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Bambi's Children

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Meet the new fawns in the forest: the descendants of Bambi discover the woods in this refreshed edition of the sequel to "Bambi," complete with new illustrations. Twin fawns Geno and Gurri are the children of Faline and Bambi. The pair must grow up and navigate the world of the woods with the help of their mother and Bambi, the new Prince of the Forest. But for young fawns Meet the new fawns in the forest: the descendants of Bambi discover the woods in this refreshed edition of the sequel to "Bambi," complete with new illustrations. Twin fawns Geno and Gurri are the children of Faline and Bambi. The pair must grow up and navigate the world of the woods with the help of their mother and Bambi, the new Prince of the Forest. But for young fawns, the wild can be dangerous. Gurri is injured by a fox and has a run-in with the most dangerous of creatures: man. Geno is challenged by rival deer and worries about the impending fight. But when the family begins to fall apart, it is the familiar presence of Bambi who tries to set it right again. This beautiful sequel to the beloved classic Bambi, tells the story of a forest family and the struggles of growing up.


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Meet the new fawns in the forest: the descendants of Bambi discover the woods in this refreshed edition of the sequel to "Bambi," complete with new illustrations. Twin fawns Geno and Gurri are the children of Faline and Bambi. The pair must grow up and navigate the world of the woods with the help of their mother and Bambi, the new Prince of the Forest. But for young fawns Meet the new fawns in the forest: the descendants of Bambi discover the woods in this refreshed edition of the sequel to "Bambi," complete with new illustrations. Twin fawns Geno and Gurri are the children of Faline and Bambi. The pair must grow up and navigate the world of the woods with the help of their mother and Bambi, the new Prince of the Forest. But for young fawns, the wild can be dangerous. Gurri is injured by a fox and has a run-in with the most dangerous of creatures: man. Geno is challenged by rival deer and worries about the impending fight. But when the family begins to fall apart, it is the familiar presence of Bambi who tries to set it right again. This beautiful sequel to the beloved classic Bambi, tells the story of a forest family and the struggles of growing up.

30 review for Bambi's Children

  1. 4 out of 5

    hannah renee.

    This book lacked the artistic inspiration of the first book and was riddled with childlike characterization and dialogue in comparison to the eerie and un-human intelligence that was characterized in its predecessor.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    I had been looking forward to reading this for a long time after being blown away Felix Salten's previous book, Bambi. I understood from the Goodreads reviews and the premise that this was not going to be the soul-searing, powerful, sobering read I got from Bambi, so I prepared myself for a pleasant, reassuring little venture to rest my mind in between sections of The Lord of the Rings. To a certain extent, I got what I expected. The mood of this book is much closer to Disney's actually pretty d I had been looking forward to reading this for a long time after being blown away Felix Salten's previous book, Bambi. I understood from the Goodreads reviews and the premise that this was not going to be the soul-searing, powerful, sobering read I got from Bambi, so I prepared myself for a pleasant, reassuring little venture to rest my mind in between sections of The Lord of the Rings. To a certain extent, I got what I expected. The mood of this book is much closer to Disney's actually pretty decent sequel (one of the very rare few to boast of such praise) Bambi 2 than to the original Bambi novel. It's occasionally melancholy, though generally hopeful and optimistic. It had been implied at the end of the first book that Bambi was going to become like his father, an often cold and distant figure who only comes into his children's lives after they had "come of age" and needed to learn the subtler ways of the forest. Here in Bambi's Children, Bambi is a very warm and caring father, taking on a much more present and active role in the rearing of his children besides just "watching from a distance". It's not very realistic for deer behavior, and it conflicts with the tone and message of the first book, but it's reassuring and heart-warming all the same. The philosophical tone from the previous book is still somewhat present here, and the meaning of Man's role in Nature is thoughtfully discussed. While the heart-stopping "big reveal" at the conclusion of the previous book was much more of a poignant commentary on not only Man's role in Nature but the nature of Life and Death itself, Salten still has some wise things to say about his own species. There is some "domestic drama" here, something about a misunderstanding between Faline and her stepsister that escalates to some needless spite and grudge-holding more suitable for a human soap opera than a story about a herd of deer. For the love of Pete! You're deer, not The Real Housewives! Get the hell over it and go graze in a meadow or something. I would have enjoyed this book much more if this unnecessary drama had been left out. All the same, I enjoyed this and I'm happy to have finally gotten my hands on a copy of Bambi's Children. If you're a fan of all things Bambi, philosophical children's books, or just xenofiction/talking animal fantasy in general, definitely give this a read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Luisa Knight

