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We Are Robin, Volume 1: The Vigilante Business

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A modern spin on the original teen superhero! In a Gotham City ravaged by the Joker, Batman alone is not enough to keep the peace—and just one Robin isn’t nearly enough to back him up. Now, teenagers who want to make a difference are coming together in droves and adopting the “R.” They’re not a gang. They’re not sidekicks. They are Robin. When Duke Thomas is recruited by t A modern spin on the original teen superhero! In a Gotham City ravaged by the Joker, Batman alone is not enough to keep the peace—and just one Robin isn’t nearly enough to back him up. Now, teenagers who want to make a difference are coming together in droves and adopting the “R.” They’re not a gang. They’re not sidekicks. They are Robin. When Duke Thomas is recruited by the mysterious Nest to join teens from all different backgrounds and walks of life in the Robins, he hopes that they can help him find his missing parents. Instead, they find something much more nefarious—an underground conspiracy that threatens to bring down Gotham. Now it’s up to these untrained teen vigilantes to save the city from a mysterious evil force. But being Robin is dangerous. Robins die. Will these new heroes face the same fate? Collecting: We Are Robin #1-6, DC Comics Sneak Peek: We Are Robin #1.


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A modern spin on the original teen superhero! In a Gotham City ravaged by the Joker, Batman alone is not enough to keep the peace—and just one Robin isn’t nearly enough to back him up. Now, teenagers who want to make a difference are coming together in droves and adopting the “R.” They’re not a gang. They’re not sidekicks. They are Robin. When Duke Thomas is recruited by t A modern spin on the original teen superhero! In a Gotham City ravaged by the Joker, Batman alone is not enough to keep the peace—and just one Robin isn’t nearly enough to back him up. Now, teenagers who want to make a difference are coming together in droves and adopting the “R.” They’re not a gang. They’re not sidekicks. They are Robin. When Duke Thomas is recruited by the mysterious Nest to join teens from all different backgrounds and walks of life in the Robins, he hopes that they can help him find his missing parents. Instead, they find something much more nefarious—an underground conspiracy that threatens to bring down Gotham. Now it’s up to these untrained teen vigilantes to save the city from a mysterious evil force. But being Robin is dangerous. Robins die. Will these new heroes face the same fate? Collecting: We Are Robin #1-6, DC Comics Sneak Peek: We Are Robin #1.

