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Digital Transformation Playbook: Rethink Your Business for the Digital Age

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Rethink your business for the digital age. Every business begun before the Internet now faces the same challenge: How to transform to compete in a digital economy? Globally recognized digital expert David L. Rogers argues that digital transformation is not about updating your technology but about upgrading your strategic thinking. Based on Rogers's decade of research and tea Rethink your business for the digital age. Every business begun before the Internet now faces the same challenge: How to transform to compete in a digital economy? Globally recognized digital expert David L. Rogers argues that digital transformation is not about updating your technology but about upgrading your strategic thinking. Based on Rogers's decade of research and teaching at Columbia Business School, and his consulting for businesses around the world, The Digital Transformation Playbook shows how pre-digital-era companies can reinvigorate their game plans and capture the new opportunities of the digital world. Rogers shows why traditional businesses need to rethink their underlying assumptions in five domains of strategy--customers, competition, data, innovation, and value. He reveals how to harness customer networks, platforms, big data, rapid experimentation, and disruptive business models--and how to integrate these into your existing business and organization. Rogers illustrates every strategy in this playbook with real-world case studies, from Google to GE, from Airbnb to the New York Times. With practical frameworks and nine step-by-step planning tools, he distills the lessons of today's greatest digital innovators and makes them usable for businesses at any stage. Many books offer advice for digital start-ups, but The Digital Transformation Playbook is the first complete treatment of how legacy businesses can transform to thrive in the digital age. It is an indispensable guide for executives looking to take their firms to the next stage of profitable growth.


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Rethink your business for the digital age. Every business begun before the Internet now faces the same challenge: How to transform to compete in a digital economy? Globally recognized digital expert David L. Rogers argues that digital transformation is not about updating your technology but about upgrading your strategic thinking. Based on Rogers's decade of research and tea Rethink your business for the digital age. Every business begun before the Internet now faces the same challenge: How to transform to compete in a digital economy? Globally recognized digital expert David L. Rogers argues that digital transformation is not about updating your technology but about upgrading your strategic thinking. Based on Rogers's decade of research and teaching at Columbia Business School, and his consulting for businesses around the world, The Digital Transformation Playbook shows how pre-digital-era companies can reinvigorate their game plans and capture the new opportunities of the digital world. Rogers shows why traditional businesses need to rethink their underlying assumptions in five domains of strategy--customers, competition, data, innovation, and value. He reveals how to harness customer networks, platforms, big data, rapid experimentation, and disruptive business models--and how to integrate these into your existing business and organization. Rogers illustrates every strategy in this playbook with real-world case studies, from Google to GE, from Airbnb to the New York Times. With practical frameworks and nine step-by-step planning tools, he distills the lessons of today's greatest digital innovators and makes them usable for businesses at any stage. Many books offer advice for digital start-ups, but The Digital Transformation Playbook is the first complete treatment of how legacy businesses can transform to thrive in the digital age. It is an indispensable guide for executives looking to take their firms to the next stage of profitable growth.

30 review for Digital Transformation Playbook: Rethink Your Business for the Digital Age

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Cowie

    I am reviewing this book in the July-August issue of Global Business and Organizational Excellence I am reviewing this book in the July-August issue of Global Business and Organizational Excellence

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rodrigo

    Rogers proposes to view the digital transformation in companies as a strategy over the technology process. Based on 5 domains (customers, competition, data, value, and innovation), he analyses case studies in order to exemplify his point of view. The book is a good material to understand and adapt to this kind of transformation in companies.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mohamed

    This book is written with care. It creates a framework for digital transformation that suits most of organizations. A lot of illustrative examples and many tools that can be put in action by consultants. It is really worth reading!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lanre Dahunsi

