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The Afterlife of Abdul (Dark, Horror, Afterlife, Paranormal, Spiritual, Mystical short story)

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Abdul kills himself and Jenny... he didn't mean to. Their deaths were the result of a car crash. He had been rushing to meet his date. His motorbike collided with her Mum's red car and Jenny a little six year old girl died. He didn't know she was there. It was an accident. Their souls meet in the space between their immediate deaths and the start of their afterlives. Im Abdul kills himself and Jenny... he didn't mean to. Their deaths were the result of a car crash. He had been rushing to meet his date. His motorbike collided with her Mum's red car and Jenny a little six year old girl died. He didn't know she was there. It was an accident. Their souls meet in the space between their immediate deaths and the start of their afterlives. Imagine dying and meeting Azrael, the Angel of Death. What happens in that place? What happens when you are forced to submit to your death? This is a short story of approximately ten thousand words. Central to all the characters is their voice which represents their consciousness. The story is told from the perspective of each of the different characters as they transition towards their destinations. Inspired by the works of Imam Al-Ghazali.


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Abdul kills himself and Jenny... he didn't mean to. Their deaths were the result of a car crash. He had been rushing to meet his date. His motorbike collided with her Mum's red car and Jenny a little six year old girl died. He didn't know she was there. It was an accident. Their souls meet in the space between their immediate deaths and the start of their afterlives. Im Abdul kills himself and Jenny... he didn't mean to. Their deaths were the result of a car crash. He had been rushing to meet his date. His motorbike collided with her Mum's red car and Jenny a little six year old girl died. He didn't know she was there. It was an accident. Their souls meet in the space between their immediate deaths and the start of their afterlives. Imagine dying and meeting Azrael, the Angel of Death. What happens in that place? What happens when you are forced to submit to your death? This is a short story of approximately ten thousand words. Central to all the characters is their voice which represents their consciousness. The story is told from the perspective of each of the different characters as they transition towards their destinations. Inspired by the works of Imam Al-Ghazali.

30 review for The Afterlife of Abdul (Dark, Horror, Afterlife, Paranormal, Spiritual, Mystical short story)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I have never read this author before. The story was a bit slow moving considering how short it is. The characters are bland and do not really draw you in. They are more just snapshots of their personalities without any real depth to them. The language that is used by them seems to fit with who they are as far I can tell. Azrael, the Angel of Death comes to collect the souls of Abdul and those who die with him. Abdul does not die alone and Jenny, a six year old who is asleep in her mother's back I have never read this author before. The story was a bit slow moving considering how short it is. The characters are bland and do not really draw you in. They are more just snapshots of their personalities without any real depth to them. The language that is used by them seems to fit with who they are as far I can tell. Azrael, the Angel of Death comes to collect the souls of Abdul and those who die with him. Abdul does not die alone and Jenny, a six year old who is asleep in her mother's back seat also dies. What happens next is something they could not have seen coming. This was alright but not worth another read. I have not decided whether to red the next in the series yet. I will be reading another book from this author and decide what to do. While I found it rather dry someone else might not.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    I enjoy stories like this. As an agnostic, who was raised in the church, I often have a hard time separating what I was taught, to my current beliefs. But, then I come across a story like this, and it makes me start thinking of faith and what I believe in. This tale was a pleasure to read, and I loved how the three lives coalesced at the end. Yep, I'd recommend this story and author. I plan on reading more from Ms. Hafiza.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jalyn

