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In-Between Days: A Memoir About Living with Cancer

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2016 Governor General's Literary Award Finalist 2017 Kobo Emerging Writer Prize Winner 2017 Joe Shuster Award Nominee Teva Harrison was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer at the age of 37. In this brilliant and inspiring graphic memoir, she documents through comic illustration and short personal essays what it means to live with the disease. She confronts with heartbreak 2016 Governor General's Literary Award Finalist 2017 Kobo Emerging Writer Prize Winner 2017 Joe Shuster Award Nominee Teva Harrison was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer at the age of 37. In this brilliant and inspiring graphic memoir, she documents through comic illustration and short personal essays what it means to live with the disease. She confronts with heartbreaking honesty the crises of identity that cancer brings: a lifelong vegetarian, Teva agrees to use experimental drugs that have been tested on animals. She struggles to reconcile her long-term goals with an uncertain future, balancing the innate sadness of cancer with everyday acts of hope and wonder. She also examines those quiet moments of helplessness and loving with her husband, her family, and her friends, while they all adjust to the new normal. Ultimately, In-Between Days is redemptive and uplifting, reminding each one of us of how beautiful life is, and what a gift.


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2016 Governor General's Literary Award Finalist 2017 Kobo Emerging Writer Prize Winner 2017 Joe Shuster Award Nominee Teva Harrison was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer at the age of 37. In this brilliant and inspiring graphic memoir, she documents through comic illustration and short personal essays what it means to live with the disease. She confronts with heartbreak 2016 Governor General's Literary Award Finalist 2017 Kobo Emerging Writer Prize Winner 2017 Joe Shuster Award Nominee Teva Harrison was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer at the age of 37. In this brilliant and inspiring graphic memoir, she documents through comic illustration and short personal essays what it means to live with the disease. She confronts with heartbreaking honesty the crises of identity that cancer brings: a lifelong vegetarian, Teva agrees to use experimental drugs that have been tested on animals. She struggles to reconcile her long-term goals with an uncertain future, balancing the innate sadness of cancer with everyday acts of hope and wonder. She also examines those quiet moments of helplessness and loving with her husband, her family, and her friends, while they all adjust to the new normal. Ultimately, In-Between Days is redemptive and uplifting, reminding each one of us of how beautiful life is, and what a gift.

30 review for In-Between Days: A Memoir About Living with Cancer

  1. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Mitchell

    I spent most of this book either crying, or screen-shotting the pages (read on my iPad), so I wouldn't forget all of the experiences Teva described that are the exact same as my own. Also living with Stage IV, the feeling of hope-turned-sadness-turned-anger is so real for me. If you ever want a glimpse into my life, or anyone living with this incurable disease, read this book. It'll break your heart but you'll come out more compassionate, guaranteed. **after reading a second time I cried less (ma I spent most of this book either crying, or screen-shotting the pages (read on my iPad), so I wouldn't forget all of the experiences Teva described that are the exact same as my own. Also living with Stage IV, the feeling of hope-turned-sadness-turned-anger is so real for me. If you ever want a glimpse into my life, or anyone living with this incurable disease, read this book. It'll break your heart but you'll come out more compassionate, guaranteed. **after reading a second time I cried less (maybe I have more gotten used to the idea) but felt more. I cried through the sad parts but didn’t pay enough attention to the hopeful. This is a book I will re-read again and again.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Canadian Reader