30 review for We Are Robin, Volume 1: The Vigilante Business

  1. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    2.5 stars You know what's been missing in DC comics? Robins. I mean, there just haven't been enough over the years! Let's see...Dick, Jason, Tim, & Damian. Oh, and then Stephanie Brown for about 3 seconds. Plus, Miller's Carrie Kelley, and the Earth 2's Helena Wayne. Am I missing anyone, guys? So, yeah. We needed more Robins. And that's exactly what Lee Bermejo gives us in Volume One. I've honestly read worse stuff, but this isn't something that I'm going to go out of my way to ever grab again. And if 2.5 stars You know what's been missing in DC comics? Robins. I mean, there just haven't been enough over the years! Let's see...Dick, Jason, Tim, & Damian. Oh, and then Stephanie Brown for about 3 seconds. Plus, Miller's Carrie Kelley, and the Earth 2's Helena Wayne. Am I missing anyone, guys? So, yeah. We needed more Robins. And that's exactly what Lee Bermejo gives us in Volume One. I've honestly read worse stuff, but this isn't something that I'm going to go out of my way to ever grab again. And if its target audience is teenagers, then (at least in my house) it was a flop. My 16 year old said it was too boring to finish, and then asked me if I had the Punisher comic that he asked for from the library. So. I didn't think it was too boring, but it didn't grab me by the feelings and shake my world, either. Maybe because this is the first volume, and maybe because it's till finding its legs? Not sure. Anyway. Remember that kid from Endgame? The one Batman rescued in that fake Crime Alley reenactment? Well, his name is Duke, and he's sort of the main character. Or at least he's the main voice in this, because he's the new recruit. There are evidently a ton of these Robins, but Duke meets (and somewhat befriends) a core group of about 6 or so. I honestly don't remember the exact number, and I certainly don't remember all of their names. Different backgrounds, different races, and different reasons for wanting to fight crime. I actually liked Duke and some of the other kids. Sadly, they weren't likable enough for me to overlook the shoddy premise, or lack of any sort of explanation of their mad fighting skilz. Seriously, who trained them? I know lots of teenage kids, and none of them would be able to walk away from a fight against an adult assassin. <--that happens, I swear! If you're going to read this, then be prepared to suspend disbelief quite a bit more than you would with a regular comic. Especially the parts where NO ADULT EVER checks on the kid to see if they're in their room. EVER. Shhh! Kids are stealthy... Ok, for real? Teens are sneaky little bastards, so admittedly some of these kids would be able to get away with it at first, but it would be dependent on a complete lack of any parental involvement for them to continue to get away with it in the long run. And maybe I'm just farting rainbows, but I think it's unlikely that all of them have idiot guardians. Issue #4 is a cute (but odd) crossover with Barbara Gordon. She shows up to help one of the Robins who (for some reason) fantasizes daily that she is having conversations with Batgirl. I don't...???? Whatever makes you happy, I guess. You know what made me happy? All of the kick-ass covers! They were all fantastic, but this one was my absolute favorite. In the end? I'm not sure if the characters have enough likability to overcome all the nonsense. There was way too much gimmicky texting and way too few explanations for their ninja skills. I'll personally think twice before grabbing the next one.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Gotham City, that crime-ridden cesspool of a town, is already the vigilante capital of the DC universe, what with Batman and the Bats family and friends running around trying to corral super-villains, and wannabe psychopathic, homicidal losers. So whose idea was it to start a kiddie crime unit based on Robin and call themselves the, uh, Robins? A member of the Bats family and friends, that’s who. So, if teens from all walks of life, no matter what their sex, race, social status, creed, religion, na Gotham City, that crime-ridden cesspool of a town, is already the vigilante capital of the DC universe, what with Batman and the Bats family and friends running around trying to corral super-villains, and wannabe psychopathic, homicidal losers. So whose idea was it to start a kiddie crime unit based on Robin and call themselves the, uh, Robins? A member of the Bats family and friends, that’s who. So, if teens from all walks of life, no matter what their sex, race, social status, creed, religion, national origin, party affiliation or hair style, get a little bored with the Interwebz, they can enroll in the school of punching deadbeats silly. Jinkies! Even on paper this sounds like a crappy idea. In their attempt to distance themselves from The New 52, is DC trying to appeal to bored, disaffected youth? The kids are pulled in several different directions, with a creepy left-over dude from the Court of Owls storyline trying to recruit them as well. “No worries. We have a great dental plan.” So whose idea was this fiasco? (view spoiler)[Blame Alfred. (hide spoiler)] Bottom line: DC’s attempt to meld Batman and Scooby Doo and texting falls flat, except for one issue in the middle of this volume in which a different artist pumps a little life (and humor) into this book. It’s what could have been… *sigh* Two and a half stars rounded down.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    There’s a scene in Batman: Endgame where Batman saves a kid from a Joker zombie mob - who knew THAT was the impetus behind this We Are Robin series?! Unsurprisingly, the flimsiest of premises makes for a pretty crap book. Some teenagers decide to call themselves Robin and run around the city doing vigilante stuff. There’s a Talon (from the Court of Owls storyline) with a giant sickle who’s created this underground group of homeless worshippers… for reasons… and that’s it. Rubbish! Who are these There’s a scene in Batman: Endgame where Batman saves a kid from a Joker zombie mob - who knew THAT was the impetus behind this We Are Robin series?! Unsurprisingly, the flimsiest of premises makes for a pretty crap book. Some teenagers decide to call themselves Robin and run around the city doing vigilante stuff. There’s a Talon (from the Court of Owls storyline) with a giant sickle who’s created this underground group of homeless worshippers… for reasons… and that’s it. Rubbish! Who are these kids? How did they meet? Why do they think being a vigilante is easy? These are just ordinary kids! How are they not getting their butts handed to them every single time they set foot into Gotham’s shadows?! I suppose in a city where the likes of Jason Todd and Tim Drake saw Batman & Robin and thought, “Me too!”, there were bound to be a few more wannabes who thought the same way. But still, these kids are not convincing heroes in the least and this setup is garbage. The story is nonsense, the characters are poorly written and the formation of this Robin group is anyone’s guess – I suppose DC just wanted another Bat-title! Disappointingly, Alfred got dragged into this travesty too. Jorge Corona’s art isn’t anything special and the one issue James Harvey drew was painful to look at, the art was so busy. We Are Morons is a terrible series. Lee Bermejo continues to prove he’s a fine artist (the covers are great) but he isn’t anywhere as good when it comes to writing.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on our blog by clicking here. Lee Bermejo? You might be wondering who on earth that is, right? He’s the man who wrote, illustrated and inked the famous Batman: Noël. He’s the one who did the artwork for the notable piece, Joker by Brian Azzarello. He’s also the guy behind the art of Before Watchmen: Rorschach. When I first saw posters for this new series, I actually had no clue what it was about or who was writing it. I grabbed the 1st issue out of pure instinct and thought You can find my review on our blog by clicking here. Lee Bermejo? You might be wondering who on earth that is, right? He’s the man who wrote, illustrated and inked the famous Batman: Noël. He’s the one who did the artwork for the notable piece, Joker by Brian Azzarello. He’s also the guy behind the art of Before Watchmen: Rorschach. When I first saw posters for this new series, I actually had no clue what it was about or who was writing it. I grabbed the 1st issue out of pure instinct and thought I might as well try it because the cover was pretty darn sexy. And now, after going through the first 6 issues (which constitutes the first volume, The Vigilante Business), I can tell you that I don’t regret the calling. The ideas behind it, the diverse styles of art, and the unique direction it was taking sold me. We Are Robin is the story of a bunch of juvenile teenagers with an interest in Batman and vigilantism. This volume explores their motives and introduces them to a new identity that they all chose to wear. That’s right. Robin. With a stunning artwork that seems to often have a sunset color palette and sharp designs to characters, this new series promises to bring the street out of the darkness and drown it in kick-ass teenage vigilantism. For a comic series that doesn’t focus on Batman, but draws from his universe, We Are Robin is definitely a brilliant idea in progress, a story that Batfans should check out. It’s inspiring to see that the “R” insignia managed to become a symbol for all teenagers to don. However, it doesn’t take away the etiquette that their actions will always hold. Vigilantism. We Are Robin doesn’t forget to acknowledge it and makes sure to showcase as many upsides as downsides to a group a teenagers taking justice into their own hands. Throughout the story, this new gang receives text messages from The Nest, their faceless boss, and readers only find out later on who that is (if you think you know, think again). This element of suspense is quite intriguing since it showcases this blind justice that the teenagers are following. Driven by this desire to meet and work for Batman, their only route to satisfy such a craving is to build a blind trust to The Nest. When the story has a group of teenagers at the wheel, it’s surely inevitable to see some stereotypes develop for each character. However, Lee Barmejo makes sure to destroy this repetitive angle to such a direction of storytelling. His characters all have their own personalities and showcases them with distinct dialogues. As the story unfolds, every member manages to present an interesting background. Issue #4 even gives a special attention to Riko Sheridan and her own personal obsession over Batgirl. This very issue was fascinating in so many ways. The artwork was very old school (really awesome, if you ask me), and gave way to a great tribute to an iconic character from Batman’s universe. Although there’s a general focus on Duke Thomas, our afro-american protagonist, the first six issues succeeds to balance out the point of views by giving enough time to shine for every character. With adversity, this gang of Robin’s quickly learn to grow closer instead of straying away from one another. Coming from various backgrounds, this new identity of Robin helps them build trust and friendship as if it was them against the rest of the world. Lee Bermejo didn’t hesitate in taking certain steps in order to make this new family happen. To top it off, the arrival of a certain new villain into their lives later into the series helps accentuate their need to believe in each other and strive for the greater good. We Are Robin is a promising series with great ideas to hold its foundation firm and strong. It is an entity of its own, and the finale of The Vigilante Business seems to point out to some even greater ideas on gangs and the numerous dilemmas that they bring to light.If anything, more character development and a continuation in the direction its taking for the story could make this series absolutely amazing. Yours truly, Lashaan Lashaan & Trang | Bloggers and Book Reviewers Official blog: http://bookidote.wordpress.com ___________________________________ I jumped onto this series without thinking twice cause the general idea was quite original. The first issue definitely managed to captivate me and pronounced itself as a strong entity. I enjoyed the issues as they always brought something new to the table, especially issue #4 with the dramatic change in artwork, the change in narration, the unique direction in storytelling and the appearance of Batgirl! Honestly, this series has great potential and the first six issues manages to keep the suspense going as to who's the mysterious boss behind the growing "organization". I still feel that the characters, each of them, could use more spotlight issues just to get readers to connect with them more. Looking forward to a surge in the series, especially volume 3; cause Robin War... is... Well, see you on my review of it! ;) P.S. A full review to come. Yours truly, Lashaan Lashaan & Trang | Bloggers and Book Reviewers Official blog: http://bookidote.wordpress.com

