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Science Comics: Volcanoes: Fire and Life

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Get ready to explore the depths of the ocean, the farthest reaches of space, and everything in between! Volcanic eruptions, vampire bats, feathered velociraptors, and more await you in SCIENCE COMICS. In a not-so-distant future our world is as cold as a frozen burrito. But can humanity save itself by harnessing a power that dwells inside the Earth? Explode into the world of Get ready to explore the depths of the ocean, the farthest reaches of space, and everything in between! Volcanic eruptions, vampire bats, feathered velociraptors, and more await you in SCIENCE COMICS. In a not-so-distant future our world is as cold as a frozen burrito. But can humanity save itself by harnessing a power that dwells inside the Earth? Explode into the world of geology in Volcanoes: Fire and Life! A lot of magic happens under the Earth's crust. Thanks to magma vents, shifting continental plates, and volcanic eruptions, we know that our planet is alive and in motion. Alongside Aurora, a young explorer, you'll learn that volcanoes are just one of the massively powerful forces at work on our planet. From catastrophic destruction to the creation of new land masses, volcanoes have made their mark on our amazing Earth.


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Get ready to explore the depths of the ocean, the farthest reaches of space, and everything in between! Volcanic eruptions, vampire bats, feathered velociraptors, and more await you in SCIENCE COMICS. In a not-so-distant future our world is as cold as a frozen burrito. But can humanity save itself by harnessing a power that dwells inside the Earth? Explode into the world of Get ready to explore the depths of the ocean, the farthest reaches of space, and everything in between! Volcanic eruptions, vampire bats, feathered velociraptors, and more await you in SCIENCE COMICS. In a not-so-distant future our world is as cold as a frozen burrito. But can humanity save itself by harnessing a power that dwells inside the Earth? Explode into the world of geology in Volcanoes: Fire and Life! A lot of magic happens under the Earth's crust. Thanks to magma vents, shifting continental plates, and volcanic eruptions, we know that our planet is alive and in motion. Alongside Aurora, a young explorer, you'll learn that volcanoes are just one of the massively powerful forces at work on our planet. From catastrophic destruction to the creation of new land masses, volcanoes have made their mark on our amazing Earth.

30 review for Science Comics: Volcanoes: Fire and Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    A little story told in a way to really get nerdy about volcanoes. There has been something happen to Earth so there is permanent winter. Tribes roam the old world looking for anything to burn. They scan in books into a computer to save knowledge before they burn it. A girl finds a book on Volcanoes and believes if they find one, they can find a way to keep warm. I was surprised that is was a compelling story. They did it well. It reminds me of this little series we watched in grade school on the A little story told in a way to really get nerdy about volcanoes. There has been something happen to Earth so there is permanent winter. Tribes roam the old world looking for anything to burn. They scan in books into a computer to save knowledge before they burn it. A girl finds a book on Volcanoes and believes if they find one, they can find a way to keep warm. I was surprised that is was a compelling story. They did it well. It reminds me of this little series we watched in grade school on the card catalog and how to find information. The world sorta ends and there is a little race of humanity trying to survive against this new species. They stumble into a library and somehow the library was frozen in time and she shows them how to look up information to find winning strategies. We loved it as kids. I can see kids enjoying this story and you learn a whole geek ton of stuff about volcanoes. I knew the basics, but it was a great reminder. Fun and entertaining and learning. I’m leaving these younger books out to see if any of them interest my niece. She is enjoying reading graphic novels right now and whatever to keep her reading.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    This book is an unusual mix of fiction and nonfiction. The story revolves around a young girl named Aurora, her brother and sister, and their teacher Dallas. They live on an icebound earth that requires them to spend much of their time looking for fuel to burn to keep their tribe alive. On one such trip, they find their way into a city where they come across a library. In the basement of the library, they discover a bunch of books which they are excited to report as fuel. But they do take the ti This book is an unusual mix of fiction and nonfiction. The story revolves around a young girl named Aurora, her brother and sister, and their teacher Dallas. They live on an icebound earth that requires them to spend much of their time looking for fuel to burn to keep their tribe alive. On one such trip, they find their way into a city where they come across a library. In the basement of the library, they discover a bunch of books which they are excited to report as fuel. But they do take the time to scan each book into their computer so the knowledge isn't lost when the books are burned. While doing this, Aurora comes across a book about volcanoes which interest her so much that she sneaks off and reads it. The rest of the book is a combination of story and fact. Aurora is so excited about what she's read and the possibilities for helping her tribe that she tells her companions all about what she has learned. The reader then learns about types of volcanoes, how they are made, types of eruptions, and other interesting facts about volcanoes. But Aurora's excitement about volcanoes makes her a bit careless of her responsibilities and leads to the others getting really mad at her. And the computer keeps blocking her from accessing additional information. This Science Comics series is a fun way for young readers to learn about real life topics combined in a format that they love. The story mixed with the facts can be interesting. Although I would have liked more background about the characters and their situation. I was a bit confused at times. But this won't stop children from enjoying the book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joy Machen

