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A Most Novel Revenge

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Amory and Milo Ames “channel Nick and Nora Charles” (Booklist) in the latest installment in this Edgar-nominated charming traditional mystery series set in 1930s England. Amory and Milo Ames are drawn into the investigation of a years-old murder by a salacious novelist in the English countryside in the latest installment in this “smart and sophisticated” (Library Reads) ser Amory and Milo Ames “channel Nick and Nora Charles” (Booklist) in the latest installment in this Edgar-nominated charming traditional mystery series set in 1930s England. Amory and Milo Ames are drawn into the investigation of a years-old murder by a salacious novelist in the English countryside in the latest installment in this “smart and sophisticated” (Library Reads) series from a bright new voice in traditional mysteries. With two murder investigations behind them and their marriage at last on steady ground, Amory and Milo plan to quietly winter in Italy. The couple find their plans derailed when Amory receives an urgent summons from her cousin Laurel to the English countryside. At Lyonsgate, the country house of Laurel’s friend Redinald Lyons, Amory and Milo are surprised to discover an eccentric and distinguished group of guests have been invited, led by notorious socialite Isobel Van Allen. Isobel has returned to England after years of social exile to write a sequel to her scandalous first book, the thinly-fictionalized account of a high-society murder at the very country house the Ameses have been called to. Her second incriminating volume, she warns the house’s occupants—all of whom were present when one of their companions was killed years ago—will tell everything that really happened that fateful night. But some bones are meant to stay buried, and when a desperate person turns to murder, it’s up to Amory and Milo to sort through a web of scandal and lies to uncover the truth, and the identity of a killer.


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Amory and Milo Ames “channel Nick and Nora Charles” (Booklist) in the latest installment in this Edgar-nominated charming traditional mystery series set in 1930s England. Amory and Milo Ames are drawn into the investigation of a years-old murder by a salacious novelist in the English countryside in the latest installment in this “smart and sophisticated” (Library Reads) ser Amory and Milo Ames “channel Nick and Nora Charles” (Booklist) in the latest installment in this Edgar-nominated charming traditional mystery series set in 1930s England. Amory and Milo Ames are drawn into the investigation of a years-old murder by a salacious novelist in the English countryside in the latest installment in this “smart and sophisticated” (Library Reads) series from a bright new voice in traditional mysteries. With two murder investigations behind them and their marriage at last on steady ground, Amory and Milo plan to quietly winter in Italy. The couple find their plans derailed when Amory receives an urgent summons from her cousin Laurel to the English countryside. At Lyonsgate, the country house of Laurel’s friend Redinald Lyons, Amory and Milo are surprised to discover an eccentric and distinguished group of guests have been invited, led by notorious socialite Isobel Van Allen. Isobel has returned to England after years of social exile to write a sequel to her scandalous first book, the thinly-fictionalized account of a high-society murder at the very country house the Ameses have been called to. Her second incriminating volume, she warns the house’s occupants—all of whom were present when one of their companions was killed years ago—will tell everything that really happened that fateful night. But some bones are meant to stay buried, and when a desperate person turns to murder, it’s up to Amory and Milo to sort through a web of scandal and lies to uncover the truth, and the identity of a killer.

30 review for A Most Novel Revenge

  1. 5 out of 5

    Phrynne

    Another good book in this excellent series. In A Most Novel Revenge Amory and her husband, Milo, are invited to a house party in the country. Milo is sure it will be a complete bore but of course there is a murder and Amory helps solve the case. The mystery is good but it is the relationship between the two main characters which is the highlight of the story. Milo has always had a tendency to dally with other females but this time, when Amory is in danger, he shows his devotion to her. As a coupl Another good book in this excellent series. In A Most Novel Revenge Amory and her husband, Milo, are invited to a house party in the country. Milo is sure it will be a complete bore but of course there is a murder and Amory helps solve the case. The mystery is good but it is the relationship between the two main characters which is the highlight of the story. Milo has always had a tendency to dally with other females but this time, when Amory is in danger, he shows his devotion to her. As a couple they are very entertaining. I am very much looking forward to what happens to them next.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Roman Clodia

    Ok, this is fluff, but it's stylish, glamorous fluff! Weaver pays homage to Golden Age crime with her country house setting, and I adore her Bright Young Things narrator with her impossibly handsome husband. Now that their marriage has settled down there's a slight lessening in romantic tension but still enough marital banter to keep me grinning. Charming switch-off reading and I'm already looking forward to the next adventure with Amory and the divine Milo! Ok, this is fluff, but it's stylish, glamorous fluff! Weaver pays homage to Golden Age crime with her country house setting, and I adore her Bright Young Things narrator with her impossibly handsome husband. Now that their marriage has settled down there's a slight lessening in romantic tension but still enough marital banter to keep me grinning. Charming switch-off reading and I'm already looking forward to the next adventure with Amory and the divine Milo!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Jayyn

