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On the Pulse of Morning: Limited Edition

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A beautifully packaged hardcover edition of the poem that captivated the nation and quickly became a national bestseller. From the Trade Paperback edition.


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A beautifully packaged hardcover edition of the poem that captivated the nation and quickly became a national bestseller. From the Trade Paperback edition.

30 review for On the Pulse of Morning: Limited Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Connie

    I have committed the entire poem to memory. It should be our national poem.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Diane Malikah Moomin Pinkston

    without a doubt some of my favorite excepts out of Dr. Maya Angelou's inaugural poem to William Jefferson Clinton on January 20, 1993: So say the Asian, the Hispanic, the Jew The African and Native American, the Sioux, The Catholic, the Muslim, the French, the Greek The Irish, the Rabbi, the Priest, the Sheikh, The Gay, the Straight, the Preacher, The privileged, the homeless, the Teacher. They hear. They all hear The speaking of the Tree. Today, the first and last of every Tree Speaks to humankind. Come without a doubt some of my favorite excepts out of Dr. Maya Angelou's inaugural poem to William Jefferson Clinton on January 20, 1993: So say the Asian, the Hispanic, the Jew The African and Native American, the Sioux, The Catholic, the Muslim, the French, the Greek The Irish, the Rabbi, the Priest, the Sheikh, The Gay, the Straight, the Preacher, The privileged, the homeless, the Teacher. They hear. They all hear The speaking of the Tree. Today, the first and last of every Tree Speaks to humankind. Come to me, here beside the River. Plant yourself beside me, here beside the River. Each of you, descendant of some passed On traveller, has been paid for. You, who gave me my first name, you Pawnee, Apache and Seneca, you Cherokee Nation, who rested with me, then Forced on bloody feet, left me to the employment of Other seekers–desperate for gain, Starving for gold. You, the Turk, the Swede, the German, the Scot … You the Ashanti, the Yoruba, the Kru, bought Sold, stolen, arriving on a nightmare Praying for a dream. Here, root yourselves beside me. I am the Tree planted by the River, Which will not be moved. I, the Rock, I the River, I the Tree I am yours–your Passages have been paid. Lift up your faces, you have a piercing need For this bright morning dawning for you. History, despite its wrenching pain, Cannot be unlived, and if faced With courage, need not be lived again. Lift up your eyes upon The day breaking for you. Give birth again To the dream. Women, children, men, Take it into the palms of your hands. Mold it into the shape of your most Private need. Sculpt it into The image of your most public self. Lift up your hearts Each new hour holds new chances For new beginnings. Do not be wedded forever To fear, yoked eternally To brutishness. The horizon leans forward, Offering you space to place new steps of change. Here, on the pulse of this fine day You may have the courage To look up and out upon me, the Rock, the River, the Tree, your country. No less to Midas than the mendicant. No less to you now than the mastodon then. Here on the pulse of this new day You may have the grace to look up and out And into your sister’s eyes, into Your brother’s face, your country And say simply Very simply With hope Good morning. Dr. Maya Angelou

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Definitely need to read it a second time. Unlike the other poetry from Angelou this one makes you think. I like the hint at political references. I’m not sure it warrants a three star, but it was good nonetheless.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kim B

    My first introduction to Maya Angelou. Unforgettable.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    "Give birth again To the dream." The first time I was old enough to vote was during the 1992 election. Maya Angelou read this beautiful poem at President Clinton's inauguration. I was so moved that I bought this little paperback copy as soon as I saw it in the bookshop. I remember the feeling of hope that it kindled in me then, the feeling that I nearly lost during these last four years. But, then... the first time my son was old enough to vote was during the 2020 election. My hope was reborn, and "Give birth again To the dream." The first time I was old enough to vote was during the 1992 election. Maya Angelou read this beautiful poem at President Clinton's inauguration. I was so moved that I bought this little paperback copy as soon as I saw it in the bookshop. I remember the feeling of hope that it kindled in me then, the feeling that I nearly lost during these last four years. But, then... the first time my son was old enough to vote was during the 2020 election. My hope was reborn, and again, I am moved by this timeless work. My son and I were brought to tears by Amanda Gorman's words as she read her inaugural poem last month. Listening to her inspired me to dig out my old copy of "On the Pulse of Morning" and share it with my children and students. The dream lives on.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Josh Pendergrass