    When I first picked up this book, I honestly did not think I was going to enjoy it. I don't usually read graphic novels, and I normally don't read science books either. All that to say, I was shocked because I loved it. It is GREAT and I had a hard time putting it down because I wanted to see what happened to the main character, Rory, and her community. The fact that it's a graphic novel made the science learning in it enjoyable and interesting. The story that goes along with it is engaging and When I first picked up this book, I honestly did not think I was going to enjoy it. I don't usually read graphic novels, and I normally don't read science books either. All that to say, I was shocked because I loved it. It is GREAT and I had a hard time putting it down because I wanted to see what happened to the main character, Rory, and her community. The fact that it's a graphic novel made the science learning in it enjoyable and interesting. The story that goes along with it is engaging and the information in it is actually quite fascinating. I also liked that it was easy to follow and understand. I took Earth Science my sophomore year in college and it was surprisingly pretty hard for me. I feel like I actually understand volcanoes now way more than I did that semester. This book is a fun read, but it is also extremely informative and would be so enjoyable to pair with a lesson on volcanoes!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    This did not work for me at all. I enjoy the series and learn so much (favorite was probably the coral reefs) but right from the start I did not connect with the fictional storyline that was going to be woven throughout the discovery of how volcanoes operate so as to save their not-so-distant-future cold selves by using what was right inside the earth. It kind of tainted the entire learning experience of volcanoes unfortunately. It just goes to show that the underlining story does need to work w This did not work for me at all. I enjoy the series and learn so much (favorite was probably the coral reefs) but right from the start I did not connect with the fictional storyline that was going to be woven throughout the discovery of how volcanoes operate so as to save their not-so-distant-future cold selves by using what was right inside the earth. It kind of tainted the entire learning experience of volcanoes unfortunately. It just goes to show that the underlining story does need to work well with the instruction of the science to make it work- this one didn't for me.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    I read this with my kids and they really liked it. They present an interesting storyline, where the futuristic world is in an ice age and the tribe has to find ways to survive the cold. The main character Arora finds a book in an old library about volcanoes and decides to find a volcano and use its heat to save the tribe. The story is compelling enough to get you through the science, and the science is presented in small segments that are put in context with the plot, making it palatable for kid I read this with my kids and they really liked it. They present an interesting storyline, where the futuristic world is in an ice age and the tribe has to find ways to survive the cold. The main character Arora finds a book in an old library about volcanoes and decides to find a volcano and use its heat to save the tribe. The story is compelling enough to get you through the science, and the science is presented in small segments that are put in context with the plot, making it palatable for kids. I look forward to reading the other books in the Science Comics series with my kids.

