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Fantasy Magazine, December 2015: Queers Destroy Fantasy! Special Issue

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LIGHTSPEED is an online science fiction and fantasy magazine. In its pages, you will find science fiction: from near-future, sociological soft SF, to far-future, star-spanning hard SF—and fantasy: from epic fantasy, sword-and-sorcery, and contemporary urban tales, to magical realism, science-fantasy, and folktales. Funded as a stretch goal of LIGHTSPEED’s Queers Destroy Sc LIGHTSPEED is an online science fiction and fantasy magazine. In its pages, you will find science fiction: from near-future, sociological soft SF, to far-future, star-spanning hard SF—and fantasy: from epic fantasy, sword-and-sorcery, and contemporary urban tales, to magical realism, science-fantasy, and folktales. Funded as a stretch goal of LIGHTSPEED’s Queers Destroy Science Fiction! Kickstarter campaign, this month we’re presenting a special one-off issue of our otherwise discontinued sister-magazine, FANTASY, called Queers Destroy Fantasy!: an all-fantasy extravaganza entirely written—and edited!—by queer creators. Here’s what we’ve got lined up for you in this special issue: Original fantasy—edited by Christopher Barzak—by Catherynne M. Valente, Kai Ashante Wilson, Carlea Holl-Jensen, and Richard Bowes. Reprints—selected by Liz Gorinsky—by Caitlin R. Kiernan, Austin Bunn, Shweta Narayan, and Nicola Griffith. Nonfiction articles—edited by Matthew Cheney—by merritt kopas, Matthew Cheney, Keguro Macharia, Ekaterina Sedia, Mary Anne Mohanraj, and Ellen Kushner. Plus an original cover illustration by Priscilla Kim and original interior illustrations by Goñi Montes, Odera Igbokwe, Sam Schechter, Elizabeth Leggett, and Vlada Monakhova.


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LIGHTSPEED is an online science fiction and fantasy magazine. In its pages, you will find science fiction: from near-future, sociological soft SF, to far-future, star-spanning hard SF—and fantasy: from epic fantasy, sword-and-sorcery, and contemporary urban tales, to magical realism, science-fantasy, and folktales. Funded as a stretch goal of LIGHTSPEED’s Queers Destroy Sc LIGHTSPEED is an online science fiction and fantasy magazine. In its pages, you will find science fiction: from near-future, sociological soft SF, to far-future, star-spanning hard SF—and fantasy: from epic fantasy, sword-and-sorcery, and contemporary urban tales, to magical realism, science-fantasy, and folktales. Funded as a stretch goal of LIGHTSPEED’s Queers Destroy Science Fiction! Kickstarter campaign, this month we’re presenting a special one-off issue of our otherwise discontinued sister-magazine, FANTASY, called Queers Destroy Fantasy!: an all-fantasy extravaganza entirely written—and edited!—by queer creators. Here’s what we’ve got lined up for you in this special issue: Original fantasy—edited by Christopher Barzak—by Catherynne M. Valente, Kai Ashante Wilson, Carlea Holl-Jensen, and Richard Bowes. Reprints—selected by Liz Gorinsky—by Caitlin R. Kiernan, Austin Bunn, Shweta Narayan, and Nicola Griffith. Nonfiction articles—edited by Matthew Cheney—by merritt kopas, Matthew Cheney, Keguro Macharia, Ekaterina Sedia, Mary Anne Mohanraj, and Ellen Kushner. Plus an original cover illustration by Priscilla Kim and original interior illustrations by Goñi Montes, Odera Igbokwe, Sam Schechter, Elizabeth Leggett, and Vlada Monakhova.

