Hot Best Seller

The Women of Pemberley

Availability: Ready to download

The Women of Pemberley follows the lives of five women, some from the beloved works of Jane Austen, some new from the author's imagination, into a new era of post industrial revolution England at the start of the Victorian Age. Vast changes are in motion, as they were throughout this dynamic century. The women, like many of Jane Austen's heroines, are strong, intelligent i The Women of Pemberley follows the lives of five women, some from the beloved works of Jane Austen, some new from the author's imagination, into a new era of post industrial revolution England at the start of the Victorian Age. Vast changes are in motion, as they were throughout this dynamic century. The women, like many of Jane Austen's heroines, are strong, intelligent individuals and the depth and variety of the original characters develop into a series of episodes linked together by their relationship to each other and to Pemberley, which is the heart of their community. The central themes of love, friendship, marriage and a sense of social obligation remain as do the great political and social issues of the age.


Compare

The Women of Pemberley follows the lives of five women, some from the beloved works of Jane Austen, some new from the author's imagination, into a new era of post industrial revolution England at the start of the Victorian Age. Vast changes are in motion, as they were throughout this dynamic century. The women, like many of Jane Austen's heroines, are strong, intelligent i The Women of Pemberley follows the lives of five women, some from the beloved works of Jane Austen, some new from the author's imagination, into a new era of post industrial revolution England at the start of the Victorian Age. Vast changes are in motion, as they were throughout this dynamic century. The women, like many of Jane Austen's heroines, are strong, intelligent individuals and the depth and variety of the original characters develop into a series of episodes linked together by their relationship to each other and to Pemberley, which is the heart of their community. The central themes of love, friendship, marriage and a sense of social obligation remain as do the great political and social issues of the age.

30 review for The Women of Pemberley

  1. 5 out of 5

    Della Tingle

    This is the second book in the Pemberley Chronicles series by Rebecca Ann Collins. I enjoyed this one much more than the first. The Women of Pemberley is about five women, all characters created by Collins, but most of their parents are beloved Pride and Prejudice characters: Charles and Jane Bingley, Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner, Fitzwilliam and Elizabeth Darcy, and Colonel Fitzwilliam. I love Fitzwilliam Darcy. Always have; always will. However, he is not a god. He is not perfect. He is placed on a ve This is the second book in the Pemberley Chronicles series by Rebecca Ann Collins. I enjoyed this one much more than the first. The Women of Pemberley is about five women, all characters created by Collins, but most of their parents are beloved Pride and Prejudice characters: Charles and Jane Bingley, Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner, Fitzwilliam and Elizabeth Darcy, and Colonel Fitzwilliam. I love Fitzwilliam Darcy. Always have; always will. However, he is not a god. He is not perfect. He is placed on a very, very high pedestal by Collins. “They needed Mr Darcy’s advice. ‘Fitzwilliam will not move without consulting Mr Darcy’” (25). They had to “discuss the situation and plan some action with the benefit of Mr Darcy’s wise counsel. Darcy, more than any other member of the family, had become their source of reasoned and sensible advice. They looked to him whenever they were unsure of their own judgement” (25). 🫤

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ruthie Schmeichel

    This was even better than the first one! Even though there were five points of view—five different people—from which the story is told, each person has their own story and event that they're going through, so it's not confusing at all! I was at the halfway mark by the first three days! This was even better than the first one! Even though there were five points of view—five different people—from which the story is told, each person has their own story and event that they're going through, so it's not confusing at all! I was at the halfway mark by the first three days!