  6. 4 out of 5

    OpenBookSociety.com

    http://openbooksociety.com/article/sc... Science Comics: Volcanoes Fire and Life Jon Chad ISBN 978-0-9906031-0-8 Brought to you by OBS Reviewer Scott Review: The newest entry into the Science Comics line by First Second Books, is Volcanoes, those frightening, yet magnificent wonders of the world. Jon Chad, weaves a plot into this one, and although the educational value is always there (featuring a glossary and further readings section), the plot comes first, creating a open and closed graphic novel th http://openbooksociety.com/article/sc... Science Comics: Volcanoes Fire and Life Jon Chad ISBN 978-0-9906031-0-8 Brought to you by OBS Reviewer Scott Review: The newest entry into the Science Comics line by First Second Books, is Volcanoes, those frightening, yet magnificent wonders of the world. Jon Chad, weaves a plot into this one, and although the educational value is always there (featuring a glossary and further readings section), the plot comes first, creating a open and closed graphic novel that is remarkably self-contained in its scope, but indispensable in the knowledge it imparts. Throughout Science Comics: Volcanoes, people will become more familiar with both a statement on climate change, and the role volcanoes and geo-thermal heat play in the world. A tightly knitted story interlaces the mountainous (excuse the pun) amount of information about volcanoes – their types, forms, and effects. That this was a well-researched graphic novel is an understatement – to say the least. It is the story, though that caught my interest right away, and what a story it is. Taking place in a second ice age, humans have died out into tribes that plunder the ruins of mankind in search of combustibles, the only means of generating heat and keeping warm. When young Aurora stumbles across the archives of an old library that the adventure starts to take a new twist. Enter the volcano, those mighty untapped sources of plasma, the fourth elemental form – a solid with liquid like properties. Aurora tries to convince her fellow scroungers of the immense value that volcanic heat could bring to the tribe in their quest to survive. This well executed story brings out the science in a natural form; not seemingly thrown in for knowledge acquisition. It’s this type of cutting edge story/science interplay that holds the reader intent through the course of Science Comics: Volcanoes. The artwork is notably European in its style, taking an almost eerie Moebius like effect on the people and environments they are involved in. The lines are clean and deft, well placed on the page and only is a little confusing in its panelation – notably when the most science is thrown at you en masse. Otherwise this is a clean read, with lots of momentum keeping it going. Despite some problems with the placement of information, the story reads easily, and it generally sticks to variants of the tried and true six panel layout. The speech balloons and expository dialogue (about Volcanoes, what else?) are for the most part, well placed and read well. Colors are washed and as faded as the sun in the story which no longer warms the earth the way it used to. All of this combined, give a palette to whet the senses. Combined, the artwork and the story make this a really good read. The no-frills artwork combined with a stellar background story actually makes learning about volcanoes fun. That is how science should be presented. After all if there is no pursuit, there is no gain. And the wealth of material within this graphic novel brings both areas with three on base and a home run. Having read other ‘Science Comics’ titles, this would definitely be at the top of my list for quality, and informative purposes. A finely tuned blend of science and story put this miles above the previous titles and heralds a new beginning of sorts to the ‘Science Comics’ line. For the budding geologist, or for the curious about natures perhaps most destructive course, Science Comics: Volcanoes holds something for you. *OBS would like to thank the publisher for supplying a free copy of this title in exchange for an honest review*

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ellon

    I like that this was told as a story instead of just presenting facts. However, I did think it was a little advanced for a children’s graphic novel. I had trouble keeping up at times.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A desolate world covered in ice. Scattered tribes of humans scavenging for fuel to burn for warmth. Dependence on solar power hampered by frequent cloud cover, which also prevents the sun from warming the Earth's surface. It sounds like something out of a post-apocalyptic movie, but it's actually the setting for a new graphic novel from First Second Books in their Science Comics series. In this installment of the series, Aurora and her siblings are out on a fuel mapping expedition. The mappers ex A desolate world covered in ice. Scattered tribes of humans scavenging for fuel to burn for warmth. Dependence on solar power hampered by frequent cloud cover, which also prevents the sun from warming the Earth's surface. It sounds like something out of a post-apocalyptic movie, but it's actually the setting for a new graphic novel from First Second Books in their Science Comics series. In this installment of the series, Aurora and her siblings are out on a fuel mapping expedition. The mappers explore the barren surface of the earth and look for burnables that can be gathered and hauled back to their tribe. The tribe lives underground and depends on these scavenged items to heat their living space. As they go from building to building the group come across a library. (I know - I cringed just thinking about the fate of those poor books!) Luckily, they have a scanner that digitizes all the books before they are marked for pickup. Aurora spends the night reading one of the books and learns all about volcanoes. The next day she is very excited about the possibility of using geothermal energy to supply heat for the tribe, but her siblings (Luna and Sol) and their leader Pallas don't believe her. How can there be such heat inside the Earth when the surface is frozen? It is up to Aurora to convince them that finding access to that heat is better than spending all their time scavenging for fuel. The idea of sharing science concepts through a graphic format is not new - look at the Magic School Bus and the Max Axiom books for proof of that. This series follows in that tradition. The "hook" for young readers is the futuristic setting and the life or death consequences that depend on Aurora's knowledge of volcanoes. There is typical sibling banter and squabbling, with her brother's obsession over food causing some humorous moments. Aurora's use of an holographic display to share the images from the book and the I-cycles powered by solar cells offer a glimpse of future tech possibilities. While Rory (her nickname), tries to convince the others that geothermal energy still exists to be found, she shows them diagrams of famous volcanoes throughout history and explains the different types of volcanoes and eruptions as well as their causes. Whether they are looking for a book on volcanoes, a story about possible future conditions on Earth, or simply enjoy the graphic novel format, young readers will have fun reading about Aurora and her quest to save her tribe. I read an e-book provided by the publisher through NetGalley.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*