  5. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Starr Light

    Bullet Review: So you cannot NOT blame this book for lacking in diversity (well maybe LGBT, but it's still early on and, like you would expect for a book like this, people aren't gabbing about their sex lives). Out of the team of 6 5 there are 2 women, 1 Asian, 1 Puerto Rican, 1 black, and 1 Italian-American. I'm rounding up to 3 stars because it's way more interesting than the book I am listening to on audio. Nonetheless, I must be (as per usual) missing about 8 billion other issues and backstory Bullet Review: So you cannot NOT blame this book for lacking in diversity (well maybe LGBT, but it's still early on and, like you would expect for a book like this, people aren't gabbing about their sex lives). Out of the team of 6 5 there are 2 women, 1 Asian, 1 Puerto Rican, 1 black, and 1 Italian-American. I'm rounding up to 3 stars because it's way more interesting than the book I am listening to on audio. Nonetheless, I must be (as per usual) missing about 8 billion other issues and backstory to explain 1) who all these kids are, 2) why someone thought it a smart idea to put 16 year olds in the line of fire, and 3) why Gotham even needs so-called Robins in the first place.

  6. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    There's terrible comics. When the dialog is so awful you can't read it. There's stupid comics. Where the plot is so dumb there's no questioning it. Then there's this...a pointless comic with a pointless plot with a pointless cast of characters doing pointless things. So to sum it up it's very much pointless. Too bad to because was interested in the concept. What I liked: The idea of it. What I didn't like: Everything else. Art was okay at best. The characters all sounded the same and none were l There's terrible comics. When the dialog is so awful you can't read it. There's stupid comics. Where the plot is so dumb there's no questioning it. Then there's this...a pointless comic with a pointless plot with a pointless cast of characters doing pointless things. So to sum it up it's very much pointless. Too bad to because was interested in the concept. What I liked: The idea of it. What I didn't like: Everything else. Art was okay at best. The characters all sounded the same and none were likeable. The ending was TERRIBLE. The fights were as boring as could be. The whole idea was truly pointless and you can see why it's canceled so quick. Skip this one completely. Not worth your time and money. I rather read All Star Batman by crazy frank miller than this. SKIP!!!!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    Considering no familiar characters are here except for one, whom I won't give away, this was pretty fun. My only complaint would be all the texting or whatever you call it, messages, between all the Robins, which is how they communicate. I mean, I text and email, I'm not that old. But the proliferation on every page sort of hits you over the head with the idea that this is extremely modern. And the text speak, ack, really gets to me. So if you can live with some OMGs and LOLs and borderline anno Considering no familiar characters are here except for one, whom I won't give away, this was pretty fun. My only complaint would be all the texting or whatever you call it, messages, between all the Robins, which is how they communicate. I mean, I text and email, I'm not that old. But the proliferation on every page sort of hits you over the head with the idea that this is extremely modern. And the text speak, ack, really gets to me. So if you can live with some OMGs and LOLs and borderline annoying/weird commentary that hints of Frank Miller, there's plenty of meat and good ol' vigilante justice.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea &#x1f3f3;️‍&#x1f308;

    This was pretty enjoyable! I liked it the most during Duke and Riko's stories. I really like Duke's narrative - he sounds like a real teenager and he's got such a realistic personality. My first introduction to him was in All Star Batman and I've been attached to him ever since. It's a pretty unique way to start his story as one of the Batfam. Riko is a character I don't think shows up a lot outside of this story and Robin War? and that's a bummer because I like her style. Anyway, I didn't care This was pretty enjoyable! I liked it the most during Duke and Riko's stories. I really like Duke's narrative - he sounds like a real teenager and he's got such a realistic personality. My first introduction to him was in All Star Batman and I've been attached to him ever since. It's a pretty unique way to start his story as one of the Batfam. Riko is a character I don't think shows up a lot outside of this story and Robin War? and that's a bummer because I like her style. Anyway, I didn't care that much for the expositional aspects of the book. Unfortunately, that was quite a bit of the volume.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    We Are Robin is a apart of The DCYou imprint. While I didn't love this, It wasn't bad. They definitely went for a younger audience with this, and a more diverse audience as well. I sound like an old man but the tweet dialogue was a bit overused.. But that's more of just a small thing. Solid storytelling, the artwork at times was chaotic, but mostly well done. I received an advanced copy of this from NetGalley.com and the publisher. . We Are Robin is a apart of The DCYou imprint. While I didn't love this, It wasn't bad. They definitely went for a younger audience with this, and a more diverse audience as well. I sound like an old man but the tweet dialogue was a bit overused.. But that's more of just a small thing. Solid storytelling, the artwork at times was chaotic, but mostly well done. I received an advanced copy of this from NetGalley.com and the publisher. .

