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The Winter Garden Mystery

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England 1923. Plucky Daisy Dalrymple takes another Town and Country magazine assignment, to write up and photograph gloomy Occles Hall. She unearths Grace Moss, missing parlor maid, seeks killer amid occupants - school chum and wallflower Bobbie Parslow, thorny Lady Valeria.


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England 1923. Plucky Daisy Dalrymple takes another Town and Country magazine assignment, to write up and photograph gloomy Occles Hall. She unearths Grace Moss, missing parlor maid, seeks killer amid occupants - school chum and wallflower Bobbie Parslow, thorny Lady Valeria.

30 review for The Winter Garden Mystery

  1. 4 out of 5

    Terry Southard

    Enjoyable series, or as Daisy might say, "Just spiffing." Not nearly as good as the Maisie Dobbs series, it is still an enjoyable summer read. This one has the body of a serving girl found buried in an estate's garden. The town is ready to pin the murder on the Welsh gardener, but was it really him? I thought this one was fairly obvious from the get-go, but I still enjoyed it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    Reviewed for The Bibliophibian. No surprises that I picked up the next Daisy Dalrymple book pretty quickly — they’re just the perfect length for a long soak in the bath followed by a lazy evening, which is exactly how I’ve been reading them. I continue to enjoy the fact that Daisy’s a worker (although helped significantly by her class), and her relationship with Alec and his team; Phillip Petrie is rather a dear, despite being rather daft. His class-conscious snobbery fades away quickly as soon a Reviewed for The Bibliophibian. No surprises that I picked up the next Daisy Dalrymple book pretty quickly — they’re just the perfect length for a long soak in the bath followed by a lazy evening, which is exactly how I’ve been reading them. I continue to enjoy the fact that Daisy’s a worker (although helped significantly by her class), and her relationship with Alec and his team; Phillip Petrie is rather a dear, despite being rather daft. His class-conscious snobbery fades away quickly as soon as he talks to someone for a while and discovers some things in common. The new characters for this book are rather fun too: Lady Valeria is, of course, a battleaxe, while Roberta’s stubbornness is a joy. I called Sebastian’s relationships with various characters: it seemed very obvious up-front. I didn’t expect to like him, actually: he displays a pretty weak will to begin with, and a tendency to be led astray from what he should hold to — but in the end, he displays a bit of backbone and it really works. Ben was my favourite of the new characters, perhaps predictably: he sees some of the loneliness in Daisy’s past and is one of those people who reaches out and starts to help heal the wounds a little (brought on by her late love having been a conscientious objector, killed while driving an ambulance, and the way most people viewed him as a coward). The mystery itself is solid enough providing you care enough about the characters to care about the outcome. When viewing the country house to write an article about it, Daisy sees a dead rosebush and comments on it. Once it has been dug up, however, a dead body is revealed — the body of a housemaid everyone thought had run off with a travelling salesman, who turns out to have been pregnant when she died. Daisy involves herself immediately on behalf of the young Welsh gardener (ugh, I was not convinced by his phonetically rendered accent) first accused of the murder, and calls Alec straight in. Of course, it’s a bit contrived — even twice all but falling over a dead body while visiting a stranger’s house for work is kind of unbelievable, so I do hope that there’ll be some variation on how Daisy gets involved as time goes on! The central relationship of the books remains obvious, though it doesn’t develop too fast. Right now, Daisy and Alec are still thinking of the relationship as a possibility, despite their attraction to each other and the telling hints that they really do care. I’m looking forward to seeing this continue to develop. All-in-all, still a fun cosy mystery, and Daisy is compelling enough a character for me to keep following the series — helped by the fact that I also care about Alec (as opposed to Amory and Milo in Ashley Weaver’s books, for example).

  3. 5 out of 5

    *The Angry Reader*

    Let me start by saying these are not 4 star books. This ting is a solid silly three. None of the characters have immense depth. The 1920s slang is distracting and adorable. The mystery is hardly nuanced. And I think the big twist in this one was blindingly obvious. That said - we’re still in reno-purgatory here. And that wretched hurricane made his way right past us today. My kid has been off school for 5 days. And one of my dogs got sick. When I absolutely couldn’t bear another thing stalwart D Let me start by saying these are not 4 star books. This ting is a solid silly three. None of the characters have immense depth. The 1920s slang is distracting and adorable. The mystery is hardly nuanced. And I think the big twist in this one was blindingly obvious. That said - we’re still in reno-purgatory here. And that wretched hurricane made his way right past us today. My kid has been off school for 5 days. And one of my dogs got sick. When I absolutely couldn’t bear another thing stalwart Daisy Dalrymple was a balm to my soul.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shauna