    I've been obsessed with this poem for the last few months. I'm not going to try to analyze it other than to say that there is something in it that is mystical and boundlessly beautiful. "Your armed struggles for profit Have left collars of waste upon My shore, currents of debris upon my breast. Yet, today I call you to my riverside, If you will study war no more. Come, Clad in peace and I will sing the songs The Creator gave to me when I and the Tree and the rock were one." You can hear her read it here I've been obsessed with this poem for the last few months. I'm not going to try to analyze it other than to say that there is something in it that is mystical and boundlessly beautiful. "Your armed struggles for profit Have left collars of waste upon My shore, currents of debris upon my breast. Yet, today I call you to my riverside, If you will study war no more. Come, Clad in peace and I will sing the songs The Creator gave to me when I and the Tree and the rock were one." You can hear her read it here - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9nTt...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Jenkins

    Come on!! It’s Maya Angelou, how could this not be amazing? It’s short and easy to get though and filled with so much meaning and beauty.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Freddy

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

  9. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

    On the Pulse of Morning was read at President Clinton's 1993 inauguration. Being a supporter of President Clinton I was excited to read this. I hope my political views do not taint this review. Prior to On the Pulse of Morning I had only read I know Why The Caged Bird Sings, which I enjoyed, but had never ventured into her poetry. Maya Angelou's poem was beautiful, a flow of thought-provoking inspirational words. I am not an "inspirational" reader. I usually find them sappy and Hallmark Channeles On the Pulse of Morning was read at President Clinton's 1993 inauguration. Being a supporter of President Clinton I was excited to read this. I hope my political views do not taint this review. Prior to On the Pulse of Morning I had only read I know Why The Caged Bird Sings, which I enjoyed, but had never ventured into her poetry. Maya Angelou's poem was beautiful, a flow of thought-provoking inspirational words. I am not an "inspirational" reader. I usually find them sappy and Hallmark Channelesque. Although, this was different perhaps it was due to my political views and read with rose-tinted glasses, but I don't think so. Maya Angelou's way of twisting words into lyrics is incomparable. It is short and sweet (like this review) but gets the point across without inhaling breath. Gorgeous.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    My favorite poem of all time.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Epp

    I found it a little silly buying 1 poem in a hardcover. I was wrong. This poem deserves to be stand-alone as it encapsulates our past, present and future.

  12. 4 out of 5

    M.W.P.M.

    Maya Angelou recited her poem "On the Pulse of Morning" at the Presidential Inauguration of Bill Clinton on 20 January 1993. She was the second poet to recite a poem at a presidential inauguration after Robert Frost recited his poem "The Gift Outright" at the Presidential Inauguration of JFK on 20 January 1961. A Rock, A River, A Tree Hosts to species long since departed, Marked the mastodon, The dinosaur, who left dried tokens Of their sojourn here On our planet floor, Any broad alarm of their Maya Angelou recited her poem "On the Pulse of Morning" at the Presidential Inauguration of Bill Clinton on 20 January 1993. She was the second poet to recite a poem at a presidential inauguration after Robert Frost recited his poem "The Gift Outright" at the Presidential Inauguration of JFK on 20 January 1961. A Rock, A River, A Tree Hosts to species long since departed, Marked the mastodon, The dinosaur, who left dried tokens Of their sojourn here On our planet floor, Any broad alarm of their hastening doom Is lost in the gloom of dust and ages. But today, the Rock cries out to us, clearly, forcefully, Come, you may stand upon my Back and face your distant destiny, But seek no haven in my shadow, I will give you no hiding place down here. You, created only a little lower than The angels, have crouched too long in The bruising darkness Have lain too long Facedown in ignorance, Your mouths spilling words Armed for slaughter. The Rock cries out to us today, You may stand upon me, But do not hide your face. [...] - from On the Pulse of Morning Watch Maya Angelou's reading here.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Genesis