    📰📰 (two stars as rated in salaciously titillating tabloids) What really happened at Lyonsgate? Like it or not, Amory Ames and her husband Milo are back in the throes of another perplexing mystery - this time a years old death under terribly mystifying circumstances at a secluded English manor. The question of what really happened that night has plagued the rumor mills (and gossip rags) for years. But when the Ames' are invited to visit the estate, the truth begins the surface. And some secrets a 📰📰 (two stars as rated in salaciously titillating tabloids) What really happened at Lyonsgate? Like it or not, Amory Ames and her husband Milo are back in the throes of another perplexing mystery - this time a years old death under terribly mystifying circumstances at a secluded English manor. The question of what really happened that night has plagued the rumor mills (and gossip rags) for years. But when the Ames' are invited to visit the estate, the truth begins the surface. And some secrets are better left buried... I must admit, I was a bit disappointed by the third book in what has otherwise been an enjoyable series. I just didn't feel quite as much of a pull to finish the thing. By the end, I was rather dragging myself through it. That being said, I remain fully committed to reading more of the Ames' adventures. And I am wondering if the lack of romantic drama between Miles and Amory (and lack of sexual tension, thereby) was a bit of what let me down? Don't get me wrong here: I adore that the pair have managed to find peace and understanding within their marriage. That, in and of itself, is a delight. The actual mystery, however, just left a lot to be desired. Content warnings for this book: murder, death, relationship between an adult and a minor