    A murder series set in 1920's Britain. This book has a paper-thin plot and pantomime characters. Not much attention to detail- lower class characters all seem to speak the same regardless of regional accents and I found the relaxed and very modern attitudes towards sexual relationships shown by the characters very unbelievable.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    It was a good mystery with enough twists to explore the rapidly changing world. Imagine Maggie Smith a bit younger & constantly in a bad mood. Now add in a body found in her garden along with Daisy there doing a story. Another fun glimpse at a kind of Downton Abbey murder mystery. I love-hate the glimpses into the everyday life & expectations of the times. Manor servants get very little time off & live highly regimented lives. They're up early & don't retire until quite late. Even when they go ou It was a good mystery with enough twists to explore the rapidly changing world. Imagine Maggie Smith a bit younger & constantly in a bad mood. Now add in a body found in her garden along with Daisy there doing a story. Another fun glimpse at a kind of Downton Abbey murder mystery. I love-hate the glimpses into the everyday life & expectations of the times. Manor servants get very little time off & live highly regimented lives. They're up early & don't retire until quite late. Even when they go out, they have to be back in by 11pm. A half day off once a month was used as a joke, but didn't seem terribly out of bounds. Getting fired for placing plates from the wrong side! The lord of the manor leased the village to the people that lived there! Oy! Makes me very grateful for my working day. Thoroughly enjoyable, well written, & narrated. Highly recommended, but don't expect anything more than a pleasurable interlude.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Andree

    3.5 stars. Continuing to find this series super enjoyable. Okay, the first third was a bit slow, but then DI Fletcher showed up, and I was mollified. Also, guessed the "twist" on about page 15. But whatevs. I am also totally a sucker for mysteries set in English manor houses. 2017 Reading Challenge: A book with one of the four seasons in the title

  7. 4 out of 5

    Wealhtheow

    The Honorable Daisy Dalyrymple is visiting an old school chum while writing about her ancestral home when a body is discovered in the garden. Although the local police are happy to pin the housemaid's murder on her young foreign swain, Daisy has doubts. She calls in her childhood friend Philip Petrie and her new friend, Alec Fletcher of Scotland Yard, to help her investigate. Who killed Grace? Was it the beautiful but spineless heir who had gotten her pregnant? His best friend, the jealous Ben? The Honorable Daisy Dalyrymple is visiting an old school chum while writing about her ancestral home when a body is discovered in the garden. Although the local police are happy to pin the housemaid's murder on her young foreign swain, Daisy has doubts. She calls in her childhood friend Philip Petrie and her new friend, Alec Fletcher of Scotland Yard, to help her investigate. Who killed Grace? Was it the beautiful but spineless heir who had gotten her pregnant? His best friend, the jealous Ben? His devoted sister, manipulative mother, or cowardly father? Grace's father or fiance? Or was it the travelling salesman who was seen talking to her only hours before she was killed? There are no physical clues. Only Daisy's stubborn will and insight into human nature can help her solve this case. This is not as good as the first Daisy mystery, Death at Wentwater Court. The main characters have already been introduced, so Dunn spends less time drawing them out. The murder itself is not one of those incredibly convoluted schemes that takes the latest forensic tech to solve. It is just a basic small village murder, and is simply solved by buying rounds of drinks at the village pub and interviewing suspects. The real delight to these books is the 1920s themselves, which Dunn draws with a deft and light hand. Reminders of a depressed economy, rumbles of discontent against the upper classes, growing independence for women, and the damages of the first World War are woven throughout. And the characters themselves are fresh and breezy. Daisy has a great deal of spirit and sympathy, but as smart and kind as she is, she is still very much a product of her upbringing--she can't bring herself to shingle her hair, or stop grouping people according to class. This is, overall, a murder as cozy as a murder can be, and well worth the few hours it will take to read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Book Concierge