    The story of Bambi continues in this wonderful sequel! Geno and Gurri are Bambi's children and are just as frolicsome as him; though perhaps with each other to egg on, they get into a little more mischief and have more to learn about obedience and behavior then their father did at their age. The twin fawns have many adventures, and Bambi and Faline too, including some close encounters with a hunter and a dog that will keep readers turning the pages as quickly as they can. There are definitely more The story of Bambi continues in this wonderful sequel! Geno and Gurri are Bambi's children and are just as frolicsome as him; though perhaps with each other to egg on, they get into a little more mischief and have more to learn about obedience and behavior then their father did at their age. The twin fawns have many adventures, and Bambi and Faline too, including some close encounters with a hunter and a dog that will keep readers turning the pages as quickly as they can. There are definitely more action sequences in this book than the first, so your younger listeners will be captivated easier. It's another heartwarming, educational tale, with the sequel offering social lessons that the entire family can benefit from. Ages: 7+ Cleanliness: Like the Disney cartoon, there are some tense moments when the hunters are out and animals are being shot. A few scenes are described using a sentence or two about blood flowing from the neck etc. **Like my reviews? Then you should follow me! Because I have hundreds more just like this one. With each review, I provide a Cleanliness Report, mentioning any objectionable content I come across so that parents and/or conscientious readers (like me) can determine beforehand whether they want to read a book or not. Content surprises are super annoying, especially when you’re 100+ pages in, so here’s my attempt to help you avoid that! So Follow or Friend me here on GoodReads! You’ll see my updates as I’m reading and know which books I’m liking and what I’m not finishing and why. You’ll also be able to utilize my library for looking up titles to see whether the book you’re thinking about reading next has any objectionable content or not. From swear words, to romance, to bad attitudes (in children’s books), I cover it all!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lara Vehar

    I finally got around to reading the sequel and I have very mixed feelings about this book. On the one hand- it's an all right book about nature and growing up but it seems milder and watered down compared to the first one. I really didn't like Faline in this. She comes off as weirdly rude and toxic character. I also liked that in the first book humans were present but they were always lurking in the background- they were just always presented as a danger- He with a thunder stick that can kill yo I finally got around to reading the sequel and I have very mixed feelings about this book. On the one hand- it's an all right book about nature and growing up but it seems milder and watered down compared to the first one. I really didn't like Faline in this. She comes off as weirdly rude and toxic character. I also liked that in the first book humans were present but they were always lurking in the background- they were just always presented as a danger- He with a thunder stick that can kill you if you are not careful. In this book they seem much more human and less scary because we learn more about them - we don't know their names but we still know that one is a forest keeper that takes home injured animals and nurses them back to help and that he feeds them during the winter. We also had poachers and a young spoiled brat that loved hunting and didn't really respect adults or nature and he paid by being attacked by Bambi when he wanted to shoot up his family. At least that part was somewhat satisfying. This book seems toned down quite a bit. Whilst you had a lot of buck fighting and gore in general in Bambi, this one doesn't really have that many dark parts. Some characters get shot but it's not even remotely as dark as Gobo's death from the first one or a few scenes of intense fighting or killing from the first one. I did like Bambi in this though. He was still a distant father like all the other fathers - but he was still there when his children or his herd needed him - I especially love the scenes when he comes to Gurri when she is taken by the forest keeper after she gets injured by a fox and the scene where he saves Boso- he is probably the best character in this entire series. Overall, it's an allright book and an allright sequel but not even remotely as good as Bambi was because it lacks certain charm that that book has.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lenny Husen

    3.5. I am a huge fan of Bambi, and have read it at least 10 times in my life. This sequel is fine, cute, a little dull-- but basically the title is the entire plot. If this book were a Disney movie, it would be released straight to Video (DVD). Nothing new, different or innovative and lacked the emotional punch of the first book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    LobsterQuadrille

