Hot Best Seller

The People Of The Mist: By H. Rider Haggard - Illustrated (Comes with a Free Audiobook)

Availability: Ready to download

How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books The People of the Mist is a classic lost race fantasy novel written by H. Rider Haggard. It How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books The People of the Mist is a classic lost race fantasy novel written by H. Rider Haggard. It was first published serially in the weekly magazine Tit-Bits, between December 1893 and August 1894; the first edition in book form was published in London by Longmans in October, 1894. The work's importance was recognized in December, 1973, by its revival by Ballantine Books as the sixty-third paperback volume of the celebrated Ballantine Adult Fantasy series.The People of the Mist is the tale of a British adventurer seeking wealth in the wilds of Africa, finding romance, and discovering a lost race and its monstrous god. The penniless Leonard Outram attempts to redress the undeserved loss of his family estates and his fiancee by seeking his fortune in Africa. In the course of his adventures, he and his Zulu companion Otter save a young Portuguese woman, Juanna Rodd, together with her nursemaid Soa, from slavery. Leonard and Juanna are plainly attracted to each other, but prone to bickering, and their romance is impeded by the watchful and jealous Soa. The protagonists seek the legendary People of the Mist, said to possess a fabulous hoard of jewels. On finding them, they immediately become embroiled in the turbulent political affairs of the lost race, which is riven by a power-struggle between its king and the priests of its giant crocodile god. The heroic Outram can do little more than react to events. The action climaxes in a hair-raising escape by tobogganning a large flat stone down a steep glacier.


Compare

How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books The People of the Mist is a classic lost race fantasy novel written by H. Rider Haggard. It How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books The People of the Mist is a classic lost race fantasy novel written by H. Rider Haggard. It was first published serially in the weekly magazine Tit-Bits, between December 1893 and August 1894; the first edition in book form was published in London by Longmans in October, 1894. The work's importance was recognized in December, 1973, by its revival by Ballantine Books as the sixty-third paperback volume of the celebrated Ballantine Adult Fantasy series.The People of the Mist is the tale of a British adventurer seeking wealth in the wilds of Africa, finding romance, and discovering a lost race and its monstrous god. The penniless Leonard Outram attempts to redress the undeserved loss of his family estates and his fiancee by seeking his fortune in Africa. In the course of his adventures, he and his Zulu companion Otter save a young Portuguese woman, Juanna Rodd, together with her nursemaid Soa, from slavery. Leonard and Juanna are plainly attracted to each other, but prone to bickering, and their romance is impeded by the watchful and jealous Soa. The protagonists seek the legendary People of the Mist, said to possess a fabulous hoard of jewels. On finding them, they immediately become embroiled in the turbulent political affairs of the lost race, which is riven by a power-struggle between its king and the priests of its giant crocodile god. The heroic Outram can do little more than react to events. The action climaxes in a hair-raising escape by tobogganning a large flat stone down a steep glacier.

30 review for The People Of The Mist: By H. Rider Haggard - Illustrated (Comes with a Free Audiobook)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Henry Avila

    When two brothers lose their home because of the father's unethical behavior, then he commits suicide, Leonard Outram and his older sibling, Tom are left penniless. Both flee to Africa and vowing to each other never to return until they regain Outram Hall, in England. But how to restore their family's centuries old, estate and honor? Leonard leaves the woman he loves Jane Beach, her father forbids his daughter from marrying Outram who has no income or prospects. Besides, a rich man wants Jane to When two brothers lose their home because of the father's unethical behavior, then he commits suicide, Leonard Outram and his older sibling, Tom are left penniless. Both flee to Africa and vowing to each other never to return until they regain Outram Hall, in England. But how to restore their family's centuries old, estate and honor? Leonard leaves the woman he loves Jane Beach, her father forbids his daughter from marrying Outram who has no income or prospects. Besides, a rich man wants Jane to be his bride, emotions run high as Leonard and Jane say good-bye probably for the last time. Many tears flow and not just from Jane's eyes, hugs and kisses and then she disappears into the cold night...Seven years later, the brothers are digging for gold on a lonely hill in southern Africa finding a small amount yet Leonard still remembers Jane, and Tom is dying in a tent. Leonard reaffirms his pledge to Tom to keep on until their goal is reached as his brother's life slowly comes to an end at dawn. The despondent Leonard helplessly watches, all his entourage are now dead. Four graves dug, the African servants have gone too. Only his friend the black dwarf named Otter (by him) because he swims like one, remains. However a hungry old woman arrives and tells a fantastic tale, slave traders have kidnapped her mistress Juanna (the correct name should be Joana). While her father was away from his small settlement and taken with others to a slave camp in Portuguese Mozambique. If he rescues her the woman Soa will take him to her tribe The People of the Mist, where precious stones, rubies and sapphires are found. Miraculously he succeeds by disguising himself as a French slaver but not before marrying Juanna, by force. Francisco a captured Catholic priest performed the ceremony the couple had known each other for a few minutes; nevertheless Outram was the top bidder! The slaver boss Antonio Pereira, almost a gentleman he insisted Leonard do the right thing ...well maybe that's not really quite true, he did kill a few people. After much bloody fighting, burning up the camp, destroying it forever with the help of his new, freed and grateful African friends. The unlikely and uneasy party of five strangers, Leonard, Juanna, Otter, Francisco and Soa, the unfriendly guide. Along with some former captives recently liberated by the now, well nicknamed the "Deliverer", Leonard. They head up north to the mountains in the center of the unexplored continent, months pass the tired group are starving worst yet, Juanna acts like she hates Leonard, he loves the Portuguese lady and she keeps away from her "husband". At long last they come to their destination... a tall cliff. How can the five get over it and come to the hostile land of Soa's, the tribe practice human sacrifice to the Gods ( a monster in a pool). The old woman hasn't been here in forty years, changes would have occurred since then? Still Mr. Outram would rather die than turn back...the group starts climbing...Death awaits there in the mysterious land of the thick mists. Set at the end of the Victorian age... Just pure fun, a touch of red liquid though... for suitable entertainment...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