    Digital audiobook read by Bernadette Dunne Book number two in the Daisy Dalrymple series has our heroine traveling to Occles Hall to research her latest article for Town and Country on England’s country manor houses. Lady Valeria is none too pleased at this intrusion, but Daisy IS “to the manor born” so she is tolerated. Still, when Daisy asks to photograph the winter garden the last thing she expects to find is a body. Daisy cannot help but get involved when she sees an injustice being carried Digital audiobook read by Bernadette Dunne Book number two in the Daisy Dalrymple series has our heroine traveling to Occles Hall to research her latest article for Town and Country on England’s country manor houses. Lady Valeria is none too pleased at this intrusion, but Daisy IS “to the manor born” so she is tolerated. Still, when Daisy asks to photograph the winter garden the last thing she expects to find is a body. Daisy cannot help but get involved when she sees an injustice being carried out, so she convinces Alec Fletcher of Scotland Yard to investigate. There are a number of secrets being kept by the residents of the household and some are bound to come out in the process of getting at the truth of the murder. This is a charming cozy mystery series set in the 1920s. Daisy is charming, inquisitive, intelligent and resourceful. She does sometimes plunge headlong into trouble, but on the whole, she is appropriately cautious and responsible. I also like her slow-burning relationship with Fletcher. Bernadette Dunne does a fine job voicing the audio book. She has great pacing and enough skill as a voice artist to give the many characters sufficiently unique voices.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Renee M

    2.5 stars. Cozy mysteries are just so pleasant... even with a decomposing body in the garden.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Olga Godim

    3.5 stars A nice cozy with one of my favorite literary sleuths, Daisy Dalrymple, a young journalist from an aristocratic family in the 1920s England. The book is a bit slow, but Daisy is her charming self, and as always, I enjoyed reading her story. Daisy is comforting and very pleasant, and what is more important, she is never in danger. She is just too nice, so no one threatens her, which is often the case in other cozies, but instead, everyone confides in her, while she tries and fails to stay 3.5 stars A nice cozy with one of my favorite literary sleuths, Daisy Dalrymple, a young journalist from an aristocratic family in the 1920s England. The book is a bit slow, but Daisy is her charming self, and as always, I enjoyed reading her story. Daisy is comforting and very pleasant, and what is more important, she is never in danger. She is just too nice, so no one threatens her, which is often the case in other cozies, but instead, everyone confides in her, while she tries and fails to stay out of a murder investigation. Not her fault, really. She makes me smile.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Aerykah

    I didn't think this book was as good as the first one... Daisy is funny and, for the most part, an enjoyable character. And I have enjoyed Alec and Philip too. But the stories just aren't quite what I like. Add to that the bad language (mild, though it is) and the important roll that homosexuality played in the story and I'm thinking that I most likely won't be reading any more of these books. Warning: there is some bad language in this one and homosexuality plays a pretty important part in the s I didn't think this book was as good as the first one... Daisy is funny and, for the most part, an enjoyable character. And I have enjoyed Alec and Philip too. But the stories just aren't quite what I like. Add to that the bad language (mild, though it is) and the important roll that homosexuality played in the story and I'm thinking that I most likely won't be reading any more of these books. Warning: there is some bad language in this one and homosexuality plays a pretty important part in the story too.

  12. 4 out of 5

    CatBookMom

    I've read this series very much out of order, but I wanted to get a feeling for the first encounters that Daisy and Alec had. This is good. Lady Valeria is a serious Termagant, a Domestic Despot, with the side chuckle of being apt to use alliteration, even in the midst of her rants. Too bad that neither Daisy nor Alec were able to be witnesses to her eventual major smack-down, from both her unregarded daughter and her so-closely-coddled son.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I picked this up the other night because I was wanting a mystery and it's set during the 1920s, probably my favorite historical era. It was just okay - a quick read for a lazy weekend. Although some of the historical details were interesting, the story wasn't too compelling and there were modern sensibilities that seemed out of place.

  14. 5 out of 5

    benebean

    I think I'm going to give up on this series. It looks to be one of those series where some sexual perversion is always woven in to the mystery and I'd rather not fill my head with those types of imaginings.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Selah Pike

    I love this series! I'm revising my opinion on narrator Bernadette Dunne. She sounds like a young Penelope Wilton (who I love in Doctor Who, Downton Abbey, etc.) and I enjoy her voice.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Hearn

    I enjoy Daisy Dalrymple stories and this one was no exception. The only negative was that I was listening to the book on CD and the person they had reading it had no idea about English accents. She tried but there were so many errors that could easily have been caught and weren’t. It was a wee bit distracting from the story but not enough to make me hate the book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jammin Jenny

    I really enjoyed this Daisy Dalrymple book, it was #2 in the series. I read #1 then jumped around a bit so it was nice to come back to the beginning. Daisy's mom still doesn't approve of her daughter getting involved in all this murder stuff, she's a young woman in the 1920s in England and shouldn't be behaving that way. I love it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Chrysta