    Digital transformation is not about technology—it is about strategy and new ways of thinking. Transforming for the digital age requires your business to upgrade its strategic mindset much more than its IT infrastructure. Digital transformation requires a holistic view of business strategy. The rules of business have changed. In every industry, the spread of new digital technologies and the rise of new disruptive threats are transforming business models and processes. The digital revolution has tur Digital transformation is not about technology—it is about strategy and new ways of thinking. Transforming for the digital age requires your business to upgrade its strategic mindset much more than its IT infrastructure. Digital transformation requires a holistic view of business strategy. The rules of business have changed. In every industry, the spread of new digital technologies and the rise of new disruptive threats are transforming business models and processes. The digital revolution has turned the old business playbook upside down. Businesses founded before the rise of the Internet face a stark challenge: Many of the fundamental rules and assumptions that governed and grew their businesses in the pre-digital era no longer hold. The good news is that change is possible. Pre-digital businesses are not dinosaurs doomed to extinction. Their disruption is not inevitable. Businesses can transform themselves to thrive in the digital age. The digital revolution is still just getting started. With an ever-unfolding cascade of new technologies and all the potential they provide, it is impossible to predict how the digital future will impact your business or any industry. But if you are savvy, your business can choose to use each new wave of change as an opportunity to create new value for your customers. The organizations that flourish in the digital age will combine the right strategic mindset with the right leadership skill set. They will understand the new strategic fundamentals of the digital age and use them to craft new products, services, brands, and business models. Whatever their size, they will maintain the organizational agility to seize new opportunities, and they will balance the art of incubating and learning like a start-up with the art of scaling and integrating like an enterprise. These organizations will be guided, as their strategies and business models change, by a focus on continuous value creation. The five domains of business: strategy: customers, competition, data, innovation, and value. Customers – From passive targets…to dynamic networks Digital technologies change how we connect and create value with our customers. We may have grown up in a world in which companies broadcast messages and shipped products to customers. But today the relationship is much more two-way: customers’ communications and reviews make them a bigger influencer than advertisements or celebrities, and customers’ dynamic participation has become a critical driver of business success. Competition – From products…to platforms Digital technologies transform how we need to think about competition. More and more, we are competing not just with rival companies from within our industry but also with companies from outside our industry that are stealing customers away with their new digital offerings. We may find ourselves competing fiercely with a long-standing rival in one area while leveraging that company’s capabilities by cooperating in another sector of our business. Increasingly, our competitive assets may no longer reside in our own organization; rather, they may be in a network of partners that we bring together in looser business relationships. A platform is a business that creates value by facilitating direct interactions between two or more distinct types of customers. Asymmetric Competition Today, we are moving to a world of fluid industry boundaries, one where our biggest challengers may be asymmetric competitors—companies from outside our industry that look nothing like us but that offer competing value to our customers. Data – From silos….to strategic asset Digital technologies have changed our world perhaps most significantly in how we think about data. In traditional businesses, data was expensive to obtain, difficult to store, and utilized in organizational silos. Today, data is being generated at an unprecedented rate—not just by companies but by everyone. Moreover, cloud-based systems for storing data are increasingly cheap, readily available, and easy to use. The biggest challenge today is turning the enormous amount of data we have into valuable information. To create good data strategy, you must begin with an understanding of the four templates of data value creation, the new sources and analytic capabilities of big data, the role of causality in data-driven decision making, and the risks around data security and privacy. Innovation – From top-down planning…to experimentation Digital technologies are also transforming the ways that businesses innovate. Traditionally, innovation was expensive, high stakes, and insular. Testing new ideas was difficult and costly, so businesses relied on their managers to guess what to build into a product before launching it in the market. Today, digital technologies enable continuous testing and experimentation, processes that were inconceivable in the past. Prototypes can be built for pennies and ideas tested quickly with user communities. Constant learning and the rapid iteration of products, before and after their launch date, are becoming the norm. This new approach to innovation is focused on careful expValue – From defending…to adapting The final domain of digital transformation is the value a business delivers to its customers—its value proposition. Traditionally, a firm’s value proposition was seen as fairly constant. Products may be updated, marketing campaigns refreshed, or operations improved, but the basic value a business offered to its customers was assumed to be constant and defined by its industry (e.g., car companies offer transportation, safety, comfort, and status, in varying degrees). In the digital age, relying on an unchanging value proposition is inviting challenge and eventual disruption by new competitors. Although industries will vary as to the exact timing and nature of their transformation by new technologies, those who assume it will be a little farther down the road are most likely to be run over. The only sure response to a shifting business environment is to take a path of constant evolution, looking to every technology as a way to extend and improve our value proposition to our customers. Rather than waiting to adapt when change becomes a matter of life or death, businesses need to focus on seizing emerging opportunities, divesting from declining sources of advantage, and adapting early to stay ahead of the curve of change. Build Platforms, Not Just Products To master competition in the digital age, businesses must learn to cope with asymmetric challengers who are reshuffling the roles of competition and cooperation in every industry. They must also understand the increasing importance of strategies to build platforms, not just products. digital transformation is not just about having the right strategy; it’s also about making that strategy happen. Harness Customer Networks Customers Customers in the digital age are not passive consumers but nodes within dynamic networks—interacting and shaping brands, markets, and each other. Businesses need to recognize this new reality and treat customers accordingly. They need to understand how customer networks are redefining the marketing funnel, reshaping customers’ path to purchase, and opening up new ways to co-create value with customers. Co-Creation A brand is no longer something that a business alone creates, defines, and projects outward; it is something that customers shape, too, and the business needs their help to fully create it. Many customers want to do more than just buy products and brands; they want to co-create them. Five Customer Network Behaviors Access: They seek to access digital data, content, and interactions as quickly, easily, and flexibly as possible. Any offering that enhances this access is incredibly compelling. Engage: They seek to engage with digital content that is sensory, interactive, and relevant to their needs. Customize: They seek to customize their experiences by choosing and modifying a wide assortment of information, products, and services. Connect: They seek to connect with one another by sharing their experiences, ideas, and opinions through text, images, and social links. Collaborate: As social animals, they are naturally drawn to work together. Accordingly, they seek to collaborate on projects and goals through open platforms. Disintermediation and Intermediation Disintermediation—the removal of an intermediary or middleman from a series of business transactions. The Internet is widely known to have been a powerful force for disintermediation, as it has made it much easier for goods and services of all kinds to reach any audience that wants them. As an incumbent, you have six possible responses when faced with a disruptive challenger: THREE STRATEGIES TO BECOME THE DISRUPTER • Acquire the disrupter • Launch an independent disrupter • Split the disrupter’s business model THREE STRATEGIES TO MITIGATE LOSSES FROM THE DISRUPTER • Refocus on your defensible customers • Diversify your portfolio • Plan for a fast exit Reimagining your business requires challenging some of its underlying core assumptions. It requires recognizing blind spots you may not realize you have. It requires thinking differently about every aspect of your strategy—customers, competition, data, innovation, and value. This kind of rethinking is difficult—but certainly possible. Just as factories built before the era of electrification were able to revamp their entire way of working and manufacturing, businesses today that were born before the Internet are quite capable of transforming for the digital age. To develop true organizational agility, your business needs to focus on three areas: • Allocating resources: How will you decide what to invest in? Are you able to disengage from initiatives and lines of business that lack future potential? Can you apply resources from older business lines to support new ventures? • Changing what you measure: What outcomes are being measured by senior decision makers? Do they simply relate to existing business practices, or can they support new directions? What should you be measuring at different stages of a transition to a new business model? • Aligning incentives: What kind of behavior is enabled, supported, and rewarded in your organization? What are managers held accountable for? How are they assigned to new positions? Do compensation and recognition support or hinder the necessary changes in your strategy?eriments and on minimum viable prototypes that maximize learning while minimizing cost.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Darren