    Sir Henry Rider Haggard, the so-called "Father of the Lost Race Novel," didn't write such stories featuring only Allan Quatermain and Ayesha, She Who Must Be Obeyed. For example, his 17th novel, "The People of the Mist" (1894), is a smashing, wonderfully exciting, stand-alone lost-race tale featuring all-new characters. But the first third of the novel is hardly a lost-race story at all, but rather one of hard-bitten African adventure. In it, we meet Leonard Outram, a penniless British adventure Sir Henry Rider Haggard, the so-called "Father of the Lost Race Novel," didn't write such stories featuring only Allan Quatermain and Ayesha, She Who Must Be Obeyed. For example, his 17th novel, "The People of the Mist" (1894), is a smashing, wonderfully exciting, stand-alone lost-race tale featuring all-new characters. But the first third of the novel is hardly a lost-race story at all, but rather one of hard-bitten African adventure. In it, we meet Leonard Outram, a penniless British adventurer who is seeking wealth in the wilds of the "Dark Continent" after losing his family lands and estates (through no fault of his own, it should be added). He becomes involved in the rescue of a young Portuguese woman from the largest slaving camp in Africa, and this thrilling and quite suspenseful section of the book offers more entertainment value than most entire novels. But it is only after Leonard and Otter (his four-foot-tall Zulu sidekick) rescue Juanna Rodd that the book really takes off, and the hunt for the People of the Mist, and their legendary jewel horde, begins. Once the lost race has been discovered, Leonard & Co. become embroiled in a plot involving the impersonation of gods and priest vs. king politics, and Haggard throws in some violent sacrifices, a giant crocodile god, a "toboggan" escape along a precipitous glacier, some romances and a good deal of humor (thanks to that wonderful Otter character) to keep the reader consistently amused. The theology of this lost race is nicely detailed and, as is fortunately common in a Haggard tale, the author offers many commentaries on the side regarding his philosophies of life. For those readers who have enjoyed other tales by Sir Henry (I've read 30 or so at this point; the man CAN prove addictive!), "The People of the Mist" will resonate all over the place, bringing to mind both earlier and later Haggard works. For example, the character of Soa (Juanna's insanely jealous nursemaid) is similar to Hendrika the Baboon Woman in "Allan's Wife" (1889). Otter himself is a precursor of Quatermain's Hottentot sidekick Hans, especially when he attempts to fight the giant crocodile god, much as Hans would later fight the monstrous snake god in "The Ivory Child" (1916). (These giant animal gods, it should be noted, are likely inspirations for all those similar monstrosities in the tales of Robert E. Howard, just as Hendrika was a likely inspiration for Edgar Rice Burroughs' Tarzan.) But there is no way in the world that a reader--even one familiar with the author--will guess how things turn out for our intrepid explorers, in this continuously engrossing tale. That said, it should be noted that Haggard is guilty of a few slips in the course of the book. A huge gem of the crocodile god is carved from a sapphire; several hundred pages later, it has become a ruby. The motto of Leonard's family is said to be "For Heart, Home and Honour"; later on, that motto is said to be "For Home, Honour and Heart." But these are minor matters that only the sharpest-eyed readers will notice (my personal curse, I suppose). The overwhelming majority of readers, I feel, will be so busy being thrilled and entertained that they will never notice these little goofs. The bottom line is that "The People of the Mist" is still another wonderful page-turner from H. Rider Haggard. Now, when is some respectful filmmaker going to spend $200 million to bring THIS ONE to the big screen?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Abandoning this one. It started off pretty good, but then got bogged down with the romance. It's not for me.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Julie Davis

