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The Art of Grace: On Moving Well Through Life

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In this joyful exploration of grace’s many forms, Pulitzer Prize–winning critic Sarah L. Kaufman celebrates a too-often-forgotten philosophy of living that promotes human connection and fulfillment. Drawing on the arts, sports, the humanities, and everyday life—as well as the latest findings in neuroscience and health research—Kaufman illuminates how our bodies and our bra In this joyful exploration of grace’s many forms, Pulitzer Prize–winning critic Sarah L. Kaufman celebrates a too-often-forgotten philosophy of living that promotes human connection and fulfillment. Drawing on the arts, sports, the humanities, and everyday life—as well as the latest findings in neuroscience and health research—Kaufman illuminates how our bodies and our brains are designed for grace. She promotes a holistic appreciation and practice of grace, as the joining of body, mind, and spirit, and as a way to nurture ourselves and others.


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In this joyful exploration of grace’s many forms, Pulitzer Prize–winning critic Sarah L. Kaufman celebrates a too-often-forgotten philosophy of living that promotes human connection and fulfillment. Drawing on the arts, sports, the humanities, and everyday life—as well as the latest findings in neuroscience and health research—Kaufman illuminates how our bodies and our bra In this joyful exploration of grace’s many forms, Pulitzer Prize–winning critic Sarah L. Kaufman celebrates a too-often-forgotten philosophy of living that promotes human connection and fulfillment. Drawing on the arts, sports, the humanities, and everyday life—as well as the latest findings in neuroscience and health research—Kaufman illuminates how our bodies and our brains are designed for grace. She promotes a holistic appreciation and practice of grace, as the joining of body, mind, and spirit, and as a way to nurture ourselves and others.

30 review for The Art of Grace: On Moving Well Through Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elsie

    Where to start with this book? When I decided to read this book I hoped to find some useful advice about moving through life in a more graceful way - emphasis on getting along with people - not on swimming or diving or acting in films. My first clue that this book was not going to hit the mark was the selection of a actor/movie star, Cary Grant as the epitome of grace. I have loved Grant in the movies too, but he was an ACTOR. He played ROLES that were graceful, charming, humorous, etc. None of Where to start with this book? When I decided to read this book I hoped to find some useful advice about moving through life in a more graceful way - emphasis on getting along with people - not on swimming or diving or acting in films. My first clue that this book was not going to hit the mark was the selection of a actor/movie star, Cary Grant as the epitome of grace. I have loved Grant in the movies too, but he was an ACTOR. He played ROLES that were graceful, charming, humorous, etc. None of us knew him. We knew his IMAGE. Lame example. I won't go into any detail of how the author proceeds, but I will give her credit for occasionally citing some wise advice about how to approach life and treat others well. I really had to just pass over references to other movie stars - who've we've all watched and loved, but we did not really know. A later section of the book deals with physical grace, understandably, because the author is a dance critic and a former dancer herself. However, it felt more like the beginning of a whole separate book. I really failed to see the connection between the emotional, spiritual and compassionate side of living life gracefully and having physical grace that comes from a well trained body. On the plus side, I think the author is a adequate writer. I just felt the book was unfocused, repetitive and very lightweight. The most useful thing I found was the list of actual tips for living graciously that she finished the book with. They seemed to be the entire argument of the book. I wished I had read them first and skipped the rest of the book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Gloria