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    3.5 stars rounded up to reflect my love of the series It's taken me too long to get to the next book in this fabulous series and this was just the right time to read a cosy, glamorous, compelling mystery set in 1930s England. Amory and Milo, completely gorgeous wife and husband, embark on a trip to a country house summoned by Amory's cousin Laurel who worries that a tragedy that happened in the same house 10 years ago may have repercussions now... Her suspicions are confirmed and a mystery needs so 3.5 stars rounded up to reflect my love of the series It's taken me too long to get to the next book in this fabulous series and this was just the right time to read a cosy, glamorous, compelling mystery set in 1930s England. Amory and Milo, completely gorgeous wife and husband, embark on a trip to a country house summoned by Amory's cousin Laurel who worries that a tragedy that happened in the same house 10 years ago may have repercussions now... Her suspicions are confirmed and a mystery needs solving! I love me some cosy crime and I really do like these two...looking forward to more in this series :)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    Pretty, inquisitive, stylish Amory Ames returns in the third novel — and so far, best — in Ashley Weaver’s delightful series. She and her devilishly handsome and charming husband Milo attend a house party at the Shropshire country estate of Lyonsgate in February 1933. In 1925, there was a mysterious death at a different house party at Lyonsgate; one of the guests, the unscrupulous Isobel Van Allen, goes on to publish a thinly fictionalized, sensationalized account that causes a scandal so great Pretty, inquisitive, stylish Amory Ames returns in the third novel — and so far, best — in Ashley Weaver’s delightful series. She and her devilishly handsome and charming husband Milo attend a house party at the Shropshire country estate of Lyonsgate in February 1933. In 1925, there was a mysterious death at a different house party at Lyonsgate; one of the guests, the unscrupulous Isobel Van Allen, goes on to publish a thinly fictionalized, sensationalized account that causes a scandal so great that several of the guests literally go into exile. Amory’s beloved cousin Laurel Ellison was there in 1925, and she begs Amory — and “Bring Milo if you must” — to join her at Lyonsgate for the Lyons’ newest party — one that, once again, includes Isobel Van Allen. Understandably, Laurel has a very bad feeling when the guest list includes all of those who were there seven years ago, and she hopes Amory, who had such success with sleuthing in two other cases, can shed some light. Like Murder at the Brightwell and Death Wears a Mask, A Most Novel Revenge sparkles with its charming and astute heroine, clever dialogue, and homages to the great mystery writers of the 1930s. Don’t miss it! While reading the previous novels first makes for a most satisfactory read, readers new to the series will still enjoy A Most Novel Revenge very much. They’ll find that the wry characters and the novel’s many twists and turns will keep them reading much too late into the night. Lastly, narrator Alison Larkin proved so annoying in Death Wears a Mask that I had to return the Audible edition and read the book in the Kindle format. She’s more tolerable in A Most Novel Revenge; however, she still resembles Billie Burke in a particularly over-the-top performance, and I do wish they’d either bring back the original narrator, Billie Fulford-Brown — or, really, anyone who doesn’t sound like a lisping, breathy preschooler from a posh family.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Points for the brashness of this mystery, but mostly: I wanted more of the Milo/marriage storyline!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    'Amory and Milo Ames are drawn into the investigation of a years-old murder by a salacious novelist in the English countryside in the latest installment in this “smart and sophisticated” (Library Reads) series from a bright new voice in traditional mysteries. With two murder investigations behind them and their marriage at last on steady ground, Amory and Milo plan to quietly winter in Italy. The couple find their plans derailed when Amory receives an urgent summons from her cousin Laurel to the 'Amory and Milo Ames are drawn into the investigation of a years-old murder by a salacious novelist in the English countryside in the latest installment in this “smart and sophisticated” (Library Reads) series from a bright new voice in traditional mysteries. With two murder investigations behind them and their marriage at last on steady ground, Amory and Milo plan to quietly winter in Italy. The couple find their plans derailed when Amory receives an urgent summons from her cousin Laurel to the English countryside. At Lyonsgate, the country house of Laurel’s friend Redinald Lyons, Amory and Milo are surprised to discover an eccentric and distinguished group of guests have been invited, led by notorious socialite Isobel Van Allen. Isobel has returned to England after years of social exile to write a sequel to her scandalous first book, the thinly-fictionalized account of a high-society murder at the very country house the Ameses have been called to. Her second incriminating volume, she warns the house’s occupants—all of whom were present when one of their companions was killed years ago—will tell everything that really happened that fateful night. But some bones are meant to stay buried, and when a desperate person turns to murder, it’s up to Amory and Milo to sort through a web of scandal and lies to uncover the truth, and the identity of a killer.' _____________________________ A Most Novel Revenge is the third book in Ashley Weaver's debut series, The Amory Ames Mystery Series and is a historical mystery set in the 1930s. Cozy mystery house party vibe in this book results in murder, but with a twist. Like the previous book in the series, this book has a definite Clue game vibe, which I will forever have a weakness for. Despite being largely better behaved, Milo is still being a bit of a turd. Regardless of if Amory feels threatened or not, he needs to respect his wife more and stop making her look bad because no amount of charm can make up for it in my books. I'm still very much hoping for a redemption for him at some point, I'm truly hoping this persona and the absences can be excused by him being some form of secret agent. It took me a little bit to get into this one, mainly because I found the premise justifying Amory and Milo's presence at this gathering to be stretching the realms of believablity. It's a bit strange that the owner of the home would extend the invitation to return to the scene of the worst thing to ever happen to this group solely because Laurel asked. That's really my only complaint though, because as a whole I enjoyed this addition to the series and I really liked the way the reveal was handled. Really loving this series so far and recommend it to other who enjoy some cozy style historical mysteries.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    I've enjoyed this series, but this book has been my least favorite so far. As with the previous stories, the upper class 1930's English setting was fun. Amory again flouted expectations for a young society woman by involving herself in yet another murder mystery. But there were a number of aspects of the case that simply did not ring true. Not the least of these was why, with no apparent coercion involved, all the players present at the years ago scandal and death agreed to return to the scene of I've enjoyed this series, but this book has been my least favorite so far. As with the previous stories, the upper class 1930's English setting was fun. Amory again flouted expectations for a young society woman by involving herself in yet another murder mystery. But there were a number of aspects of the case that simply did not ring true. Not the least of these was why, with no apparent coercion involved, all the players present at the years ago scandal and death agreed to return to the scene of the crime. Even at the climax, the revelation of some characters' motivations elicited no satisfying "aha!" but more a muted "huh." In addition, I found some of the characters in this book to be puzzling or frustrating. Cousin Laurel supposedly was Amory's best friend, like a sister, yet they chose to spend little time together and there was scant evidence of that closeness in their interactions. Milo's character, though, is the one I found most disappointing. His greatest attributes seem to be looks and charm, with little outward substance evident. As Amory noted, he loves to be adored and rarely is serious about anything. His cavalier attitude about scandal and its effect on Amory-whom he professes to love--have been hard to forgive. I've tried over the course of the last three books to explain this away by imagining he was some kind of covert agent whose assignments often take him away and he has used the playboy persona as a cover. But I've yet seen no evidence that this is so and I'm having a hard time seeing him as a worthy partner to Amory when the handsome-but-shallow appearance seems to be real. Oh, well. I will read the next book in the series, mostly because I like Amory but perhaps a little because I still harbor some hope of redemption for Milo.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    3.5 I didn't like this as well as the first two. I think some of it is Weaver's writing tics bothering me. There's a lot of "Something about our conversation bugged me, but I couldn't put my finger on what." Just trust that the reader will pick up on the clue without that hint. (Actually, this reader mostly didn't, so that just annoyed me more because I'd want to flip back and see what I was supposed to figure out.) I DID like getting to meet Laurel and I appreciate that Amory and Milo's marriage 3.5 I didn't like this as well as the first two. I think some of it is Weaver's writing tics bothering me. There's a lot of "Something about our conversation bugged me, but I couldn't put my finger on what." Just trust that the reader will pick up on the clue without that hint. (Actually, this reader mostly didn't, so that just annoyed me more because I'd want to flip back and see what I was supposed to figure out.) I DID like getting to meet Laurel and I appreciate that Amory and Milo's marriage really does seem okay now. Re-read Nov/Dec 2021 I remembered a little more of this one!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I just love this series! It's so charming, and Amory continues to be such a great character. The 1930s country house party is the perfect Golden Age cozy mystery setting. Amory and Milo are charming, glamorous, and a delight to follow, as Amory delves into a murder case and Milo tries to make sure she doesn't get herself into serious trouble. I've read the first two books, but this was the first one I listened to an audio, and the narrator was perfect. I just love this series! It's so charming, and Amory continues to be such a great character. The 1930s country house party is the perfect Golden Age cozy mystery setting. Amory and Milo are charming, glamorous, and a delight to follow, as Amory delves into a murder case and Milo tries to make sure she doesn't get herself into serious trouble. I've read the first two books, but this was the first one I listened to an audio, and the narrator was perfect.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    3 Stars - Good book The Amory Ames series has become my go-to for a quick but engaging read. As I’ve said in other reviews of books in this series, some of the plotlines are a bit ridiculous but overall engaging. This time Amory and her husband Milo end up in the midst of a dramatic scene when Amory’s cousin, Laurel, requests Amory join her at a friend’s country estate. I don’t think it’s a spoiler to say that there’s murder and Amory jumps into action. Of the 3 Weaver books I’ve read to-date, I 3 Stars - Good book The Amory Ames series has become my go-to for a quick but engaging read. As I’ve said in other reviews of books in this series, some of the plotlines are a bit ridiculous but overall engaging. This time Amory and her husband Milo end up in the midst of a dramatic scene when Amory’s cousin, Laurel, requests Amory join her at a friend’s country estate. I don’t think it’s a spoiler to say that there’s murder and Amory jumps into action. Of the 3 Weaver books I’ve read to-date, I think this one has the most unsympathetic characters. That is to say there’s a handful of them that I just could not connect with and frankly just didn’t like. Honestly, that’s fine with me because I like other characters, it’s just that this is the first book where some characters just seemed like evil, awful people. Recommended if you’ve read the 2 previous books.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lorraine