  3. 5 out of 5

    bookyeti

    Yet another wonderful work by Ms. Collins. The story continues on, from her first masterpiece, The Pemberley Chronicles, as we read yet more about our favorite characters' changing lives. Collins, in her own unique style, weaves a convincing tale of Pemberley's families and friends, as the years roll by. Keeping to the theme of Austen's Pride and Prejudice novel, subtle humour and romance are the order of the day -- but also great detail is placed on the political and social aspects of the time. Yet another wonderful work by Ms. Collins. The story continues on, from her first masterpiece, The Pemberley Chronicles, as we read yet more about our favorite characters' changing lives. Collins, in her own unique style, weaves a convincing tale of Pemberley's families and friends, as the years roll by. Keeping to the theme of Austen's Pride and Prejudice novel, subtle humour and romance are the order of the day -- but also great detail is placed on the political and social aspects of the time. The Women of Pemberley certainly leaves one hoping for another novel from our talented Ms. Collins.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    How tedious this book was! It was written in passive tense which really irritates me. I prefer to live the story than be told what happened. In addition, Collins included over 50 characters. That's way too many to keep track of. It didn't take long before I didn't care about any of them. I kept reading (gotta be a reason for it) because the author had done extensive research. I learned a lot about the early Victorian Age with the Poor Laws and changes from conservative to liberal and back in the How tedious this book was! It was written in passive tense which really irritates me. I prefer to live the story than be told what happened. In addition, Collins included over 50 characters. That's way too many to keep track of. It didn't take long before I didn't care about any of them. I kept reading (gotta be a reason for it) because the author had done extensive research. I learned a lot about the early Victorian Age with the Poor Laws and changes from conservative to liberal and back in the government. In spite of the information, I don't think I need to read any more of her books.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Destiny

    I really enjoyed this book. I liked how the chapters were divided up between five of the women characters. I liked reading about all five of the women: Emma, Emily, Cassandra, Isabella and Josie. My only compliant is that sometimes the chapters weren't focused on the character they were named after. I enjoyed them anyway, but in the case of Cassy's chapter, it didn't seem to be about her at all. Also why are the Wickham always dog-piled on? I know the parents made mistakes, but couldn't they hav I really enjoyed this book. I liked how the chapters were divided up between five of the women characters. I liked reading about all five of the women: Emma, Emily, Cassandra, Isabella and Josie. My only compliant is that sometimes the chapters weren't focused on the character they were named after. I enjoyed them anyway, but in the case of Cassy's chapter, it didn't seem to be about her at all. Also why are the Wickham always dog-piled on? I know the parents made mistakes, but couldn't they have turned out to be good parents? Apparently in this version, they couldn't. Still I will be reading the rest of the books in the series.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    This is still a very well-written series, probably one of the best Jane Austen ones I've come across so far. The reasons I liked it less were because it's increasingly about the next generation who just don't hold my interest as well and because I find it hard to believe that anyone can be that good and knowledgeable about the best course of action to take. It's obvious that the writer is making them model citizens who take the best course since, of course, she knows history. It's still a very i This is still a very well-written series, probably one of the best Jane Austen ones I've come across so far. The reasons I liked it less were because it's increasingly about the next generation who just don't hold my interest as well and because I find it hard to believe that anyone can be that good and knowledgeable about the best course of action to take. It's obvious that the writer is making them model citizens who take the best course since, of course, she knows history. It's still a very interesting read, especially for the history of change in England.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Solveig Singleton

    Oh dear. The author has turned them all into social activists. Every one of them. They post about England, preserving the starving Irish, helping cottagers displaced by the Enclosure Acts, coming to the aid of workers in a collapsed mine, agitating for public health. Oh DEAR. It is very funny, but unintentionally so. I was able to finish it, however.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Characters are consistent and developed. I don't know if it's my state of mind right now or not, but I found books 1 and 2 to be slow, so I'm not going to finish the series. Characters are consistent and developed. I don't know if it's my state of mind right now or not, but I found books 1 and 2 to be slow, so I'm not going to finish the series.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    Enjoyable.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I enjoy the Pemberly Chronicles by Rebecca Collins but you do have to get past the wordiness and unnecessary amount of descriptions.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    added for reading completeness but don't remember enough to review. added for reading completeness but don't remember enough to review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany L

    I LOVE this book series. With P&P being my all-time favorite book, it is wonderful to read about the characters and what happens to them and future generations.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen Villanueva

    Huge fan of the author and love that Pride and Prejudice just keeps going ❤

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia Grove

    A re-read. Not a favourite from this series as it is in five parts each focussing on one particular woman. But the stories are excellent and add more knowledge about each person's story. A re-read. Not a favourite from this series as it is in five parts each focussing on one particular woman. But the stories are excellent and add more knowledge about each person's story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Pat Lawlor