55 review for Fantasy Magazine, December 2015: Queers Destroy Fantasy! Special Issue

  1. 5 out of 5

    karen

    WELCOME TO DECEMBER PROJECT! this explanation/intro will be posted before each day’s short story. scroll down to get to the story-review. this is the FOURTH year of me doing a short story advent calendar as my december project. for those of you new to me or this endeavor, here’s the skinny: every day in december, i will be reading a short story that is 1) available free somewhere on internet, and 2) listed on goodreads as its own discrete entity. there will be links provided for those of you who l WELCOME TO DECEMBER PROJECT! this explanation/intro will be posted before each day’s short story. scroll down to get to the story-review. this is the FOURTH year of me doing a short story advent calendar as my december project. for those of you new to me or this endeavor, here’s the skinny: every day in december, i will be reading a short story that is 1) available free somewhere on internet, and 2) listed on goodreads as its own discrete entity. there will be links provided for those of you who like to read (or listen to) short stories for free, and also for those of you who have wildly overestimated how many books you can read in a year and are freaking out about not meeting your 2019 reading-challenge goals. i have been gathering links all year when tasty little tales have popped into my feed, but i will also accept additional suggestions, as long as they meet my aforementioned 1), 2) standards. if you scroll to the end of the reviews linked here, you will find links to all the previous years’ stories, which means NINETY-THREE FREEBIES FOR YOU! 2016: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... 2017: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... 2018: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... reviews of these will vary in length/quality depending on my available time/brain power. so, let’s begin DECEMBER 6 They couldn’t guess what shape, this time, the hero’s metamorphosis would take; she had no idea herself. Their only forewarning was that, whatever changes, they would be always perilous, always a shock. soooo, this was great. i'm always excited to read new stories by this guy, and this is probably my second-favorite of everything of his i've read (The Devil in America is still #1). this is the least linguistically playful of his work (although there's still a touch of that here), but it's also the biggest and broadest in terms of concept/story, even though the main focus is still small; on three of the four members of an unusual family. there's always some ambiguity leftover for later, and i would love to know more about sofiya, but i'm very happy with all of the words that exist, so i'm not gonna grouse about the ones that don't. short review for a short story, but think of all the time i've saved you! now you can go read the story itself, which is much better than any of my sentences about it have or would have been! read it for yourself here: http://www.fantasy-magazine.com/new/n... ******************************************* DECEMBER 1 DECEMBER 2 DECEMBER 3 DECEMBER 4 DECEMBER 5 DECEMBER 7 DECEMBER 8 DECEMBER 9 DECEMBER 10 DECEMBER 11 DECEMBER 12 DECEMBER 13 DECEMBER 14 GOODREADS ERASED THIS STORY AND MY REVIEW FROM THE SITE, SO IF YOU REALLY WANT TO READ IT, IT IS HERE. THANKS. DECEMBER 15 DECEMBER 16 DECEMBER 17 DECEMBER 18 DECEMBER 19 DECEMBER 20 DECEMBER 21 DECEMBER 22 DECEMBER 23 DECEMBER 24 DECEMBER 25 DECEMBER 26 DECEMBER 27 DECEMBER 28 DECEMBER 29 DECEMBER 30 DECEMBER 31 come to my blog!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Althea Ann

    Available for free, here: http://www.fantasy-magazine.com/new/n... "Kaiju," of course, refers to the Japanese film genre featuring battles between giant monsters. (I used to work at a club where the band "Kaiju Big Battel" played frequently, so I can't see the word without thinking of their shows...) Here we meet a family, one of whom is a Hero, travelling out of humanity's safe dwelling caves to do battle against a destructive alien monster. The story is intercut with a couple of different kinds Available for free, here: http://www.fantasy-magazine.com/new/n... "Kaiju," of course, refers to the Japanese film genre featuring battles between giant monsters. (I used to work at a club where the band "Kaiju Big Battel" played frequently, so I can't see the word without thinking of their shows...) Here we meet a family, one of whom is a Hero, travelling out of humanity's safe dwelling caves to do battle against a destructive alien monster. The story is intercut with a couple of different kinds of texts. Some are notes from a geneticist, talking about the project to change some humans into "heroes" in order to fight the alien menace. The others are like video game strategy notes, talking about how much XP and power a character can get from their companions. The story seems to have been inspired by the idea of "lending strength" to someone, and how one might "take strength" from their family bonds - here the idea is taken quite literally. I liked the story, and thought it got quite a lot of complex and fascinating ideas into a short amount of space. However, I wished that the main narrative had been clear enough to dispense with the need for the 'genetics notes,' and I also thought that the 'video game notes' weakened the story rather than strengthening it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kalin