    Having become disenchanted with Haggard's classic "She" to the point of quitting halfway through, I embark upon this book having been assured by my oldest daughter, Hannah, that this book is different and worthy of the time. I must say that so far it has been enthralling and I've been devoting my few spare moments to devouring it. It is living up to the description which I share here:A penniless British adventurer seeks untold wealth in the wilds of the "Dark Continent" after losing his family l Having become disenchanted with Haggard's classic "She" to the point of quitting halfway through, I embark upon this book having been assured by my oldest daughter, Hannah, that this book is different and worthy of the time. I must say that so far it has been enthralling and I've been devoting my few spare moments to devouring it. It is living up to the description which I share here:A penniless British adventurer seeks untold wealth in the wilds of the "Dark Continent" after losing his family lands and estates in this thrilling novel of romance, adventure, and lost peoples. An intensely engrossing tale.Adventure in Africa, lost love, vicious slave traders, a possible new love, an amazing sidekick, and a mysterious, possibly not-to-be-trusted woman with a giant "red stone" (think ruby, folks) ... all add up to a roller coaster ride so far. Florid, over the top, rattling good yarn. How can you resist? Of course, you shouldn't. UPDATE Reading this aloud for my Forgotten Classics podcast, I am having a pure blast, and that's just with the first couple of chapters.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dagny

    As the story opens, an ancestral home is for sale. The father has ruined the family with drinking and gambling. The two sons, Tom and Leonard, vow to make a fortune and regain the family home. They go gold-hunting in Africa and when the story picks up seven years later the action is non-stop.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Derek

    This is an adventure novel which turns into a heist story through its middle part. The 'heist' part of it--posing as gods to a lost civilization in order to obtain a heap of the pretty pebbles which Europeans seem to love so much--forms the unexpectedly soggy middle of the narrative. This section feeds on the spectacle of the People of the Mist and their wild, barbaric religious ceremonies. The protagonists, shoehorned into the role of deities, are sequestered and become little more than witnesse This is an adventure novel which turns into a heist story through its middle part. The 'heist' part of it--posing as gods to a lost civilization in order to obtain a heap of the pretty pebbles which Europeans seem to love so much--forms the unexpectedly soggy middle of the narrative. This section feeds on the spectacle of the People of the Mist and their wild, barbaric religious ceremonies. The protagonists, shoehorned into the role of deities, are sequestered and become little more than witnesses, having to wait around until the plot clock ticks and things start to spiral out of control. What astonished me was that the entire first third of the novel, up to the expedition to the People of the Mist, formed a separate novel in itself, and one which had a much faster pace.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    Haggard pretty much began the Lost Race novel, or so it is generally said. For that reason I'll give this book a 4. Just for reading, however, I'd have to rate it a 3. Good, but a little slow. Not as much fun as ERB or REH.

  8. 4 out of 5

    MB Taylor

    I finished reading The People of the Mist (1894) by H. Rider Haggard last night (on 6/12/2010). Having enjoyed re-reading Tarzan, I thought I’d go a little bit further back in time and read an African adventure by the author of King Solomon’s Mines (1885) and She (1886). It’s been a while since I read either of those notables, but I think I enjoyed them somewhat more than The People of the Mist. Of course, She is a classic; according to Wikipedia it’s been in print almost continuously for over a I finished reading The People of the Mist (1894) by H. Rider Haggard last night (on 6/12/2010). Having enjoyed re-reading Tarzan, I thought I’d go a little bit further back in time and read an African adventure by the author of King Solomon’s Mines (1885) and She (1886). It’s been a while since I read either of those notables, but I think I enjoyed them somewhat more than The People of the Mist. Of course, She is a classic; according to Wikipedia it’s been in print almost continuously for over a hundred and twenty years. And Allan Quatermain (the hero of King Solomon’s Mines) is considered by many to be the archetype from which Indiana Jones eventually sprang. The People of the Mist was enjoyable, but after reading Burroughs’ fast and furious pacing in Tarzan, it seemed a little slow. But there’s plenty of action, death defying (and improbable) escapes and foolish lovers denying love at first sight. Unlike Burroughs, Haggard’s main characters are a little most realistic, or at least not quite so purely good or evil. And Haggard’s Africa has some verisimilitude; he’d lived in South Africa for several years, whereas Burroughs apparently never visited the place. Plus Haggard's endings aren’t always happily ever after. Still, in many ways Burroughs’ books seem like the direct descendants of Haggard’s. Haggard was writing of lost (and fallen) civilizations throughout Burroughs early years; in fact their professional lives overlapped by about a decade. I have a hard time imagining that Haggard’s books weren’t a major influence on Burroughs. Next, I think I’ll venture further into the past and shift genres and read some Edgar Allen Poe. Jules Verne and H.P. Lovecraft each wrote a sequel to one his novels and that sounds like an interesting adventure...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    A rousing adventure tale in the best traditions of the genre. If this book had been written at a later time I would say the plot was tired and overused. However given the time period of the writing it is easy to see how Sir Henry's works form the basis for the adventures tales of later authors including (as I understand) Robert Howard (of Conan fame) and Edgar Rice Burroughs(Tarzan among others). The writing was excellent, the plot twists were well done and the dialogue was fun to read as it was A rousing adventure tale in the best traditions of the genre. If this book had been written at a later time I would say the plot was tired and overused. However given the time period of the writing it is easy to see how Sir Henry's works form the basis for the adventures tales of later authors including (as I understand) Robert Howard (of Conan fame) and Edgar Rice Burroughs(Tarzan among others). The writing was excellent, the plot twists were well done and the dialogue was fun to read as it was written in period. The only drawback for me were the characters. I liked the heroine and the sidekick but the hero didn't work for me. The sidekick (a dwarf african native) should have been the hero. Otter (the sidekick) repeatedly saved the hero's ass. Leonard (the 'hero') just wasn't heroic. He was constantly being saved, never coming up with a plan himself and berating those who were pulling his fat out of the fire. He seemed to me to be simply along for the ride that the others were actively on. Overall a great story and fun read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    The People of the Mist by H. Rider Haggard was a Kindle Freebie that I had downloaded from Amazon. Although written in the antiquated style of the 1800's, it was an exciting tale of romance and adventure. The book begins with Leonard Outram losing his fortune at the hands of his father and he is turned out penniless to seek his fortune to regain his ancestral home. He travels to Africa with his brother to seek their fortunes together. Soon afterward, he takes "Otter" in his employ, loses his bro The People of the Mist by H. Rider Haggard was a Kindle Freebie that I had downloaded from Amazon. Although written in the antiquated style of the 1800's, it was an exciting tale of romance and adventure. The book begins with Leonard Outram losing his fortune at the hands of his father and he is turned out penniless to seek his fortune to regain his ancestral home. He travels to Africa with his brother to seek their fortunes together. Soon afterward, he takes "Otter" in his employ, loses his brother to sickness, meets Soa, and becomes involved in a rescue of her mistress Juanna, and the adventures begin. They travel 3 months to reach the "People of the Mist" and enter the plateau of the people of the mist, while impersonating gods. The author adds in a few well-placed human sacrifice, an ancient alligator god, an escape along a glacier, romance and humor for a delightful adventure tale. Although this is a little slow at times (I skipped a few pages here an there as the tempo slowed) it is a rousing adventure that I enjoyed. It had great detail, storyline and character development. I liked this book and would recommend it. I gave it three stars for "I Liked It". I would have loved it more with updated language, and modern editing. I also second other reviewers who want to know when it will be made into a movie. It would follow well on the heels of 'Indiana Jones'!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Holmes