    Tips for Moving Well Through Life: Slow down and plan; Practice tolerance and compassion and take time to listen and understand; Make room for others - on the sidewalk and in your life; Strive to make things easy for people; Make things easy for yourself - be easily pleased - be gracious; Lighten your load - no painful shoes, let the bad stuff go physically and emotionally; Take care of your body; Practice extreme noticing - look for grace where you least expect it; Be generous - anticipate and f Tips for Moving Well Through Life: Slow down and plan; Practice tolerance and compassion and take time to listen and understand; Make room for others - on the sidewalk and in your life; Strive to make things easy for people; Make things easy for yourself - be easily pleased - be gracious; Lighten your load - no painful shoes, let the bad stuff go physically and emotionally; Take care of your body; Practice extreme noticing - look for grace where you least expect it; Be generous - anticipate and fulfill someone's hopes; Enjoy. This book tackles a word that is often hard for people to define. Author uses many examples of grace in art, dance, fashion, walking, film, politics, and more, and while this helps familiarize the reader with what she is referring to, it is the ordinary existence of grace that is perhaps most compelling. Perhaps a bit too much emphasis on Cary Grant (way too much emphasis), but overall a perceptive examination of the subject of grace.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    A thoughtful, even meditative book about adding grace, gracefulness, and especially graciousness to our lives, written by a Pulitzer-prize winning dance critic. Sarah Kaufman begins by taking Cary Grant as her muse: his ability to bring up everyone around him, gracefully, was a key to his success. He used to purposefully flub his lines in order to make younger actors look (& feel) better. She goes on into sports (grace versus strength on the tennis court) and in the arts, as well. Kaufman challen A thoughtful, even meditative book about adding grace, gracefulness, and especially graciousness to our lives, written by a Pulitzer-prize winning dance critic. Sarah Kaufman begins by taking Cary Grant as her muse: his ability to bring up everyone around him, gracefully, was a key to his success. He used to purposefully flub his lines in order to make younger actors look (& feel) better. She goes on into sports (grace versus strength on the tennis court) and in the arts, as well. Kaufman challenges her readers to look for, find, and even create grace in our modern, hectic world. This is a probably best described as a self-improvement book because in the end, it made me was to be a better person.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    I prefer to only add books to my Goodreads feed if I have read them from cover to cover, beginning to end. Otherwise, I feel like it's a personal cheat to myself because I haven't really read the book, so why add it to the list. However, as a result of reading a review of The Art of Grace: On Moving Well Through Life in today's (actually, tomorrow's, but we get half of Sunday's paper delivered on Saturday) New York Times Book Review, I decided this book needed to be added to my list. The reviewer, I prefer to only add books to my Goodreads feed if I have read them from cover to cover, beginning to end. Otherwise, I feel like it's a personal cheat to myself because I haven't really read the book, so why add it to the list. However, as a result of reading a review of The Art of Grace: On Moving Well Through Life in today's (actually, tomorrow's, but we get half of Sunday's paper delivered on Saturday) New York Times Book Review, I decided this book needed to be added to my list. The reviewer, Toni Bentley, expressed the majority of my sentiment, and be forewarned, it is not positive. I did not like the book. It seemed pompous, light-weight, and worshipful of those Sarah Kaufman deemed to have grace. I, too, am a fan of Cary Grant. But to suggest he is the epitome of grace and devote as many pages to him as she did, well, that took a leap of faith, and my leap was nowhere near as graceful as Kaufman's idolatry! Now that you've been forewarned, here is Bentley's review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ipek

    I find old fashioned etiquette books entertaining and they are easy reads for when I want to distract myself from the daily life with a bit of light idealism and bourgeoisie. I wanted to read this one for the same purpose but it's hard to find the point of a single chapter if it weren't for its title because the book is amazingly cluttered with names and examples of which old and modern celebrity does what, where and how. The book starts as a love letter to Cary Grant as the epitome of grace and I find old fashioned etiquette books entertaining and they are easy reads for when I want to distract myself from the daily life with a bit of light idealism and bourgeoisie. I wanted to read this one for the same purpose but it's hard to find the point of a single chapter if it weren't for its title because the book is amazingly cluttered with names and examples of which old and modern celebrity does what, where and how. The book starts as a love letter to Cary Grant as the epitome of grace and the author's wax poetic reaches a point where it resembles the gushing of a fangirl and the point of the concept of "grace" entirely falls behind. After many, many pages about his life, you finally reach the guidelines section. In these chapters, you try to find your way through pages and pages of celebrity names and vaguely relevant, crowded anecdotes. There is no focus other than the celebrities of whom the author thinks fondly. What I thought would be a fun, light read bored me to sleep with its rambling and I found myself skipping pages towards the end, and not regretting it. The list at the very end is the entire point of the book. I'm glad I didn't pay for this.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Hilary "Fox"

