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The Eleventh Pan Book of Horror Stories

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A forgotten diary so absorbs the finder that 'My spine seemed fixed and my flesh fluid and creeping around it'. With the last page comes a stark revelation of blinding terror... The Cell, David Case. Sickening murder was not enough, only a living death could feed Marlene's lust for revenge... The Baby-Sitter, Dulcie Gray. In true Grand Guignol tradition, a fish fryer comes i A forgotten diary so absorbs the finder that 'My spine seemed fixed and my flesh fluid and creeping around it'. With the last page comes a stark revelation of blinding terror... The Cell, David Case. Sickening murder was not enough, only a living death could feed Marlene's lust for revenge... The Baby-Sitter, Dulcie Gray. In true Grand Guignol tradition, a fish fryer comes in handy when Old Bunting has his chips... Fried Man, Martin Waddell. Just three appetizers from twenty-one spell-binding tales of invisible evil and unjust death that will linger in the dark corners of the mind until cold earth spatters colder lips...


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A forgotten diary so absorbs the finder that 'My spine seemed fixed and my flesh fluid and creeping around it'. With the last page comes a stark revelation of blinding terror... The Cell, David Case. Sickening murder was not enough, only a living death could feed Marlene's lust for revenge... The Baby-Sitter, Dulcie Gray. In true Grand Guignol tradition, a fish fryer comes i A forgotten diary so absorbs the finder that 'My spine seemed fixed and my flesh fluid and creeping around it'. With the last page comes a stark revelation of blinding terror... The Cell, David Case. Sickening murder was not enough, only a living death could feed Marlene's lust for revenge... The Baby-Sitter, Dulcie Gray. In true Grand Guignol tradition, a fish fryer comes in handy when Old Bunting has his chips... Fried Man, Martin Waddell. Just three appetizers from twenty-one spell-binding tales of invisible evil and unjust death that will linger in the dark corners of the mind until cold earth spatters colder lips...

30 review for The Eleventh Pan Book of Horror Stories

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul Bryant

    This collection was published in 1970 so you know there's not gonna be much political correctness to be found! Prepare to be slightly offended... Actually there are only a few stories worth commenting on. By 1970 this series had run out of good horror. The real horror is that it carried on for another 19 years! David Case, ‘The Cell’ Diary of a werewolf. This one, when human, is an uptight prudish rightwing male chauvinist (as they were called in 1970) which is quite an amusing idea - a pr This collection was published in 1970 so you know there's not gonna be much political correctness to be found! Prepare to be slightly offended... Actually there are only a few stories worth commenting on. By 1970 this series had run out of good horror. The real horror is that it carried on for another 19 years! David Case, ‘The Cell’ Diary of a werewolf. This one, when human, is an uptight prudish rightwing male chauvinist (as they were called in 1970) which is quite an amusing idea - a prudish werewolf. (In the brilliant mockumentary What we Do in the Shadows(New Zealand, 2014) a group of vampires run into a group of werewolves and start verbally abusing each other until one of the latter group shouts out "Come on, let's go, we're werewolves not swearwolves...") . David Case plays with the idea that serial killers are werewolves. In one sense or another. Bryan Lewis, ‘A Question of Fear’ Hilarious - many of these Pan horror stories start off with two old buffers swapping stories over a large brandy and cigar in a gentlemen's club somewhere in Mayfair, just like the 1960s never happened. (Well, for many people, they didn't.) So here we have a "war hero" who doesn’t know the meaning of fear; in the club he meets a swarthy man named Smith who lays a wager of £500 (a lot in those days). He is to spend the night in a country mansion and if he survives he wins. In the mansion, first he is attached by toothless mastiffs. As he has brought his trusty service revolver he shoots them but then ... he's attacked by a gorilla! He shoots that too. But then sees it was behind a pane of bullet proof glass. He reclines on his bed and .... a guillotine has been rigged over it! He escapes death by inches! This Smith joker turns out to be the son of the pianist who our war hero had tortured during WW2 (for quite proper reasons). And Smith now works at Porton Down - yes, the government chemicals warfare secret laboratory! And has manufactured a way of disintegrating human bones inside living humans to turn them into human worms! Human worms! And our war hero has already ingested the evil potion! Squirm, war hero, squirm. Barry Martin, ‘Case of Insanity' How many PB stories feature spouses who hate each other, or one hates the other? Answer : loads and loads. And how many feature downtrodden husbands? Answer : loads and loads. “You bloody ponce! That’s what you are! If you can’t do right by me, why don’t you go out and get yourself some pretty, sweet little queer to have your sex with?” That's telling him. But you really shouldn't raise your voice in a Pan horror story because naturally he kills her and dismembers her gruesomely then takes the suitcase with her remains inside to be buried in the woods, along with another suitcase full of his clothes. On the way back he’s in a car crash and taken to hospital. They open his suitcase to find out who he is and alas they find the wife because he’d buried the wrong suitcase in the woods. That'll teach him. Although come to think of it he must have noticed that the case he was burying weighed less than his wife's dismembered corpse? Could be men's suits and that extra pair of brogues were really heavy in those days. That must be it. Robert Duncan, ‘The Market-Gardeners’ The Pan books were heterogeneous to a fault - just when you think it's all campy splatter stuff along comes a realistic genuinely chilling piece like this. A childless couple who sell vegetables at a market are visited by two men for an unspecified reason. They’re tied up and one rapes the woman. They take their time about it and then casually leave. No explanations, no conclusion. Nasty, brutal and effective. Dulcie Gray, ‘The Babysitter’ Dulcie Gray was a major British stage actress who switched to writing and was pretty good at that too. She came up with a couple of classics for the Pan Books and this is one. The fat 15 year old babysitter ends up taking her anger out on the baby, naturally, and it's a really horrific scene. Don't think anyone would publish this now. The Pan Books stories features a number of evil fat people. Like I say, don't look for any PC here. Conclusion : it's probably not a bad thing that some books go out of print.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dan Coxon

    A couple of forgotten gems (notably from Barry Martin and Nigel Kneale), but also some stories that have dated rather badly. Still, interesting reading, if rather patchy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Giles

    I don't know if it's me, but horror stories got a little cheesy on the 70's. I don't know if it's me, but horror stories got a little cheesy on the 70's.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kerri

  5. 5 out of 5

    Harry

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mahnoor

  7. 5 out of 5

    John

  8. 4 out of 5

    jsewellmcevoy

  9. 4 out of 5

    David Evans

  10. 5 out of 5

    Morgan Scorpion

  11. 4 out of 5

    Liz Chell

  12. 5 out of 5

    Si

  13. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Dunlop

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kirk King

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cecilia Dunbar Hernandez

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

  17. 4 out of 5

    Arthur Chappell

  18. 5 out of 5

    Gordon Jackson

  19. 4 out of 5

    Karl Hickey

  20. 4 out of 5

    OTIS

  21. 4 out of 5

    Simon Rowling

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bill

  23. 4 out of 5

    Petra-X Off having adventures

  24. 5 out of 5

    Julie Higgs

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alan Mcwatters

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nick

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chad Case

  28. 4 out of 5

    Hugo

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ian Munro

  30. 5 out of 5

    Þórhallur

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