    It can feel difficult to keep up at times, what with businesses being transformed, changed, adapted or disrupted by digitalisation. For the business that keeps up, it can be highly beneficial, yet it is still a distracting, disorientating state of affairs for far too many. A business may want to change (that is part of the battle already won) but figuring out how to do it can be something else. Oh, what to do…! This book may help, promising a host of practical advice, based around five major rul It can feel difficult to keep up at times, what with businesses being transformed, changed, adapted or disrupted by digitalisation. For the business that keeps up, it can be highly beneficial, yet it is still a distracting, disorientating state of affairs for far too many. A business may want to change (that is part of the battle already won) but figuring out how to do it can be something else. Oh, what to do…! This book may help, promising a host of practical advice, based around five major rules, that should help businesses of all sizes adapt, innovate and maximize value creation. A host of case studies round this off, showing how other companies have successfully transformed their business activities. Customers, competition, data, innovation and value are what the author calls the five domains of digital transformation. Get all of these sorted and you are laughing. Yet what is transformation? It is more than just sticking an analogue process into a digital world. One good example given is the Encyclopaedia Britannica, once the “gold standard” of knowledge with its 32 leather-bound volumes lining every school and public library shelves (as well as the homes of many who were persuaded by smooth-talking salesmen). CD-ROMs such as Encarta and then the Internet came and online resources started to eat it for dinner. Now where do most people search? Possibly Wikipedia, being well-indexed by search engines such as Google. Now the company has lost in one market but it has managed to pivot and find a new market – it might not be as lucrative or as well-known but it transformed and not break the business in half as a result. That is an example of transformation in action. The book has plenty more of them. It leads to an engaging and interesting read that dispenses a fair bit of knowledge along the way. It is a book that may demand a lot from the reader since they have to seek to put the advice into action, yet the end result can be worth a little pain. What may the alternative be? It was a good read that could be also relevant to the curious generalist with no business to transform. It is quite accessible and broad in reach, so there is something for every reader. The style might not necessarily be something everyone will get on with, but the sum of its knowledge may make up for any perceived small issues and grumbles.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Angela Lam