    A commendable project whose results did not satisfy me completely. Mostly, it was a matter of aesthetic incompatibilities between me and the editors: I found some stories too slow or directionless, others, too broken or outright nasty. This is not about sexuality; it's about individual, idiosyncratic sensitivity. But I'm going to journey on with Queers Destroy Science Fiction, eventually. My personal highlights: I may try more of: - Keguro Macharia, because his "False Starts" may well lead to startl A commendable project whose results did not satisfy me completely. Mostly, it was a matter of aesthetic incompatibilities between me and the editors: I found some stories too slow or directionless, others, too broken or outright nasty. This is not about sexuality; it's about individual, idiosyncratic sensitivity. But I'm going to journey on with Queers Destroy Science Fiction, eventually. My personal highlights: I may try more of: - Keguro Macharia, because his "False Starts" may well lead to startling finales. - Shweta Narayan's Jahinara stories, because Nara sparks off my own Yin (known to Bulgarian readers as Юна) in ways that no gender-insistent person (or reliable narrator) can fathom. - Charlie Jane Anders's All the Birds in the Sky--but only if Patricia does manage to take Laurence to a Great Outdoors Adventure Weekend. (And show him magic. ;) I'm already watching for: - Hal Duncan: an elemental of passion and empowerment (and, as the interview here reveals, of hospitality towards each and every Other).

  4. 4 out of 5

    Maija

    This issue gets a 4 star rating in all, although the average rating would come down to 3.25 stars. I still enjoyed the experience of reading it, and I liked my favourite stories enough to up the rating. My thoughts on all the individual stories below. ORIGINAL FICTION "The Lily and the Horn", by Catherynne M. Valente: 5 stars The preparations for an irregular, poisonous feast, told in gorgeous prose. My favourite from the whole issue. Valente's writing style, the descriptions, and the world just ha This issue gets a 4 star rating in all, although the average rating would come down to 3.25 stars. I still enjoyed the experience of reading it, and I liked my favourite stories enough to up the rating. My thoughts on all the individual stories below. ORIGINAL FICTION "The Lily and the Horn", by Catherynne M. Valente: 5 stars The preparations for an irregular, poisonous feast, told in gorgeous prose. My favourite from the whole issue. Valente's writing style, the descriptions, and the world just had me enchanted. "Kaiju Maximus", by Kai Ashante Wilson: 3.5 stars. A hero travels with her family to confront a Kaiju. This story doesn't focus on LGBTQ+ characters, instead it flips regular gender role expectations with a female hero and a male caretaker. I enjoyed the main story, but had to read the Author Spotlight to understand the meaning of the diversions from the main storyline. "The Lady's Maid", by Carlea Holl-Jensen: 3.5 stars A maid serves a lady with many changeable heads. When I read it I didn't know if the author had accidentally swiped visuals and scenes from Return to Oz or if it was intentional, until the very end. If I had read the Author Spotlight beforehand, I would've known that it was very much intentional, and that the story started life as a retelling. Then I would've probably enjoyed it much better from the start (not being confused by the parallels), and that would've affected my rating! I added 0.5 stars to my initial rating to reflect this. This story could've well been in the horror issue, there were two very viscerally disturbing scenes. I tried to read while eating, which was a big mistake! It was impossible to swallow anything while reading those. "The Duchess and the Ghost", by Richard Bowes: 3 stars A young gay boy is haunted by the ghosts of his past in 60s Greenwich Village. Quite light on the fantasy elements, but the writing style is flowing and easy to read. I originally gave this 4 stars when I read it, but ultimately it hasn't stuck in my head like some of the other stories. REPRINTS "The Padishah Begum's Reflections" by Shweta Narayan: 3 stars A mechanical female ruler in India meets with a French delegate. Took me a couple of false starts to finish, this is quite complex with stories within stories. I enjoyed the world! "Down the Path of the Sun", by Nicola Griffith: 2 stars A story about a small family (two sisters and their mother) surviving in a post-apocalyptic world. While the writing was good, I'm sad to say that I didn't really get why this was the story. It felt more like one scene from a brutal, post-apocalyptic novel. Again, more was explained in the Author Spotlight, and I understand the story's personal meaning to her, but I didn't get all that from reading it (since I don't share her experiences). Might work better and be more hard-hitting for other readers. Also, this was Nicola Griffith's first ever short story. "Ledge" by Austin Bunn, 2 stars A ship travels to the edge of the world. More of a metaphorical, literary story about death and longing. Not my cup of tea. "The Sea Troll's Daughter" by Caitlín R. Kiernan: 4 stars The hero of this story is a drunkard, boasting swordswoman who kills a troll that plagues a village, and then stays to wait for her reward while the village leaders hum and haw. This "hero kills a troll story" doesn't take the expected paths or follow the familiar story beats of revenge, which was quite refreshing. NOVEL EXCERPT "All the Birds in the Sky" by Charlie Jane Anders I liked the writing style, but I have heard mixed things about this book, so I'm not sure if I'll be picking it up. - The non-fiction was more or less interesting, but there was no stand-out for me. "Retrofuturism and Agendered Fashion: What Will We Wear?" by Ekaterina Sedia was interesting. I admit to skim-reading the Hal Duncan interview, since I haven't read any of his books, and the interview topic wasn't that interesting to me personally. There were also some interesting artists in the Artists' Gallery, whose names I wrote down.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Marco