    After reading Cleopatra and King Solomon's Mines, I wanted to read another Hagard book. This began in England, where, because of his uncle's financial affairs, Outram loses his family mansion and his intended. He goes to Africa with his brother but when his brother dies, Outram has no gold, only his trusty Zulu dwarf Otter. Otter recognizes a woman from a slave camp that he escaped. She knows where rubies are but she requires that the two help her free her mistress, a white woman, besides any ot After reading Cleopatra and King Solomon's Mines, I wanted to read another Hagard book. This began in England, where, because of his uncle's financial affairs, Outram loses his family mansion and his intended. He goes to Africa with his brother but when his brother dies, Outram has no gold, only his trusty Zulu dwarf Otter. Otter recognizes a woman from a slave camp that he escaped. She knows where rubies are but she requires that the two help her free her mistress, a white woman, besides any other captives they can free. Quite an adventure in which Juanna is to be auctioned into marriage only Outram goes through the ceremony. After they bamboozle the Arab slavers, I realized I had downloaded a long Kindle book. That seemed adventure enough but every time I picked up the book, the characters were so well-drawn that I continued to the ruby treasure. Soa came from the Children of the Mist and she knows how to disguise Juanna and Otter to look like gods prophesied to return someday. One peril leads to another, the gods have to prove their power, and as usual, Hagard writes a cinematic story. Otter enjoys his heights, the rubies fall into an abyss, but Otter cleverly and bravely saves the main characters in a bizarre twist. All the while, relationships develop from the sham marriage. The story surges.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    I feel slightly guilty checking this book as "read," because I didn't read it--just listened to it. I'm afraid I've become a bit hooked on audiobooks. Don't misunderstand me--I don't plan to overhaul my reading style, and you can always find me at lunchtime propping open an actual, physical book with my plate while I try not to splash spaghetti sauce on the pages. But when I'm folding laundry, spiffing up the house, or making meals, having an audiobook to fall back on has been so delightful. I d I feel slightly guilty checking this book as "read," because I didn't read it--just listened to it. I'm afraid I've become a bit hooked on audiobooks. Don't misunderstand me--I don't plan to overhaul my reading style, and you can always find me at lunchtime propping open an actual, physical book with my plate while I try not to splash spaghetti sauce on the pages. But when I'm folding laundry, spiffing up the house, or making meals, having an audiobook to fall back on has been so delightful. I don't know that I would have gotten around to reading The People of the Mist on my own time, but with Laura P. from the Forgotten Classics podcast reading it to me at 1.5 speed, we got through it in a week or two. She gave history on H. Rider Haggard and made interesting comments after each "episode," which was nice. This story reminds me of something along the Indiana Jones or Tarzan lines--all crazy adventure, some romance, and a lot of racist stuff that wasn't considered racist at the time (you just have to let that go at the start or you'll never enjoy the book). It's the type of adventure that makes me miss my grandpa--he probably read it and loved it!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tinnean