    Ashley Weaver’s A Most Novel Revenge (Amory Ames #3) is set in the 1930s at Lyonsgate, a Tudor-style country house which needs a great deal of tlc. Reggie and Beatrice, brother and sister, let Isobel Van Allan, a “notorious socialite”, invite all who were present at a tragic house party they gave seven years prior. Included this time are Amory and Milo Ames as Amory’s cousin, Laurel, requested the owner invite them. Amory and Milo were on their was to Italy for a delightfully warm vacation when Ashley Weaver’s A Most Novel Revenge (Amory Ames #3) is set in the 1930s at Lyonsgate, a Tudor-style country house which needs a great deal of tlc. Reggie and Beatrice, brother and sister, let Isobel Van Allan, a “notorious socialite”, invite all who were present at a tragic house party they gave seven years prior. Included this time are Amory and Milo Ames as Amory’s cousin, Laurel, requested the owner invite them. Amory and Milo were on their was to Italy for a delightfully warm vacation when Amory received the invitation to Lyonsgate, and her desire to visit with her cousin talked Milo into go to cold and drafty Lyonsgate instead. Laurel thought with Amory’s ‘experience’ investigating murders, it might be wise to have Amory and Milo present as the previous ‘house party’, a death occurred. To be honest I think the author’s reasoning why the Ames are invited is pretty weak. I believe that I would have gone to Italy! When Amory and Milo arrive, Amory begins to ‘pick up on’ the attendees’ moods which all tend to be negative. The author’s descriptive prose is well done, and the ending may just blow you away, but this Amory Ames mystery,I feel, is too long and too far-fetched. 3 stars.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    Most mysteries you can pick up wherever, without missing too much. This one, with a married couple at the center, makes much reference to how their marriage used to be. Not once or twice, but repeatedly, enough to annoy me. The mystery is an old standard--someone threatens to write a tell all, to the people they are going to tell all about, then ends up dead. Everyone's a suspect. The weird marriage dynamic of the protagonists is echoed in the suspects, too. Some have strange relationships, other Most mysteries you can pick up wherever, without missing too much. This one, with a married couple at the center, makes much reference to how their marriage used to be. Not once or twice, but repeatedly, enough to annoy me. The mystery is an old standard--someone threatens to write a tell all, to the people they are going to tell all about, then ends up dead. Everyone's a suspect. The weird marriage dynamic of the protagonists is echoed in the suspects, too. Some have strange relationships, others are simply strained. Overall, the observations on their strained behavior felt repetitive and uninformative. The end does wrap up neatly, though.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Love, love, love this series. This book was excellent, and I loved it. The mystery, setting, and characters were all delightful, and I must say I'm glad the drama between Amory and Milo has wrapped itself up. Highly recommend! Can't wait for the next one. Love, love, love this series. This book was excellent, and I loved it. The mystery, setting, and characters were all delightful, and I must say I'm glad the drama between Amory and Milo has wrapped itself up. Highly recommend! Can't wait for the next one.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jeannine