    You'd be forgiven for thinking a story titled "The Afterlife of Abdul" is about Abdul's afterlife. You'd be wrong, but you'd be forgiven. I got this free on Amazon, and I knew it was a short story going into it. I was pretty excited about it, actually, because the author is Muslim and I was interested to hear a Muslim perspective on heaven/the afterlife. That's not what's here, though. Not at all. It starts out strong. The first chapter is about Abdul - it sets up a conflict between him not being a You'd be forgiven for thinking a story titled "The Afterlife of Abdul" is about Abdul's afterlife. You'd be wrong, but you'd be forgiven. I got this free on Amazon, and I knew it was a short story going into it. I was pretty excited about it, actually, because the author is Muslim and I was interested to hear a Muslim perspective on heaven/the afterlife. That's not what's here, though. Not at all. It starts out strong. The first chapter is about Abdul - it sets up a conflict between him not being as good a Muslim as he could be but desiring to be better, and the way the girl he's dating seems to be Muslim in name only and he likes her but is afraid she's pulling him away from God. This is all set up through internal monologue as he drives his motorcycle through the rain, and gave me a really solid connection to this character. The chapter ends with him colliding with a car (part of the problem was that he was speeding, but part of it was the car had its lights off and he didn't see it) and dying. Then the second chapter from Jenny's perspective and her experience with dying in the car crash and going to heaven. I didn't really care about Jenny all that much - her chapter is much shorter and focuses on her death only - but I accepted it because the back cover played up her as important and maybe this is important to Abdul's story. (Bear in mind that at this point, Abdul has been solidly cemented as the main character in my mind.) Chapter three is from Jenny's mom's perspective. I don't think the author was trying to play her off as unlikeable, but she very much was. She pretty much ticked every box on the "independent and b*tchy" stereotype checklist. She was also driving drunk, which is why her lights were off and Abdul didn't see her car. So though the back cover tried to play it off as entirely Abdul's fault Jenny died, I think it's at least 50% Jenny's mom's fault. This character also gets a lot of backstory, which is why I think the author was trying to make her sympathetic and just failed. Chapter four was super short and from the perspective of Azrael, the angel of death. And that's it. There's four chapters. The focus is on the deaths and the moments after, no actual afterlives involved. And the point-of-view characters get progressively less likeable/enjoyable as the story goes on. Mostly I'm just disappointed that I didn't get what I was promised - a story about Abdul's experience in the afterlife. The first chapter was stellar, and if it had continued with Abdul and not a disjointed series of other characters, I'd be chomping at the bit for book two, not delivering a verdict of "very disappointing."

  4. 4 out of 5

    Roxie Prince

    Read this review and more on my blog at [Roxie Writes]. 'The Afterlife of Abdul (Azrael Series Book 1)' by Ayse Hafiza ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 4/5 Finished on January 12, 2017 GIVEN FREE COPY IN EXCHANGE FOR HONEST REVIEW. FREE on Kindle now (typically $2.99) BOOK DESCRIPTION: In this short story, we meet Abdul, a young Muslim man, as he travels on his motorcycle to his girlfriend's house. He contemplates his religion and his struggles with human nature and how that conflicts with his desire to be a good Muslim. As h Read this review and more on my blog at [Roxie Writes]. 'The Afterlife of Abdul (Azrael Series Book 1)' by Ayse Hafiza ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 4/5 Finished on January 12, 2017 GIVEN FREE COPY IN EXCHANGE FOR HONEST REVIEW. FREE on Kindle now (typically $2.99) BOOK DESCRIPTION: In this short story, we meet Abdul, a young Muslim man, as he travels on his motorcycle to his girlfriend's house. He contemplates his religion and his struggles with human nature and how that conflicts with his desire to be a good Muslim. As he gets caught up in his thoughts, he gets into a tragic accident that results not only in his death, but in the death of a little girl, Jenny, and the injury of her mother. The Angel of Death, Azrael, comes to collect their souls and shows us how circumstances are always more complicated than they seem on the surface. Everyone has a story, and sometimes they are intertwined in ways we could only imagine. MY REVIEW: I was given a free copy of this book in exchange for honest review. I read this book as part of my #yearofindiewomen. I have to admit, before reading this, I was ignorant to what beliefs Muslims hold about angels. I have a very peripheral understanding of Islam as a whole, unfortunately. I am not a religious person, personally. I am not a fan, in general, of organized religion, but I do have respect for people who have a strong faith. So, it was eye-opening to learn that yes, Muslims do believe in angels. This is an extremely well-crafted and well-written story about what might happen after death, but what intrigued me more about this tale was how interconnected people are in life and how everyone has a story. How every story is complex and layered. Through the loss of Jenny and Abdul, we learn about the lives of all three people involved and how the choices they made brought them all together. Hafiza does an impeccable job of weaving them all together to create a beautifully poignant story. It's a quick read, but a lot happens. I look forward to reading the rest of the series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This was a short, but very interesting book. The book deals with the deaths of Abdul, a 26 yr old practicing Muslim and Jenny, a six yr old girl. Jenny is in the back seat of a car being driven by her mother Sophie, who is drunk driving after a office party. Sophie also did not buckle her daughter into her car seat. Abdul is driving his motorcycle late on a rainy night to see his girlfriend. She is also a Muslim but not practicing. Abdul is having an internal argument with himself about his futur This was a short, but very interesting book. The book deals with the deaths of Abdul, a 26 yr old practicing Muslim and Jenny, a six yr old girl. Jenny is in the back seat of a car being driven by her mother Sophie, who is drunk driving after a office party. Sophie also did not buckle her daughter into her car seat. Abdul is driving his motorcycle late on a rainy night to see his girlfriend. She is also a Muslim but not practicing. Abdul is having an internal argument with himself about his future. He wants to fall in love, get married and have children but he's not sure if his new girlfriend is the one and he is having second thoughts on going there this late and what will happen when he gets there. I could relate to having a conversation with myself in my head because I do it all the time. And yes, I do argue with myself but I always win . After the accident, Abdul meets Azrael, the Angel of Death. This is where it gets really interesting and you may end up having a conversation with yourself about your religious beliefs, if any, and how you feel about the afterlife. This is the first of three books about Azrael and, for lack of a better word, his adventures as the Angel of Death. I got this free ebook from Amazon and agreed with the author to give an honest review. I recommend this book. It's short but it just might result in a conversation with yourself or other people.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie Dale Keck