    I'm still working on this. I have a Kindle version, which I was reading while I was at Gulf Coast Medical waiting for my husband to be taken to recovery. There were parts I had to read over again because frankly it was putting me to sleep, but I kept reminding myself this story was at least 100 years old. Also 1. at that time they were more into telling than showing, and this is something else I have to keep in mind. Also 2. they were big into facial hair, which...ewww. On the plus side, it does I'm still working on this. I have a Kindle version, which I was reading while I was at Gulf Coast Medical waiting for my husband to be taken to recovery. There were parts I had to read over again because frankly it was putting me to sleep, but I kept reminding myself this story was at least 100 years old. Also 1. at that time they were more into telling than showing, and this is something else I have to keep in mind. Also 2. they were big into facial hair, which...ewww. On the plus side, it does take me back to my younger years, when I rabidly read anything by Edgar Rice Burroughs. I'll rate it once I've finished it. Update: read another chapter yesterday, and I have to wonder why he felt in was necessary to title each paragraph. I've reached Chapter XXI, The Folly of Otter. Given that, I have to assume Otter is going to screw up royally. OMG, I don't think I can deal with this!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    The People of the Mist is an adventure novel written by H. Rider Haggard, the father of the Lost World literature genre. It is not a fast read, but an enjoyable read when you slow your pace down to Haggard's late 1800's style of writing where he allowed characters to fully developed, morality tales abound, and several side stories to be played out. Haggard was amazing in his ability to create his lost world with intense imagination and flawless detail. This book includes all love types....of cou The People of the Mist is an adventure novel written by H. Rider Haggard, the father of the Lost World literature genre. It is not a fast read, but an enjoyable read when you slow your pace down to Haggard's late 1800's style of writing where he allowed characters to fully developed, morality tales abound, and several side stories to be played out. Haggard was amazing in his ability to create his lost world with intense imagination and flawless detail. This book includes all love types....of course man/woman desire, brotherly love, friendship love, parental love, sacrificial love, obsessive/jealous love as well as unrequited love. Even though I would not consider this book one of my favorites, I want to read more of Haggard's books. I want to study his works to come to understand the place where he came from as a man as well as the life message he felt compelled to share as is literature legacy.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Moe

    This is a tale of derring-do, with great villains, damsels in distress, and English adventurers to the rescue. If I had to compare it to a story I've read I would go with the Count of Monte Cristo. The hero is obsessive and unscrupulous in his pursuit of treasure, even to the point of risking the lives of those he loves to obtain it, but is otherwise courageous and valiant. His companion, Otter, is a dwarf-servant and my favorite character in the book. The story has two main thrusts and both are This is a tale of derring-do, with great villains, damsels in distress, and English adventurers to the rescue. If I had to compare it to a story I've read I would go with the Count of Monte Cristo. The hero is obsessive and unscrupulous in his pursuit of treasure, even to the point of risking the lives of those he loves to obtain it, but is otherwise courageous and valiant. His companion, Otter, is a dwarf-servant and my favorite character in the book. The story has two main thrusts and both are great tales. If you are in the mood for something light but gripping, you could hardly excel in your choice beyond The People of the Mist.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Derek Davis

    I'd imagine a lot of people have downgraded this novel for its antediluvian approach to race and class. Well, that's just the way those things were done in those days (late 19th century, turn of the 20th). You'll seldom find much else, especially in African adventure tale. On the positive side, "Mist" has a lot stronger sense of plot than "She" and a better and more nuanced cast of characters. Otter, the black dwarf, is a marvelous creation on every level. Yes, he's deep in the "wog" tradition, I'd imagine a lot of people have downgraded this novel for its antediluvian approach to race and class. Well, that's just the way those things were done in those days (late 19th century, turn of the 20th). You'll seldom find much else, especially in African adventure tale. On the positive side, "Mist" has a lot stronger sense of plot than "She" and a better and more nuanced cast of characters. Otter, the black dwarf, is a marvelous creation on every level. Yes, he's deep in the "wog" tradition, but like Gunga Din, he's a better man than I am. If you can discard the cultural noise that comes from the time and place in which it was written, "Mist" has a whole lot going for it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laura - Random Utopias

    Pure classic. I love the "lost race" tales so this filled in my attention for a lots of time while on the subway on the way to school or home. It is a very good book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tim Standafer

    Didn't want it to end.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Philip