    This installment of the Amory Ames series was more fun than usual - Amory and Milo are more in sync than before, though Amory is still the driving force in the investigation. A group of people who were together for a wild house party at which there was a murder years ago are back together. Of course, someone dies and Amory gets to the bottom of it. Though there wasn’t as much action in this story, it moved quickly and constant revelations kept me engaged. The evolution of Amory and Milo’s relati This installment of the Amory Ames series was more fun than usual - Amory and Milo are more in sync than before, though Amory is still the driving force in the investigation. A group of people who were together for a wild house party at which there was a murder years ago are back together. Of course, someone dies and Amory gets to the bottom of it. Though there wasn’t as much action in this story, it moved quickly and constant revelations kept me engaged. The evolution of Amory and Milo’s relationship is the side story that is more positive and fun in this book (compared to the last, where Amory still felt neglected at times).

  16. 4 out of 5

    QNPoohBear

    Now that Amory and her husband Milo are happier than ever, they plan to spend a romantic winter in Italy alone. However, Amory's cousin Laurel wants Amory to come join a house party at Lysonsgate, the scene of a tragic event years earlier that tore apart the lives of several young people. Amory discovers that the house party was assembled by one Miss Isobel Van Allen, a notorious writer who wrote a scandalous tell-all novel about that fateful night. Now Isobel claims she has evidence that she ha Now that Amory and her husband Milo are happier than ever, they plan to spend a romantic winter in Italy alone. However, Amory's cousin Laurel wants Amory to come join a house party at Lysonsgate, the scene of a tragic event years earlier that tore apart the lives of several young people. Amory discovers that the house party was assembled by one Miss Isobel Van Allen, a notorious writer who wrote a scandalous tell-all novel about that fateful night. Now Isobel claims she has evidence that she had been wrong and the killer is still out there. She plans to unmask the killer in her new novel, but the killer finds her first. One of the guests or the hosts must be the culprit and Amory won't rest until she solves the mystery. I liked the mystery better than the previous two. It seemed like it might be the typical pick them off one by one story but it stayed central to the core mystery-what happened after a wild night of partying that resulted in a young man's death. Was it merely a toxic combo of drugs and alcohol plus exposure to the cold or was it murder? If it was murder, then who? Someone doesn't want anyone to know. The mystery kept me guessing and I never ever guessed. The story didn't go in the direction I expected in terms of old secrets. That was a nice change from typical mysteries set in this period. Now Amory and Miles are getting along better, I like her. She is now communicating with her husband and he recognizes now that she is not invulnerable and she does love him. He's a very attentive husband now but still charming as ever. None of the other characters are even remotely likeable. Isobel is a despicable human being. She encourages scandalous behavior only for the purposes of exploitation. She drives the action in the story both before the novel begins and after her death. She ruined several lives in the process of trying to become a rich and famous writer. Reggie Lyons seems like a nice fellow. He had a difficult time during the war but still he fell prey to Isobel and went along with her schemes so he was just as responsible for the destruction of his family and friends, yet no one sees it that way. His sister Beatrice comes across as a cold-hearted witch. Lucinda acts like a child. I thought she was 16 but she was apparently 16 at the time of the incident. I felt sorry for her to have a sister like Beatrice but not sorry for her because she threw herself at a married man. I felt sorry for Amory's old friend Freida, but she had choices and chose a path that led to unhappiness. Her husband is creepy. Desmond Roberts is weak and whiny. Like Freida, he made bad choices that led to unhappiness. Only Laurel is normal and nice but she's pretty bland. Mr. Winters, the artist, may be likable. He amused me but he is hard to read and may be hiding something. I'll leave you to read the book and figure out the killer's identity!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Veronica