    Loved the book. Was initially worried it'd be very academic, but it turned out to be extremely well organized, well-written and thought-provoking. I personally find it really hard to keep up with the all the new technologies and never-ending developments in the digital/tech space. This book gave me some really useful strategic frameworks and concepts to string things together mentally and think about my business strategy through the lens of the digital era. Basically, we have moved from an analog Loved the book. Was initially worried it'd be very academic, but it turned out to be extremely well organized, well-written and thought-provoking. I personally find it really hard to keep up with the all the new technologies and never-ending developments in the digital/tech space. This book gave me some really useful strategic frameworks and concepts to string things together mentally and think about my business strategy through the lens of the digital era. Basically, we have moved from an analog to digital age, and the business rules and environment have changed fundamentally. It can be hard to make sense of the digital world, especially when things are all interconnected and change so quickly. The big idea in the book is this: Digital transformation is much more than technology. It's about a holistic change of strategy and an entirely new way of thinking. David Rogers breaks it down into 5 strategic domains—customers, competition, data, innovation and value—and for each domain, he explains the changes in strategic assumptions, presents several foundational concepts/frameworks, and 1-2 tools to help you think about your strategy in that domain. He then ends off with a section on disruptive technologies/businesses and how to identify and manage them. I'm a big fan of Clayton Christensen's The Innovator's Dilemma, and I think Rogers did a really nice job with his "Business Model Theory of Disruption" expands on Christensen's model to cover more scenarios/variables. Won't go into all the details here... you can get a summary at https://readingraphics.com/book-summa... The book supposed focuses on enterprises established before the Internet age, but I personally run an fully-online business and I really found the frameworks and insights to be useful. So I dare say they're probably applicable to any modern business. Overall, there's a clear structure, a great blend of concepts, frameworks, tools and examples to take you through the strategic thinking and applications. It's quite heavy in terms of content, but written in a way that's easy to read/understand. A pretty good guidebook to keep and refer to. Book summary at : https://readingraphics.com/book-summa...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lingyuxiu Zhong

    Work book that I wish I'd read two years ago...Rogers breaks down digital transformation to five components: Customer: from one-directional, mass-market customers that companies convince to make purchase decisions, to networked, influential and personalized individuals seeking to access, engage, connect, customize, and collaborate on products. competition: from similar companies in same industry to asymmetric competitors due to disintermediation (i.e. getting sidelined). Rogers maintains that pla Work book that I wish I'd read two years ago...Rogers breaks down digital transformation to five components: Customer: from one-directional, mass-market customers that companies convince to make purchase decisions, to networked, influential and personalized individuals seeking to access, engage, connect, customize, and collaborate on products. competition: from similar companies in same industry to asymmetric competitors due to disintermediation (i.e. getting sidelined). Rogers maintains that play here is to think of a platform product - however i don't see how this applies to more traditional manufacturers e.g. L'Oreal. Data: vast amount of data being generated, most unstructured e.g. location data and sentient data (natural language) innovation: much faster, iterative, continuous learning through A/B testing (convergent learning) and qualitative testing (divergent) value proposition: digital disrupters challenge companies to rethink their value proposition to customers. Rogers wraps up the book with an analysis on true disruption: only those that offer an incremental value to customers in a way that creates barriers to imitation, otherwise they are just innovators that can be fought with current business model. If a company is truly disrupted, then it can think about acquiring, launching, diversifying, refocusing on current customers, or making a speedy exit. Really helpful read. Wish there was more meaty stuff on the data front.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Armin