    As it turns out, the English translation of Bambi's Children is notoriously abridged and by many accounts, doesn't do justice to the original. But I wanted to try the sequel to Bambi and unfortunately can only judge it by a translation I can actually understand. So if you like, you may consider this more of a review of a particular English translation, and not so much as a review of the story Felix Salten originally penned. Sadly, I was not at all impressed by Bambi's Children. The writing is As it turns out, the English translation of Bambi's Children is notoriously abridged and by many accounts, doesn't do justice to the original. But I wanted to try the sequel to Bambi and unfortunately can only judge it by a translation I can actually understand. So if you like, you may consider this more of a review of a particular English translation, and not so much as a review of the story Felix Salten originally penned. Sadly, I was not at all impressed by Bambi's Children. The writing is serviceable, but lacks the immersive quality and believable animal voices of the first book. Geno and Gurri were rather grating characters, and Faline wasn't much better. Most of the plot seems to consist of pointless squabbling, and the screech-owl and Geno apparently knowing human phrases like "little pitchers have big ears" completely breaks the immersion. The animals also have an "inquiry into the 'Cause of Death'" at one point. Do these wild animals suddenly have a justice system now? It simply makes no sense in context to have them do and say things like this. I could overlook some of the birds using human proverbs because they may travel further afield and overhear more, but then why does Geno recognize references to pitchers and empty vessels? The setting really loses the wilderness feeling here too, as there is so much time spent talking about the gamekeeper. I didn't find Bambi's Children to be a truly awful book, but it was a real letdown after the beauty and simplicity of its predecessor.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Bambi was my childhood favorie book! I adored it. I loved the movie. I loved the characters. I breathed the setting. I lived the writing. I copied the illustrations. So I screamed when I found this in the library, sitting there for me to find it. Because I'd read a bit of it once even before I read Bambi. It was in thirft store and I skimmed it and always remembered that Bambi's Children exists, and I've waited forever to be able to read it again. It made my day. Really reminiscent and similar to Bambi was my childhood favorie book! I adored it. I loved the movie. I loved the characters. I breathed the setting. I lived the writing. I copied the illustrations. So I screamed when I found this in the library, sitting there for me to find it. Because I'd read a bit of it once even before I read Bambi. It was in thirft store and I skimmed it and always remembered that Bambi's Children exists, and I've waited forever to be able to read it again. It made my day. Really reminiscent and similar to the first book. I know some people would complain but I cannot. Since we're dealing with animals,,, the characters and plot are completely different from what I usually read, and could be quite boring for some poeple, but I don't care :'') the setting is the most gorgeously fleshed out thing one could ask for. and the writing is really really good with lots of foresty vocabulary. idk if I'd recommend it to just anyone, because I don't want you /not/ liking it. But if Disney's Bambi ever hit home for you, read Felix Salten's first book,,, and if you liked that, then read this one. 5 STARS OBVIOUSLY.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Emma's In Stock

    Here’s the thing.... My main gripe with this book is the fact that, continuity-wise, it made no sense in connection to the first one. So many new things were introduced and were written to be believed that they had been canon all along. For example, 1. Since when were there known-about laws of the forest? We never heard about any in the first book. 2. What happened to Bambi’s father’s mantra of “to stay alive is to stay alone”? 3. The gamekeeper was so unrealistic, as were the other hunters. I’m sor Here’s the thing.... My main gripe with this book is the fact that, continuity-wise, it made no sense in connection to the first one. So many new things were introduced and were written to be believed that they had been canon all along. For example, 1. Since when were there known-about laws of the forest? We never heard about any in the first book. 2. What happened to Bambi’s father’s mantra of “to stay alive is to stay alone”? 3. The gamekeeper was so unrealistic, as were the other hunters. I’m sorry but no regular hunters just go shoot anything and everything in sight. I played devil’s advocate with the first book because it said that they were poachers, but the sequel says that it’s an annual thing and that they’re ‘hunters’. 4. How do animals know about algebra and the nth power? 5. Why do they call each other “man” and “woman” but only know to call the humans He? I feel like the author tried to make a character-based story again, like with Bambi, but this one just felt all over the place. The pacing was odd, too, with it feeling so choppy. I don’t know. It just got to be a little too absurd for me.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Emily Dorffer