    I no longer recall what it was that first turned me onto this book. Whatever it was that caused me to put it into my 'to read' shelve I'm grateful for, as this book was enlightening and reassuring, a soft light to guide the way towards the path to inner perfection. This book is not so much a guide as it is a celebration and definition of grace - that elusive quality that we all know and strive for. Who doesn't wish to be associated with it, after all? This book leads through example. Between its I no longer recall what it was that first turned me onto this book. Whatever it was that caused me to put it into my 'to read' shelve I'm grateful for, as this book was enlightening and reassuring, a soft light to guide the way towards the path to inner perfection. This book is not so much a guide as it is a celebration and definition of grace - that elusive quality that we all know and strive for. Who doesn't wish to be associated with it, after all? This book leads through example. Between its covers are a number of actors, artists, an athletes that possess that quality we call grace. Through anecdata of how they possess it, what they do, how they act, and what it is that sets them apart from the rest - we all can hope to cultivate grace within our own lives. While we won't all be the star athletes and performers enumerate here, there is still ample opportunity to learn what characterizes grace and how we can adapt it into our own lives, and through that adaptation, spread it into the world around us. Mimicry, after all, is a very human action. This book is enlightening, especially in the final section where everything is broken down into a slight scientific understanding of form and behavior, a history of grace and why it is so very cherished. Grace, it seems, is something we never wholly lose - and by cultivating it even the ravages of Parkinsons can be significantly lessened. Dance and music, rhythmic motion, is something our bodies and spirits crave - and even through the horrors of dementia we can enjoy and incur grace. This is a good book, and more than that a useful one. We all need a bit more grace in our lives.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn Day

    About 50 pages into this book, I was already bored by it. Kaufman’s premise is interesting though: she tries to unpack what “grace” really is or looks like, covering everyone from athletes to famous actors (Cary Grant, for example). Later, she challenges the reader to embrace grace in a new way too. But therein lies the disconnect that follows us throughout the book. Is everyday grace attainable, or even desirable? Is a mere change of posture enough for us to smugly congratulate ourselves on gra About 50 pages into this book, I was already bored by it. Kaufman’s premise is interesting though: she tries to unpack what “grace” really is or looks like, covering everyone from athletes to famous actors (Cary Grant, for example). Later, she challenges the reader to embrace grace in a new way too. But therein lies the disconnect that follows us throughout the book. Is everyday grace attainable, or even desirable? Is a mere change of posture enough for us to smugly congratulate ourselves on gracefulness? This book would have better suited the reader as an essay, perhaps focusing solely on Cary Grant, since Kaufman comes back to him over and over again. The Art of Grace was a great idea with mediocre execution.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dan Zak

    Critic becomes philosopher here. In a coarse, lurching world, I'm glad we have Sarah Kaufman to remind us of the easiness of ease and the contagiousness of grace. The book's first chapter is epigrammed with Wittgenstein and centered around Cary Grant, and builds to bracing notions like this: "Think of grace as the artistic, empathetic side of an embodied language that humans have been speaking throughout time. Our actions speak louder than words, as the saying goes; why not soften them, round th Critic becomes philosopher here. In a coarse, lurching world, I'm glad we have Sarah Kaufman to remind us of the easiness of ease and the contagiousness of grace. The book's first chapter is epigrammed with Wittgenstein and centered around Cary Grant, and builds to bracing notions like this: "Think of grace as the artistic, empathetic side of an embodied language that humans have been speaking throughout time. Our actions speak louder than words, as the saying goes; why not soften them, round them, make them graceful?"

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    This was a lovely and fairly fast-paced non-fiction read. I found myself mostly agreeing with the author's personal references for grace, and even when I didn't, she explained herself so thoroughly and eloquently that I could readily recognize why *she* felt the way she did. There were some redundant portions, and the book would probably have improved with some better organization or editing, but I still found it a joyful exploration of grace and have recommended it to several people and found i This was a lovely and fairly fast-paced non-fiction read. I found myself mostly agreeing with the author's personal references for grace, and even when I didn't, she explained herself so thoroughly and eloquently that I could readily recognize why *she* felt the way she did. There were some redundant portions, and the book would probably have improved with some better organization or editing, but I still found it a joyful exploration of grace and have recommended it to several people and found it relevant to several discussions since I started reading it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This is basically a book about privilege, gender roles and fancy people. First clue was when she worked in a dig on Jackie Kennedy (which doesn't seem particularly graceful). And the moment I shut the book was when she praised Margaret Thatcher as graceful because, among many things, she "was supremely self-confident and had a commanding presence [which] she sweetened with feminine grace: she paid attention to her self-presentation," and "took the shrillness out of her voice". No thanks. This is basically a book about privilege, gender roles and fancy people. First clue was when she worked in a dig on Jackie Kennedy (which doesn't seem particularly graceful). And the moment I shut the book was when she praised Margaret Thatcher as graceful because, among many things, she "was supremely self-confident and had a commanding presence [which] she sweetened with feminine grace: she paid attention to her self-presentation," and "took the shrillness out of her voice". No thanks.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Huber