    I got little out of this book. Lots of famous examples of successful companies for those who didn't know them, yet. And a few so-called "tools" that are very superficial, abstract, and probably hard to put into practice without lots of help. The three stars are for the bits of background theory on social networks and platforms that got me interested in these topics. I got little out of this book. Lots of famous examples of successful companies for those who didn't know them, yet. And a few so-called "tools" that are very superficial, abstract, and probably hard to put into practice without lots of help. The three stars are for the bits of background theory on social networks and platforms that got me interested in these topics.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jose Papo

    A good summary and framework of topics related to Digital Transformation. The author also offers tools for each item in te framework. This helps in the work of transforming and disrupting businesses via digital.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brian Ali

    Reasonable I would recommend this book for colleagues completely NEW to the concept of Digitalization in the business arena and keen on entrepreneurship. Otherwise, concepts are basic and intuitive. Tools are helpful as prescriptive ways of thinking through your business

  11. 4 out of 5

    Raphael Donaire

    Rogers shared essential concepts related to digital transformation. Based on a strategic and not a technology perspective the author suggests to look for digital change on five domains: customers; competition, data, innovation, and value. To adapt in the digital age businesses must learn to view customers differently, understanding the dynamic, networked ways in which they interact, now both with companies and with each other. To operate successfully companies must have a dynamic understanding of Rogers shared essential concepts related to digital transformation. Based on a strategic and not a technology perspective the author suggests to look for digital change on five domains: customers; competition, data, innovation, and value. To adapt in the digital age businesses must learn to view customers differently, understanding the dynamic, networked ways in which they interact, now both with companies and with each other. To operate successfully companies must have a dynamic understanding of how firms compete and cooperate. Rather than a simplistic view of bitter enemies, businesses need to see all their interfirm relationships as a shifting mix of competition and cooperation. The strategic challenge for business is to develop a clear vision and the growing capability needed to put data to work in the service of innovation and value creation. Another book learning for organizations that are facing digital transformation is that to innovate businesses must learn to experiment continuously and effectively. By continually companies must iterate and test new ideas and get real data and real customer feedback as a flexible structure. Only then will they be able to innovate in a way that is fast enough, cheap enough, and smart enough. The last domain of digital transformation is to adapt to the company's value proposition. By taking a truly customer-centric attitude, a business can stay ahead of the curve o change. If it can learn to continuously reevaluate the value it delivers, identify changing customer needs, and spot emerging opportunities, it can continue to be the most valuable option form its customers. The final chapter of the book (Mastering disruptive business models) tries to conceptualize disruption and presented tools that allow businesses to identify business model remarkable changes. Frankly, I didn't realize a difference between the business model theory of disruption submitted by the author and a broader business model analysis based on Osterwalder and Kagermann concepts. If you are leading a digital transformation in your company, this is a must-have read. The reading is smooth, and the author shared good examples and useful tools.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Paulo Saraiva

    Great source of information for those who are looking for knowledge to create and evaluate Business Models for companies willing to reinvent themselves digitally. The author covers five aspects of digital transformation, but focusing on strategical aspects rather than emergent technologies: customers, competition, value creation, turn data into assets and innovation. For each of these aspects, a different framework is presented for the company to be able to create and maintain its own digital co Great source of information for those who are looking for knowledge to create and evaluate Business Models for companies willing to reinvent themselves digitally. The author covers five aspects of digital transformation, but focusing on strategical aspects rather than emergent technologies: customers, competition, value creation, turn data into assets and innovation. For each of these aspects, a different framework is presented for the company to be able to create and maintain its own digital competition strategy, despite of its size or market segment. By doing this, Rodgers present us with great insights about the news waves of strategic planning, business management, value creation, disruption, innovation and others. His sources and influences are wide. You will find mentions and sharp comments on the thoughts of great authors such as Peter Ducker, Andy Groove, Clayton Christensen and Alexander Osterwalder. Highly recommend not only for business leaders, but also for those who have interest in understand that the Digital Transformation is reshaping the dynamics of the economic relations between organizations and consumers.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Maurício Linhares