    Teva Harrison has written a delicate, beautiful, and honest memoir, interspersed with comics. (I had heard that this was a graphic memoir, but that is not strictly true. There is a nice balance of visuals and text.) Diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer at age 37, she had experienced deep, inexplicable bone pain for months before the painful breast lump pointed to what was really going on. Even though she had a family history of reproductive cancers--a great aunt and aunt who had died of metas Teva Harrison has written a delicate, beautiful, and honest memoir, interspersed with comics. (I had heard that this was a graphic memoir, but that is not strictly true. There is a nice balance of visuals and text.) Diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer at age 37, she had experienced deep, inexplicable bone pain for months before the painful breast lump pointed to what was really going on. Even though she had a family history of reproductive cancers--a great aunt and aunt who had died of metastatic breast cancers and a maternal grandmother who survived 3 cancers (Ashkenazi Jewish genetics explain some of this), Teva's doctors missed her cancer in its early stages. By the time she was diagnosed, she was stage IV. The cancer was in her bones and subsequently moved to her liver. Teva addresses the fear, the anxiety, the sickness that comes with the treatments she receives, the pain, the treatment-induced menopause and sexual dysfunction, and her profound love for her husband and for life. Plainly, this is not an easy read, but Teva's love of life provides a balance of sorts against the pain and sadness of the story and its reminder that we all are mortal, after all.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    A kind of hybrid prose and comics/cartoons memoir about the author's being diagnosed with (incurable) metastatic breast cancer at the age of only 37. One page has images, the next has an anecdote or reflection, and I guess I might have preferred more of one than the other. I wasn't a fan of the illustrations (give her a break, maybe? While she calls herself an artist, this is her first foray into cartooning), but also in a way--I know this sounds crazy--I actually might have preferred her illust A kind of hybrid prose and comics/cartoons memoir about the author's being diagnosed with (incurable) metastatic breast cancer at the age of only 37. One page has images, the next has an anecdote or reflection, and I guess I might have preferred more of one than the other. I wasn't a fan of the illustrations (give her a break, maybe? While she calls herself an artist, this is her first foray into cartooning), but also in a way--I know this sounds crazy--I actually might have preferred her illustrating her struggles, focusing on the images to convey her experiences--to her prose. But I can say if you have cancer or know someone close to you that has cancer, this could be an important book for you. It has a very high Goodreads rating so far, so lots of people love it, find solace and fellow-feeling in it. A quick glance at some of the reviews confirms this, too. I don't have cancer (I think) though I have a lot of experience with family and friends who have or have had it. I also have read a number of cancer memoirs and specifically graphic memoirs about living with cancer and thought this was good, honest, real, useful, pretty engaging. And sad, of course, though she is hopeful her team can turn "incurable" into "chronic condition."

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laurie Siblock

    I am living with Stage 3 Ovarian Cancer, currently in remission. My preferable term for "in remission" is "cured". Teva describes my own experience so perfectly that I want to buy her book for everyone I know and when I give it to them I can say, "This is exactly what I'm going through". Although I have to acknowledge that, while Teva's Stage 4 Metastatic Breast cancer is incurable, my remission has a chance of really turning into "cured"; if I can make it to the 5-years-after-treatment stage wi I am living with Stage 3 Ovarian Cancer, currently in remission. My preferable term for "in remission" is "cured". Teva describes my own experience so perfectly that I want to buy her book for everyone I know and when I give it to them I can say, "This is exactly what I'm going through". Although I have to acknowledge that, while Teva's Stage 4 Metastatic Breast cancer is incurable, my remission has a chance of really turning into "cured"; if I can make it to the 5-years-after-treatment stage without a recurrence. I'm told that after 5 years, if the cancer hasn't come back, you have the same odds as anyone else of getting cancer again. I don't know if that is true or not, but I'm pinning my hopes on it. Don't correct me if I'm wrong, pretty please. Thank you, Teva for being brave and being so open, public and honest with your experience. Your drawings were delightful and I avidly read In-Between Days in almost one sitting, interrupted only by sleep, a sleep in which I almost got up at 3:00 in the morning to finish your book. Your book is going to make a lot of difference to people living with cancer and those who love and support them. <3

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sharyl

    Teva Harrison's wonderful, touching work of art about her life, before and after her diagnosis of Stage 4 metastatic breast cancer, at the age of thirty-seven. Teva is an inspiration to everyone, with her profound expressions of living life to its maximum. I would recommend this to absolutely anyone. I never would have found out about her on my own--I'm thankful for my bookish friends! And--she has a blog. Teva Harrison's wonderful, touching work of art about her life, before and after her diagnosis of Stage 4 metastatic breast cancer, at the age of thirty-seven. Teva is an inspiration to everyone, with her profound expressions of living life to its maximum. I would recommend this to absolutely anyone. I never would have found out about her on my own--I'm thankful for my bookish friends! And--she has a blog.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sardonyx