    Fantasy and Lightspeed magazine were unified some time ago. They are very well-known science fiction and fantasy magazine. Even in fantasy, supposedly the genre of limitless possibility, where everyone is invited to the adventure, minorities are often underrepresented. Last year Lightspeed started the "destroy science fiction" series, a yearly program focusing on underrepresented minorities to give them a voice, and to see what they have to offer and to contribute to the genre. In 2014 they focu Fantasy and Lightspeed magazine were unified some time ago. They are very well-known science fiction and fantasy magazine. Even in fantasy, supposedly the genre of limitless possibility, where everyone is invited to the adventure, minorities are often underrepresented. Last year Lightspeed started the "destroy science fiction" series, a yearly program focusing on underrepresented minorities to give them a voice, and to see what they have to offer and to contribute to the genre. In 2014 they focused on sci-fi and women. In 2015 they focused on queer authors and themes, with three specials, one for sci-fi, one for horror, and this one, that focuses on fantasy. Next year they will focus on people of color. While fantasy is considered by many the more open of the literary genres, heterosexual, heteroromantic, and cisgendered are considered the default, to the extent that everything else is "deviation," and must be eyed with suspicion. But all fantasy is real fantasy. Fantasy is vast, and incredible fascinating in all its facets. It is inclusive. Fantasy is about people, and queer people, no matter how they identify [Gay, lesbian, bisexual, demisexual, asexual, pansexual, intersex, transgender, genderfluid, genderqueer.. anyone who fits within the QUILTBAG], are a big part of that. They always have been. They are just sometimes harder to see. So, in the interests of visibility and breaking stuff, Queers Destroy Fantasy! will show you just how wide the spectrum of sexuality and gender identity can really be. This special all-queer issue features original fantasy short stories from many award winning authors including Christopher Barzak, Kai Ashante Wilson, Catherynne M. Valente, Richard Bowes, Caitlín R. Kiernan, Nicola Griffith, Shweta Narayan , Ellen Kushner, and Charlie Jane Anders. The issue also include an interesting assortment of author and artist spotlights, interviews, nonfiction features, plus personal essays from writers about their experiences being queer reading and writing fantasy. Two of the stories deserved a special mention, because of their power and quality: The Duchess & the Ghost, by Richard Bowes, is the story of a young man growing up queer in a time where it was very difficult to do even in the "liberal" New York City, facing his internal fears and ghosts. The Padishah Begum’s Reflections by Shweta Narayan, is the story of a clockwork monarch, adroitly weaved across multiple timelines to form a breathtaking tapestry. A very interesting read, almost as good as the previous installment of the series that focused on science fiction. I am looking forward reading the next "destroy" issue.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alina

    Set in three timelines, an oriental flavoured story with mechanical creatures. You can find it on Fantasy Magazine's site or in Steam-Powered: Lesbian Steampunk Stories Set in three timelines, an oriental flavoured story with mechanical creatures. You can find it on Fantasy Magazine's site or in Steam-Powered: Lesbian Steampunk Stories

  7. 5 out of 5

    Hillary

    An excellent collection that introduced me to a couple of authors I definitely, definitely want to read more from. And all the stories had queer themes! Fabulous in more ways than one.