    This was a cute book! Daisy is such a fun character to read! Cute cozy mystery and it wasn’t til the end that I figured out who the murder was. Can’t wait to check out the next installment.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stacie Haden

    A new favorite cozy mystery series. England 1923

  20. 5 out of 5

    Eileen Lynx

    Cute good narrator

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    3.5 stars So far, this has been an enjoyable series. Daisy, Alec and Philip are fun characters.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rbucci

    Very fun mystery that takes you away, exposes you to a little history and a different way of living.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth (Miss Eliza)

    Wherever Daisy goes death is sure to follow. This time she's off to Cheshire and Occles Hall, which thanks to her old school chum, Bobbie Parslow, she has been able to wrangle an invite. Bobbie's mother, Lady Valeria, is notoriously bad tempered and also very protective of her unnaturally good looking son, Sebastian. In fact, the first thing that Daisy hears upon arriving in the picture postcard perfect village of Occleswich is the raging feud between Lady Valeria and Stan Moss, the local car me Wherever Daisy goes death is sure to follow. This time she's off to Cheshire and Occles Hall, which thanks to her old school chum, Bobbie Parslow, she has been able to wrangle an invite. Bobbie's mother, Lady Valeria, is notoriously bad tempered and also very protective of her unnaturally good looking son, Sebastian. In fact, the first thing that Daisy hears upon arriving in the picture postcard perfect village of Occleswich is the raging feud between Lady Valeria and Stan Moss, the local car mechanic. Stan wants to put in a gas station, and Lady Valeria will not hear of it blighting her perfect town. Stan has had a rough time of it of late, his daughter Grace, who worked up at the Hall as a parlor maid and took care of him in her spare time, ran off with a travelling salesman a few months back. Daisy instantly loves the hall and sees the picture possibilities for her article and is grateful to Bobbie and her father, Sir Reginald. The Tudor facade hides much turmoil and secrets though. Sir Reginald has an obsession with his Dairy so is rarely seen by anyone. Sebastian's famed good looks did nothing to prepare Daisy for the Adonis that is brought before her. Then there's the family's secretary, Ben Goodman, who was injured in the war and who Sebastian is very protective of. But what lies in the family tree is not important to Daisy who is there to capture the house, not the inhabitants, for her article. Daisy is lucky enough to get a tour of the grounds and the famed winter garden, in blooms though it is not quite spring. Owen Morgan, the assistant gardener and jilted boyfriend of Grace, is showing Daisy the wonders of blossoms in winter when Daisy notices a disturbance in the flowerbed. A disturbance which happens to be Grace Moss. She didn't run off with that travelling salesman after all. It's not long before the local coppers decide that Owen Morgan is their man. They claim that the Welshman lost his temper when Daisy declared she was pregnant and in love with Sebastian and he hide her among the flowers. But Daisy knows this is wrong. She was there when Owen found Grace, and the conclusion the cops have reached couldn't be farther than the truth. Daisy starts to dig and soon finds out all manner of secrets the family was concealing, none of which really have a bearing on the case. Fearing for her safety and sensing she is once more in over her head, her old friend Phillip Petrie comes with the cavalry of Inspector Fletcher, there to get to the bottom of things and fix the mess the local police have made of this case. But when Bobbie disappears and the locals start to close ranks, it looks like the answer might never be found and that Daisy might be excommunicated from Occles Hall without her article finished. But which is worse? Not finding the killer or looser her job? There's something fun and infectious about Carola Dunn's Daisy Dalrymple Mysteries. They're the quick little mystery fix that you need on a cold winter's day to while away the hours. I am drawn to them because they do have an Agatha Christie feel to them, and most Christie novels, even if I haven't read them, have been adapted to death so that the killers and plots are second nature to us bibliophiles. Therefore it's like fresh new Christie, but a period feel with a modern sensibility. Also I felt that unlike the first installment, the cast of characters was not so unwieldy, and that you grasped the basic suspect pool fairly fast. Also, how much fun is it that we actually get to have the inquest in this one? That staple of British mysteries was sadly lacking in the first book. On a final note I'd like to say, how cool is Daisy's job. Sure she's "tarnishing" the family name by working for a living. But getting to travel to all these great houses, which Carola Dunn brings such life and reality to, makes me just wish for more time to pick up the next book and then the next.