    Goodread's rating scale is 0 (did not like it) to 5 (it was amazing). I gave it a 5, because I've been reading it since yesterday and my stomach has been in knots and my eyes on the verge of tears since I started, heck, even as I write this review. Teva's honest descriptions of what her life is like living with metastases cancer just broke my heart into a million pieces as I read it. It gave me some serious insights and better understanding of what someone with cancer experiences. I wish her wel Goodread's rating scale is 0 (did not like it) to 5 (it was amazing). I gave it a 5, because I've been reading it since yesterday and my stomach has been in knots and my eyes on the verge of tears since I started, heck, even as I write this review. Teva's honest descriptions of what her life is like living with metastases cancer just broke my heart into a million pieces as I read it. It gave me some serious insights and better understanding of what someone with cancer experiences. I wish her well in her continued journey fighting, surviving it and living her life as fully as she can!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    Holy crap. Will have to take a little longer to process Teva's book and what makes it so special, but wow. Met her when she was one of the featured authors of my local authors festival, and only picked up the book after I saw her on a panel. Now that I've read it, I need to meet and speak with her again. It's just lovely. Holy crap. Will have to take a little longer to process Teva's book and what makes it so special, but wow. Met her when she was one of the featured authors of my local authors festival, and only picked up the book after I saw her on a panel. Now that I've read it, I need to meet and speak with her again. It's just lovely.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Regina

    My daughter won this book on Goodreads and passed it on to me to read. As a breast cancer survivor, I could relate to everything the author shares in her memoir. I loved how honest she is about her experiences and thoughts as she deals with metastatic breast cancer. Thanks to Teva Harrison for sharing her journey, and showing how to find beauty and hope while living with this disease.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    I feel like Teva Harrison is a friend and an advocate even though she has no idea who I am. This book is fiercely honest. It's gentle, too. If you know someone with cancer or are someone with cancer, In Between Days might take away some lonely. I feel like Teva Harrison is a friend and an advocate even though she has no idea who I am. This book is fiercely honest. It's gentle, too. If you know someone with cancer or are someone with cancer, In Between Days might take away some lonely.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Suzze Tiernan

    Hard to read, yet so full of hope. I pray for the author and anyone else living day to day with cancer.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Liv

    So, this will sound silly, but I honestly didn't realize that this was a memoir about living with cancer when I purchased it. The purple text on the cover doesn't really pop out, and my thought process was literally, "oh, here's that comic by the woman from my work, I never met her but a lot of people I work with knew her - she died recently... I should give it a go", and I popped it in my bag without looking too closely. My father passed away of terminal cancer last year, so reading this was ac So, this will sound silly, but I honestly didn't realize that this was a memoir about living with cancer when I purchased it. The purple text on the cover doesn't really pop out, and my thought process was literally, "oh, here's that comic by the woman from my work, I never met her but a lot of people I work with knew her - she died recently... I should give it a go", and I popped it in my bag without looking too closely. My father passed away of terminal cancer last year, so reading this was actually kind of a mild emotional mine-field for me. "Was he thinking these things? Did he go through that? I know he was on a lot of medication for pain but wow I hope it wasn't this bad..." It's obviously pretty different experiences between an elderly man and a young woman. But then I've also been going through a lot MYSELF about figuring out how to make the most of the years I have left (not that I'm ill, but I'm also not immortal) and so much of Teva's thoughts seemed personally relevant (although I acknowledge I am very lucky to be healthy and looking at these questions much longer-term). The illustrations are great and the pairing with text works very well. It's not a happy read, but it is an interesting one, and it feels somehow like you are honouring her memory by reading her words and becoming part of her legacy.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This was a very moving book. I definitely shouldn't have read this in one sitting, just before bed. The BRCA1 mutation runs in my family, and this book had me lying awake for a long time, thinking about the women in my family. I have a few friends who are currently living with stage 4 breast cancer, and this book helped me understand how they must be feeling. This was a very moving book. I definitely shouldn't have read this in one sitting, just before bed. The BRCA1 mutation runs in my family, and this book had me lying awake for a long time, thinking about the women in my family. I have a few friends who are currently living with stage 4 breast cancer, and this book helped me understand how they must be feeling.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Carney

    I wish I could give this book a 3.5 star rating but can't. It is really good and raw but something about the writing style didn't quite click with me. Many of the passages are painful, sad, and eye-opening and I still recommend this book especially to people who enjoy graphic novels. Quick read too- I read it in a day throughout my weekend of nonstop reading haha. I wish I could give this book a 3.5 star rating but can't. It is really good and raw but something about the writing style didn't quite click with me. Many of the passages are painful, sad, and eye-opening and I still recommend this book especially to people who enjoy graphic novels. Quick read too- I read it in a day throughout my weekend of nonstop reading haha.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Spiegel

    I read cancer books for fun.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kari