    Chad, John Volcanoes: Fire and Life (Science Comics) 115 pgs. First Second, 2016. $12.99 Content: Language: G (0 swears); Mature Content: G Violence: G This graphic novel combines fiction with non-fiction. Aurora and her family live in a time where earth has changed and the climate has become an endless frozen winter. They spend their days searching for fuel to burn. Before they burn a library of books, they scan them into their computer. But Aurora discovers a book about volcanoes. The more she Chad, John Volcanoes: Fire and Life (Science Comics) 115 pgs. First Second, 2016. $12.99 Content: Language: G (0 swears); Mature Content: G Violence: G This graphic novel combines fiction with non-fiction. Aurora and her family live in a time where earth has changed and the climate has become an endless frozen winter. They spend their days searching for fuel to burn. Before they burn a library of books, they scan them into their computer. But Aurora discovers a book about volcanoes. The more she reads the more she is convinced that they may be solution to her tribe’s problems. She educates her family and friends about volcanoes in an effort to make her case. I normally love informational books that use a story to make learning more palatable but this one is just a tad off base for a number of reasons. The story is very intriguing, sort of dystopian survival, but when the information component about volcanoes comes into play its serious information vomit. Tons and tons of technical information which is off putting as it instantly reveals that the whole book is a sugar coated trick. Now tons of technical information isn’t a barrier to true interest, but the only students in my school who are super excited about volcanoes are Kindergartner's and first graders, though it is 5th grade curriculum. This might work for middle school ESL or lower level readers who could use the visuals to give textual clues when being asked to learn about science topics. I had my eye on purchasing this entire series, but I think (with some small exceptions) the factual information has a cut and paste from a complex textbook feel. EL, MS – OPTIONAL Reviewer: Stephanie Elementary School Librarian & Author.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    This cool--well, cold, actually--graphic novel provides more than you ever wanted to know about volcanoes. It does so in engaging fashion with a story line concerning Aurora, a young girl who is out searching for possible fuel sources with her siblings Sol and Luna, and their teacher Pallas. The story takes place on Earth in the future when life is bleak and cold without the sun's influence. While scavenging for fuel of any sort, they stumble upon an archive of books in a library basement and sc This cool--well, cold, actually--graphic novel provides more than you ever wanted to know about volcanoes. It does so in engaging fashion with a story line concerning Aurora, a young girl who is out searching for possible fuel sources with her siblings Sol and Luna, and their teacher Pallas. The story takes place on Earth in the future when life is bleak and cold without the sun's influence. While scavenging for fuel of any sort, they stumble upon an archive of books in a library basement and scan the books for their information before planning to burn them. Aurora becomes intrigued with the possibility of heat from the Earth's core as provided by a volcano. Although Pallas and the others are naysayers and doubt that Aurora's ideas could have any validity, as it turns out she is right, and the Earth may still have enough heat lying deep within for their needs. The book blends the information about volcanoes and how they can destroy whatever lies within their reach while also creating new land masses within Aurora's story deftly and without it seeming to be an add-on. I liked all the interesting volcano snippets that were provided here, including a vocabulary section recounting all the words introduced in the book. Not only does this book provide a helpful introduction to the topic, but it also provides enough new information for someone familiar with volcanoes so that there would be something new to be learned by just about anyone. This is a must-have title in a great elementary and intermediate series for science classrooms. There are even observations about the personalities of humans are like different types of volcanoes.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Science Comics: Volcanoes: Fire and Life by Jon Chad is part of a middlegrade comic series covering a variety of science topics. In Volcanoes: Fire and Life, readers follow Aurora as she attempts to convince her mission leader that volcanoes do exist, and that the Earth’s natural phenomenon could solve the fuel problems that leave her tribe struggling to keep warm in future Earth’s ice age. The science fiction setting helps break up thorough, engaging infographics, giving readers a chance to abs Science Comics: Volcanoes: Fire and Life by Jon Chad is part of a middlegrade comic series covering a variety of science topics. In Volcanoes: Fire and Life, readers follow Aurora as she attempts to convince her mission leader that volcanoes do exist, and that the Earth’s natural phenomenon could solve the fuel problems that leave her tribe struggling to keep warm in future Earth’s ice age. The science fiction setting helps break up thorough, engaging infographics, giving readers a chance to absorb what they’re reading. Aurora’s infectious enthusiasm encourages readers to learn with her about plate subduction, chemosynthesis, and even the microscopic characteristics of volcanic ash. Very specific vocabulary (pyroclastic flow; mafic v. felsic, the geotherm) and detailed diagrams lay a strong foundation for understanding Earth’s physical forces. Where many books explain the general concepts and list types of volcanoes, Volcanoes: Fire and Life presents text-book level detail (and better!). I’ll admit: there’s so much information that even I learned something! I especially loved the inclusion of chemical formulas (Si, CO2, SO2, etc.) and historic volcanic eruptions (Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Vesuvius, etc.). Jon Chad takes full advantage of the comic book format to bring amazingly thorough information to life, making it just as exciting as the story. My son enjoyed reading over this multiple times. I highly recommend VOlcanoes: Fire and Life as an engaging learning resource for self-motivated learners who are ready to go beyond the basics.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    I like to vet out new books I think my girls might be interested in. This was good nerdy fun. The plot is set sometime in the not too distant future where the world appears to be in an ice age. Our hero is one of three kids undergoing training for fuel mapping (looking for burnables). The group finds a bookshop in which they scan them all into their database before turning them over to be burned for warmth. One girl stays up all night reading books about volcanoes. The next morning she erupts wi I like to vet out new books I think my girls might be interested in. This was good nerdy fun. The plot is set sometime in the not too distant future where the world appears to be in an ice age. Our hero is one of three kids undergoing training for fuel mapping (looking for burnables). The group finds a bookshop in which they scan them all into their database before turning them over to be burned for warmth. One girl stays up all night reading books about volcanoes. The next morning she erupts with information and excitement that volcanoes that she shares with the group. The information is explained in simple language with on-point illustrations making the information easier to digest. Packed within the context of the plot comes a surprising amount of information about volcanoes including, plate tectonics, lava viscosity and composition, famous eruptions, volcano types and much more. All in all, I found the book clever, fun, and informative with a nice story arc. However, I feel like my girls would be put off by the sheer volume of information. They'd feel like they were at school or "being taught", similar to the reaction I get when I try to make broccoli look fun and delicious by arranging it fancifully on the plate with yummy dips. So this would be great for kids with more than a passing interest in volcanoes--you know, the kind that already like broccoli.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Carla Johnson-Hicks

