediately got me 'hooked': what if Peter Pan was not really such a nice guy, but a boy with a very malignant streak? What surprised me was that the main character, Peter Pan, remained flat as a pancake throughout the whole novel. While Madge was just OK, Slightly, kind of Pan's second in command, was so beautifully and vividly portrayed that I immediately fe Reading this book, I alternated in equal parts between enthusiasm, surprise, boredom and disappointment. The original concept of the story immediately got me 'hooked': what if Peter Pan was not really such a nice guy, but a boy with a very malignant streak? What surprised me was that the main character, Peter Pan, remained flat as a pancake throughout the whole novel. While Madge was just OK, Slightly, kind of Pan's second in command, was so beautifully and vividly portrayed that I immediately fell in love with him. But my absolute favorite was Captain Hook, who was not at all the villain he used to be originally. The island was described with enough detail to make it come to life before my mind's eye, and the story had enough twists to hold my attention, but there were several passages that felt unnecessary and dragging along. However, the ending managed to placate me for any weak parts.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sue Wallace

    All darling children by Katrina Monroe is a horror and sci-fi and fantasy read. All boys grow up, except one. On the tenth anniversary of her mother's death, fourteen-year-old Madge Darling’s grandmother suffers a heart attack. With the overbearing Grandma Wendy in the hospital, Madge runs away to Chicago, intent on tracking down a woman she believes is actually her mother. On her way to the Windy City, a boy named Peter Pan lures Madge to Neverland, a magical place where children can remain young All darling children by Katrina Monroe is a horror and sci-fi and fantasy read. All boys grow up, except one. On the tenth anniversary of her mother's death, fourteen-year-old Madge Darling’s grandmother suffers a heart attack. With the overbearing Grandma Wendy in the hospital, Madge runs away to Chicago, intent on tracking down a woman she believes is actually her mother. On her way to the Windy City, a boy named Peter Pan lures Madge to Neverland, a magical place where children can remain young forever. While Pan plays puppet master in a twisted game only he understands, Madge discovers the disturbing price of Peter Pan's eternal youth. Very enjoyable read with great characters. I loved Made. She was my favourite character. Little slow in places. 4*. I voluntarily reviewed an advanced copy of this book from netgalley.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Susan Peterson

    Captivating, dark, twisty story; an updated, modern version of Peter Pan. Madge Darling escapes her family home when her guardian and grandmother, Wendy suffers a heart attack. Although they've just had a memorial to commemorate the 10th anniversary of her mother's death, Madge is convinced her mother is still alive. On her way to Chicago to find her, she is whisked off to Neverland by Peter Pan himself, where she is drawn into his world and all it encompasses. Very well-done retelling of a stor Captivating, dark, twisty story; an updated, modern version of Peter Pan. Madge Darling escapes her family home when her guardian and grandmother, Wendy suffers a heart attack. Although they've just had a memorial to commemorate the 10th anniversary of her mother's death, Madge is convinced her mother is still alive. On her way to Chicago to find her, she is whisked off to Neverland by Peter Pan himself, where she is drawn into his world and all it encompasses. Very well-done retelling of a story that most of us are familiar with, with old, beloved characters brought back to life in a new way.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Irene

    Madge Darling has never been happy living with her grandmother Wendy. She has tried to run away before but is sent back to her grandmother's cold unwelcoming house. She doesn't believe that her mother is dead, and desperately wants to find her. Madge makes her escape one night when she has been left alone with her drunken uncle Michael but is whisked away by Peter Pan with a promise to take her to her mother. Will she find the truth in Neverland? Or is the truth in Grandmother Wendy's diary? Kat Madge Darling has never been happy living with her grandmother Wendy. She has tried to run away before but is sent back to her grandmother's cold unwelcoming house. She doesn't believe that her mother is dead, and desperately wants to find her. Madge makes her escape one night when she has been left alone with her drunken uncle Michael but is whisked away by Peter Pan with a promise to take her to her mother. Will she find the truth in Neverland? Or is the truth in Grandmother Wendy's diary? Katrina Monroe has envisioned and brought to life a dark and savage Peter Pan that is indeed a far cry from the innocent Disney version. I received a complimentary copy for review.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Zara West