    This is a great story; I really enjoyed it and am definitely going to read more books by H. Rider Haggard, assuming that they will similarly be as good. The beginning starts out slowly, introducing background and characters in a easy-to-follow way and leading into the main premise of the plot. Unlike some stories with slow starts, I really never had a problem staying interested, though, and never thought that there was too much exposition used for framing; it was just showing the background and s This is a great story; I really enjoyed it and am definitely going to read more books by H. Rider Haggard, assuming that they will similarly be as good. The beginning starts out slowly, introducing background and characters in a easy-to-follow way and leading into the main premise of the plot. Unlike some stories with slow starts, I really never had a problem staying interested, though, and never thought that there was too much exposition used for framing; it was just showing the background and setting and done in an engaging manner. (My problem was a sudden lack of reading time for a couple weeks, but that's neither here nor there.) Shortly enough things get underway and the main characters entangle themselves in all sorts of tricky situations. It is somewhat contrived the way that Leonard and Otter are pulled into Soa's quest, yet the background previous and the events that occur immediately beforehand make it quite believable that Leonard would accept the task. Then, after lots of action and a really entertaining and engaging read, they accomplish their main task. And the novel is only a third of the way over. Huh? That's how I felt at this point in the story. I felt that tons had happened and things were pretty much coming to a close, yet the novel was still only starting. Which turned out to be fantastic as it meant there was much more of the same. Ultimately, the plot was a well-crafted roller coaster of a plot, a gradual start into sudden action, with lulls and twists and drops thrown together in a really top-notch manner. Now, having taxed that analogy entirely too much, let's go on to other things as I never like talking about specific plot points in my reviews. As Leonard and Otter were getting into the action, I was struck with a strong resemblance to The Green Hornet (I actually enjoyed that movie despite Seth Rogan) in that it seemed like Otter was doing pretty much everything while Leonard was getting the credit. However, I must add that Leonard did quite redeem himself as the story continued and pulled himself to as high of an esteem as I was holding Otter. (I love Otter.) However, this is possibly one failing of the novel; Leonard and Otter (and other's who join them in their quest) seem almost too able. Sure, they are pushed to their limits and it is always an entertaining read, but sometimes it seems that their limit is a bit beyond what is reasonable. I'm not sure, it was just a vague sensation I had occasionally and one of only two quibbles I had with the characters. Contrasting their (great) abilities, each had some real flaws which were definitely explored and each had its own impact on the story for better or for worse. All through this, the personalities, I felt, were well defined and (mostly) realistic. (I love Otter.) Mostly realistic. Leads to my second quibble (what a dumb word). The book was published in the 1890s. It is a product of the era and less a failing on the part of H. R. Haggard, but there is some terrible bigotry. Black people are in general dense, savages, and just in general not as good as white men. Women are overall much frailer and less clever than men (and some of the characteristics he assigns to all women as far as romance goes are... bad (but what do I know, I'm not a woman...)). Overly feminine men are somewhat distasteful. These general thoughts prevailed through the novel and are unfortunate. It seems like the majority of the time the narrator or one of the characters is extolling the virtues of Olfan, it is by comparing him to the usual base natures of the "wild men" or "savages"; almost as if he would be more or less unremarkable if compared to your usual white man. Probably, from any aspect, that is my biggest complaint of the novel. And there is more than enough positives to allow me to put up with/ignore it. One of my favorite things that I noticed throughout this novel was how well Haggard justified the character's actions. Even when they seemed somewhat ridiculous at the outset; once seen from the character's perspective, it rather made sense. This was especially well done, I thought, towards the end when one of the characters begins acting more or less insane; yet it stays understandable how her actions might make sense to herself. So the characters were great and the writing of the characters were great. The writing in general was fine once you get used to it. It's obviously a more old-fashioned style; somewhat naturalistic in that Haggard describes almost every action - which slows things down a bit but really involves the reader, I felt. Despite this, when things were happening, the writing felt like things were moving quickly and I really knew what was going on. Or if there was something that seemed unlikely or didn't make sense immediately; the narrator would go back and explain how exactly it had happened as it did. This had the advantage of really reducing the feeling of Deus Ex Machina that might have edged in otherwise. Additionally, there were times that I really felt confused as to what had happened while the characters felt confused as to what was happening; but then the narrator would go back and clear things up later; leading to both an in the moment what just happened feeling but then an overall feeling of clarity. Sure, it slowed the story down a bit, but I didn't have a problem with it. The ending. I usually don't like talking about the ending in reviews, but this one stuck out as I was reading it. The way things turned out at the end was rather as expected. The way things got there I did not expect at all. Yet it was clearly explained and felt justified; that Haggard didn't just pull it out of nowhere. Despite that, though, it felt a bit too convenient and abrupt. At one point, I was really stunned, feeling that perhaps I was entirely wrong on my presupposition of how things would end. There simply didn't seem to be enough left to finish the story. However, then a series of perfectly explainable/mostly reasonable steps occurred leading to the ending; still it somehow felt - well, as I said - too convenient. Yet, in the short epilogue of sorts showing how things turned out, it was so perfect that I couldn't help but feeling satisfied regardless. (I love Otter.) A few last things I wanted to comment on: 1) This book had one of the most positive portrayals of a Catholic priest I have read in a long time. He wasn't unbelievably perfect by any means (as mentioned, none of the characters were), but I appreciated the way that Haggard created Francisco. 2) They started in south Africa, traveled north, and commented on how it was becoming too cold for those more used to "southern climes". Huh? 3) There were very few places in this story where I felt that there was a much more obvious/sensible action/whatever available than the characters took. The fewer of such occasions, the better, in my opinion. This story definitely tested these characters, but it wasn't their stupidity providing the tests. Usually. And when it was; the other characters generally made sure to point this out. To conclude this overly long review. This is a very enjoyable novel. Perhaps no great truths or such as some novels, but an engaging and entertaining read to be certain. I am definitely going to be reading more of this mans novels in the hopes that they will be of a similar quality.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Adam Krug