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    This review pertains to the audio version of The Winter Garden Mystery. I bought the book not knowing it was the 2nd of the series so I put off listening to it until after I listen to the 1st (Death at Wentwater Court). Had I bought that book before this one, the Winter Garden Mystery would not have been in my library. So I admit I started this book with low expectations. Now for my thoughts on The Winter Garden Mystery. The non-recurring characters were not (for the most part) very well develop This review pertains to the audio version of The Winter Garden Mystery. I bought the book not knowing it was the 2nd of the series so I put off listening to it until after I listen to the 1st (Death at Wentwater Court). Had I bought that book before this one, the Winter Garden Mystery would not have been in my library. So I admit I started this book with low expectations. Now for my thoughts on The Winter Garden Mystery. The non-recurring characters were not (for the most part) very well developed. The characters were mostly one dimensional with 2 of the characters almost making to two dimensional status. Almost. We didn’t get to know the murder victim at all because she was killed before the story started. We also knew very little about the murderer and the accused murder. I find it hard to care about characters I don’t know. We are given some backstory but not enough to get me interested in them. The plot was simplistic. Despite an attempt by the author to explain why several people could have killed Grace Moss, there were really only 2 options one of whom was not very believable as a murderer. The author attempted to explain why several people could be suspects. The explanations were not convincing. Even the character giving the explanations admitted that. The slang of the period was overused. It seemed like almost everything was spiffing old bean. Even riding in the dickey which, although uncomfortable, seemed to have occurred (or was at least thought about) with some regularity. So boring, underdeveloped characters tried to solve a nonmystery while driving to and fro with no petrol station in sight with someone sitting in the dickey of the car as they overused 1920’s slang. Definitely not the series for me.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    The Winter Garden Mystery ~Kensington (11) Delightful change of Pace, December 29, 2011 By Ellen Rappaport This review is from: The Winter Garden Mystery: A Daisy Dalrymple Mystery (Daisy Dalrymple Mysteries) (Paperback) This book was just what I needed...a delightful change of pace in a mystery series. The Winter Garden Mystery centers around Daisy Dalrymple in England during the 1920's. Daisy is a journalist for the Town & Country magazine. She travels to Occles Hall to write an article base The Winter Garden Mystery ~Kensington (11) Delightful change of Pace, December 29, 2011 By Ellen Rappaport This review is from: The Winter Garden Mystery: A Daisy Dalrymple Mystery (Daisy Dalrymple Mysteries) (Paperback) This book was just what I needed...a delightful change of pace in a mystery series. The Winter Garden Mystery centers around Daisy Dalrymple in England during the 1920's. Daisy is a journalist for the Town & Country magazine. She travels to Occles Hall to write an article based on personal research and finds herself most unwelcomed by the matriarch of the family, Lady Valeria. Daisy is an emancipated sort of woman and is bound and determined not to allow Lady Valeria to become an obstacle in her quest. While being shown around the Winter Garden one of the gardeners finds the body of the missing parlourmaid, Grace Moss. Daisy takes it upon herself to involve Chief Inspector Alec Fletcher of the New Scotland Yard. It's here that we find there may be more to their relationship than this murder. The Inspector delves into the investigation while attempting to keep Daisy at a distance for her own safety sake...but that appears to be easier said than done. Soon the two of them are at work together trying to piece together the loose ends of this murder case. I am so happy to report that with this Daisy Dalrymple book I've found a new mystery series and a wonderful new author. This book is quite unique, not your everyday paperback mystery and so wonderfully original. I happily recommend this book to all cozy lovers without reservation. So veddie, veddie British.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    The Winter Garden Mystery by Carola Dunn is the second book in the Daisy Dalrymple series. I love how Daisy uses her position in society to write Magazine articles about houses. Of course she stumbles over another death and is horrified by the way Lady Valeria rides roughshod over the local police so that they immediately arrest the wrong person. Daisy eventually manages to have Chief Inspector Alec Fletcher come and solve the murder. I love how the family dynamics around Lady Valeria take place The Winter Garden Mystery by Carola Dunn is the second book in the Daisy Dalrymple series. I love how Daisy uses her position in society to write Magazine articles about houses. Of course she stumbles over another death and is horrified by the way Lady Valeria rides roughshod over the local police so that they immediately arrest the wrong person. Daisy eventually manages to have Chief Inspector Alec Fletcher come and solve the murder. I love how the family dynamics around Lady Valeria take place, how the village avoids going against her except for Mr. Moss the mechanic who keeps junk on his property in an effort to get a petrol pump. Who murdered Grace Moss? The solution is a wild romp through Cheshire and a great cast of characters. Everyone has their own way of dealing with the Death or is order to deal with it by Lady Valeria. It was a great story of trying to eliminate the suspects and find the real murderer. I am so happy that this book will be reprinted next year, and hope the following OOP books will soon follow. Recommend reading this book if you like British Historical mysteries.