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Batman is gone. Gotham City is reeling from yet another insane Joker attack. The youths of the city are tired of sitting back. Now, they're taking back the streets. Don't call they sidekicks though - they are Robin! This book tries to do a lot all at once, and doesn't really manage to do any of it particularly well. There's a whole cast to introduce, most of whom are brand new (aside from Duke Thomas, who was still mostly a blank slate at this point). Then there's the mystery of The Nest, a bombi Batman is gone. Gotham City is reeling from yet another insane Joker attack. The youths of the city are tired of sitting back. Now, they're taking back the streets. Don't call they sidekicks though - they are Robin! This book tries to do a lot all at once, and doesn't really manage to do any of it particularly well. There's a whole cast to introduce, most of whom are brand new (aside from Duke Thomas, who was still mostly a blank slate at this point). Then there's the mystery of The Nest, a bombing plot, a shadowy villain, and some Court Of Owls stuff thrown in for good measure as well. For six issues, there's perhaps too much going on. As a result, everything feels like it's pulled in different directions. Duke's quest to find his parents falls apart after one issue, none of the new Robins get much development beyond a few pages, and while the Nest mystery is actually pretty clever, the villain of the piece feels more like Robin War set-up than an actual threat themselves. There's also an attempt to look at the effect of losing a fellow hero on the people left behind, but this again comes up on maybe a few pages before being lost in the shuffle. Plus the ideas that a) Batgirl would be okay with loads of kids running around unsupervised and b) four teenagers and a motorbike could take on a Talon, are frankly laughable. I love suspending my disbelief as much as the next guy, but there are limits even I'll reach eventually. The art doesn't really help much either - the majority of the heavy lifting is by Jorge Corona (with breakdowns by Rob Haynes). His lines are solid, but his panels are too busy with people and things going on, to the point where I had to turn my book upside down to work out what was going on in one panel (it was a sword hilt and not a face, which was why I was getting confused). Everyone's a little distended as well, like Humberto Ramos but without actually committing to the style. It's fine, but it does make things feel really difficult to read at times. We Are Robin has many good ideas, but it struggles to execute them in a fashion that doesn't just feel like a tick-box exercise. It introduces and drops plot points as needed, and the artwork muddies the water even further. I wanted to like it a lot more than I actually did.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    Better than expected. It was nice to see the youth of Gotham City take up the Robin mantle when needed. Some of the characters were a bit cliched, but overall they were distinct enough to be interesting. Solid art and colors.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    The idea of a social movement of Robin-vigilantes is intriguing ... but Bermejo never really takes advantage of it. The idea that there are other Robins than our core six is only addressed once, and it's more confusing than anything, because it's not clear if they're part of the story or not. And the whole social movement ... doesn't really move. Beyond that the story is about characterization, and it unfortunately falls short here. I dunno if it's muddy artwork, muddy storytelling, or both, but The idea of a social movement of Robin-vigilantes is intriguing ... but Bermejo never really takes advantage of it. The idea that there are other Robins than our core six is only addressed once, and it's more confusing than anything, because it's not clear if they're part of the story or not. And the whole social movement ... doesn't really move. Beyond that the story is about characterization, and it unfortunately falls short here. I dunno if it's muddy artwork, muddy storytelling, or both, but I never have a good impression of who most of these people are. So, though I enjoy the concept and the characters (and how this fits into the Batman mythos), the book never really gels, and I'm not sure I see reason to read any more.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Beckiezra

    Didn’t love this and considering it actually took me over a year to finish it I probably should rate it lower, but I didn’t hate it. The art was all over the place, sometimes good, sometimes unbearably “artistic.” I don’t like all the extra Robins and don’t know what should happen to them to restore balance to the Batfamily. I only need one Robin, but I can accept the three that came after him as well. I can’t really remember the first half of the book since it’s been so long, but the characters Didn’t love this and considering it actually took me over a year to finish it I probably should rate it lower, but I didn’t hate it. The art was all over the place, sometimes good, sometimes unbearably “artistic.” I don’t like all the extra Robins and don’t know what should happen to them to restore balance to the Batfamily. I only need one Robin, but I can accept the three that came after him as well. I can’t really remember the first half of the book since it’s been so long, but the characters became clearer to me in the second half when they weren’t just being distinguished by chat user IDs. Maybe there was some earlier books I should have read that introduced this movement more. I don’t particularly care about these Robins though. They give me kind of an X-Men feel, one of the random groups of teens they’d put together to be canon fodder for a while in an attempt to attract younger readers or whatever it is comic execs are thinking when they do stuff like dump a bunch of new characters on readers. I’m not a fan of Alfred as Professor X, but I feel like I need more background on what’s led him to these actions. I feel like he’s acting out of character because all the bat people are dead or missing or amnesiac or whatever was going on when this was published.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I'm not a huge DC/Marvel comic book fan (despite loving the shows/movies) so I never go into these types of things with incredibly high hopes. However, I did find myself enjoying this first volume in the series. It's nice to see a young and diverse group of teens working together; plus I absolutely loved all the different Robin outfits. If I was still a teenager I'd probably have given this 4stars, but as an adult, it's nice to read something that would have motivated me when I was younger. I'm not a huge DC/Marvel comic book fan (despite loving the shows/movies) so I never go into these types of things with incredibly high hopes. However, I did find myself enjoying this first volume in the series. It's nice to see a young and diverse group of teens working together; plus I absolutely loved all the different Robin outfits. If I was still a teenager I'd probably have given this 4stars, but as an adult, it's nice to read something that would have motivated me when I was younger.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Todd Glaeser