    This book "On the pulse of morning" is definitely one of the best books I have ever read and is also very up-lifting. Maya Angelou discusses the irony of getting up every morning, laziness, and the power drive to do something with your life. In the book Angelou really gives you words to think about and will honestly cause you to think differently. For example here's a little taste of the book it's one of my favorite lines that contribute to what I'm saying about this great book. Lines 14-22 You, This book "On the pulse of morning" is definitely one of the best books I have ever read and is also very up-lifting. Maya Angelou discusses the irony of getting up every morning, laziness, and the power drive to do something with your life. In the book Angelou really gives you words to think about and will honestly cause you to think differently. For example here's a little taste of the book it's one of my favorite lines that contribute to what I'm saying about this great book. Lines 14-22 You, created only a little lower than The angels, have crouched too long in The bruising darkness, Have lain too long Face down in ignorance. Your mouths spilling words Armed for slaughter. The Rock cries out today, you may stand on me, But do not hide your face. If this line from the book doesnt make you think differently I don't know what will. These words made me want to re-evaluate how I think about the mornings and my personal drive. It honestly says a lot and is very empowering. If you want to read something that will help you change your outlook, help you achieve and give you something to think about this is the book for you.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michael P.

    I feel mixed about this final poem by Maya Angelou. Its conceit is that the things that outlive men and nations, such as rocks, trees, and shores, look askance at our foolishness. Fine. Angelou's approach does not work for me because it is so serious. This conceit might please me with a lighter tone for the ideas is essentially comic, but this poem is as heavy as lead. The weight of human folly seems to be upon Ms. Angelou's shoulders, transfered to the lines herein. This poem was written for an I feel mixed about this final poem by Maya Angelou. Its conceit is that the things that outlive men and nations, such as rocks, trees, and shores, look askance at our foolishness. Fine. Angelou's approach does not work for me because it is so serious. This conceit might please me with a lighter tone for the ideas is essentially comic, but this poem is as heavy as lead. The weight of human folly seems to be upon Ms. Angelou's shoulders, transfered to the lines herein. This poem was written for and read at the inauguration of President Obama, and it seems gutsy to compose a poem about the transience of nations and human achievement and for such an occasion, which is the reason I gave it that fourth star when my feelings about the work suggested three. I have no doubt that many who heard the poem read at the inauguration ceremony found it very moving, and also find it so when reading it. The tone just does not work for me.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Annalina

    Maya Angelou's receding of On the Pulse of Morning has only been the second poem read at a US president's inauguration. While Angelou read her text in 1993 for the inauguration of William Jefferson Clinton, Robert Frost before her read The Gift Outright at the inauguration of John F. Kennedy Fitzgerald Kennedy in 1961. Recurring images in Angelou's poem include the metaphor of the rock, the tree, and the river. Furthermore, the poet pays tribute to the diversity that constitutes the United States Maya Angelou's receding of On the Pulse of Morning has only been the second poem read at a US president's inauguration. While Angelou read her text in 1993 for the inauguration of William Jefferson Clinton, Robert Frost before her read The Gift Outright at the inauguration of John F. Kennedy Fitzgerald Kennedy in 1961. Recurring images in Angelou's poem include the metaphor of the rock, the tree, and the river. Furthermore, the poet pays tribute to the diversity that constitutes the United States of America by repeatedly incorporating markers of nationality, ethnicity, and religion as elements of cultural identity.