    There is a lot of information in this book. In this book the earth being in an almost ice age because the sun's heat is not reaching it. The human's set out to find fuel in a desolate world. When they end up in a library they use a piece of equipment to harvest the knowledge and stories before burning the books. One of the books is about volcanoes and when Rory reads it, she is convinced that they should be able to find another way to heat the Earth. The book then gives information about tectoni There is a lot of information in this book. In this book the earth being in an almost ice age because the sun's heat is not reaching it. The human's set out to find fuel in a desolate world. When they end up in a library they use a piece of equipment to harvest the knowledge and stories before burning the books. One of the books is about volcanoes and when Rory reads it, she is convinced that they should be able to find another way to heat the Earth. The book then gives information about tectonic plates, types of volcanoes, the earth's crust, lava and lots of other information about Volcanoes, fire and life. Of course the others do not believe her until they see steam coming from a crack. This could be overload for some readers but it is an interesting way to present the information to middle grade students. I received a copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    Another Science Comics entry featuring a strange framing story, but at least this story is actually really intriguing and could stand on its own aside from the cool volcano info. A young girl, her family, and her teacher trudge through a post-apocalyptic frozen future, searching for fuel to keep their fires lit. It's pretty bleak! The girl discovers a book about volcanoes and, through some sleuthing and a confrontation with her teacher, realizes that there's more to this frozen future than meets Another Science Comics entry featuring a strange framing story, but at least this story is actually really intriguing and could stand on its own aside from the cool volcano info. A young girl, her family, and her teacher trudge through a post-apocalyptic frozen future, searching for fuel to keep their fires lit. It's pretty bleak! The girl discovers a book about volcanoes and, through some sleuthing and a confrontation with her teacher, realizes that there's more to this frozen future than meets the eye - and maybe a solution to their problems hidden in volcanic knowledge. With the story being relatively propulsive, the volcano-fact interludes end up feeling pretty dry. The information is great and, let's be real, giant, exploding fire hills are inherently fascinating. But to really understand volcanoes, you have to power through a far too many pages on rocks and plate tectonics. Not exactly thrilling.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Edmunds