    This is a wonderful view into the idea behind and surrounding what it means to be full of grace. Not only as an athlete or a dancer but also in general as a person; to be a graceful host or a guest; to be full of grace spiritually and in essence. Reading this book sparked many ideas for me in how to be graceful throughout my life as well as in my dance practices and performances.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Diane Webber-thrush

    Another book in the category of "not for everybody, but perfect for me" -- essentially a philosophical take on grace. Could it be more perfect for someone who majored in philosophy and dance? I've enjoyed Sarah Kaufman's dance reviews in the Washington Post for years, and she is such a smooth -- yes, graceful -- writer. This book just floated by for me on a cloud. Another book in the category of "not for everybody, but perfect for me" -- essentially a philosophical take on grace. Could it be more perfect for someone who majored in philosophy and dance? I've enjoyed Sarah Kaufman's dance reviews in the Washington Post for years, and she is such a smooth -- yes, graceful -- writer. This book just floated by for me on a cloud.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Blackwell

    Lovely meditation on life and those who have exemplified living life with dignified tranquility and kindness.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sorrow

    This book was a delight. I enjoyed the cadence of her writing and the thoughtful manner in which she conveyed the indescribable Grace that humans can have.

  15. 5 out of 5

    J. Muro

    Learned so much from this beautiful author about grace and what it is, what it looks like, how it is felt by the graceful one and observer, and how grace is in moments, different professions, and so much more-what a wonderful book. For years, this elusive hard-to-attain grace has been a mysteriously curious topic and had wished to know how some walked with and in it,...now I know. In my lifetime, had rarely met a handful of genuine graceful people that left a fond memory and mark on me, and yet Learned so much from this beautiful author about grace and what it is, what it looks like, how it is felt by the graceful one and observer, and how grace is in moments, different professions, and so much more-what a wonderful book. For years, this elusive hard-to-attain grace has been a mysteriously curious topic and had wished to know how some walked with and in it,...now I know. In my lifetime, had rarely met a handful of genuine graceful people that left a fond memory and mark on me, and yet, I’ve learned that grace can be found anywhere, anytime, and any day. It is an art, skill, and one has to practise being it, feeling it, and observing it- Hope to see, feel, and experience grace in all forms, and continue to hope for other people too, for it is a beneficial gift for all to see it and be it-

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Bashaar

    This was a delightful book, all about the quality of grace. The author is a dance critic and former ballerina, so she knows a bit about the topic. She writes about physical grace, of course, but also about what we call graciousness, that quality of putting other people at ease. She provides examples ranging from Margot Fonteyn to Cary Grant to a stripper named Miss Ekaterina. It was a fun read, and inspired me to walk a little taller and move a little more slowly and gracefully. Implied, but not This was a delightful book, all about the quality of grace. The author is a dance critic and former ballerina, so she knows a bit about the topic. She writes about physical grace, of course, but also about what we call graciousness, that quality of putting other people at ease. She provides examples ranging from Margot Fonteyn to Cary Grant to a stripper named Miss Ekaterina. It was a fun read, and inspired me to walk a little taller and move a little more slowly and gracefully. Implied, but not explicitly stated in the book is this: you can't fake grace. I think there are people who are lovely inside but clumsy and oafish on the outside, but I don't think there are very many people who are graceful outside without being graceful inside. I think there's a subtle hardness and brittleness that you can sense in people who are faking it. Like my reviews? Check out my blog at http://www.kathrynbashaar.com/blog/