    As much as it might sound buzzwordy, this book actually covers a lot of interesting information, including stuff I had no idea about like how the Encyclopedia Britannica has survived the Wikipedia age. The main theme of the book is how we can use technology and the internet to evolve and grow businesses, it starts defining the main focuses companies should have, customers, data, innovation and value then defines some of the ways they can do that: harnessing customer networks (use people's connec As much as it might sound buzzwordy, this book actually covers a lot of interesting information, including stuff I had no idea about like how the Encyclopedia Britannica has survived the Wikipedia age. The main theme of the book is how we can use technology and the internet to evolve and grow businesses, it starts defining the main focuses companies should have, customers, data, innovation and value then defines some of the ways they can do that: harnessing customer networks (use people's connections to grow the business, as word of mouth is still a very effective way to grow), engaging customers in ways that make them be interested in sharing and improving the product is very important and builds community, this also creates a collaboration between the company and customers creating more value. There are multiple examples of companies that made it and those that didn't and how this affected the market.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mike WD

    A good overview of how the digital age is affecting running a business or "pre-digital age" corporations. A lot of tools are discussed as well, although it was dreary to read those paragraphs. Nevertheless, those could definitely be helpful when applied in your own company. Examples were sometimes not covering truly digital solutions or companies, it feels the "digital" perspective is loosened when it suited the situation, making you wonder if this book really is about _digital_ transformation, A good overview of how the digital age is affecting running a business or "pre-digital age" corporations. A lot of tools are discussed as well, although it was dreary to read those paragraphs. Nevertheless, those could definitely be helpful when applied in your own company. Examples were sometimes not covering truly digital solutions or companies, it feels the "digital" perspective is loosened when it suited the situation, making you wonder if this book really is about _digital_ transformation, or the transformation into the current age, with all the insights and solutions this decade has offered. Overall insightful and optimistic book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jolly

    I believe "Digital strategy" is a much more appropriate title for this book, than "Digital transformation". The author has provided practical tools, substantiated through well-known success/failure stories , for digital startups and established companies foraying into digital space. He has also recognised an array of challenges - organisational ability, resource allocation et cetera, which can impede digitalisation in large companies. He builds upon widely used strategy models, proposed by author I believe "Digital strategy" is a much more appropriate title for this book, than "Digital transformation". The author has provided practical tools, substantiated through well-known success/failure stories , for digital startups and established companies foraying into digital space. He has also recognised an array of challenges - organisational ability, resource allocation et cetera, which can impede digitalisation in large companies. He builds upon widely used strategy models, proposed by authors such as Clayton, so as to fit those for today's digital era. I particularly enjoyed reading the stories ranging from encyclopedia to the weather app.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michael McCormick

    I decidedly to read Professor Rogers's textbook on digital transformation because I signed up to take his $450 three hour class on the subject offered through Columbia Business School Executive Education on March 9th, 2021, online. I had read Professor Galinsky's book "Friend & Foe" before taking Professor Galinsky's "The Excellence Equilibrium" course online and having pre-read his book helped me immensely for the class. Both Professor Galinsky's book and class were great and Professor Rogers's I decidedly to read Professor Rogers's textbook on digital transformation because I signed up to take his $450 three hour class on the subject offered through Columbia Business School Executive Education on March 9th, 2021, online. I had read Professor Galinsky's book "Friend & Foe" before taking Professor Galinsky's "The Excellence Equilibrium" course online and having pre-read his book helped me immensely for the class. Both Professor Galinsky's book and class were great and Professor Rogers's book is a great and comprehensive account of how to "rethink your business for the digital age." Since I want to work in healthcare, Professor Rogers's book is extremely relevant.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dolf Haven