    Science Comics is a great series - combining an exciting fictional story with real-life facts about the world around us. In this book, Aurora and her family live in a world that is all ice. Something has happened to the world and everything is frozen. Aurora searches each day for fuel to stay warm. Surely there is a better way to survive than scavenging. On one outing, Aurora learns about things called "volcanoes". Maybe she can find one of these volcanoes and help her people not only get warm, Science Comics is a great series - combining an exciting fictional story with real-life facts about the world around us. In this book, Aurora and her family live in a world that is all ice. Something has happened to the world and everything is frozen. Aurora searches each day for fuel to stay warm. Surely there is a better way to survive than scavenging. On one outing, Aurora learns about things called "volcanoes". Maybe she can find one of these volcanoes and help her people not only get warm, but have a consistent source of energy. Volcanic facts and information is scattered throughout the story at regular intervals - just enough at a time to teach but not too much to weigh things down. Sure to be a hit with most students.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Earl

    Science Comics continues to impress with their latest installment- this time focusing on volcanoes. I’ve enjoyed Jon Chad’s other works (his Leo Geo series) and looked forward to reading more of his storytelling style mixed with nonfiction elements. In a future frozen world, Aurora and her tribe must rummage through people’s rubble to find things to burn for their survival. She feels there must be another solution to their problems. After stumbling upon books on volcanoes in a deserted library, Science Comics continues to impress with their latest installment- this time focusing on volcanoes. I’ve enjoyed Jon Chad’s other works (his Leo Geo series) and looked forward to reading more of his storytelling style mixed with nonfiction elements. In a future frozen world, Aurora and her tribe must rummage through people’s rubble to find things to burn for their survival. She feels there must be another solution to their problems. After stumbling upon books on volcanoes in a deserted library, she’s convinced she’s found the answer. Readers will learn what she learned as she tries to get her team on board with her recent discovery. This is a great example of educational entertainment!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Tanner

    I really wanted to like this graphic novel about volcanoes, but the premise really threw me-it's an ice age and people are scavenging the world looking for things to burn so they can stay warm? The sun is gone as a source of power (but apparently not light because they can still see to scavenge) and they know what bread is, which since it's a plant sourced product, I wonder how they would grow such a thing. Ok, enough already. The science information about the volcanoes was interesting and inter I really wanted to like this graphic novel about volcanoes, but the premise really threw me-it's an ice age and people are scavenging the world looking for things to burn so they can stay warm? The sun is gone as a source of power (but apparently not light because they can still see to scavenge) and they know what bread is, which since it's a plant sourced product, I wonder how they would grow such a thing. Ok, enough already. The science information about the volcanoes was interesting and interestingly presented, but the backstory felt weird so it was not my favorite.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kellee Moye

    Science Comics: Volcanoes by Jon Chad was an interesting combination of science fiction and informational nonfiction. The story takes place in the future where a new ice age has set in and a society is looking for heat. When Aurora discovers a book about volcanoes she cannot stop teaching her siblings and guide about them because she feels like they can save their civilization. It is through Aurora that we learn about volcanoes in a very detailed way. I think the author did a good job combining Science Comics: Volcanoes by Jon Chad was an interesting combination of science fiction and informational nonfiction. The story takes place in the future where a new ice age has set in and a society is looking for heat. When Aurora discovers a book about volcanoes she cannot stop teaching her siblings and guide about them because she feels like they can save their civilization. It is through Aurora that we learn about volcanoes in a very detailed way. I think the author did a good job combining nonfiction and fiction, and you definitely learn a lot about volcanoes during the story.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

    Some good information about volcanoes, and diagrams certainly help, but some of the terminology could have used more explanation and the framing narrative was so logically inconsistent that it got on my nerves. Also, while it's good to not try to scare kids, I feel like they over downplayed the dangers. (Also not big on the implying that volcanoes created the plaster casts pictured in Pompeii-the ash surrounded the bodies, they decayed and left a hole in the ash that archaeologists filled with pl Some good information about volcanoes, and diagrams certainly help, but some of the terminology could have used more explanation and the framing narrative was so logically inconsistent that it got on my nerves. Also, while it's good to not try to scare kids, I feel like they over downplayed the dangers. (Also not big on the implying that volcanoes created the plaster casts pictured in Pompeii-the ash surrounded the bodies, they decayed and left a hole in the ash that archaeologists filled with plaster, minor detail, but still.)