    I liked this more than some of the other reviewers. It seems this series might be laying the ground work ( or borrowing the premise ) from Frank Miller's Robin from the Dark Knight. I liked this more than some of the other reviewers. It seems this series might be laying the ground work ( or borrowing the premise ) from Frank Miller's Robin from the Dark Knight.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    This was a pretty good series. It's only 2 volumes and volume 2 looks really interesting. This was a pretty good series. It's only 2 volumes and volume 2 looks really interesting.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    This review was previously published as part of Saturday Scribblings over at If These Books Could Talk I suppose, when there’s no Batman, there’s no Robin right? Wrong. Teens across Gotham are donning the red, green and giant ‘R’ to collectively right the wrongs of the city. Even though they have the best of intentions, things soon start to go horribly wrong for them when the death of a team member not only shakes them, but makes them question why they are fighting. With no real leader, apart fro This review was previously published as part of Saturday Scribblings over at If These Books Could Talk I suppose, when there’s no Batman, there’s no Robin right? Wrong. Teens across Gotham are donning the red, green and giant ‘R’ to collectively right the wrongs of the city. Even though they have the best of intentions, things soon start to go horribly wrong for them when the death of a team member not only shakes them, but makes them question why they are fighting. With no real leader, apart from a mysterious contact called ‘The Nest’, they drift from fight to fight, eventually falling out and splitting into separate factions. It takes a violent encounter to make them realise they need each other if they’re to survive. Even though ‘The Vigilante Business’ comprises of 6 issues of the We Are Robin title (and a sneak peak at Convergence: New Teen Titans) it still feels like there’s an awful lot crammed into a very small space. Initially a team of six, the Robins are a varied mix of races and genders, but we really only get beneath the skin of a few by the end of volume 1. Duke Thomas* gets the privilege of having the most background, as is typical of any new recruit to a team, as we see him farmed out to another foster family while he secretly hunts for his parents, missing since the events of ‘Endgame’. Isabella (Codename: Robina) has a deeply intense back-story that erupts into violence within her family. A more light-hearted story is given to Riko (R-iko) a Batgirl fangirl with a split personality, who takes on all-comers. The action is fast-paced and the plotting tight, but it does get a bit frantic on occasion, leaving this reader having to double check previous pages. Lack of depth is obvious here, and as I said previously, this is down to too an uneven character balance. With an equal number of team members to issues, ‘The Vigilante Business’ could have been more even as far as characterisation is concerned, especially with a completely new set of characters. The graphic style is often eye-poppingly bright and powerful, with the action scenes getting the bigger panels and most attention. Line work is sharp, and the use of narrative captions and alternate coloured speech bubbles for the text convos is a great way of splitting the action between so many characters. Panel placement is a bit frantic, but the use of greens and blues instead of a heavy over-reliance on black makes up for it. (* Also appears in Batman Vol 8 ‘Superheavy’)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    A mess of a book in writing, logic and character work. World: The art has style and personality, but it also lacks detail, especially when you have 6 main characters and others. The art was messy. The world building was choppy and just like the writing inconsistent and full of logic holes. It's a mess. Story: The story was choppy, paced wrong and framed weirdly. The idea is interesting but there was not enough time to develop the point of the series and the characters were not developed enough so A mess of a book in writing, logic and character work. World: The art has style and personality, but it also lacks detail, especially when you have 6 main characters and others. The art was messy. The world building was choppy and just like the writing inconsistent and full of logic holes. It's a mess. Story: The story was choppy, paced wrong and framed weirdly. The idea is interesting but there was not enough time to develop the point of the series and the characters were not developed enough so making this story without much heart. Even a character demise was hollow and wrung hollow. I wills say that Robin fighting a Talon was a good idea in concept, but it was executed poorly cause the writing was poor and we don't know why the fight even happens and the sides and their ideals. Messy. Characters: Alfred would not do this, never would he do this and this is the biggest logic and character problem for the series and makes this series illogical. Add to that we don't get any real sense of the Robins cause the writing is slap dashed and done poorly. I don't care about the characters and it's a shame after 6 issues I still don't care about them. Poorly written, poorly thought out, poor quality series. Onward to the next book!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Wanted to read this because it sounded cool, needed to read this after it was referenced in Gotham Academy. That mini crossover event hasn't happened here yet. But it has enticed me to read volume 2. Not that I needed much persuasion anyway, the characters in We Are Robin are just as vibrant and diverse- (did I honestly read a page with classic 3D glasses? That doesn't happen often) as the artwork. And i related to them right from the start. Maybe because they were teenagers? Or maybe I could se Wanted to read this because it sounded cool, needed to read this after it was referenced in Gotham Academy. That mini crossover event hasn't happened here yet. But it has enticed me to read volume 2. Not that I needed much persuasion anyway, the characters in We Are Robin are just as vibrant and diverse- (did I honestly read a page with classic 3D glasses? That doesn't happen often) as the artwork. And i related to them right from the start. Maybe because they were teenagers? Or maybe I could see how they wanted to change their world and could connect with that same want. I also think this is very relatable with the current events of today- protests and riots (spearheaded usually by the youth), homelessness, social media and how it is used for good and bad. Overall a fun, enjoyable yet reflective read. I want to continue reading this comic series and I encourage others to pick it up.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    3.5 Stars In a post-Endgame Gotham, the youth of the city have decided to step up in the loss of Batman and Robin and take on the mantle of "Robin", claiming "We Are Robin". There is a large amount of potential to this book, but I think my age might be showing in how I react to this title. The art, story, drama, and fit into continuity are all good. I even like the disguised Alfred acting as "The Nest" for them. But.... the constant texting/tweeting barrage is so annoying I almost wanted to skip 3.5 Stars In a post-Endgame Gotham, the youth of the city have decided to step up in the loss of Batman and Robin and take on the mantle of "Robin", claiming "We Are Robin". There is a large amount of potential to this book, but I think my age might be showing in how I react to this title. The art, story, drama, and fit into continuity are all good. I even like the disguised Alfred acting as "The Nest" for them. But.... the constant texting/tweeting barrage is so annoying I almost wanted to skip over all that dialogue. A few of these characters could be groomed into something very lasting at DC (especially Duke), but I'll be curious to see how these characters do up against a real threat, and not just average criminals. Recommend, with slight reservation.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Adriana

