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Retrogame Archeology: Exploring Old Computer Games

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Drawing on extensive research, this book explores the techniques that old computer games used to run on tightly-constrained platforms. Retrogame developers faced incredible challenges of limited space, computing power, rudimentary tools, and the lack of homogeneous environments. Using examples from over 100 retrogames, this book examines the clever implementation tricks th Drawing on extensive research, this book explores the techniques that old computer games used to run on tightly-constrained platforms. Retrogame developers faced incredible challenges of limited space, computing power, rudimentary tools, and the lack of homogeneous environments. Using examples from over 100 retrogames, this book examines the clever implementation tricks that game designers employed to make their creations possible, documenting these techniques that are being lost. However, these retrogame techniques have modern analogues and applications in general computer systems, not just games, and this book makes these contemporary connections. It also uses retrogames' implementation to introduce a wide variety of topics in computer systems including memory management, interpretation, data compression, procedural content generation, and software protection. Retrogame Archeology targets professionals and advanced-level students in computer science, engineering, and mathematics but would also be of interest to retrogame enthusiasts, computer historians, and game studies researchers in the humanities.


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Drawing on extensive research, this book explores the techniques that old computer games used to run on tightly-constrained platforms. Retrogame developers faced incredible challenges of limited space, computing power, rudimentary tools, and the lack of homogeneous environments. Using examples from over 100 retrogames, this book examines the clever implementation tricks th Drawing on extensive research, this book explores the techniques that old computer games used to run on tightly-constrained platforms. Retrogame developers faced incredible challenges of limited space, computing power, rudimentary tools, and the lack of homogeneous environments. Using examples from over 100 retrogames, this book examines the clever implementation tricks that game designers employed to make their creations possible, documenting these techniques that are being lost. However, these retrogame techniques have modern analogues and applications in general computer systems, not just games, and this book makes these contemporary connections. It also uses retrogames' implementation to introduce a wide variety of topics in computer systems including memory management, interpretation, data compression, procedural content generation, and software protection. Retrogame Archeology targets professionals and advanced-level students in computer science, engineering, and mathematics but would also be of interest to retrogame enthusiasts, computer historians, and game studies researchers in the humanities.

32 review for Retrogame Archeology: Exploring Old Computer Games

  1. 4 out of 5

    David

    If your idea of a good time is ~200 pages of technical analysis detailing how old 8-bit games worked, then I'd highly recommend "Retrogame Archeology". Like most books in the nostalgia-driven retrogame genre, Professor Aycock takes us on a trip down (64K) memory lane, except that his emphasis is on unearthing and preserving the many snippets of hidden technical cleverness (at an assembly-instruction level of detail) -- little gems forged by the brilliant, unsung programmers who came before us. T If your idea of a good time is ~200 pages of technical analysis detailing how old 8-bit games worked, then I'd highly recommend "Retrogame Archeology". Like most books in the nostalgia-driven retrogame genre, Professor Aycock takes us on a trip down (64K) memory lane, except that his emphasis is on unearthing and preserving the many snippets of hidden technical cleverness (at an assembly-instruction level of detail) -- little gems forged by the brilliant, unsung programmers who came before us. This was a great read, and I wish there were more books like this. My only caveat is that it's a Springer book, so gads, it's expensive (even the cheaper Kindle version is $0.33 per page).

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tim Torres

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sean Tudor

  4. 5 out of 5

    Peter Hall

  5. 5 out of 5

    David Calavera

  6. 4 out of 5

    Max

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    John

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rene

  9. 4 out of 5

    peggy a schuyler

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michel Schinz

  11. 5 out of 5

    kylma

  12. 5 out of 5

    Decast

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    Romain

  14. 5 out of 5

    Java

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lari Kovanen

  16. 5 out of 5

    V

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    Enric

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    Juk

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  20. 5 out of 5

    Saharvetes

  21. 4 out of 5

    Laszlo

  22. 4 out of 5

    qux

  23. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  24. 4 out of 5

    Igrowastreesgrow

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lukas Steiner

  26. 5 out of 5

    TJ Kendon

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sven

  28. 4 out of 5

    David Baron

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jeroen Huylebroeck

  30. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  31. 5 out of 5

    Cristian Velasco

  32. 4 out of 5

    Sabine Heuschneider

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