  17. 5 out of 5

    Susan McAfee

    The Art of Grace: On Moving Well Through Life As one might expect from the Washington Post's Pulitzer-prize winning dance and arts critic, Sarah L. Kaufman's prose sings and inspires. Kaufman dives deep into understanding grace, whether it's physical grace or the grace that enables us to live well together. Through traveling with Kaufman on her exploration and reflection on all the aspects of grace, The Art of Grace helped expand my understanding beyond the confines of the sectarian. What a love The Art of Grace: On Moving Well Through Life As one might expect from the Washington Post's Pulitzer-prize winning dance and arts critic, Sarah L. Kaufman's prose sings and inspires. Kaufman dives deep into understanding grace, whether it's physical grace or the grace that enables us to live well together. Through traveling with Kaufman on her exploration and reflection on all the aspects of grace, The Art of Grace helped expand my understanding beyond the confines of the sectarian. What a lovely read!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alma

    Kaufman says that "grace is wonderfully democratic." But most of her examples are of high-profile politicians, celebrities, and otherwise rich and privileged. Physical aspects of grace are overemphasized. People are labeled as graceful and uneasy, clumsy, awkward which is, well, rather ungraceful of her. Superficial, patronizing, repetitive. And silly at times: Picasso's paintings and The Rite of Spring "are not works of grace." LOL Kaufman says that "grace is wonderfully democratic." But most of her examples are of high-profile politicians, celebrities, and otherwise rich and privileged. Physical aspects of grace are overemphasized. People are labeled as graceful and uneasy, clumsy, awkward which is, well, rather ungraceful of her. Superficial, patronizing, repetitive. And silly at times: Picasso's paintings and The Rite of Spring "are not works of grace." LOL

  19. 5 out of 5

    Juanita

    A beautiful depiction of grace - its fluidity and contrasting nature in life. The author explores grace in movement and in being. "Grace swoops in where you least expect it, where highs and lows collide" A beautiful depiction of grace - its fluidity and contrasting nature in life. The author explores grace in movement and in being. "Grace swoops in where you least expect it, where highs and lows collide"

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nadine

    I am currently reading the art of grace (1·12·18) and am determined to finish it. I love the points made, but it's not interesting enough to be a "can't put it down' book. I do enjoy the variety of example, though it feels like a long, repetitive list. I am currently reading the art of grace (1·12·18) and am determined to finish it. I love the points made, but it's not interesting enough to be a "can't put it down' book. I do enjoy the variety of example, though it feels like a long, repetitive list.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Madeleine

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1g... What is grace? Unfortunately this book's answer falls flat for me. I was compelled by the portions where Sarah Kaufman opts for a wide, almost universalist version of grace, like in the chapter where she describes dance classes for elderly people with Parkinson's. In general, however, I think Sarah Kaufman's ideas of grace are uncreative. Audrey Hepburn and Natalia Makarova may be what the society calls desirable, but they indicate a rather nasty general r https://docs.google.com/document/d/1g... What is grace? Unfortunately this book's answer falls flat for me. I was compelled by the portions where Sarah Kaufman opts for a wide, almost universalist version of grace, like in the chapter where she describes dance classes for elderly people with Parkinson's. In general, however, I think Sarah Kaufman's ideas of grace are uncreative. Audrey Hepburn and Natalia Makarova may be what the society calls desirable, but they indicate a rather nasty general rule about the relations between beauty, thinness, youth, and whiteness in women. Yeah, the ballet and the movies are charming, but who runs them? Behind the curtain is ugliness, hypocrisy, racism, blush on a sunken face, a cruel and entitled man with a laurel wreath. I want to wash my hands of this charade, but I find myself unable to let go fully, because I do believe that the idea of grace is important. We have to separate our prejudiced notions of grace and desirability (thin people are more graceful? white people are more graceful? rich people are more graceful? able-bodied people are more graceful?) with what is true. If that's not possible, we have to know. If I were to write this book, instead of people who have benefited from our cultural notions of beauty for their entire lives, I would interview the people relegated to the wings and ask them what they think grace is. And what they think beauty is. For example, nearly 40% of American adults aged 20+ are obese. Is there a new way of incorporating the true gift of gracefulness into our daily lives despite a culture which tells us is that "grace" is lightness and a slender wrist and that "elegance" is a bony neck with the tendons showing? "Being gracious is allowing other people to be or appear graceful."