    This book wasn't quite as good as Bambi, but it was still a very enjoyable read. Geno and Gurri both had distinct, well fleshed out personalities. They matured at a good pace throughout the novel. Their interactions with other deer were well handled for the most part, although the young buck Gurri interacts with toward the end did feel like he was shoehorned into the plot for the sake of giving her a (view spoiler)[ ultimately doomed (hide spoiler)] love interest. The main exception to this is This book wasn't quite as good as Bambi, but it was still a very enjoyable read. Geno and Gurri both had distinct, well fleshed out personalities. They matured at a good pace throughout the novel. Their interactions with other deer were well handled for the most part, although the young buck Gurri interacts with toward the end did feel like he was shoehorned into the plot for the sake of giving her a (view spoiler)[ ultimately doomed (hide spoiler)] love interest. The main exception to this is everyone's interactions with Bambi. I really didn't like how Bambi was handled in this book. He felt way to humanized. That's a huge shame because one of the original novel's biggest strengths was that the deer didn't feel humanized. On the bright side, this novel did do one thing better than the original. The portrayal of humans in this novel was much more nuanced. Overall, I believe this book is well worth reading. It's not as extraordinary as the original, but it is still quite good. It's the perfect novel to read before bed, with or without your children.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Hoyt

    Brilliant. Bambi is so beast in this. He is no longer the little Disney fawn we're used to seeing in the media. This buck is a hero: he rescues his daughter from human captivity, he faces down a wild dog, and he even BUCKS a teen boy hunting in the woods. This book makes Bambi the legend he was supposed to be. An incredibly enjoyable read! Brilliant. Bambi is so beast in this. He is no longer the little Disney fawn we're used to seeing in the media. This buck is a hero: he rescues his daughter from human captivity, he faces down a wild dog, and he even BUCKS a teen boy hunting in the woods. This book makes Bambi the legend he was supposed to be. An incredibly enjoyable read!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    It had good closure. More than I can say for Bambi the original.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Wyatt Grondin

    God, this took me almost a full year! Plenty of that was just real life happening, obviously, but it should be noted that if Goodreads did half stars my rating would be 2.5. When this story gets good, it's VERY good, the problem is that is meanders a whole lot and feels like it wants to cram in as much as it possibly can. It's not like the first novel which knew how to be compact and excellent, it's also not like the first as the dark tones don't occur as much and it feels a bit too kid-friendly i God, this took me almost a full year! Plenty of that was just real life happening, obviously, but it should be noted that if Goodreads did half stars my rating would be 2.5. When this story gets good, it's VERY good, the problem is that is meanders a whole lot and feels like it wants to cram in as much as it possibly can. It's not like the first novel which knew how to be compact and excellent, it's also not like the first as the dark tones don't occur as much and it feels a bit too kid-friendly in it's writing style sometimes. But again the enjoyable bits are very engaging, I just wish they happened more often. Pretty sure I'm not going to read the rest of the series, but I'm happy I made it this far. Also, don't take that promise to heart, it's super likely I'll forget I said that and read the other Bambi books anyway.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chal

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Overall I enjoyed the book. At first I didn't care too much for the children and their personalities, but eventually it all comes together. I loved all the scenes with Bambi. Definitely some darker moments in the sequel. I'm not sure about the scenes with the gamekeeper. It seemed as if he was written to be the some Grandfather of the Forest, but the vibe got lost for me. Especially when he killed the cat, yet allowed the wolf dog to live. I wasn't impressed with the ruthless killing spree the ga Overall I enjoyed the book. At first I didn't care too much for the children and their personalities, but eventually it all comes together. I loved all the scenes with Bambi. Definitely some darker moments in the sequel. I'm not sure about the scenes with the gamekeeper. It seemed as if he was written to be the some Grandfather of the Forest, but the vibe got lost for me. Especially when he killed the cat, yet allowed the wolf dog to live. I wasn't impressed with the ruthless killing spree the gamekeeper allowed the hunters to do either. The hunters didn't even pick up the dead animal carcasses, just left them laying around the forest for a day or two. So the fawns got to walk around and see all their dead animal friends or on the brink of dying. The sequel also had quite a bit of bickering too. Too much drama and middle school jibing for my taste.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    I was desperately looking forward to this book arriving, as I have been searching for another copy to replace one I had lost for decades. I was devastated to find that it was an adaptation, NOT the original text. I see other negative reviews here, and agree. If you are expecting the depth and quality of the original by Felix Salten, you will be very disappointed. The character of Ate does not even appear in this version. I would never have bought it if it had been properly advertised as an adapt I was desperately looking forward to this book arriving, as I have been searching for another copy to replace one I had lost for decades. I was devastated to find that it was an adaptation, NOT the original text. I see other negative reviews here, and agree. If you are expecting the depth and quality of the original by Felix Salten, you will be very disappointed. The character of Ate does not even appear in this version. I would never have bought it if it had been properly advertised as an adaptation. This is a book for children, not the beautiful, deeply moving story that has stayed with me for almost fifty years. So sad.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gale