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kiri

    Great little graphic novel set in the frozen future. A trio of kids and their chaperone are hunting around for sources of fuel to burn to help keep their tribe alive. By chance they discover the concept of volcanoes, and bit by bit fascinating details (and images) unfold. Could volcanoes help save their tribe somehow? Read it to find out. I enjoyed the pictures and the bits of volcano history, mechanics, and geochemistry. I couldn't quite get into the futuristic world (didn't seem plausible) nor Great little graphic novel set in the frozen future. A trio of kids and their chaperone are hunting around for sources of fuel to burn to help keep their tribe alive. By chance they discover the concept of volcanoes, and bit by bit fascinating details (and images) unfold. Could volcanoes help save their tribe somehow? Read it to find out. I enjoyed the pictures and the bits of volcano history, mechanics, and geochemistry. I couldn't quite get into the futuristic world (didn't seem plausible) nor the screechiness of the kids, but I'm probably not the target audience. :)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brandi Rae Fong

    I wanted to love this a bit more than I did. There's a lot of information crammed into this title, and at times it seemed the balance between the images of a comic, and the text of a non-fiction book were a bit off, particularly when the author was trying to explain some of the more complicated aspects of volcanoes. I definitely think there is an audience for this among my patrons, and will be giving the series another try with a different title. I wanted to love this a bit more than I did. There's a lot of information crammed into this title, and at times it seemed the balance between the images of a comic, and the text of a non-fiction book were a bit off, particularly when the author was trying to explain some of the more complicated aspects of volcanoes. I definitely think there is an audience for this among my patrons, and will be giving the series another try with a different title.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Donna Sanders

    Received from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. I did not like this book. I found the pages visually to busy, the language way to technical and at times confusing. Not sure what age you this is intended for but with the techy language I won't recommend this to anyone under the age of 10 or even 12. But as it stands right now, I would not recommend. Received from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. I did not like this book. I found the pages visually to busy, the language way to technical and at times confusing. Not sure what age you this is intended for but with the techy language I won't recommend this to anyone under the age of 10 or even 12. But as it stands right now, I would not recommend.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alec Longstreth

    A great framing story kept me engaged while I learned a lot of information about volcanoes. Tons of great diagrams and drawings get across lots of complicated ideas in a very effective way. I'm looking forward to checking out more of these Science Comics. A great framing story kept me engaged while I learned a lot of information about volcanoes. Tons of great diagrams and drawings get across lots of complicated ideas in a very effective way. I'm looking forward to checking out more of these Science Comics.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mary Anne

    Lots of great, accessible scientific info woven into this story of people struggling to find fuel sources on a frozen planet. A discovery of an ancient library with books about volcanoes, sends one curious explorer searching for a possible heat source!

  25. 5 out of 5

    P.

    This entry in the Science Comics line is so great! The post-climate-apocalypse storyline is a perfect framing device and keeps things from getting too dry. And I learned a lot about volcanoes. Definitely more than I ever learned in school. The art is sweeping and detailed and also fun.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I thoroughly enjoy the Science Comics line and this was another fascinating exploration. With a different but fun framing device, the information and the infectious presentation flow naturally. Art is detailed but not overbearing with colors that take advantage of the necessary reds and yellows.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

    I like the addition of non-fiction graphic to the nominees for the Mass Children's Book Award. The dystopic frozen setting drives the residents to find burnable items but one girl is convinced there's a better way to find heat after she reads a book about volcanoes. I like the addition of non-fiction graphic to the nominees for the Mass Children's Book Award. The dystopic frozen setting drives the residents to find burnable items but one girl is convinced there's a better way to find heat after she reads a book about volcanoes.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Leigh Anne

    SEE-IT Award nominee, giving all 5 stars to avoid spoilers, proper review post-award.

  29. 5 out of 5

    wildct2003

    Good volcano info, but the fictional storyline interfered with my reading experience. A better, realistic storyline could have been chosen.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    I loved learning about volcanoes but I wasn't interested in the future frozen earth part. Wonderful artwork of course! I loved learning about volcanoes but I wasn't interested in the future frozen earth part. Wonderful artwork of course!

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