Hot Best Seller

All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 11

Availability: Ready to download

The adventures of the world's first and finest super-team, the Justice Society of America, continue in the penultimate volume of this landmark series of reprints. In All Star Comics Archives Vol. 11 the JSA face threats from villains such as the Diamond Man, Mr. Alpha, a sinister Circus, and more.


Compare

The adventures of the world's first and finest super-team, the Justice Society of America, continue in the penultimate volume of this landmark series of reprints. In All Star Comics Archives Vol. 11 the JSA face threats from villains such as the Diamond Man, Mr. Alpha, a sinister Circus, and more.

37 review for All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 11

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    The comic was tired out by this point, some of the stories had some cleverness to them, Wonder Woman and Black Canary were being used regularly as was the word "suddenly" but overall a disappointment. One example, the villain is escaping in a tram over a canyon and Wonder Woman and Green Lantern don't know how to catch him so the Atom yanks the cords loose that hold it and pulls the villain back. When stories rely on the Atom (who has gained the strength of Superman!) to save Green Lantern, Flas The comic was tired out by this point, some of the stories had some cleverness to them, Wonder Woman and Black Canary were being used regularly as was the word "suddenly" but overall a disappointment. One example, the villain is escaping in a tram over a canyon and Wonder Woman and Green Lantern don't know how to catch him so the Atom yanks the cords loose that hold it and pulls the villain back. When stories rely on the Atom (who has gained the strength of Superman!) to save Green Lantern, Flash and Wonder Woman you know the writers are stretching. i think that as a twelve year old i would have been frustrated by the stories. But you can see where the Barry Allen and JLA stories would be coming from, the few years Broome and Schwartz took off really built on these tales.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rich Meyer

    The final volume of the All Star Comics Archives is interesting, at least to me. I had read the first volume in the series and numerous Justice Society reprints over the years, but none of the tales in this book. They're fun, old-fashioned comic stories, but they're a little lacking on the logic at times. In one tale, the team is put in suspended animation for an entire year. You'd wonder how Alan Scott's communications empire ran without him for that long, or why Joan Garrick didn't go banana-w The final volume of the All Star Comics Archives is interesting, at least to me. I had read the first volume in the series and numerous Justice Society reprints over the years, but none of the tales in this book. They're fun, old-fashioned comic stories, but they're a little lacking on the logic at times. In one tale, the team is put in suspended animation for an entire year. You'd wonder how Alan Scott's communications empire ran without him for that long, or why Joan Garrick didn't go banana-wacky worrying where the Flash was, or why Diana Prince wasn't prosecuted for being AWOL. I suppose when you're writing for kids, you don't necessarily need a lot, but that's how no-prizes get spawned. In the final eight stories in this book, the JSA does a heckuva lot of gallivanting through time and space. We're talking the Doctor-level movement here, going into the past and future, and visiting nearly every planet in the solar system. The artwork is on a par with fifties standards, provided by Arthur Peddy, Bob Oskner and Frank Giacoia. I managed to snag a copy of this for less than a $10 used, so it was one of my better purchases of the 2013 holiday season. A fun collection and a reminder of when comic books weren't nearly as serious as they are today.

  3. 5 out of 5

    The other John

    The end... sort of. This volume completes the reprints of the Justice Society's Golden-Age adventures in All-Star comics, covering issues from December of 1949 to February of 1951. After that fateful issue, the JSA was no more, and All Star Comics became All Star Western. Of course, the JSA returned in the sixties, as guest characters in Justice League of America comics. Then in the seventies, All Star Comics was revived with new JSA adventures. Heck, even this volume of the archives wasn't the The end... sort of. This volume completes the reprints of the Justice Society's Golden-Age adventures in All-Star comics, covering issues from December of 1949 to February of 1951. After that fateful issue, the JSA was no more, and All Star Comics became All Star Western. Of course, the JSA returned in the sixties, as guest characters in Justice League of America comics. Then in the seventies, All Star Comics was revived with new JSA adventures. Heck, even this volume of the archives wasn't the end, as DC published Volume 0 of the archives, reprinting the three issues of All Star that preceded the JSA. But enough history. How does this last-volume-that-isn't-the-last-volume of JSA reprints measure up? Well, it's standard fare. The JSA spent their last year fighting off alien invasions and thwarting earthbound crimes. They even had one last jaunt through time. While it's not spectacular, it's entertaining... if you like this sort of thing.

  4. 5 out of 5

    B. Jay

    Even knowing the timeframe of these comics, even knowing the contribution to both superhero and comic book history, and trying to read it as a child would, these comics are just dumb, dumb, dumb. The plotholes and incredible predictability of the stories just dumbfounds even a five-year old brain. I appreciate the influences they snuck in, and the "scientific facts" which attempted to lend some educational value to a medium largely disrespected, especially back then. But if you love these charac Even knowing the timeframe of these comics, even knowing the contribution to both superhero and comic book history, and trying to read it as a child would, these comics are just dumb, dumb, dumb. The plotholes and incredible predictability of the stories just dumbfounds even a five-year old brain. I appreciate the influences they snuck in, and the "scientific facts" which attempted to lend some educational value to a medium largely disrespected, especially back then. But if you love these characters, stick to the current re-imaginings. There is nothing of great value in this volume.

  5. 5 out of 5

    David

  6. 5 out of 5

    James Hearn

  7. 5 out of 5

    Steven

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cameron

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jack Holt

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Pohl

  11. 4 out of 5

    John Webster

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rex

  14. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Taylor

  15. 4 out of 5

    Siddhant Nath

  16. 4 out of 5

    Steven Heywood

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ronald

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Parker

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  20. 4 out of 5

    Doug

  21. 4 out of 5

    Xaanua

  22. 5 out of 5

    Damon Williams

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jack

  24. 5 out of 5

    John Desmarais

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joshlynn

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  28. 4 out of 5

    Yinzadi

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joe

  30. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Thornton

  31. 5 out of 5

    Michael Grugel

  32. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

  33. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Koehne

  34. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  35. 4 out of 5

    Brad Beeson

  36. 5 out of 5

    Richard Anderson

  37. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.