    Learning Woodlore Survival Skills Perfect for a one-night bedtime story this adaptation invites young readers to continue to story of beloved Bambi and his Faline. Now they have twin fawns who must learn to survive in the woods and the wild, but youngsters often disobey their elders… How will Faline and her daughter, Gurri, manage for months without son, Geno, and Bambi’s wise, reassuring presence? Will the little family make it through the spring to reach another autumn? June 28, 2017

  16. 4 out of 5

    Trianna Hyde

    Having never read a book like this I wasn't sure what to expect. A kids book? A quick read? Having read it though I found myself getting into the book and wanting the book not to end. I wish it had had more details in the story but I like how this book allows for more of your imagination to paint what your reading into a picture. The action, while geared more toward the children's book spectrum, is quick and keeps you reading to find out what happens. I was really into this book and actually rea Having never read a book like this I wasn't sure what to expect. A kids book? A quick read? Having read it though I found myself getting into the book and wanting the book not to end. I wish it had had more details in the story but I like how this book allows for more of your imagination to paint what your reading into a picture. The action, while geared more toward the children's book spectrum, is quick and keeps you reading to find out what happens. I was really into this book and actually read it twice before this official finish date.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    Bambi was pretty good, but this sequel is kind of a mess. It's like the author couldn't make up his mind to make it light and joyful, or dark and grizzly. And then putting certain human emotions on some animals just didn't work for me. I wouldn't recommend either of the Bambi books to anyone unless they are super interested in the story, and then to teens and up. I don't think they're really for a young audience. Bambi was pretty good, but this sequel is kind of a mess. It's like the author couldn't make up his mind to make it light and joyful, or dark and grizzly. And then putting certain human emotions on some animals just didn't work for me. I wouldn't recommend either of the Bambi books to anyone unless they are super interested in the story, and then to teens and up. I don't think they're really for a young audience.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    It was a really enjoyable, really marvelous and very excellent children's novel sequel. It had really beautiful illustrations, really memorable characters, really great adventure, really excellent drama, really nice humor and a really nice story. It is a excellent sequel to the original novel, "Bambi." I really recommend this book to old and new "Bambi" fans of all ages. It was a really enjoyable, really marvelous and very excellent children's novel sequel. It had really beautiful illustrations, really memorable characters, really great adventure, really excellent drama, really nice humor and a really nice story. It is a excellent sequel to the original novel, "Bambi." I really recommend this book to old and new "Bambi" fans of all ages.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cel Perry

    The does are always freaking out when they see elk or moose or whatever the “kings” are meant to be. And when they freak out, they start screaming “BA-OH! BA-OH!” and run like hell, with nary a thought for the confused and terrified fawn they may have left behind. For “BA-OH!!!” alone, this book gets 4 stars.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bonny

    Book Bingo 2017 - Backlist from an author you read for another square.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gillie

    It was a good book, but not my favorite.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Reads like a very cheap pastiche of the original Bambi book. A poor fanfiction. I have read in some places this is due to a particularly bad translation from German into English.🤷🏻‍♂️

  23. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    Very different in comparison to what I adored in the original book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    Even better… I read this as a 10 year old and again as a 53-year-old and I can attest that this book is this masterful as a bambi, with a more fleshed out story. I love this book!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kat_

    Cool book. I like it!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Elias

    Wow

  27. 5 out of 5

    Susan Grodsky

    Just not engaging. Read a few chapters, did not finish.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Drew Graham