    3.5 stars What could be more evocative of the charm of the golden age mysteries than a murder set at an English country estate, complete with a limited pool of suspects? The third book in the Amory Ames series, set in the early 1930s, yields just such an environment with equally charming results. Planning an Italian, romantic getaway, Amory and her dashing husband Milo instead find themselves diverted to the English countryside, at the pleading request of Amory's cousin, Laurel. The site of a tra 3.5 stars What could be more evocative of the charm of the golden age mysteries than a murder set at an English country estate, complete with a limited pool of suspects? The third book in the Amory Ames series, set in the early 1930s, yields just such an environment with equally charming results. Planning an Italian, romantic getaway, Amory and her dashing husband Milo instead find themselves diverted to the English countryside, at the pleading request of Amory's cousin, Laurel. The site of a tragic death some seven years prior during a particularly hedonistic party weekend, Lyonsgate has remained abandoned and those who were present for the tragedy have lived in its shadow during the interim years. It was an event that spawned a salacious best selling novel that, in turn, led to more tragedy. It is to this same estate that Amory and Milo find themselves summoned, along with all of the original party guests. None of them know why they've been summoned (and, indeed, readers have to hand wave away the logic as to why any of them should bother to show up at all) but tensions are running high and Laurel, who was one of those present seven years ago, calls in Amory for moral support in case things get dicey. When a new dead body turns up, Amory's sleuthing skills are needed once again...much to Milo's dismay. This is a light and entertaining series that just oozes elegance and charm. The mysteries are not necessarily the strongest but I do think that this installment was stronger than the second book and more equal in quality to the first book, Murder at the Brightwell. In any event, the real highlight for me is the coupling of Amory and Milo and their amusing marital banter. They are more settled in their marriage and while Milo still loves the admiration of women, he is clearly adoring of Amory and makes the extra effort to tell her - and show her - so. And that's progress. :-) I look forward to more Amory and Milo adventures.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andree

    2021 The mystery in this one may not be quite as engaging as its predecessors, but Amory and Milo's dynamic is better, so I feel it evens out. 2016 So, I read the three of these in a day and a half. Because apparently that is the sort of thing I do. I just really enjoy this series. This one is probably not my favourite, but I do enjoy attentive-Milo, and learning-to-be-vulnerable-Amory. 2021 The mystery in this one may not be quite as engaging as its predecessors, but Amory and Milo's dynamic is better, so I feel it evens out. 2016 So, I read the three of these in a day and a half. Because apparently that is the sort of thing I do. I just really enjoy this series. This one is probably not my favourite, but I do enjoy attentive-Milo, and learning-to-be-vulnerable-Amory.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Renee

    Charming, fun read!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dana Michael

    I am obsessed with these Mysteries. I enjoyed every page. I just knew I had guessed the bad guy. I was totally wrong. Great writing and wonderful characters

  21. 5 out of 5

    Miki

    Amory and her husband, Milo, are invited to a house party, which is being held at the scene of a suspicious death seven years earlier. The other guests are those who were present at that time, except for one. That one committed suicide after being accused of the murder in a book written by another guest, who is murdered at this party. Amory, of course, is all too ready to get involved in the investigation. Amory and Milo's marriage is still in recovery stage after the events of the previous books Amory and her husband, Milo, are invited to a house party, which is being held at the scene of a suspicious death seven years earlier. The other guests are those who were present at that time, except for one. That one committed suicide after being accused of the murder in a book written by another guest, who is murdered at this party. Amory, of course, is all too ready to get involved in the investigation. Amory and Milo's marriage is still in recovery stage after the events of the previous books, and, although Amory seems to be pleased that Milo has stopped straying, she treats him as more of an annoyance than a loved husband. She doesn't like him fussing over her or telling her what to do, she practically pushes him at a young girl who has a crush on him (while warning him to be easy on her), and sends him on his way while she does "important stuff". Any interaction is mostly limited to him seducing her at every opportunity. Their relationship was the best part of the previous books, and I miss it here. The plot kept my interest but, in my opinion, was weakened by Amory's dismissal of Milo as a handsome and charming man with no depth.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Aidan

    The third book is showing signs of weakness. No character development or advancement for Amory or Miles. Just reviving the exact same plot structure. I still really enjoy these books, I just wish these book deals would allow time for authors to write better (or maybe be edited better). Don't get stuck in formulas! Don't become Tasha Alexander! The third book is showing signs of weakness. No character development or advancement for Amory or Miles. Just reviving the exact same plot structure. I still really enjoy these books, I just wish these book deals would allow time for authors to write better (or maybe be edited better). Don't get stuck in formulas! Don't become Tasha Alexander!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    My favorite of the series so far! I'm glad Mr. Ames is starting to shape up. It makes the story so much more enjoyable. I like the different feel the romance between a married couple has. A fun, torrid mystery full of fluff and endless drama. My favorite of the series so far! I'm glad Mr. Ames is starting to shape up. It makes the story so much more enjoyable. I like the different feel the romance between a married couple has. A fun, torrid mystery full of fluff and endless drama.