    A rather dark sequel to the tale of Peter Pan.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    All Darling Children by Katrina Monroe Ms. Monroe has forever changed the story of “Peter Pan” for me. I try to stay away from dark themes, for personal reasons, however the cover for “All Darling Children” sucked me in. I also have a fondness for retold fairy-tales. Honestly, I was hoping for some humor to stave off the darkness, but no, I can’t say there was enough humor to save me from the depravity that is Pan. Ms. Monroe takes the story of Peter Pan and skillfully weaves in a Lord of the Fli All Darling Children by Katrina Monroe Ms. Monroe has forever changed the story of “Peter Pan” for me. I try to stay away from dark themes, for personal reasons, however the cover for “All Darling Children” sucked me in. I also have a fondness for retold fairy-tales. Honestly, I was hoping for some humor to stave off the darkness, but no, I can’t say there was enough humor to save me from the depravity that is Pan. Ms. Monroe takes the story of Peter Pan and skillfully weaves in a Lord of the Flies type drama. *shivers* This story centers on Madge Darling, Wendy Darling’s grand-daughter. Madge wishes to escape her cold, tyrannical grandmother and find her mother. It just so happens Pan has been watching Madge for years and assists in her escape by whisking her off to Neverland. Madge is spunky, however she doesn’t come across as a strong character, and I kept having to remind myself she was only fourteen years-old. Pan’s transformation into a maniacal madman with powers of persuasion over the lost boys and the whole island of Neverland makes magical sense in the context of the story. As Madge begins to see the truth surrounding Pan and Neverland, she determines she has to confront Peter and try to set things right. But does she have the courage, strength, and cunning to pull it off? The narrative is broken up with selections from Wendy’s diary entries from her time in Neverland, which paints a whole new picture of Wendy’s character. This gives the reader a better understanding of Wendy Darling’s later adult years as well. Flashbacks are used to fill-in other reimagined events and characters, such as Captain Hook and Tiger Lily. The twists in this reworking of the tale takes the reader on a roller-coaster ride you won’t soon forget. The end left me reeling and a little unnerved. If you are into demented, twisted, reimagined fairy tales this may be a book you will enjoy. FYI: There are a few F-bombs dropped and some gory battle scenes. This is not a child’s fairy tale. **Originally written for "BigAl’s Books and Pals" book blog. May have received a free review copy.** January 4, 2017 Format/Typo Issues: No significant issues with proofing or formatting.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

    Fourteen year old Madge Darling has been living with her grandmother Wendy for the last ten years since her mother's death. But Madge doesn't believe that her mother actually died fourteen years ago, she believes that her mother is alive and well and living in Chicago. Madge has the idea to try to run away to find her mother but gets caught and brought back to her grandmother. Grandma Wendy however ends up having a heart attack and staying in the hospital. While her grandmother is away Madge aga Fourteen year old Madge Darling has been living with her grandmother Wendy for the last ten years since her mother's death. But Madge doesn't believe that her mother actually died fourteen years ago, she believes that her mother is alive and well and living in Chicago. Madge has the idea to try to run away to find her mother but gets caught and brought back to her grandmother. Grandma Wendy however ends up having a heart attack and staying in the hospital. While her grandmother is away Madge again tries to head to the Windy City to find her mother but ends up meeting a boy named Peter Pan who lures her to a place called Neverland. While in Neverland Madge uncovers some disturbing secrets about the place, the family and Peter Pan. All Darling Children is a twisted retelling of the classic story of Peter Pan. This version is a bit more horror and as some others before it centers around a more evil version of Peter than the one in the original tale. There are all the characters that you are used to knowing from Peter Pan but with a more horror twist to the story. I have to say I'm a sucker for anything Peter Pan and have read quite a lot of different versions. While a more evil Peter isn't new the author did an OK job coming up with her own story in this version. However I didn't rate this one very high due to it having a lot of inconsistencies involved with not only the characters descriptions/personalites but even some of the action in the story. If a huge fan of retellings or Peter Pan I'd still say give it a shot but don't pay too close attention to the details or it may leave you scratching your head. I received a copy from the publisher via NetGalley. For more reviews please visit https://carriesbookreviews.wordpress....

