50 review for Daredevil: Marked for Murder

  1. 5 out of 5

    Roxana Chirilă

    I can't say I've really enjoyed this - this volume contains issues from back in 1980 (as far as I can tell), when characters tended to speak in sentences with exclamation marks at the end and have cheesy dialogue lines. "Keep back, all of you! This is the Black Widow's fight now!" the Black Widow herself cries, coming in through the window in her green dress and red pigtails, looking for all the world like a lost schoolgirl with superpowers - no subtle and confident Natasha, this one, either. She I can't say I've really enjoyed this - this volume contains issues from back in 1980 (as far as I can tell), when characters tended to speak in sentences with exclamation marks at the end and have cheesy dialogue lines. "Keep back, all of you! This is the Black Widow's fight now!" the Black Widow herself cries, coming in through the window in her green dress and red pigtails, looking for all the world like a lost schoolgirl with superpowers - no subtle and confident Natasha, this one, either. She despairs over people suffering all around her and refers to herself in third person. The stories are full of action, but unfortunately they don't have much depth, so my interest kept going down and I trudged through the volume, eventually getting to such a low point that I put the book down and figured I'd read the last pages later, only I never did. There's also a Daredevil origin story, complete with some of the details Frank Miller would later reuse to write far superior stories, which move out of the pow!-wow!-behold the "red-garbed foe of evil"! zone.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jon Arnold

    Marvel were never shy about hyping up their books, a trait derived from the carny hucksterism of Stan Lee himself. The first issue reprinted in this collection announces a newcomer who will ‘explode upon the Marvel scene like a bombshell’. It’s fair to say that, if anything, that undersells Miller’s eventual impact. Miller’s most significant works lie a long way off at this point, and this run has him almost exclusively on artistic duties – he gets one just credit as co-writer across the nine iss Marvel were never shy about hyping up their books, a trait derived from the carny hucksterism of Stan Lee himself. The first issue reprinted in this collection announces a newcomer who will ‘explode upon the Marvel scene like a bombshell’. It’s fair to say that, if anything, that undersells Miller’s eventual impact. Miller’s most significant works lie a long way off at this point, and this run has him almost exclusively on artistic duties – he gets one just credit as co-writer across the nine issues collected here. That’s not to say that this isn’t a pointer to the future though – main writer Roger McKenzie is very much in tune with the darker fare Miller’s more at home with and Miller, in conjunction with inker Klaus Janson, enhances the darker mood. Miller’s use of shadow to enhance scenes is exceptional as are the visual tricks he uses to represent Daredevil’s hypersense. It’s of a piece with the likes of The Dark Knight Returns and Sin City. It’s clearly Miller’s presence that lends these issues their significance. McKenzie’s a decent but not exceptional writer and most of the tales here are standard superheroics. Only David Micheline’s single issue really breaks that pattern, caustically commenting on big business, corruption and the onset of the computer era. Overall though it’s hard to shake the suspicion that the artwork provides both style and substance to this collection.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ian Williamson

    This was a very enjoyable book, Roger Mckenzie is a forgotten master at Marvel. He created the building blocks on which Frank Miller built the dark and gritty Daredevil. He even managed to tackle a damsel in distress storyline involving the black widow which works, he presented a believable scenario where it was possible that she would be captured and potentially helpless. Furthermore there are two amazing examples of story telling, Matt Murdoch squaring up to the Hulk, and a story which I've he This was a very enjoyable book, Roger Mckenzie is a forgotten master at Marvel. He created the building blocks on which Frank Miller built the dark and gritty Daredevil. He even managed to tackle a damsel in distress storyline involving the black widow which works, he presented a believable scenario where it was possible that she would be captured and potentially helpless. Furthermore there are two amazing examples of story telling, Matt Murdoch squaring up to the Hulk, and a story which I've heard about previously but only read here, Ben Ulrich finds out the truth and confronts Matt about his secret identity, it was a great retelling of his origins and a nice moment between these long standing characters and friends. Also to note I enjoyed Millers artwork, I've never been a big fan of his and do think his work is overrated, but this is a different style than I've seen from him, when he draws in the Marvel way his talent really shows. A very good read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Johnny Andrews

    A nice lead up before Frank came and really turned DD to the darker hero he is today.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Phillip Berrie

    Not much to say here. I'm an old fan of Daredevil and it was good to read some of his older stories where they concentrated more on his hyper senses and skills rather than his passion; they are after all the point of differentiation for the character. So, if you like Daredevil as a character, do yourself a favour and read this collection. Not much to say here. I'm an old fan of Daredevil and it was good to read some of his older stories where they concentrated more on his hyper senses and skills rather than his passion; they are after all the point of differentiation for the character. So, if you like Daredevil as a character, do yourself a favour and read this collection.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dwayne Keller

    Classic Daredevil stories with Black Widow, Mr. Fear, The Unholy Three, Bullseye, Hulk, Gladiator, Dr. Octopus and more.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Derbist27

  8. 5 out of 5

    S. Gilborson

  9. 5 out of 5

    Denis Slobodeniuk

  10. 5 out of 5

    James Hough

  11. 4 out of 5

    Timur Shakirov

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ľubomír Duško

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tiaan

  14. 5 out of 5

    Graham Muir

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

  16. 4 out of 5

    Maria

  17. 5 out of 5

    Josh Cunliffe

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sam Fitzpatrick

  19. 4 out of 5

    Eric

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nefornia

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chris Kilbride

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michael Nolan

  23. 5 out of 5

    Marty

  24. 4 out of 5

    Strzelba

  25. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jan

  27. 5 out of 5

    João Santana da Silva

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jude

  29. 5 out of 5

    Milena Gorska

  30. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  31. 5 out of 5

    Louisa

  32. 5 out of 5

    Logan

  33. 5 out of 5

    michael myers

  34. 5 out of 5

    Edward McWhirter

  35. 5 out of 5

    Mark Phillips

  36. 5 out of 5

    Riaan

  37. 4 out of 5

    Jinx:The:Poet {the Literary Masochist, Ink Ninja & Word Roamer}

  38. 5 out of 5

    Philippe Kraus

  39. 5 out of 5

    Martin

  40. 4 out of 5

    Mateusz Kozok

  41. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Warren

  42. 4 out of 5

    Kane

  43. 5 out of 5

    Chanel gandy

  44. 4 out of 5

    Knowan Attall

  45. 5 out of 5

    Pat Winter

  46. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  47. 4 out of 5

    Katrin Hüttemann

  48. 4 out of 5

    Rhys Davies-thomas

  49. 4 out of 5

    Marione

  50. 5 out of 5

    Vicente Cortez

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