  24. 4 out of 5

    OLT

    This is Weaver's third entry in her Amory and Milo Ames mystery series with a 1930s setting. The series is reminiscent of the style of Agatha Christie's stories and the characters remind one of Nick and Nora Charles of Dashiell Hammett's THE THIN MAN. We first met rich, upper-class Brits Amory and Milo in MURDER AT THE BRIGHTWELL, in which Amory had her first chance to solve a murder mystery. This was followed by another murder to solve in DEATH WEARS A MASK. And that's why Milo asks Amory at th This is Weaver's third entry in her Amory and Milo Ames mystery series with a 1930s setting. The series is reminiscent of the style of Agatha Christie's stories and the characters remind one of Nick and Nora Charles of Dashiell Hammett's THE THIN MAN. We first met rich, upper-class Brits Amory and Milo in MURDER AT THE BRIGHTWELL, in which Amory had her first chance to solve a murder mystery. This was followed by another murder to solve in DEATH WEARS A MASK. And that's why Milo asks Amory at the beginning of this third book "Well, darling, who do you suppose will turn up dead this time?" The couple are on their way to Lyonsgate, at the request of Amory's cousin Laurel, who is to be a guest at the manor home of Reginald Lyons. Eight years ago a group of hard-partying guests had been together at Lyonsgate when tragedy occurred. One of the guests died of an apparent overdose and possible hypothermia, the death being ruled accidental. However, this incident inspired the writing of a scandalous novel by Isobel Van Allen, who had been one of the guests and Reginald's lover at the time. The novel posited that the death was murder and implicated one of other guests, who subsequently committed suicide. Now all the surviving guests are being reunited at Lyonsgate and Laurel, fearing the worst, invites Amory (and bring Milo, she says, "if you must"). So off Amory and Milo go to Lyonsgate, where we meet all the 'suspects' and Isobel Van Allen announces to all that she is planning a new novel on the subject, having changed her mind about who the killer really was. Amory digs around to the best of her ability to sort everything out, somebody is murdered, and we readers try to decide who the murderer is. There are secrets and lies and unexpected relationships that are revealed during the investigation. This is one of those cozy, stylized mysteries, where perhaps not enough is divulged to the readers for them to know for certain "whodunit", followed at the end by a gathering of all the guests for the big reveal by Amory. If you enjoy Hercules Poirot, Miss Marple, Father Brown, Nick and Nora, etc., you will also enjoy Weaver's mystery series, which is a throwback to that style of writing. In addition, if you're a romance lover, we have the ongoing troubled relationship of Amory and Milo, which seems to be settling down in this third story. In the first two books, the reader (and Amory) is convinced that Milo is an unfaithful, partying, world-traveling (without Amory) rake. In this third book we are to believe that they have come to some kind of accord in their marriage and that Milo is trying to prove his love for Amory. I was not totally convinced by his behavior here. He still seems to be egocentric, selfish and a bit immature for my taste in husbands, but I suppose if Amory is feeling comfortable about him, that's what matters.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

    An English country home mystery with Strozzis? Sign me up!! What larks! Amory & Milo are invited to a party at a country house in the dead of winter -- a drafty country house. Of course, a dead body becomes part of the festivities. Enter a handsome police inspector for Amory's cousin to fall over and plenty of ladies for Milo to flirt with, and we have the elements all in place. Of course, plenty of people despised the victim. But who did the dreadful deed? Amory cannot resist digging in! Loving t An English country home mystery with Strozzis? Sign me up!! What larks! Amory & Milo are invited to a party at a country house in the dead of winter -- a drafty country house. Of course, a dead body becomes part of the festivities. Enter a handsome police inspector for Amory's cousin to fall over and plenty of ladies for Milo to flirt with, and we have the elements all in place. Of course, plenty of people despised the victim. But who did the dreadful deed? Amory cannot resist digging in! Loving this series!!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Harriet

    Just as charming as the others in this series! The book draws you in from start to finish. It has a very Hercule Poirot feel to it, but with a glamorous, stylish and witty couple as its sleuths. Amory is fantastic and who doesn’t love her sidekick (and handsome) husband?!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jude: The Epic Reader

    Glad that the relationship between Amory and Milo is tightknit but his personality is the same. They are honestly very funny. I don't know if I liked the setting all that much but its always entertaining to be stuck in a mansion with a certain group. Glad that the relationship between Amory and Milo is tightknit but his personality is the same. They are honestly very funny. I don't know if I liked the setting all that much but its always entertaining to be stuck in a mansion with a certain group.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    I quite like the more even footing that Amory and Milo's relationship is on in this book, but I'm sad that I didn't like an english manor murder mystery more. Those are my jam. I quite like the more even footing that Amory and Milo's relationship is on in this book, but I'm sad that I didn't like an english manor murder mystery more. Those are my jam.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alix