    This was an enjoyable read. The dialogue and description was a bit dated and had lots of prose, so it made a bit for slow reading at times. What I find most striking in this book in the author's clear pride of colonialism and belief that white men were superior to black men, with constant references to his African characters as savage and wild. Interesting, however, was his clear empathy for these same characters that they were deserving of the same respect and kindness as his European characters This was an enjoyable read. The dialogue and description was a bit dated and had lots of prose, so it made a bit for slow reading at times. What I find most striking in this book in the author's clear pride of colonialism and belief that white men were superior to black men, with constant references to his African characters as savage and wild. Interesting, however, was his clear empathy for these same characters that they were deserving of the same respect and kindness as his European characters received. This seemed at odds with his preference and reverence of imperialism, but for a book of it's time, was somewhat refreshing Also of note is Haggard's ability to write characters. They're all a little bit flat, but somehow he finds a way to still make them engaging and meaningful. What's truly remarkable for a book of this era is that his female characters, while still falling into the trope of being a plot device for the male characters, are strong and resourceful and not just useless props or wishy-washy. True, there are only two, and one is a villain, but they're a far sight better than the annoying and lifeless Jane Withersteen in Riders of the Purple Sage. Overall, an exciting adventure story worth the read, as long as you can get past the dated prose and the author's reverence for colonialism or at least read the book with an understanding of the time it was written in.

  21. 4 out of 5

    George

    First published in 1894 It is a tale of a British adventurer seeking wealth in the wilds of Africa, finding romance, and discovering a lost race and its monstrous god. The story opens with Tom and Leonard’s family ancestral home and all other items auctioned off to pay off the father’s debts leaving the young men pennyless with the sons vowing to make a fortune and regain the family home or never return to England. The first 2 chapters cover this along with Leonard’s engagement to Jane Beach, who First published in 1894 It is a tale of a British adventurer seeking wealth in the wilds of Africa, finding romance, and discovering a lost race and its monstrous god. The story opens with Tom and Leonard’s family ancestral home and all other items auctioned off to pay off the father’s debts leaving the young men pennyless with the sons vowing to make a fortune and regain the family home or never return to England. The first 2 chapters cover this along with Leonard’s engagement to Jane Beach, whose greedy father has called it off now that Leonard is pennyless, wanting his daughter to marry the son of the weathy man who has bought the brothers’ estate. The 3rd chapter jumps 7 years into the future with Leonard and Tom struggling in South Africa still seeking a fortune through mining for gold, and Leonard has not heard from Jane since he last saw her. For the next several months, Leonard and his faithful African native, Otter, experiencing a number of extraordinary adventures as a result of his rescuing Juanna Rudd from slave traders with the 3 ending up in London a year later.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Fraser Sherman

    After their father ruins the family, forcing his two sons to sell off the estate, they set out for Africa, vowing not to return until their fortune is made. Seven years later, on the brink of giving up, the surviving brother, Laurence, learns of the wealth in the lost valley of the People of the Mist ... This is an old-school adventure, and heartily adventurous (the escape over the ice bridge is absolutely nailbiting) though much of the plot is kind of old-hat. A bigger problem is that this is v After their father ruins the family, forcing his two sons to sell off the estate, they set out for Africa, vowing not to return until their fortune is made. Seven years later, on the brink of giving up, the surviving brother, Laurence, learns of the wealth in the lost valley of the People of the Mist ... This is an old-school adventure, and heartily adventurous (the escape over the ice bridge is absolutely nailbiting) though much of the plot is kind of old-hat. A bigger problem is that this is very 19th century in its racial views: white hero in Africa, obviously superior to the black characters (some of whom are insanely devoted to the whites), stealing from black natives, and the anti-semitic opening (it's not just that they had to sell the ancestral estate, they sold it to a Jew!!!!). Probably four stars as an adventure, one or no stars for the outmoded attitudes. Whether that makes it worth reading or not is up to you.