  27. 4 out of 5

    FangirlNation

    In The Winter Garden Mystery, the second book in the Daisy Dalrymple series by Carola Dunn, Daisy takes off for Occles Hall for her second article about the homes of the aristocracy that she is writing. It doesn’t take long before Daisy, who soon gets a reputation at Scotland Yard for "falling over bodies," is once again at the scene of the discovery of a murdered person. This time they find the body of Grace Moss, the former parlor maid of Occles Hall buried in the winter garden at the hall. Sh In The Winter Garden Mystery, the second book in the Daisy Dalrymple series by Carola Dunn, Daisy takes off for Occles Hall for her second article about the homes of the aristocracy that she is writing. It doesn’t take long before Daisy, who soon gets a reputation at Scotland Yard for "falling over bodies," is once again at the scene of the discovery of a murdered person. This time they find the body of Grace Moss, the former parlor maid of Occles Hall buried in the winter garden at the hall. She is dug up from under a dead tree by Owen Morgan, the undergardener who had been walking out with her. Read the rest of this review, more reviews, and other wonderful, geeky articles on FangirlNation

  28. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    The main characters are interesting enough that I would like to know where their stories go, but the mystery itself was a bit of a let down. Honestly, I feel a little ashamed of myself for not guessing the culprit correctly. In my defense I simply didn't think it would be that obvious of a solution. I thought the author would make it a bit more complicated. That being said, it was fairly easy to work out all the other 'secrets'. (view spoiler)[Having anyone that Daisy likes not be a valid suspec The main characters are interesting enough that I would like to know where their stories go, but the mystery itself was a bit of a let down. Honestly, I feel a little ashamed of myself for not guessing the culprit correctly. In my defense I simply didn't think it would be that obvious of a solution. I thought the author would make it a bit more complicated. That being said, it was fairly easy to work out all the other 'secrets'. (view spoiler)[Having anyone that Daisy likes not be a valid suspect seems like a bit of a cop out. This book gives the impression that only a mean angry person that no one likes is capable of murder. Oh, and if it is revealed that you are homosexual, you are immediately cleared of all suspicion. (hide spoiler)]

  29. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Daisy Dalrymple wants to write about the historic home at Occles Hall, so she wangles an invitation from daughter of the house, Bobbie Parslow, who went to the same school. Bobbie's brother is off-the-scales gorgeous, their father is well-meaning, but their mother, Lady Valeria, is downright scary. She disapproves of Daisy, but is stymied by the rules of hospitality--at least until Daisy is on hand when a murder is discovered, and has the temerity to call the police. The police are as frightened Daisy Dalrymple wants to write about the historic home at Occles Hall, so she wangles an invitation from daughter of the house, Bobbie Parslow, who went to the same school. Bobbie's brother is off-the-scales gorgeous, their father is well-meaning, but their mother, Lady Valeria, is downright scary. She disapproves of Daisy, but is stymied by the rules of hospitality--at least until Daisy is on hand when a murder is discovered, and has the temerity to call the police. The police are as frightened of Lady Valeria is the rest of the County, so Daisy is forced to call in her friend Scotland Yard rising star Alec Fletcher.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

    These are thoroughly enjoyable cozies to read (or listen to even)! The main characters are so much fun and you spend just as much time hoping the romance is resolved as the mystery. I love the wonderful language, so reminiscent of Bertie Wooster, and the addition of the post-WWI atmosphere. Men with limps and damage to their lungs from the mustard gas, as well as references to lost loves and family members. But with all the seriousness, there is a wonderful blend of romance, mystery, action, and These are thoroughly enjoyable cozies to read (or listen to even)! The main characters are so much fun and you spend just as much time hoping the romance is resolved as the mystery. I love the wonderful language, so reminiscent of Bertie Wooster, and the addition of the post-WWI atmosphere. Men with limps and damage to their lungs from the mustard gas, as well as references to lost loves and family members. But with all the seriousness, there is a wonderful blend of romance, mystery, action, and humor.

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