    I struggled with this book a lot more than I did with the first two which makes me sad. The mystery just didn’t work for me. I pretty much guessed it half way through. I’m glad we finally met the famous Lauren but I feel like she was barely in the story! Considering she is Amory’s best friend, I was disappointed that we didn’t get to see them interact more. I did really enjoy Amory and Milo’s dynamic in this one and that they finally seem to be in a very good place! I do wish they communicated mo I struggled with this book a lot more than I did with the first two which makes me sad. The mystery just didn’t work for me. I pretty much guessed it half way through. I’m glad we finally met the famous Lauren but I feel like she was barely in the story! Considering she is Amory’s best friend, I was disappointed that we didn’t get to see them interact more. I did really enjoy Amory and Milo’s dynamic in this one and that they finally seem to be in a very good place! I do wish they communicated more how they felt especially Amory. Still, I am glad we didn’t get a backslide like in the previous book!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    "Well, darling, who do you suppose will turn up dead this time?" Ashley Weaver is a master of the great opening line that hooks you from the start. For three books running, Weaver has struck just the right tone with the perfect first line. The Amory Ames Mysteries are so fun! They're the perfect palate cleanser for all the depressing literary fiction I read. But I adore these novels in their own right, and A Most Novel Revenge is no exception. It's a delightful investigative romp. Amory and Mi "Well, darling, who do you suppose will turn up dead this time?" Ashley Weaver is a master of the great opening line that hooks you from the start. For three books running, Weaver has struck just the right tone with the perfect first line. The Amory Ames Mysteries are so fun! They're the perfect palate cleanser for all the depressing literary fiction I read. But I adore these novels in their own right, and A Most Novel Revenge is no exception. It's a delightful investigative romp. Amory and Milo Ames, the most happy and secure in their marriage that they've been in years, are ready for a relaxing vacation in Italy. Instead, Amory's cousin and best friend Laurel desperately summons Amory to the house party of her friend Reginald Lyons. So Amory and Milo go the country estate Lyonsgate in the dead of winter, where they stumble into a powder keg about to blow. The guests at Lyonsgate have reconvened at the site where one of their group died tragically seven years ago. The deceased, Edwin Green's death was ruled an accident, but the femme fatale Isobel Van Allen wrote a roman à clef about that fateful house party, implying that Edwin was murdered by one of the friends. Now Isobel has orchestrated this reunion to drop a bombshell: she's going to write a second novel that will expose the rest of the group's secrets. Needless to say, another member of the group shows up dead and it's up to Amory to investigate both the crimes of the present and the past. A Most Novel Revenge is an exciting addition to the Amory Ames series. We finally get a country house setting! (Which means Milo and Amory get to go riding together again, which I love.) It's an A+ premise with the suspicious death from the past, all the people present from that tragedy years ago; it's very Agatha Christie-esque. This is perhaps the most intricately plotted installment yet. Having it hark back to the death and the secrets from years ago adds texture and emotional complexity to the story. There's sadness in the reverberations of events across the years, in the lives ruined and forever affected by the past. Now onto my favorite topic: Milo and Amory! The dynamic between this duo is 100% amazing; they have chemistry for days; they're the OTP of my life. This central relationship really makes the Amory Ames Mysteries stand apart from other mystery series and makes it the most fun. The romance is swoon-worthy. I live for every Milo and Amory interaction. Milo is a delightful rake; an adventurous, rascally dreamboat. I love how cool and collected Amory is. She's a class act. Though their marriage is finally even-keeled, it doesn't stop them from having great dialogue and exchanging witty quips. Some of the sequences of the novel are very Old Hollywood romcom. I loved the droll humor. Amory and Milo are a great team and enjoy some exciting moments together in the course of their crime solving. I appreciate the believability of Amory being asked to investigate things after her success at the Brightwell, so that's how she gets involved in mysteries. It was exciting to finally meet the oft-mentioned Laurel! I'm impressed with Weaver's ability to come up with these great pools of suspects and brand new social groups with each new book. A Most Novel Revenge features a great cast of characters replete with plenty of scandals. I can't tell you how much I LOVE the lifestyles of these rich, aristocratic Brits in the 1930s. It's right up my alley. There's plenty of misdirection in this story. With Weaver's books I keep a roster of the suspects in my mind and have (ever-changing) rankings of my top suspects. This was the first Amory Ames mystery where I managed to guess who the killer was and some of the particulars of their motivation! Amory's network of people to help her investigate is great and they all serve the perfect function in helping her solve the mystery. I'll say it again: I need the TV gods to give me a TV show of this series. It would make excellent television. In my review for Death Wears a Mask I suggested Ruth Wilson play Amory. If she's perhaps too old to play Amory, I think Heida Reed could play the blue blooded sleuth well. Or, if age isn't an issue, I could also see Michelle Dockery playing Amory. Might it be a little like Lady Mary solving mysteries? (Mary and Amory share more than a few similarities, the time periods of Downton Abbey and this series are close together, etc.) Maybe! But I don't think that would be a bad thing! Why all these casting ideas for the TV adaptation of my dreams? Well, I've gotta give the TV gods some options! (Tell me they're listening!)

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