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The New York Times Cook Book

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Since it was first published in 1961, The New York Times Cook Book, a standard work for gourmet home cooks, has sold nearly three million copies in all editions and continues to sell strongly each year. All the nearly fifteen hundred recipes in the book have been reviewed, revised, and updated, and approximately 40 percent have been replaced. Emphasizing the timeless nature Since it was first published in 1961, The New York Times Cook Book, a standard work for gourmet home cooks, has sold nearly three million copies in all editions and continues to sell strongly each year. All the nearly fifteen hundred recipes in the book have been reviewed, revised, and updated, and approximately 40 percent have been replaced. Emphasizing the timeless nature of this collection, Craig Claiborne has included new recipes using fresh herbs and food processor techniques. He has also added more Chinese, Indian, and foreign recipes and more recipes for pasta, rice, and grains. Additional fish recipes, new salads and bread recipes, and an exceptional chili dish enhance this edition, which contains traditional American recipes and selected recipes from twenty countries. All the recipes are clearly presented and suitable for many different occasions, ranging from a wide variety of family meals to the most formal dinner party. The author also covers sauces and salad dressings, relishes, and preserves. And there are countless old favorites and those wonderful desserts. Complete with essential cross-referencing, a table of equivalents and conversions, and an index, the revised edition of The New York Times Cook Book is a superb new cookbook to give, to own, and to use for years to come.


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Since it was first published in 1961, The New York Times Cook Book, a standard work for gourmet home cooks, has sold nearly three million copies in all editions and continues to sell strongly each year. All the nearly fifteen hundred recipes in the book have been reviewed, revised, and updated, and approximately 40 percent have been replaced. Emphasizing the timeless nature Since it was first published in 1961, The New York Times Cook Book, a standard work for gourmet home cooks, has sold nearly three million copies in all editions and continues to sell strongly each year. All the nearly fifteen hundred recipes in the book have been reviewed, revised, and updated, and approximately 40 percent have been replaced. Emphasizing the timeless nature of this collection, Craig Claiborne has included new recipes using fresh herbs and food processor techniques. He has also added more Chinese, Indian, and foreign recipes and more recipes for pasta, rice, and grains. Additional fish recipes, new salads and bread recipes, and an exceptional chili dish enhance this edition, which contains traditional American recipes and selected recipes from twenty countries. All the recipes are clearly presented and suitable for many different occasions, ranging from a wide variety of family meals to the most formal dinner party. The author also covers sauces and salad dressings, relishes, and preserves. And there are countless old favorites and those wonderful desserts. Complete with essential cross-referencing, a table of equivalents and conversions, and an index, the revised edition of The New York Times Cook Book is a superb new cookbook to give, to own, and to use for years to come.

30 review for The New York Times Cook Book

  1. 4 out of 5

    Leona

    I've had this cookbook since this edition was published in the early 80's. It has remained a favorite"go-to" cookbook; a timeless staple in my kitchen that has stood the test of time. I learned how to cook and bake using this cookbook. I can't speak to other editions, but this one is definitely a classic.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Susan Gardner

    In these pages Craig Claiborne taught me to cook and to love to cook. I bought the first edition when it was originally published around 1961 and I have used it ever since. The recipes are clear, well organized, beautifully thought out. The photo sequences to teach how to carve a turkey, make a muffin and similar basics. Yet the food is elegant, sophisticated, as fresh and interesting as ever. I have an extensive collection of cookbooks, historic ones, books from many times and cultures but I wo In these pages Craig Claiborne taught me to cook and to love to cook. I bought the first edition when it was originally published around 1961 and I have used it ever since. The recipes are clear, well organized, beautifully thought out. The photo sequences to teach how to carve a turkey, make a muffin and similar basics. Yet the food is elegant, sophisticated, as fresh and interesting as ever. I have an extensive collection of cookbooks, historic ones, books from many times and cultures but I would sorely miss Craig in my kitchen. I have my stained, dogeared first 'first edition' and felt lucky to find a duplicate to use for the rest of my life.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Someone gave this to us as a wedding gift over 20 years ago. Could not live without it! Almost every recipe is quite simple, usually only taking 1 column. I am not too ambitious as a cook, so this suits me fine. Also, plenty of veg-friendly recipes, including an entire legume chapter.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mbahonyinyechi