    (Maybe 3.5.) Bambi is all grown up, and watches mostly from afar as Faline oversees the rearing of his two children, Gurri and Geno. Curious, enthusiastic Geno and his spunky, optimistic sister Gurri enjoy living in the forest under their serene but sometimes stern mother's watchful care, and occasionally enjoy the company and guidance of their protective and stately father. Together they make it through the change of weather as the months pass, the coming of Him and his thunder-sticks during hu (Maybe 3.5.) Bambi is all grown up, and watches mostly from afar as Faline oversees the rearing of his two children, Gurri and Geno. Curious, enthusiastic Geno and his spunky, optimistic sister Gurri enjoy living in the forest under their serene but sometimes stern mother's watchful care, and occasionally enjoy the company and guidance of their protective and stately father. Together they make it through the change of weather as the months pass, the coming of Him and his thunder-sticks during hunting season, the predators of the natural world and various other challenges of life as a roe-deer. As little-known as Bambi is, the sequel is even less familiar. I read the first book a few years ago, and I knew at the time there was a sequel, but I was even less in the habit of using inter-library loan than I was in the habit of reading a series in its entirety, so it was put on the back-burner, until I located it to read as part of my Disney source material readings. I thought this was a nice follow-up to Salten's previous fantasy of the forest, a gentle and genuine tale of a family of deer surviving and thriving in the forest. For most of this book I thought it was kind of marvelous and was a pretty clear 4 stars, but as it went on (and on and on) I decided it just didn't have that much to say. The writing is very readable and the characters are appealing and sympathetic, and read very much like actual animals, it just seems to ramble on for a few episodes too many. It rambled through the forest for the last half, and many things that had happened before had little to do with what was to come, and vice versa. I cared about the characters, but I felt like I was getting too much of a look at the minutiae of their daily lives and society. (Though the passages about the trees conversing with each other were pretty interesting, and the way all the animals spoke and interacted seemed so authentic it was like reading what animals really think and how they really communicated.) The extended family of Bambi and Faline (Rolla and her children Lana and Boso, and the poor orphan bucks Nello and Membo) add a nice level of interest and interaction, and Bambi is a great character, even if, as is the way of nature, he's not as present a character as he is in the first book.The themes of naturalism and detached philosophy are intact, and have a few more outlets to express themselves than in the first book, and it was nice that the mysterious and dangerous "He" wasn't as maligned as a heartless killing machine, just as an unknown creature, often capable of kindness and even an occasional source of protection. This was a mostly pretty charming sequel to the previous book. Bambi takes a backseat as his children step to the lead, and their life in the ever-changing forest is sometimes exciting and sometimes sad, usually pretty interesting and always authentic. I liked how it didn't vilify man as much as the first one did -- The baddies in the animal world were just as dangerous, if not more so, though a little less mysterious. It meandered after a while and went on for about 100 pages too many, but it was fun to read. ---------------------------------------------------------------- Notable quotes: [Gurri:] "Love and hatred are extreme emotions. In the middle you have..." "Tolerance and freedom," the owl cut in sharply. (And the rest of this conversation, 118-120). "If you go around thinking you're being cheated, life becomes very unpleasant." ... The squirrel's mind was as active as his muscles. They needed time to think up proper responses to refute him (229). "I was wrong, that's all. I tell you, I don't know what things are coming to. You hold beliefs, you--you cling to certain basic principles and--pam! everything blows away around you" (Perri the squirrel, 270).

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bailey Adamczyk

    I loved the book it was a very good book. I was surprised that Gurri survived because she was shot by the THUNDER STICK! I was shocked that Rolla and Feline were mad at each other. Bambi was the father of the two deers. The book was amazing but I thought that i was going to be more awesome in some spots

  30. 5 out of 5

    James

    Interesting book, certainly a worthy sequel to the original "Bambi, A Life in the Woods" by Felix Salten. This is not the warm and fuzzy book you may expect based on associations with the Disney film, but more of a study of survival in the sometimes inhospitable forest. The animals have a natural distrust for HIM, however there are certain Hims that are the exception. This is a central conflict in the story of Bambi's children. This book also examines the emotions which may or may not be true for Interesting book, certainly a worthy sequel to the original "Bambi, A Life in the Woods" by Felix Salten. This is not the warm and fuzzy book you may expect based on associations with the Disney film, but more of a study of survival in the sometimes inhospitable forest. The animals have a natural distrust for HIM, however there are certain Hims that are the exception. This is a central conflict in the story of Bambi's children. This book also examines the emotions which may or may not be true for forest animals, however they are certainly human emotions, and the conflicts depicted here are not resolved quickly nor without emotional scars. Most enjoyable is the dialog that goes on between the deer and the animal species with whom they share the forest. Neither understands the other very well, yet they strive to make their respective points to each other with often hilarious results. In conclusion, regardless of how this book appears on the surface, I would not classify it as strictly a children's book, although some children might certainly enjoy it even if they don't understand the adult perspectives. However, Felix Salten did not care to be know as a children's author and that comes across pretty well. A good read for ages 12 and above.

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