  23. 5 out of 5

    CynthyB

    This is an edge-of-your-seat nail-biter all the way! There were moments when I had to set the book down and walk away because of the anxiety I felt over what would happen next. I gave it four stars, not because it wasn't masterfully written (as Haggard is one of the beast storytellers I've ever read), but because I found the continuous stream of heart-wrenching difficulties too dark and unbelievably nerve-wracking for my taste. One of the things I love about Haggard's books is that he weaves thes This is an edge-of-your-seat nail-biter all the way! There were moments when I had to set the book down and walk away because of the anxiety I felt over what would happen next. I gave it four stars, not because it wasn't masterfully written (as Haggard is one of the beast storytellers I've ever read), but because I found the continuous stream of heart-wrenching difficulties too dark and unbelievably nerve-wracking for my taste. One of the things I love about Haggard's books is that he weaves these amazingly crafted tales with great imagery, well-defined characters, unpredictable plot twists, and a wealth of adventure while keeping his writing clean, without foul language, and a measure of virtue in his main characters. Can't wait for to read the next one!

  24. 4 out of 5

    MARTIN MCVEIGH

    An adventure/romance novel, set in Africa during the slave trade era of the 1800's. A quaint naivete and constraint characterize the writing throughout: there is violence, but not gratuitous or graphic; there is romance but no sex; the native Africans exist on a different and lower plain than the white people (but intelligent and honorable Africans play major parts in this story). This is all expected from a novel published in 1893-1894. The action moved along moderately for much of the book, wi An adventure/romance novel, set in Africa during the slave trade era of the 1800's. A quaint naivete and constraint characterize the writing throughout: there is violence, but not gratuitous or graphic; there is romance but no sex; the native Africans exist on a different and lower plain than the white people (but intelligent and honorable Africans play major parts in this story). This is all expected from a novel published in 1893-1894. The action moved along moderately for much of the book, with a few faster-paced climactic chapters. Its heroes all were likable and honorable, with little ambiguous morality about them. The tension exists from evil-versus-good situations, with evil winning battles, but good wins the war. It was worthwhile reading and I never thought to put it aside.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kay Hawkins

    another king Solomon's mines story. no Allen quatermain is not in this book but it feels almost like this was a practice novel before. maybe it is just the African style of telling stories. a group of people go out to find a legendary treasure to find the dangers of Africa and it's strange tribes no one has seen only to learn the true meaning of why things are the way they are. it reads like most of haggards book long and dull lots of planing and travel until you get to the end and you feel the another king Solomon's mines story. no Allen quatermain is not in this book but it feels almost like this was a practice novel before. maybe it is just the African style of telling stories. a group of people go out to find a legendary treasure to find the dangers of Africa and it's strange tribes no one has seen only to learn the true meaning of why things are the way they are. it reads like most of haggards book long and dull lots of planing and travel until you get to the end and you feel the true adventure of the story. I still enjoy his work and if you are a haggard fan pick up a copy. warning it was written in the 1890s so it is very politically incorrect for today's world but of you can get past that enjoy the story.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jake Mcconnell

    An Englishman loses his fortune and sets out to regain another in Africa by prospecting for gold. The expedition proves mostly fruitless and he is on the verge of giving up, when he is enlisted by a native woman to help rescue her Portuguese mistress from slavers. It would be no easy task, as the slavers' stronghold is the most heavily fortified on the continent and manned by the most brutal cutthroats in a brutal profession. The reward for accomplishing such an impossible task, though, could be An Englishman loses his fortune and sets out to regain another in Africa by prospecting for gold. The expedition proves mostly fruitless and he is on the verge of giving up, when he is enlisted by a native woman to help rescue her Portuguese mistress from slavers. It would be no easy task, as the slavers' stronghold is the most heavily fortified on the continent and manned by the most brutal cutthroats in a brutal profession. The reward for accomplishing such an impossible task, though, could be potentially untold wealth; the woman promises a priceless trove of gems from an obscure and ancient tribe known as "the People of the Mist" if he succeeds, giving a gigantic ruby as a down payment and a way to get the remainder should he succeed.

  27. 4 out of 5

    J.L. Rallios

    An exciting adventure to a mysterious, exotic, and cruel land hidden in the African wilds, to which Leonard Outram and Otter, his servant, sojourn in pursuit of wealth to reclaim his ancestral home, but he ends up gaining much more than that. A fun, melodramatic read. Highly recommended for those who like Haggard's King Solomon's Mines and She, of which this story is quite comparable, yet unique. There were few twists in the tale that were unpredictable, but it did not detract from my enjoyment.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jarrel

    One of the most memorable adventures I've read to date. From the proud Briton in a forgotten land filled with traps, tribal superstition and hidden wealth. I felt a great desire to explore the world after reading this tale, yet, in the same train of thought, I was comforted by my surroundings of spearless men who are not cannibals or mythical gods who desire the blood of the innocent. This was Indiana Jones before Indiana became a thing. I loved the story and highly recommend it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    John Lietzke

    Review of "The People of the Mist" by John Lietzke In the beginning, this book was hard for me to read an understand because it was written in 1894. I gave the the book four stars because I thought it was well written even though I had to use a dictionary to understand the meaning of some words.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jane Garoutte

    If I could rate this less than one, I would. I disliked this book from the outset. I generally appreciate the more formal style of writing of authors of this era, but I am absolutely not going to finish reading a book where the racism is front and center. Time is too short, and there are entirely too many books out there that don't piss me off. I gave it to chapter 11. That was enough.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.