    Nice

  5. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    "To eat without thought or reflection is a profanity." (page 13) Recipes in here I want to try: Alsatian Meat Pie (page 112) Pizza with Anchovies and Cheese (p. 116) Chicken and Sausage with Olive and Anchovy Sauce (p. 268) Fosenjohn [duck and meatballs in walnut sauce] (p. 304) Coulibiac of Salmon (p. 340) Preparing a Whole Artichoke for Stuffing (p. 469) Croissants (p. 556) Dacquoise (p. 633) Dacquoise, "one of the finest and most sought-after desserts in fine restaurants," is meringue layers with butte "To eat without thought or reflection is a profanity." (page 13) Recipes in here I want to try: Alsatian Meat Pie (page 112) Pizza with Anchovies and Cheese (p. 116) Chicken and Sausage with Olive and Anchovy Sauce (p. 268) Fosenjohn [duck and meatballs in walnut sauce] (p. 304) Coulibiac of Salmon (p. 340) Preparing a Whole Artichoke for Stuffing (p. 469) Croissants (p. 556) Dacquoise (p. 633) Dacquoise, "one of the finest and most sought-after desserts in fine restaurants," is meringue layers with buttercream filling. This is something I tasted at a meringue bakery in NYC, and it was amazing. Interestingly, Claiborne writes that he first tasted it at Windows on the World, the restaurant that was at the World Trade Center. Coulibiac is something I had never heard of before, but now desperately want to taste and also attempt cooking - it looks RIDICULOUSLY complicated! "Any cook who is skilled enough to prepare a brioche dough, a standard French crepe and a cream sauce is equal to the task." Reading this book also made me realize there are just some basic cooking things I would really like to learn (ie, prepping an artichoke, and making croissants). Also, the preface (or "De Gustibus," as it's delightfully called), is full of so many interesting facts and anecdotes. The invention of Caesar salad? Mexico. A salmon mousse story (maybe the inspiration for the infamous Monty Python sketch?). Great lines, such as, "Chili is conceivably America's greatest contribution to the world's cuisine." Five paragraphs slamming iceburg lettuce ("If we are unkind to iceberg lettuce, you should hear us on maraschino cherries!").

  6. 5 out of 5

    Terri

    Not one of my favorites but it does have merit. It contains many classic recipes but it is a bit pretentious and over blown. I wouldn't really recommend this book to a novice cook. Claiborne assumes that basic cooking skills are present.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Woodman

    This is not as good as the original cookbook--when they modernized it, they lost alot

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brian Mcdaniel

    Classic, but shifting culinary trends have not been kind...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Martha Hall

    I learned how to cook using this book and still refer to it often. The instructions are clear and in logical order. Also, the authors actually tested all the recipes so they work. Made my first souffle using this book and it came out great.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Emily alewine

    The best

  11. 5 out of 5

    Keri Kresler

    I have the 1961 version! Hilarious.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Teckla

    An interesting read. I like reading recipes even if i don't try them out. This time I did thug. I cooked rice the easy way. It was a really simple recipe but i can't follow a recipe to save my life, especially one on rice. I always have to check it and you're not supposed too. Don't lift the lid! my cat liked this book too. Every time i opened it she would come over and lie down in the middle of it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Patti McDermott

    I was weaned on Betty Crocker as a kid and never understood the lure of the Joy of Cooking, but this was my first go-to cookbook as an adult. I have tried many things and all have come out delicious. My favorite recipe was for the stuffed flank steak. I've never been disappointed with anything I've tried.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Geri Jeter

    I learned how to cook using this book and still refer to it often. The instructions are clear and in logical order. Also, the authors actually tested all the recipes so they work. Made my first souffle using this book and it came out great.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Girly

    This was my first cookbook after I left home. It looks horrid, which I guess is a good sign that it has been used and abused to its fullest. I think it even has the branded mark of a stove-top coil on the cover.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    I confess that I bought this to read rather than use. It's one of the must haves for a cookbook collector.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jessicafriedman

    A favorite, because if nothing else, the recipes are worth reading.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Peter Kliem

    1961 Edition

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    My favorite basic cookbook.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cws

    641.5 Cla

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ivonne

    15?

  22. 4 out of 5

    Costacoralito

    This is the cookbook I go to first. It has a good selection of recipes that are fairly simple to prepare. I keep well supplied with the Mango Chutney by making a new batch every year.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    This is a classic as far as cookbooks go.. I just saw a new edition (pictured) last year. It's a must-have for every cook.

  24. 5 out of 5

    OssifrageRage

    Another staple cookbook, many classic and timeless recipes. I am not as fond of the updated version as I am of the original. I would try to get it used for the original recipes.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lance

    This is one of the books I go to if I am looking for a new recipe or checking for an old recipe. Very Good.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    This was the book that I first followed when I started cooking. I've outgrown it, preferring recipes that are more creative, ethnic and low-cal. But it served me well for many years.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rudolfo

    All the recipes that me and a friend of mine made turned out very well. These are superb recipes, refined and tried. Highly recommended.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Erik

    I prefer the layout of the earlier edition of this book. The quick hollandaise is a great simple way of creating this sauce.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Wilda Das

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mary

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