    NOT kindle unlimited, must have gotten it on a freebie day. The End. Azrael the Angel of Death, grabbed Abduls' soul from his smashed and mangled body as it lay on the cold wet asphalt road. Parted from his motorbike, Abdul didn’t die alone. He killed Jenny, an innocent six year old girl she was asleep in the backseat of her mothers' car. Seconds before the crash they were strangers. More than a bit preachy, and such things as not properly restraining a child and more than a bit of misogynism in t NOT kindle unlimited, must have gotten it on a freebie day. The End. Azrael the Angel of Death, grabbed Abduls' soul from his smashed and mangled body as it lay on the cold wet asphalt road. Parted from his motorbike, Abdul didn’t die alone. He killed Jenny, an innocent six year old girl she was asleep in the backseat of her mothers' car. Seconds before the crash they were strangers. More than a bit preachy, and such things as not properly restraining a child and more than a bit of misogynism in this story, so well...and all that happens in 4 very short chapters, so as if could have just probably combined the 3 books as 1 decently long book, {and this coming from someone who reads a LOT of serialized/shorter stories, but they are still pretty complete for that} but don't know for sure because again none of them are ku. 2 to match the amazon 2, not the star meaning. The Afterlife of Abdul (Azrael Series Book 1) King Solomon and the Cat (Azrael Series Book 2) Mr. Time (Azrael Series Book 3)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Rifai

    Must read book Loved it. lots of books but description of things happeneing, emotions, and i get lost in the book but this one made me feel what the characters felt. too bad it was just a short story. side note i actually thought i was the one who was cheating and took a small break to convince my self that im not married

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sherry Westendorf

    A different kind of read then I am used to. I missed the first one so it was weird coming into the second one. It was different and interesting. I enjoyed reading something different for a change. One which held my attention. I recommend it. I was given a review copy and voluntarily reviewed it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    stephen smitten

    Absorbing A great short story, I am very interested in the afterlife and although this is a fictional story, the death and afterlife experiences of the characters were very believable and just how I imagine. Recommended!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Flora

    I liked this book. The short story The Afterlife of Abdul ends 79% into the book, the remaining pages contain a taster of another of Ms Hafiza's stories King Solomon and the Cat (Prophet, Paranormal, fantasy, dark, Jinn, Genie, mystical) plus disclaimers, author bio and contact details. I was sent this book for free when I subscribed to Ms Hafiza's e-list. Ayse Hafiza is a new-to-me author; I found her story well written, easy to follow and felt connected to all of her characters. Compared to oth I liked this book. The short story The Afterlife of Abdul ends 79% into the book, the remaining pages contain a taster of another of Ms Hafiza's stories King Solomon and the Cat (Prophet, Paranormal, fantasy, dark, Jinn, Genie, mystical) plus disclaimers, author bio and contact details. I was sent this book for free when I subscribed to Ms Hafiza's e-list. Ayse Hafiza is a new-to-me author; I found her story well written, easy to follow and felt connected to all of her characters. Compared to other books I've read, I'm not sure whether I'd put this tale in the horror genre; it's more a poignant, spiritual paranormal story. I was impressed by Ms Hafiza and will put her stories on my TBR list.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Emmy

    The title threw me for a loop and was kind if misleading because Abdul's POV ends soon after he dies, Jenny's is a little bit further, then scene three is the mother.