  8. 4 out of 5

    bee

    Fiction The Lily and the Horn by Catherynne M. Valente: 4.5/5 Kaiju Maximus®: “So Various, So Beautiful, So New” by Kai Ashante Wilson: 3/5 The Lady's Maid by Carlea Holl-Jensen: 3/5 The Duchess & the Ghost by Richard Bowes: 4/5 The Padishah Begum's Reflections by Shweta Narayan: 3.5/5 Down the Path of the Sun by Nicola Griffith: 4/5 The Ledge by Austin Bunn: 3/5 The Sea Troll's Daughter by Caitlín R. Kiernan: 5/5 Non-fiction The Sleepover Manifesto by merrit kopas: 5/5 False Starts by Keguro Macha Fiction The Lily and the Horn by Catherynne M. Valente: 4.5/5 Kaiju Maximus®: “So Various, So Beautiful, So New” by Kai Ashante Wilson: 3/5 The Lady's Maid by Carlea Holl-Jensen: 3/5 The Duchess & the Ghost by Richard Bowes: 4/5 The Padishah Begum's Reflections by Shweta Narayan: 3.5/5 Down the Path of the Sun by Nicola Griffith: 4/5 The Ledge by Austin Bunn: 3/5 The Sea Troll's Daughter by Caitlín R. Kiernan: 5/5 Non-fiction The Sleepover Manifesto by merrit kopas: 5/5 False Starts by Keguro Macharia: 3/5 Retrofuturism and Agendered Fashion: What Will We Wear? by Ekaterina Sedia: 4/5 Eggplant and Unicorns by Mary Anne Mohanraj: 4/5 Girls on Boys on Boys by Ellen Kushner: 1.5/5 Average rating: 3.65/5. Bumping it down to an even 3/5 because the extremely liberal idea of "queer" littered throughout some of the non-fiction and interviews gave me acid reflux and a lot of the LGBTness in a lot of the stories was subtext which isn't what I'm looking for in an issue of something called "Queers Destroy Fantasy".

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dennis

    Place holder for Kaiju maximus: So Various, So Beautiful, So New by Kai Ashante Wilson

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ana

    I wish there had been more stories and less nonfiction - but that's really more of a compliment than a criticism because of the handful of short stories/reprints there were only two I really did not enjoy. The rest were each phenomenal in their own way, and I think the magazine accomplished a two-fold purpose: not only did I get to read lovely queer fantasy, but now I am curious about all these different authors and am keeping an eye out for their other work. In short, this issue was (very nearly I wish there had been more stories and less nonfiction - but that's really more of a compliment than a criticism because of the handful of short stories/reprints there were only two I really did not enjoy. The rest were each phenomenal in their own way, and I think the magazine accomplished a two-fold purpose: not only did I get to read lovely queer fantasy, but now I am curious about all these different authors and am keeping an eye out for their other work. In short, this issue was (very nearly) everything I could have wanted and looked forward to!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bridget Mckinney

    Perhaps it’s because fantasy is my first and forever true love under the SFF umbrella, but I’m convinced that the Fantasy Magazine entries in the DestroySF project are the best. At the very least, they’ve been consistently my favorite magazines in the series. Queers Destroy Fantasy has, hands down, the best fiction in any of the Destroy issues so far. Read the full review at SF Bluestocking. Perhaps it’s because fantasy is my first and forever true love under the SFF umbrella, but I’m convinced that the Fantasy Magazine entries in the DestroySF project are the best. At the very least, they’ve been consistently my favorite magazines in the series. Queers Destroy Fantasy has, hands down, the best fiction in any of the Destroy issues so far. Read the full review at SF Bluestocking.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bill Herman

    Queer stories Ok, so someone decides to write a story about being gay no problem. But you can bet that story after story about gays tended to get old fast. I suppose that some folks prefer this but I was expecting something more. The word Queer to me doesn't necessarily mean homosexual to me it means different or strange. Three stars seemed appropriate to me neither hating nor liking the book but saying that there were a few stories that I enjoyed.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cora Snow