  28. 5 out of 5

    Emmy

    What made the experience of listening to All Darling Children the most enjoyable? Although I've picked up several books about Wendy's daughter, Jane, I had not read any to completion. I'm not sure if this picks up any information from those. And that brings me to what I loved most. I loved how this spanned three generations. Wendy, Jane, and Madge only had their strong nature in common. But the similarities end there. Madge was an angry child who was emotionally stunted, a clear teen rebel who ac What made the experience of listening to All Darling Children the most enjoyable? Although I've picked up several books about Wendy's daughter, Jane, I had not read any to completion. I'm not sure if this picks up any information from those. And that brings me to what I loved most. I loved how this spanned three generations. Wendy, Jane, and Madge only had their strong nature in common. But the similarities end there. Madge was an angry child who was emotionally stunted, a clear teen rebel who ached for love and acceptance. The original characters were brought back with grace and the backstory was brief yet thorough for all characters (except Michae's) . The first 95% was captivating and very well written. I don't feel the book ended with complete satisfaction. It felt loose ends were dangling. The epilogue didn't resolve the questions nor bring contentment, either. Michael didn't make sense. He was the only character who was underdeveloped and shallow. Who knows why he is called Uncle although he was Madge's grandmother's brother. Who knows why Peter wasn't enlightened of his relationship to Madge? I don't think Jonathan's life span was clear either, come to think of it. Neverland had changed since the original Peter Pan story and fit beautifully with events and the plot. Jane was the perfect narrator for this book. She offered the voices for each character that complemented their age and mental status. Any additional comments? Ireview all ebooks and audiobooks. However, my disclaimer per Aubiobook Book: "I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review."

  29. 4 out of 5

    Imani

    This book had a dark and ominous tone to it. Compared to the original Lost Boys story but the tale of Peter Pan always had the questioningly similar theme of one being young forever - because one is actually just a young corpse instead. This book has the 'What if...?' aspects of all the scary and confusing thoughts of what would happen to a human if they were able to reach immortality. Pan turned into a monster. The Lost Boys were a group of naive, mindless, changeable conveniences to Pan and hi This book had a dark and ominous tone to it. Compared to the original Lost Boys story but the tale of Peter Pan always had the questioningly similar theme of one being young forever - because one is actually just a young corpse instead. This book has the 'What if...?' aspects of all the scary and confusing thoughts of what would happen to a human if they were able to reach immortality. Pan turned into a monster. The Lost Boys were a group of naive, mindless, changeable conveniences to Pan and his wicked and numerous plans. The Darlings were unfortunate victims in the crossfire. The characters were all two-sided. They had good moments and bad decisions. Except Pan, because he was pass the point of redemption. Even Wendy from the original story was despicable and you can feel the hate and disgust the main character felt for Wendy too. I can feel the struggle and seemingly endless nightmare Madge, Wendy's granddaughter, had to live through. This book was dark, but well written. I enjoyed it. I enjoyed a new take on the lovable characters from the Peter Pan story like Captain Hook, Smee and even Tiger Lily. It like the way the book ended. I kinda wish there was another book for a series but this Stand-Alone book was exceptional too. Definitely hardcore, a bit more mature than what I thought should be for young readers but still something I would recommend for a profound read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte Lynn

    I am a sucker for a good fairy tale twist. All Darling Children is a new one for me. This is the first Peter Pan twist that I have read. I love that the characters were familiar, Peter Pan, Captain Hook, Smee, The Lost Boys, and Wendy. Add to that list some new characters with Jane and Madge and the story takes on new life. The story of Peter Pan is a fairytale to most people. In this story you see a different side of Pan and an entirely different Hook. The Darling children from Wendy, her daugh I am a sucker for a good fairy tale twist. All Darling Children is a new one for me. This is the first Peter Pan twist that I have read. I love that the characters were familiar, Peter Pan, Captain Hook, Smee, The Lost Boys, and Wendy. Add to that list some new characters with Jane and Madge and the story takes on new life. The story of Peter Pan is a fairytale to most people. In this story you see a different side of Pan and an entirely different Hook. The Darling children from Wendy, her daughter Jane, and finally her granddaughter Madge all travel to Neverland and realize what Peter Pan really is. The fact that Wendy returns to the real world and becomes a scorned old woman really changes my perception of her. I felt for Madge, stuck growing up with a woman like Wendy has become. All Darling Children is a dark tale. It is not bells and whistles, fun and fairies. Katrina Monroe takes a happy Neverland and melds it into a dark, scary Neverland. I really enjoyed this twisted fairytale. Pick up a copy ASAP.

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