  12. 4 out of 5

    storybookreader

    While I don't really like to read short stories, I felt compelled to read this one. I had no idea what to expect, just feeling the need to read it and understand it. (I'm in the middle of another book, and I NEVER read more than one at a time.) This book spoke to my broken heart and filled it with hope again. God works in mysterious ways and I believe with my heart and soul that God put these words before me this night for a reason. For me, religion is religion. You believe or you do not. We nee While I don't really like to read short stories, I felt compelled to read this one. I had no idea what to expect, just feeling the need to read it and understand it. (I'm in the middle of another book, and I NEVER read more than one at a time.) This book spoke to my broken heart and filled it with hope again. God works in mysterious ways and I believe with my heart and soul that God put these words before me this night for a reason. For me, religion is religion. You believe or you do not. We need to respect each others' beliefs, or lack thereof. There is only one God, the Creator, who has many names and faces. This short story gave me peace in my mind and heart and hope to be worthy of the Kingdom of Heaven when my name is called. Thank you so much, Ayse Hafiza, for bringing God's words to me in this fashion. I can only hope that others will read it and take something precious from it with them, as well. I will be watching for your future books. Your writing is wonderful and I recommend this book to everyone!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Romero

    I wasn't exactly sure what to expect with this short story. As soon as I started it however, I was hooked. It was like a movie in my head, which are the stories I like best. If you write so well that I can see it in my head, then you have accomplished something big. We all wonder about death. What comes next? What happens at the time of your death? Are there second chances? Is there an angel of death? All of these questions are beautifully answered here. A book that made me cry and feel. That's t I wasn't exactly sure what to expect with this short story. As soon as I started it however, I was hooked. It was like a movie in my head, which are the stories I like best. If you write so well that I can see it in my head, then you have accomplished something big. We all wonder about death. What comes next? What happens at the time of your death? Are there second chances? Is there an angel of death? All of these questions are beautifully answered here. A book that made me cry and feel. That's the key. You made me feel and think! I would love to read all the other books as well! All I can say is just read it, it is nothing like anything I've ever read and I really recommend you read it!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Ellis

    When Abdul is hit by a car while riding his motorcycle one rainy night, he is killed. The Afterlife of Abdul is the short story of what he experiences immediately afterward with the angel of death and the young girl who died with him. It's an interesting idea of what death might be like, and how our lives are entwined with others. It's a very simple story, without much of a plot or character development, but it's one that will probably touch the hearts of a lot of people, and at the very least ge When Abdul is hit by a car while riding his motorcycle one rainy night, he is killed. The Afterlife of Abdul is the short story of what he experiences immediately afterward with the angel of death and the young girl who died with him. It's an interesting idea of what death might be like, and how our lives are entwined with others. It's a very simple story, without much of a plot or character development, but it's one that will probably touch the hearts of a lot of people, and at the very least get the reader to think about what the afterlife might be like.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

    This was a well done and interesting story about life, death, our religious beliefs (or lack thereof), fate and the afterlife. It is the kind of story that stays with you and makes you think. I was fortunate to receive a free copy of this book, with the request to leave an honest review if I wished to. I would like to read more by this talented author in the future.

  16. 4 out of 5

    SA

    The interconnections work. Three people, a point in time, and fate collide.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mrs N Caliskan

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ibragin Soto

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lena Smith

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tamara

  22. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    I voluntarily read and reviewed this free book at the request of the author. I finished the book, it was very short so, there’s that. I don’t really know how to start this review off. I would start off reading the chapter, skim through it because they would start talking to a voice in their head. Now, don’t get me wrong, while I can understand the voice thing, it seemed like Abdul had an actual problem with it, getting into full out arguments with his voice. I always tell people not to worry about I voluntarily read and reviewed this free book at the request of the author. I finished the book, it was very short so, there’s that. I don’t really know how to start this review off. I would start off reading the chapter, skim through it because they would start talking to a voice in their head. Now, don’t get me wrong, while I can understand the voice thing, it seemed like Abdul had an actual problem with it, getting into full out arguments with his voice. I always tell people not to worry about talking to yourself, you only need to worry if you start arguing with yourself. Also, the title could be different. I mean, it’s correct, it is The Afterlife of Abdul but it’s also the afterlife of Jenny and the life of the mother. *Warning: Spoiler!* Then I want to shake my Kindle when the mom made the brilliant decision to go pick up her six year old when she was drunk and then made the even more brilliant decision to not strap her six year old into the car seat. *End Spoiler* Then there’s the ending. That last chapter just ended up feeling like the religion was being shoved down my throat. Again, don’t get me wrong, I’m a Christian, I’m saved and I believe in Heaven and Hell and all that but I also believe in allowing others to believe in what they believe in. If I try to harp on them about my beliefs, I’m going to end up pushing people away. I don’t really think that last chapter was necessary. I really don’t think I would recommend. Thank you for reading my review. -Sam

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rahul Gandhi

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Todd

  25. 5 out of 5

    maggie brown

  26. 4 out of 5

    Troubletail

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sigrid Patrick

  28. 5 out of 5

    Zelda

    I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Told from the points of view of three people involved in a tragic accident, and the angel who guides two of them to heaven; this book is engaging and thought provoking.

  29. 5 out of 5

    D. Paul McZeal

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Shawki

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