  16. 4 out of 5

    ❄ Nina ❄

    The entire poem is a thing of pure beauty, ringing so true. Read aloud at Clinton's inauguration in 1993, people were absolutely spellbound by the distinguished woman on stage and the thought-provoking words flowing from her lips – uttering a reminder of the wounds of the past, a challenge to the present and a fervent hope for the future. Each line made me think about hidden meanings and once more Angelou exhibited her incomparable trademark, that particular way of warping simple words into mean The entire poem is a thing of pure beauty, ringing so true. Read aloud at Clinton's inauguration in 1993, people were absolutely spellbound by the distinguished woman on stage and the thought-provoking words flowing from her lips – uttering a reminder of the wounds of the past, a challenge to the present and a fervent hope for the future. Each line made me think about hidden meanings and once more Angelou exhibited her incomparable trademark, that particular way of warping simple words into meaningful verses.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kudzai Mhangwa

    I have read this poem many times before and I probably will continue to read it in forever. The grace in which Maya Angelou selects her words and shapes them into this lyric, descriptive and timeless poem is amazing. I do agree though with some sentiments that it is more of a popular poem than a 'great' poem, but none the less this poem is a piece of tapestry that the original phenomenal woman has given to this earth as a gift. I have read this poem many times before and I probably will continue to read it in forever. The grace in which Maya Angelou selects her words and shapes them into this lyric, descriptive and timeless poem is amazing. I do agree though with some sentiments that it is more of a popular poem than a 'great' poem, but none the less this poem is a piece of tapestry that the original phenomenal woman has given to this earth as a gift.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    This poem starts with the rock, the river and the tree, which know our human history and we must stand and face it. But at the pulse of morning we have the chance of a fresh start. "Lift up your hearts Each new hour holds chances For a new beginning Do not be wedded forever To fear, yoked eternally To brutishness." The answer in the end is simply to look into our brother's and sister's faces and say good morning. Great look at remembering the past, but allowing for change. This poem starts with the rock, the river and the tree, which know our human history and we must stand and face it. But at the pulse of morning we have the chance of a fresh start. "Lift up your hearts Each new hour holds chances For a new beginning Do not be wedded forever To fear, yoked eternally To brutishness." The answer in the end is simply to look into our brother's and sister's faces and say good morning. Great look at remembering the past, but allowing for change.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Read this right before opening statements on the George Floyd murder trial and am clinging to "And say simply Very simply With hope-- Good morning." Within the next month, we'll see if that is true for everyone in my neighborhood. Minneapolis, the world is watching us. Let's be on the right side of history. Read this right before opening statements on the George Floyd murder trial and am clinging to "And say simply Very simply With hope-- Good morning." Within the next month, we'll see if that is true for everyone in my neighborhood. Minneapolis, the world is watching us. Let's be on the right side of history.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    Maya Angelou writes the inaugural poem for William Jefferson Clinton in January of 1993. With a style and depth that only Maya Angelou can reach. Written, perhaps, for just his occasion, but with an eternal call across the generations. Great call to humanity and unity.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ray Zimmerman

    All poets remind us of our dreams. This poem, read at the first inauguration of President William Jefferson Clinton, January 1993 reminds us of the dream of freedom. Maya Angelou is a model poet.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    A stirring piece of verse by one of America's finest poets delivered on one of America's finest days. A stirring piece of verse by one of America's finest poets delivered on one of America's finest days.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    I'd never sat down and read this before. It's infinitely more powerful to hear it recited than to read it off the page, to be honest. I'd never sat down and read this before. It's infinitely more powerful to hear it recited than to read it off the page, to be honest.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    So beautiful. So hopeful. So aware of the hurt of the American past and the dream of a better American future.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sieara DeLone

    Beautiful, inspiring poem. As a millennial, I couldn't agree more. We have to seize the opportunity we have because of our ancestors. This poem is powerful. Beautiful, inspiring poem. As a millennial, I couldn't agree more. We have to seize the opportunity we have because of our ancestors. This poem is powerful.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Suzi

    Very good. Love her writing.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jake Powell

    Optimism - beautiful and hopeful.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    Maya Angelou's On the Pulse of Morning is a beautiful poem, reaching out to something beyond hope, dragging readers along toward something collective and something greater. Maya Angelou's On the Pulse of Morning is a beautiful poem, reaching out to something beyond hope, dragging readers along toward something collective and something greater.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jessamine

    so insanely powerful in the most simple and sweet way

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sinta

    Bill didn’t deserve this. There’s no point adding in excerpts that I liked - I would just copy + paste the entire poem.

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