    We Are Robin is a very human story that shows that all it takes is some heart (and a person with connections moving things from the shadows) to defend your beliefs. The kids all get a bit of exposition to show why they're joining the group. This is a great side-chapter to the Gotham Universe. I love stories where you get to see the people who live in Gotham, because it shows what Batman has been fighting for all along. It does a really good job of setting up an alternate point of view for the w We Are Robin is a very human story that shows that all it takes is some heart (and a person with connections moving things from the shadows) to defend your beliefs. The kids all get a bit of exposition to show why they're joining the group. This is a great side-chapter to the Gotham Universe. I love stories where you get to see the people who live in Gotham, because it shows what Batman has been fighting for all along. It does a really good job of setting up an alternate point of view for the war that is perpetually taking place in Gotham. Be warned that you should have at least some knowledge of the events in the main Batman storyline, because several things will probably make very little sense if you're not in the know.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Frank McGirk

    An updating of the "teen force" trope in comics...not a ton of new ideas here, but the texting angle works well and doesn't feel forced. In general, the best thing about it, is that it's not "forcing" any of the issues. The multiculturalism, for which it has been praised, feels organic more than doctrinaire. The "bad guy" is unexceptional as is the larger story arc of his quest for the new "heroes" hearts and minds, but I think the book could become more engaging as it starts flushing out the ch An updating of the "teen force" trope in comics...not a ton of new ideas here, but the texting angle works well and doesn't feel forced. In general, the best thing about it, is that it's not "forcing" any of the issues. The multiculturalism, for which it has been praised, feels organic more than doctrinaire. The "bad guy" is unexceptional as is the larger story arc of his quest for the new "heroes" hearts and minds, but I think the book could become more engaging as it starts flushing out the characters more and more.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tony

    Full disclosure, I have the Robin "R" tattooed on my arm. I was going to like this no matter what, but this so so so great. It is why I have the tattoo. Had this book come out when I was a kid, I would have been out there, dressed in Red and Yellow with a bat. Net Galley gave me an ARC and that is amazing. Full disclosure, I have the Robin "R" tattooed on my arm. I was going to like this no matter what, but this so so so great. It is why I have the tattoo. Had this book come out when I was a kid, I would have been out there, dressed in Red and Yellow with a bat. Net Galley gave me an ARC and that is amazing.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    I'm struggling with my rating for this one, but I'm going to settle on a 2.5. I liked the art, but I found the characterization to be lacking and I don't feel like this has anything new to say about vigilantes or youth activism. I'm going to give the 2nd volume a shot - hopefully we'll get to actually know these characters more because as of right now, I'm not terribly invested in them. I'm struggling with my rating for this one, but I'm going to settle on a 2.5. I liked the art, but I found the characterization to be lacking and I don't feel like this has anything new to say about vigilantes or youth activism. I'm going to give the 2nd volume a shot - hopefully we'll get to actually know these characters more because as of right now, I'm not terribly invested in them.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Don Witzel

    I love the concept of teenagers being Vigilantes. They decide to adopt the "R" Robin. We start getting layers of charter development as the team builds. A great mix of diverse kids and backgrounds. A great start.... I love the concept of teenagers being Vigilantes. They decide to adopt the "R" Robin. We start getting layers of charter development as the team builds. A great mix of diverse kids and backgrounds. A great start....