    3/5. Positive: My favourite stories were The Lily and the Horn, Kaiju Maximus, and The Sea Troll's Daughter. These were solid stories that were well-written. I liked that the majority of relationships depicted were F/F, a rarity in any kind of fiction. Negative: I didn't really enjoy any other stories. Some of them were really dark and disturbing, and not in a good way.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bill Hsu

    I suppose it's honorable of the editors not to include their own work. But I'd much rather revisit Barzak's "Map of Seventeen" or Cheney's "Walk in the Light While There is Light", than read most of the selections here. (And I would similarly recommend many other Barzak and Cheney short stories, over the pieces in this issue.)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mikayla

    An excellent collection, but I was disappointed by the lack of ace and/or aro characters/essays.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Berta Kleiner

    Extremely promising

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

    Wow, this prose!! I have never read, seen, or heard of a superhero story quite like this.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mathew

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kai

  20. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lara Okafor

  22. 5 out of 5

    Heather Blair

  23. 5 out of 5

    Siobhan

  24. 4 out of 5

    Carlia

  25. 4 out of 5

    David King

  26. 5 out of 5

    Winna King

  27. 4 out of 5

    Pam

  28. 5 out of 5

    Erin Subramanian

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jojtown

  30. 4 out of 5

    Just_ann_now

  31. 5 out of 5

    Angelica

  32. 5 out of 5

    Erin

  33. 5 out of 5

    Tasha Turner

  34. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  35. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

  36. 5 out of 5

    Simon Ellberger

  37. 4 out of 5

    Andrija

  38. 4 out of 5

    Noonlit

  39. 5 out of 5

    Kaleb

  40. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

  41. 4 out of 5

    Pioup

  42. 4 out of 5

    Gilberto

  43. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

  44. 5 out of 5

    Jesse

  45. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  46. 4 out of 5

    Anne Skelding

  47. 5 out of 5

    Ashleigh

  48. 5 out of 5

    Waru

  49. 5 out of 5

    S.L. Cooper

  50. 5 out of 5

    Hisham El-far

  51. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  52. 4 out of 5

    Jay

  53. 5 out of 5

    Louise

  54. 4 out of 5

    lauraღ

    Caitlin R. Kiernan's "The Sea Troll's Daughter" was excellent! Really engaging, really moving, really fun. I adored Kai Ashante Wilson's "Kaiju maximus ®" as I will probably adore everything he writes, but I'm a bit confused. Where was the queerness? Did I blink and miss it? "The Lily and the Horn" needed a reread for me to really get into it, but I enjoyed it a lot. The rest of the anthology was good. Not really what I expected from something called "Queers Destroy Fantasy!" I would have appreci Caitlin R. Kiernan's "The Sea Troll's Daughter" was excellent! Really engaging, really moving, really fun. I adored Kai Ashante Wilson's "Kaiju maximus ®" as I will probably adore everything he writes, but I'm a bit confused. Where was the queerness? Did I blink and miss it? "The Lily and the Horn" needed a reread for me to really get into it, but I enjoyed it a lot. The rest of the anthology was good. Not really what I expected from something called "Queers Destroy Fantasy!" I would have appreciated less subtext and more text from several of the stories. But they were all enjoyable in some way. And I really appreciated Ellen Kushner's essay! More or less worth the read. 3.5 stars. Merged review: But as we engineer the superhuman corpus, again I say, let us not neglect the heart! Read this a few years ago as part of a collection; the reread was enjoyable and illuminating. I love what Kai Ashante Wilson does with words and lyricism, I love that he uses images and metaphors that are personal, and black ("If you’ve ever sucked and chewed on sugarcane, then you have the right image." I have!), I love the metatextuality in his work, I love the little nods he gives to video games. Reading the little interview he did after, I wasn't expecting to hear that some inspiration came from Bioware games, but thinking about it, I'm not very surprised! Love the thought of a heroic gene, and that image of the hero, having to hold herself apart from her family, and yet depending on them so completely to complete her mission. Really good!

  55. 4 out of 5

    Tara

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