    Given to me by the author's sister - this graphic novel memoir about being diagnosed with cancer at age 37 shows heart from the first frame. I didn't know about Teva's journey before reading this - but felt like she took my hand and led me thru her world... I wish I had seen her while she was in Portland on the book tour because she felt like a friend by the books end... Given to me by the author's sister - this graphic novel memoir about being diagnosed with cancer at age 37 shows heart from the first frame. I didn't know about Teva's journey before reading this - but felt like she took my hand and led me thru her world... I wish I had seen her while she was in Portland on the book tour because she felt like a friend by the books end...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tova

    While I think this book would be great, I feel as if it's going to be too triggering personally. While I think this book would be great, I feel as if it's going to be too triggering personally.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shelley Gibbs

    A heartbreakingly raw, yet beautifully hopeful, graphic memoir about living with incurable metastatic breast cancer.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    I liked the creative format the author used for her story and expression of her experience. It’s raw, made me think a lot about mortality in the face of cancer through the author’s journey and without. Her story and the stories of her family members are full of hope, survival and the will to live.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Elda Pappadà

    This book was very inspiring. At first, I was uncertain whether I wanted to read her memoir, but I did not feel sad as I read it. In fact, it helped me understand what people who are dying from cancer go through and re-established what life meant to me. I think this memoir is relatable to anyone suffering or recovering from an illness, as well as those who know someone in a similar situation. A very profound, honest, moving piece. Her artwork illustrations were a nice addition and her writing wa This book was very inspiring. At first, I was uncertain whether I wanted to read her memoir, but I did not feel sad as I read it. In fact, it helped me understand what people who are dying from cancer go through and re-established what life meant to me. I think this memoir is relatable to anyone suffering or recovering from an illness, as well as those who know someone in a similar situation. A very profound, honest, moving piece. Her artwork illustrations were a nice addition and her writing was great.

  20. 4 out of 5

    rabble.ca

    http://rabble.ca/books/reviews/2016/0... Review by Lauren Scott "I occupy the liminal spaces, slipping between unnoticed. The hours of cancer are strange. MRIs at 3:00 a.m., pain at 2:00 a.m., capable one day, incapable the next. It's like living in the shadows," writes Teva Harrison in her debut graphic memoir In-between Days, which chronicles her life with cancer. "And so I take the spaces nobody claims and I occupy them in the best way I know how: living life with a sense of wonder and delight. http://rabble.ca/books/reviews/2016/0... Review by Lauren Scott "I occupy the liminal spaces, slipping between unnoticed. The hours of cancer are strange. MRIs at 3:00 a.m., pain at 2:00 a.m., capable one day, incapable the next. It's like living in the shadows," writes Teva Harrison in her debut graphic memoir In-between Days, which chronicles her life with cancer. "And so I take the spaces nobody claims and I occupy them in the best way I know how: living life with a sense of wonder and delight." In-between Days begins like this, establishing Harrison's jovial voice and wistful approach to life, despite being in a situation most would find disheartening. At 37, Harrison was diagnosed with stage IV metastatic breast cancer -- cancer that has spread to multiple organs and is incredibily difficult to cure -- after years of unexplainable pain and constant reassurance from her doctors that she was healthy. According to the Metastatic Breast Cancer Network, only seven per cent of breast cancer research funding in North America and the United Kingdom went to metastatic cancer research between 2000 and 2013. The majority of research grants are put towards curing cancer. Since metastatic cancer is currently largely incurable, the focus for these patients becomes to prolong life and promote a better quality of living. Read more here: http://rabble.ca/books/reviews/2016/0...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    How do you write about cancer? How do you write about incurable cancer? And how do you write about Stage IV cancer? Teva, the author, approaches with sadness, and thoughtfulness, and the thoughts that one things when faced with all that. She is an atheist. She joins a group of other stage IV cancer patients and finds she doesn't relate. She doesn't believe in the afterlife. She believes in kindness. This book isn't so much a story of her life, but thoughts on that mortality of her life. How do you How do you write about cancer? How do you write about incurable cancer? And how do you write about Stage IV cancer? Teva, the author, approaches with sadness, and thoughtfulness, and the thoughts that one things when faced with all that. She is an atheist. She joins a group of other stage IV cancer patients and finds she doesn't relate. She doesn't believe in the afterlife. She believes in kindness. This book isn't so much a story of her life, but thoughts on that mortality of her life. How do you explain that your life is made up of fighting for your life, without making that all the people think of you? When she does small talk, what does she say? Her illness is not visible. No one gives her their seat on the subway. Very striking book. Dying of cancer is not a fun thing, and there is no real fun in this. Just insight, and thoughtfulness. The cartoons are mixed with short stories about what each cartoon means. This book is for those curious about how people live with cancer. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alexis