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    With Batman apparently dead with his last fight with Joker, the streets of Gotham have suddenly surged with a gang of Robins fighting crime in his name, led by a mysterious benefactor named "The Nest". This series focuses mainly on six different Robins as they fight crime together. This trade paperback collects the first six issues of the 2015 on-going series and the DC Sneak Peek: We Are Robin into the DCYou phase incarnation of the New 52. We Are Robin: The Vigilante Business opens up with the With Batman apparently dead with his last fight with Joker, the streets of Gotham have suddenly surged with a gang of Robins fighting crime in his name, led by a mysterious benefactor named "The Nest". This series focuses mainly on six different Robins as they fight crime together. This trade paperback collects the first six issues of the 2015 on-going series and the DC Sneak Peek: We Are Robin into the DCYou phase incarnation of the New 52. We Are Robin: The Vigilante Business opens up with the DC Sneak Peek: We Are Robin short that introduced the series from the Convergence crossover event, which was written by Lee Bermejo and penciled by Jorge Corona. In a Gotham City without Batman, the streets of Gotham City has been flooded with teenagers taking on the mantle of Robin to protect the streets from minor crimes, although there are many this issue focus on five (the sixth has yet to join). Led by a mysterious benefactor that goes by the moniker of "The Nest" he leads the team on their missions. It is an interesting concept and a unique evolution for the Robin mantle. The on-going series opens up with Duke Thomas in a middle of a schoolyard fight. Apparently, Duke Thomas have been spending his days and nights searching for his parents in the sewers, abandoned subway tunnels, and all the undesirable places of Gotham City to find his missing parents, who was infected with Joker Venom in the Batman: Endgame storyline. Duke Thomas is placed in yet another foster family and escapes that night to resume his search. Unfortunately, he stumbles in on a crime in process and was attacked because of it. Duke Thomas was saved by a group of teenaged Robins. Together, they were successful in defeating the underground gang, but Duke Thomas blacked out when the police arrived. When he awoken, Duke Thomas finds himself in an interrogation room where he tells a very interesting detective about the bombs that the underground group have installed around Gotham City. After leaving, Duke Thomas finds out that he wasn't in an interrogation room, but a set where he finds a motorcycle with Robin gear draping over it – Duke Thomas was officially drafted into the Robin Movement. The mission continues as the group separates into two groups take care of the explosives that is scatter all over Gotham City. For the most part, it is successful, except for one place – where Troy Walker stayed behind and tried to disarm the explosive and dies in the process. It is here in the epilogue that we found out the obvious – that The Nest is Alfred Pennyworth. While the death of Troy Walker makes the story realistic – it is obvious that lives would be lost in a business like vigilantism, the impact wasn't that strong. It was too soon to introduce a death of a main character, because we barely know Troy Walker – he was in three issues – four if we count the Sneak Peek, his death would have a more powerful impact if we got to know him better. It is interesting how Alfred Pennyworth deals with loss – Bruce Wayne lost his memories, Dick Grayson is apparently dead, Tim Drake is busy with the Titans, and Damian Wayne is out on his Quest of Atonement. So, what does the patriarch of the Bat-Clan does suffering from empty nest syndrome – creates a band of Robins to fight crime. Lee Bermejo wrote the entire trade paperback and for the most part it was written rather well. I really like the diverse cast of characters in the group and all of them from the lower socioeconomic side of Gotham City. It is good to see Duke Thomas again and to see him promoted to a series regular while before he made many cameos. Of the new Robins made, I connected most to Riko Sheridan, because of her East-Asian decent and I found Daxton "Dax" Chill very interesting – especially his surname in the Batman mythos – hopefully that would be explored more in the series. We Are Robin: The Vigilante Business has four different pencilers. With the exception of one issue (We Are Robin #4) which was penciled by James Harvey, the rest were penciled by Jorge Corona (We Are Robin #1–3, 5–6) with Khary Randolph penciling the epilogues for two issues (We Are Robin #1–2) and Carmine Di Giandomenico penciled the epilogue for We Are Robin #6. With the exception of James Harvey the rest of the penciling worked well and complement each other. James Harvey – I'm not sure what to make of his penciling style – except that it's too artsy for my taste. Cameo appearances include James Gordon as Batman (We Are Robin #3), which obviously didn't like that there is a gang of Robin wannabes fighting crime. Barbara Gordon as Batgirl also made an appearance with Riko Sheridan as they team up to fight crime in the James Harvey penciled We Are Robin #4. A Talon also makes an appearance (We Are Robin #5) trying to rid the streets of these colorful Robins. All in all, We Are Robin: The Vigilante Business is a wonderful beginning for the series and I can't wait to read the next trade paperback. It seems that Duke Thomas has found a new family and circle of friends and I can't wait to get to know each one more in depth.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Painful to read between the text-message style and the 'edgy' names that bring the story to a halt every time one pops up because they make the brain scream TYPO TYPO TYPO. Painful to read between the text-message style and the 'edgy' names that bring the story to a halt every time one pops up because they make the brain scream TYPO TYPO TYPO.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    We Are Robin Author: Lee Bermejo (Author), Jorge Corona (Illustrator), Khary Randolph (Illustrator), Carmine Di Giandomenico (Illustrator), James Harvey (Illustrator) Publisher: DC Comics Date: 04/05/2016 Pgs: 160 Disposition: Hoopla e-book _________________________________________________ REVIEW MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS Summary: The youth of Gotham City are rising. They aren’t a gang. They’re not sidekicks. They are Robin. The Nest draws them together. Duke Thomas whose parents were victims of Joker Venom We Are Robin Author: Lee Bermejo (Author), Jorge Corona (Illustrator), Khary Randolph (Illustrator), Carmine Di Giandomenico (Illustrator), James Harvey (Illustrator) Publisher: DC Comics Date: 04/05/2016 Pgs: 160 Disposition: Hoopla e-book _________________________________________________ REVIEW MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS Summary: The youth of Gotham City are rising. They aren’t a gang. They’re not sidekicks. They are Robin. The Nest draws them together. Duke Thomas whose parents were victims of Joker Venom and disappeared leaving him in the foster care system. While searching for them, he runs into the Robins and together they find a conspiracy in the underground of Gotham that threatens everything. They’re all that stands between this evil force and destruction. Being Robin is dangerous. Life is cheap. Heroes face the ultimate test. We are Robin. _________________________________________________ Genre: Comics Graphic Novels Superheroes Why this book: Robin and youth gone wild. _________________________________________________ Favorite Character: Duke Thomas is an interesting character. He is playing off of stereotypes in the foster care system. But his interactions with the other Robins is interesting. And add a little meta-knowledge, his being The Signal in later Bat comic continuity. Least Favorite Character: The Nest as presented. Favorite Scene / Quote: When the shadowy figure behind the Robin movement goes from observing his crew to opening his closet and his soliloquy: “Those with talent and courage. Those who can learn to channel the rage before it consumes them. Those whose pasts won’t predict the future. The future. The future of this city is not dark walls and (the) cold, grey concrete it’s foundation stands upon. It’s a place of color.” Duke’s letter to his missing parents as a framing sequence for the 2nd issue/chapter is a nice touch. Then the Robin is sitting beside Batgirl watching the punks put out the fire. And the Robin pokes Batgirl to make sure she’s real. Greatness. When The Nest tells them that the GCPD don’t like vigilantes, any vigilantes. And that that was just something that the Robins were going to have to get used to if they were going to continue to pursue their night job. Pacing: Well paced. Plot Holes/Out of Character: Of the suspects of who could be The Nest, this one made the most sense. But I submit that this sending youths into dangerous situations is out of character for him even with seeing the various Robins in action over the years. The Nest persona is much too hands off for him. Hmm Moments: Duke taking it on himself to run away from his new foster home to search for his parents because he feels no one else is really trying rings true to the character when you know his backstory. And what Gotham City story is complete without a requisite run through the sewers. This city must have the most extensive subsurface warren of sewers, caves, and bullshit rivaling any city besides London and Paris. The Batgirl appearance is great. The “we should keep going despite the public and the police” scene taking place in the Acme Chemical Company where Batman and the Joker first encountered each other is cool when placed in juxtaposition to how the public and police felt about Batman at the beginning. WTF Moments: A little late for the “we’re just kids” argument that two of the Robins use just before meeting The Nest. Of course, they could just be out on a lark and not be in to the cause. They could be tourists instead of natives. And if there is a betrayal of the Robins coming, these two could be at the center of it. Double of course, we never saw the body of the one who tried to disarm the bomb either. The scene was only shown from the perspective of security cams and as the other Robins evacuated the scene. Meh / PFFT Moments: Duke’s foster home experiences are every stereotype come to life. The voice of the text doesn’t ring youthful. Reads like an old person writing youthspeak. And how do the Robins react now that they know and have proof that they aren’t working for/with Mecha-Batman and one of their own has died in the line of duty? Hope they stay away from the betrayal from within trope. They’ve already planted the seed in two different characters. Really hope that it doesn’t bear fruit. There’s a whole lot of blame the good guy in this. It has become such a trope in superhero comics. Almost as bad as the IA investigation in cop shows. The Nest waiting until the end of the beginning like this to tell them to wear masks is probably not smart. Seems like that should have been part of basic training, especially in light of who The Nest is. _________________________________________________ Last Page Sound: Odd spot to end on, but I guess that is the end of the beginning. Author Assessment: I liked it well enough to read more. Editorial Assessment: The R-iko section where we spent pages on textspeak as the trollie capecatchers tried to lure one in could have been condensced. Knee Jerk Reaction: it’s alright _________________________________________________

