Hot Best Seller

X-Ray Audio: The Strange Story of Soviet Music on the Bone

Availability: Ready to download

Telling the story of forbidden culture, bootleg technology and human endeavour, this is the secret history of Russian X-ray records and of the people who made, bought and sold them. Many older people in Russia remember seeing and hearing mysterious vinyl flexi-discs when they were young. They had partial images of skeletons on them, could be played like gramophone records a Telling the story of forbidden culture, bootleg technology and human endeavour, this is the secret history of Russian X-ray records and of the people who made, bought and sold them. Many older people in Russia remember seeing and hearing mysterious vinyl flexi-discs when they were young. They had partial images of skeletons on them, could be played like gramophone records and were called 'bones' or 'ribs'. They contained forbidden music. In the cold war era, the Soviet recording industry and permissible musical repertoire were ruthlessly controlled by the State. But a secret and risky subculture of bootleg recordings arose. Incredibly, bootleggers built homemade recording machines and found an extraordinary way to copy banned gramophone records – they used X-Rays clandestinely obtained from hospitals. X-Ray Audio: The Strange Story of Soviet Music on the Bone tells the secret history of these ghostly records and of the people who made, bought and sold them. Lavishly illustrated with images of discs collected in Russia, it is a unique story of forbidden culture, bootleg technology and human endeavour. Contributions from Russian musical commentators and interviews, including one with the last bootlegger standing, set the scene for the intersection of ideological, technological and historical events that created this brief Samizdat musical culture. In a time when songs can be copied in an instant and when streaming services provide virtually infinite choice and access, X-Ray Audio provides a poignant reminder of the immense cultural value of music and the extraordinary lengths people to which people will go to listen to what they love.


Compare

Telling the story of forbidden culture, bootleg technology and human endeavour, this is the secret history of Russian X-ray records and of the people who made, bought and sold them. Many older people in Russia remember seeing and hearing mysterious vinyl flexi-discs when they were young. They had partial images of skeletons on them, could be played like gramophone records a Telling the story of forbidden culture, bootleg technology and human endeavour, this is the secret history of Russian X-ray records and of the people who made, bought and sold them. Many older people in Russia remember seeing and hearing mysterious vinyl flexi-discs when they were young. They had partial images of skeletons on them, could be played like gramophone records and were called 'bones' or 'ribs'. They contained forbidden music. In the cold war era, the Soviet recording industry and permissible musical repertoire were ruthlessly controlled by the State. But a secret and risky subculture of bootleg recordings arose. Incredibly, bootleggers built homemade recording machines and found an extraordinary way to copy banned gramophone records – they used X-Rays clandestinely obtained from hospitals. X-Ray Audio: The Strange Story of Soviet Music on the Bone tells the secret history of these ghostly records and of the people who made, bought and sold them. Lavishly illustrated with images of discs collected in Russia, it is a unique story of forbidden culture, bootleg technology and human endeavour. Contributions from Russian musical commentators and interviews, including one with the last bootlegger standing, set the scene for the intersection of ideological, technological and historical events that created this brief Samizdat musical culture. In a time when songs can be copied in an instant and when streaming services provide virtually infinite choice and access, X-Ray Audio provides a poignant reminder of the immense cultural value of music and the extraordinary lengths people to which people will go to listen to what they love.

39 review for X-Ray Audio: The Strange Story of Soviet Music on the Bone

  1. 5 out of 5

    Skyler

    Really fascinating topic, and there's certainly some amazing picture in here... but I was still left wanting more. Really fascinating topic, and there's certainly some amazing picture in here... but I was still left wanting more.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Yoruk Ilhan

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rich Zahradnik

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bess Camarata

  5. 5 out of 5

    salvatore

  6. 4 out of 5

    Spenser

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nodis

  8. 5 out of 5

    Wesley Johnson

  9. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

  10. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  11. 5 out of 5

    Otis

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen

  13. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  14. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

  15. 5 out of 5

    José

  16. 5 out of 5

    Niall Fogarty

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

  18. 5 out of 5

    Finch

  19. 4 out of 5

    Hendel

  20. 4 out of 5

    Richard Bailie

  21. 5 out of 5

    Seb

  22. 5 out of 5

    AWilliam

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emilia Hamra

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tim Halen

  25. 4 out of 5

    George

  26. 4 out of 5

    loser

  27. 4 out of 5

    Cal

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anne

  30. 5 out of 5

    Season

  31. 5 out of 5

    Uğur Topçu

  32. 5 out of 5

    Teesta Bose

  33. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Short

  34. 5 out of 5

    Julie Furman

  35. 5 out of 5

    Maddie

  36. 5 out of 5

    Kait Armada

  37. 4 out of 5

    Danine

  38. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

  39. 5 out of 5

    Katie

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.