    I've never read something quite like this before. Teva Harrison was in her 30s when she was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer, which is incurable. (There are different types of breast cancer and metastatic will spread throughout your body). Most people don't know that there are different types of breast cancer, and metastatic receives a very low level of all the funds allocated to breast cancer. Anyway, this is a heartbreaking, honest and beautiful graphic memoir that talks about life and l I've never read something quite like this before. Teva Harrison was in her 30s when she was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer, which is incurable. (There are different types of breast cancer and metastatic will spread throughout your body). Most people don't know that there are different types of breast cancer, and metastatic receives a very low level of all the funds allocated to breast cancer. Anyway, this is a heartbreaking, honest and beautiful graphic memoir that talks about life and living with metastatic breast cancer. It's a short book. Teva started drawing illustrations to deal with her illness and she writes a short blurb on the page after the illustration. This is a beautiful, painful and necessary book. I wish her much success with it. Highly recommended.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laura Frey (Reading in Bed)

    I actually wanted more illustration, and less prose, from this graphic novel, which is usually the opposite of how I feel. 2.5 stars. There were certain sections I loved, like the tribute to the female family members the author lost to cancer, but some of the sections were boring. The drawing style wasn't really my thing. I actually wanted more illustration, and less prose, from this graphic novel, which is usually the opposite of how I feel. 2.5 stars. There were certain sections I loved, like the tribute to the female family members the author lost to cancer, but some of the sections were boring. The drawing style wasn't really my thing.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Devon

    What a stunning book. I loved every vignette. I can't even begin to review properly because I feel like anything I say will pale in comparison to how well written each piece was. It's authentic and self-aware in a way I aspire to and I just feel grateful to have had this book given to me so that I had the chance to read it. What a stunning book. I loved every vignette. I can't even begin to review properly because I feel like anything I say will pale in comparison to how well written each piece was. It's authentic and self-aware in a way I aspire to and I just feel grateful to have had this book given to me so that I had the chance to read it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    This raw and honest book should be required reading for anyone dealing with a cancer diagnosis, especially those who are terminal. As a breast cancer survivor, I could relate to a lot of the situations that Teva Harrison writes about.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amy Stuart

    A stunning, moving, beautifully drawn and written memoir about the author's devastating diagnosis with metastatic breast cancer at the age of only 37. A book about cancer and fear and life and love that is at its core about hope. READ IT!!! A stunning, moving, beautifully drawn and written memoir about the author's devastating diagnosis with metastatic breast cancer at the age of only 37. A book about cancer and fear and life and love that is at its core about hope. READ IT!!!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Teva Harrison is diagnosed with a hereditary metastasized cancer when she is in her 30s. To help cope with her illness she drew pictures which she shared with her oncology team. With each picture she includes text that honestly expresses her feelings, emotions, fears, and joys.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rach

    A simple and honest illustrated memoir of Teva's reality of living with cancer. She doesn't shy away from the hard parts, but also takes time to highlight the ways she holds on to her hope and keeps going. Just because you are dying doesn't mean you can't live. Best of all, as she says in the preface, Teva gives voice to the fears that many terminal cancer patients have and encourages them to talk to their family, friends, doctors, and other loved ones. "I've since learned that it's the unspoken A simple and honest illustrated memoir of Teva's reality of living with cancer. She doesn't shy away from the hard parts, but also takes time to highlight the ways she holds on to her hope and keeps going. Just because you are dying doesn't mean you can't live. Best of all, as she says in the preface, Teva gives voice to the fears that many terminal cancer patients have and encourages them to talk to their family, friends, doctors, and other loved ones. "I've since learned that it's the unspoken that is most frightening. Shining a light on my experiences takes some of the power away from the bogeyman that is my cancer. I'm taking my power back." On hope, she says: "Hope is a dangerous thing. It's absolutely crucial all the time, or I couldn't go on. I am a naturally optimistic person, and I am inclined to hope for the moon. But I can't put too much hope in any one thing. ...I have to find a way to balance the hope I need to get up every day the pragmatism I need to deal with bad news." So much of what Teva says resonates with me. We are of a similar age (I just turned 37), and her outlook on life and hope feels very similar to mine. It's a constant balance between hopeful optimism and the certainty of impending doom. Reading Teva's words fortifies me, and gives me strength to battle through my own struggles, small as they may be in comparison. I particularly like what Teva had to say about prayer. As an atheist, she doesn't believe in an afterlife, as much as she tries, and so it would be understandable if she wrote off people when they offer prayers for her. "And yet," she says, "every time someone tells me that they're praying for me, I say thank you, and I mean it. I can't explain how it is that I believe that this will help or the depth of gratitude that I feel for the people who keep me in their thoughts in those personal sacred moments." As a person of faith, that gives me hope that when I tell someone I am praying for them, regardless of their personal beliefs, it means something to them and provides some level of comfort, if nothing else. I'm so grateful Teva shared moments of her family history with us, as well. The women in her family seem remarkable, and the legacy they have left for her of strength and endurance, of doing everything you can for the world, is strikingly evident. "What is it that we leave when we go, except the impressions we've made on the people we've loved and who loved us?" Of her granny, Teva says, "her memory is a potent reminder that, big and scary as this disease can be, I'm much more than my cancer, too." I can't say that Teva's personal art style is my favorite, but I'm also sure that doesn't actually matter in a work like this. Her words have so much power and you can feel the strength flowing through the lines of the art of each page. Each drawing holds such truth, and the catharsis that was generated through their creation shines through. There are so many more things I could share from this book - it really is worth the hour or two of your time it would take to read it. As a final moment of note, and a good thing to remember as we live each day: "So I did what I could. That's what we all do, stumbling through each day as best we can, trying to live up to our own ideals of kindness and caring."