  29. 5 out of 5

    Fizzgig76

    Reprints We Are Robin #1-6 (August 2015-January 2016). When Gotham needs heroes, Robins arise! Duke Thomas is struggling with being in the foster system, but he has a new family in the Robins. Teamed with Riko Sheridan, Daxton “Dax”, Isabella Ortiz, Troy Walker, and Dre Cipriani, the Robins learn that battling crime, even at a street level, can be dangerous and deadly…but who is their mysterious benefactor who is supplying them with technology to make their job easier? Written by Lee Bermejo, We Reprints We Are Robin #1-6 (August 2015-January 2016). When Gotham needs heroes, Robins arise! Duke Thomas is struggling with being in the foster system, but he has a new family in the Robins. Teamed with Riko Sheridan, Daxton “Dax”, Isabella Ortiz, Troy Walker, and Dre Cipriani, the Robins learn that battling crime, even at a street level, can be dangerous and deadly…but who is their mysterious benefactor who is supplying them with technology to make their job easier? Written by Lee Bermejo, We Are Robin Volume 1: The Vigilante Business is a DC Comics Batman team book. The series features art by Jorge Corona, Rob Haynes, Khary Randolph, James Harvey, and Carmine Di Giandomencio. Batman has been endangering children for years. With so many heroes in the world, the idea that there would be copycat heroes and villains, especially among kids, isn’t a stretch. It is for that reason that We Are Robin Volume 1 is an intriguing title…unfortunately, the comic’s way of presenting this idea isn’t always the strongest. The comic feels a bit like Runaways meets Secret Six. You have a mysterious benefactor guiding these teens with troubled pasts and trying to steer them toward vigilantism rather than away from it. It is a weird message since adults are supposed to “protect” the youth and not lead them to danger and makes Alfred look officially like the worst guardian. The problem with the series is that the concept is there, but it doesn’t feel like there is much of a plan behind it. Like many comics since Giant-Size X-Men #1, one of the team is killed (sorry Troy), but it no longer holds the shock value that it used to. The collection has two little arcs as a result and neither arc feels satisfying…and comics really need to hit immediately nowadays to survive. We Are Robin has a lot of potential, but I don’t think it reaches that potential in this volume. The series needs to differentiate more of the Robins besides Duke, and it tries to. With six characters and six issues an issue a character might have been a good way to roll out the team…and maybe have Troy bite it a bit later for more of an emotional impact. If nothing else, the series has some great covers. We Are Robin 1: The Vigilante Business is followed by We Are Robin 2: Jokers.

  30. 4 out of 5

    JM S

    We Are Robin: Volume 1 - The Vigilante Business Review: We Are Robin is written by Lee Bermejo with art by Khary Randolph and Rob Haynes. This took place after the events of Batman: Endgame. It is where kids are inspired to be Robin and protect Gotham City after Batman's disappearance. There are also 2 volumes of We Are Robin and this is its volume 1. While the concept for this book is decent, I wasn't really expecting anything from it. So it was about the same feeling for me after reading it. I We Are Robin: Volume 1 - The Vigilante Business Review: We Are Robin is written by Lee Bermejo with art by Khary Randolph and Rob Haynes. This took place after the events of Batman: Endgame. It is where kids are inspired to be Robin and protect Gotham City after Batman's disappearance. There are also 2 volumes of We Are Robin and this is its volume 1. While the concept for this book is decent, I wasn't really expecting anything from it. So it was about the same feeling for me after reading it. I felt liked volume 1,while has some nice ideas, was a bland book at the end. It isn't really a bad story, but the way it was just told was lacking and that it could have been better. The art is really good though, even though it has different artists and styles. I still really liked it overall. There are some decent scenes in the story and again, it has some decent ideas. But the writing is a bit of a hit or miss for me. The story as well, while has potential, the way it was handled though was lacking imo. Vol.1 is definitely a origin story for the group and it wasn't really bad, but it could have been better. A lot of the characters aren't really that interesting imo and also the attempt to have some pop culture mixed into the dialogue was vreally bad. It really didn't worked for me and ended up being a bit cringey. So overall, We Are Robin Vol.1 could have been better, especially of a really decent premise. While it has some decent scenes and some good artwork, the rest are a hit or miss. From the clunky dialogue, the story, and also its characters. What could have been an entertaining story was instead turned into a bland and forgettable story. 5.5/10

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