    Digital Transformation is all the hype these days and for a good reason: digital technology develops rapidly and has the ability to disrupt markets that previously were dominated by old incumbents. This book gives a good overview of digital transformation for an audience that mostly consists of "old" style companies, rather than startups. If you have read other books on the subject, there is nothing much new in it, though. Examples are plenty, but always seem to come back to Apple, Uber, Amazon a Digital Transformation is all the hype these days and for a good reason: digital technology develops rapidly and has the ability to disrupt markets that previously were dominated by old incumbents. This book gives a good overview of digital transformation for an audience that mostly consists of "old" style companies, rather than startups. If you have read other books on the subject, there is nothing much new in it, though. Examples are plenty, but always seem to come back to Apple, Uber, Amazon and the like, which gets tiring. As an introductory book, it's interesting, though.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Abdulaziz Hasan

    Wow really great book by all measures. Coming from a tech background I always see a solution for an imaginary problem and push it without even the slightest thinking of how this solution fits within the whole value proposition I am presenting. David realty went the highs and lows to cover the mere basic principle of capitalism: to serve customers and in return harvesting the values. The book made me interested in other publications by the author.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Renato Willi

    Great book, resonated a lot with the work I've been doing right now. I'd recommend it for all Transformation Managers, CDO's etc. It has an extensive analysis of Digital Transformations' current scenario, what are the dimensions and some interesting case studies. The last part has some speculative tools to identify and how to deal with disrupters - that I didn't like so much. Great book, resonated a lot with the work I've been doing right now. I'd recommend it for all Transformation Managers, CDO's etc. It has an extensive analysis of Digital Transformations' current scenario, what are the dimensions and some interesting case studies. The last part has some speculative tools to identify and how to deal with disrupters - that I didn't like so much.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tathagat Varma

    This book is a great introduction to Digital Transformation from first principles. Most often, people fall in love with the tech, or simply follow some standard process without really understanding whom is it for. Rogers explains the context without bringing any unnecessary jargon. A must read for all tech professionals.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Steven Carpenter

    All in all a Good Jargon Free explanation of and how to apply Digital Transformation A really interesting read, that correlates with some of my Digitization experience. Toolkits seem very practical. All in all a Good Jargon Free explanation of and how to apply Digital Transformation

  22. 5 out of 5

    RSR Murthy

    A must read for all Managers concerned with business planning and strategy. The book widens once horizon of digital challenges and transformation, from Technology orientation to a Strategic approach. As the author concludes, digital transformation is more about strategy than about technology. The narrative style with many examples makes it even more valuable and easy to understand

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tapan

    Very prescriptive yet with little bit of commonsense it can be applied to create the customized version for your enterprise. First complete no nonsense book on digital transformation. Focuses on How part elaborately

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marcos Alves

    Digital Transformation 101 - a good summary of the subject, with a framework and some additional tools. More advanced readers might find some parts old news but I do recommend for those starting on this area.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Krispijn

    Excellent read. We need new tools to adapt and thrive. Rogers delivers an innovative and enlightening perspective larded with many great examples. Anyone working in marketing, consultancy or business development should read this. This is the way forward.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Juan Jose Dougherty

    Great book It has a different perspective on digital transformation from other books with a more traditional views of it. Great real-life examples and hands-on material to start working

  27. 4 out of 5

    Evert de Ruiter

    (Again not a full review, but it deserves comment...) What a pleasant surprise. This is a properly foundational book. It is really well-researched and appropriately structured. A keeper on the DTx bookshelf.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Hannamari

    A nice introductory walkthough of different phenomena related to digitalization and modern management practices. Also includes a number of simple tools. However, to me, this offered little new and felt like a summary of a number of other books.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Adeola Adesunloye

    A really comprehensive book alot of insights and use cases of digital platform, I found the book to be impressive with it's frameworks and scope, I guess it took a lot of work getting this book ready, it's really work the read A really comprehensive book alot of insights and use cases of digital platform, I found the book to be impressive with it's frameworks and scope, I guess it took a lot of work getting this book ready, it's really work the read

  30. 5 out of 5

    Phillias

    good testimonial, justification, analysis, and framework for transformation of a traditional business. There are better pieces for starting from scratch.

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