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    In 2013, 37-year-old Canadian artist Teva Harrison was diagnosed with stage four metastatic breast cancer that had also spread to her lymph nodes and bones. Her eloquent, moving and inspiring graphic memoir, IIN-BETWEEN DAYS, offers her space to sort through her past and come to grips with the realities of her present and future. "Living with metastatic cancer is like a game of Whac-a-Mole," Harrison writes. "There's no point trying to cut it out, because it will just keep popping up somewhere e In 2013, 37-year-old Canadian artist Teva Harrison was diagnosed with stage four metastatic breast cancer that had also spread to her lymph nodes and bones. Her eloquent, moving and inspiring graphic memoir, IIN-BETWEEN DAYS, offers her space to sort through her past and come to grips with the realities of her present and future. "Living with metastatic cancer is like a game of Whac-a-Mole," Harrison writes. "There's no point trying to cut it out, because it will just keep popping up somewhere else." Harrison finds it hard to be optimistic when her doctor's diagnosis ends with, "We are no longer looking for a cure." But she understands that without hope she would not be able to go on. "I need to be careful," she writes. "Hope is delicious, heady stuff, but reality has a way of upsetting the applecart." A simple but expressive full-page illustration precedes each short (one or two pages) chapter/essay. Harrison deals with chemo-induced menopause, the genetic heritage of her disease in other family members, learning to put herself first and trying to find the "sweet spot" in her pain medication. Harrison captivates with her charming illustrations as she navigates her disease and her uncertain but hopeful life with wry humor and refreshing candor. The journey to sad and dark places is a little less scary with her leading the way. "I understand now, though, the fear of being forgotten, of being erased," she writes. No one reading this gripping and inspiring memoir will forget Teva Harrison. IN-BETWEEN DAYS navigates Teva Harrison's brave, wry and unforgettable journey after her stage four cancer diagnosis.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Martha

    At just under 160 pages, many of which are full page graphics that convey so much more than any words could ever say, Harrison packs a gut wrenching punch on every single page. No, this isn’t a light read, but it IS essential reading as far as I'm concerned- and I don’t say that lightly. You don’t have to be effected by cancer (directly or indirectly), in order to be inspired, touched, and just in awe of Teva Harrison’s journey, one which she continues on today and will do so for the rest of her At just under 160 pages, many of which are full page graphics that convey so much more than any words could ever say, Harrison packs a gut wrenching punch on every single page. No, this isn’t a light read, but it IS essential reading as far as I'm concerned- and I don’t say that lightly. You don’t have to be effected by cancer (directly or indirectly), in order to be inspired, touched, and just in awe of Teva Harrison’s journey, one which she continues on today and will do so for the rest of her life, however long that may be; and alongside so many others who live with a terminal or chronic illness. Because in these pages of pure unfiltered raw honesty and emotion, you cannot fail to also experience the depth of courage, the power of hope, and the importance of taking life by the horns and embracing it for everything it is and has to offer. Take a page from Teva Harrison’s memoir and “Live like a tornado, when [you] can…. suck the marrow out of life and see what [you’ve] been missing.” And read this book while you’re at it! I can’t recommend this graphic novel enough!

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