  22. 4 out of 5

    Isabel

    There may have been something really special about this book. Maybe. And perhaps my irritation was aimed as much as the reader as the author. But the entire first chapter was nearly identical to the introduction and I just couldn't get beyond the author's apparent enthrallment with Carey Grant. Enough already. turned it off and returned it to the library, glad I hadn't followed by impulse in the store to purchase it. Ever reminded of the adage about judging a book by its cover going both ways, p There may have been something really special about this book. Maybe. And perhaps my irritation was aimed as much as the reader as the author. But the entire first chapter was nearly identical to the introduction and I just couldn't get beyond the author's apparent enthrallment with Carey Grant. Enough already. turned it off and returned it to the library, glad I hadn't followed by impulse in the store to purchase it. Ever reminded of the adage about judging a book by its cover going both ways, positive and negative.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Snickerdoodle

    I can't say it was a good or bad book because I couldn't bring myself to finish it. I was expecting something entirely different when I picked this up in the library. Moving well through life - to me - doesn't have much to do with actually 'moving well.' From reading the reviews of others, there is still something to be gleaned from this book. I just won't be spending any more time right now looking for it's pearls of wisdom. Maybe some other time - or not. I can't say it was a good or bad book because I couldn't bring myself to finish it. I was expecting something entirely different when I picked this up in the library. Moving well through life - to me - doesn't have much to do with actually 'moving well.' From reading the reviews of others, there is still something to be gleaned from this book. I just won't be spending any more time right now looking for it's pearls of wisdom. Maybe some other time - or not.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tami

    Interesting, I really liked the chapter that she focused on a study by a neuroscientist that tracked how watching a graceful act (athlete, dancer) created a physical response, making us feel more agile. The author emphasizes that achieving the appearance of Grace takes constant work and effort: physically being aware of posture, putting your look together, paying attention to your surroundings and others, avoiding clutter and distraction.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    I found this book to be a beautiful study in both language and grace. Gracefulness is a core desired feeling of mine and I heard about this book via a meditation podcast where Sarah Kaufman was interviewed. Her grace in explaining it piqued my interest and I enjoyed the book whole heartedly throughout! Thank you for such a beautiful study!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Helena

    It was an interesting read, but I take issues with a few things. 1. Quite a bit of this book is a love letter to Cary Grant, who is apparently the most graceful human being ever to have lived. Even when we've supposedly moved on from Grant, the author keeps coming back to him. Everyone else in the book was mentioned once, and their stories felt a bit truncated in some instances, but there was always more to be said about Mr. Grant. 2. The author was incredibly unkind in her descriptions of fashion It was an interesting read, but I take issues with a few things. 1. Quite a bit of this book is a love letter to Cary Grant, who is apparently the most graceful human being ever to have lived. Even when we've supposedly moved on from Grant, the author keeps coming back to him. Everyone else in the book was mentioned once, and their stories felt a bit truncated in some instances, but there was always more to be said about Mr. Grant. 2. The author was incredibly unkind in her descriptions of fashion models, calling them "empty-eyed stick figures in stilettos" and "emaciated, abstractions of the female form, all exaggerated lines and angles. Hipbones just from praying mantis legs, thin and sharp." I know, I know, models are notorious for starving themselves to achieve impossible standards of beauty and thinness, and often criticized for making "normal" women look bad. But you know what? They're people too, and tearing them down for their physical appearance--especially in such a catty manner, in a book that talks about social grace as well as physical grace--is, I believe, unnecessary and singularly lacking in grace. 3. The author also criticizes President Barack Obama for losing the physical grace with which he started his first term as president. Well, in addition to being older, President Obama spent eight years being torn apart by critics, reporters, and Republicans on a daily basis--in addition to attending to the business of running the country. I think that would weigh anyone down. There were some other small things that I dogeared as I read because they bothered me at the time, but there's no sense in picking apart the entire book. I am going to give the author the benefit of the doubt and assume she was doing her best. I will also hope that as she goes forward in life, she would do the graceful thing and assume the same of others.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I have a penchant for quotes and found some relatable nuggets for myself. Some chapters went slower for me, but overall it was a nice read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I could not finish this. I got more than half way through it. There's not much advice, just a lot of observations. I could not finish this. I got more than half way through it. There's not much advice, just a lot of observations.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    interesting topic

  30. 4 out of 5

    adrian

    I think I might need to reread this.

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