    Interesting new stories using Jane Austen's characters. A quick, fun read Interesting new stories using Jane Austen's characters. A quick, fun read

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    The Women of Pemberley by Rebecca Ann Collins This second book in a series of Pride and Prejudice sequels by Rebecca Ann Collins follows the lives of five women of Pemberley, all descendants of the original Jane Austen characters. Each of the five chapters is a story in itself, devoted to the life of one of these strong, independent and "accomplished" female characters in her search for fulfillment through career, love and marriage. The men in their lives are every woman's ideal image of a husban The Women of Pemberley by Rebecca Ann Collins This second book in a series of Pride and Prejudice sequels by Rebecca Ann Collins follows the lives of five women of Pemberley, all descendants of the original Jane Austen characters. Each of the five chapters is a story in itself, devoted to the life of one of these strong, independent and "accomplished" female characters in her search for fulfillment through career, love and marriage. The men in their lives are every woman's ideal image of a husband, treating them with respect, love, and tenderness. Their husbands keep them safe, support them emotionally as well as physically and are their constant companions. What more could one ask for? The events occur during a significant period in England's history replete with political and social upheaval - just after the industrial revolution and at the beginning of the Victorian period. Historical events are masterfully interwoven into the plot as they pertain to the lives of the characters. Strong women such as them make a difference - helping poor Irish immigrants during the potato famine; emulating the efforts of Florence Nightingale during the Crimean war in the emerging hospitals of the period; and, finding their voice in writing like the Brontë sisters. The common thread is of course Pemberley and the Darcy family. The marriage of Elizabeth and Fitzwilliam Darcy almost seems too good to be true. Despite the death of their second child, William, which they are still coping with, they remain as much in love as ever, dedicated not only to each other but to the entire community of Pemberley. Their hospitable nature, common sense and humanitarian outlook are the ultimate model for their family and their acquaintances. They are held in the highest esteem by everyone. Indeed, the "shades of Pemberley" are not only unpolluted but enhanced by the love surrounding Elizabeth and Darcy.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    I bought this the same time as Pemberley Chronicles. After trudging through that tedious book, I was ever so reluctant to open the second in the series. I regret that I have had it for over a month and have made it less than half way through. This is a failing indeed, as I am a voracious reader who tends to read a book through in one sitting. Again this novel is strongly set in a political vent, with the Darcy's intermixing with the lower circles more and more. The families all seem to marry wit I bought this the same time as Pemberley Chronicles. After trudging through that tedious book, I was ever so reluctant to open the second in the series. I regret that I have had it for over a month and have made it less than half way through. This is a failing indeed, as I am a voracious reader who tends to read a book through in one sitting. Again this novel is strongly set in a political vent, with the Darcy's intermixing with the lower circles more and more. The families all seem to marry within the local families and the entire social sphere seems askew. To enjoy this, one must really buy into the idea that Fitzwilliam Darcy would support The Reformists. In addition, the time-line and the characters are frustrating to keep straight because 1) the names are similar if not the same as other characters, and maybe most damning, 2) the author doesn't write them well enough for the reader to care to know them. It was almost as if I needed a family tree to guide me through each chapter to be reminded of who this character is, and how do they relate to the others. I really hoped this to be a better book than Pemberley Chronicles, because it would give hope for the rest of her series, but I cannot in good conscience recommend this for purchase. It's not the worst I've read but there are many others out that are by fair better (like Mr. Darcy Presents His Bride.) Eventually I will finish this, as a matter of principle, but at present, I'm in no rush. * I eventually finished this after posting that review above on Amazon. I did not improve.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sherry

    Bk two of series, has five stories of five of the P&P characters' offspring. Emma - daughter of Jane Bennet and Charles Bingley, unhappily married to the ambitious, jealous and domineering Mr. David Wilson, a member of Parliament. His older brother James, a lawyer, looks after Emma and her two young daughters, Victoria and Stephanie. Emily Gardiner, widow of young Frenchman, Paul Antoine, married to James Courtney, theological scholar at Pemberly, now rector at Kympton. Children: Elizabeth, Will Bk two of series, has five stories of five of the P&P characters' offspring. Emma - daughter of Jane Bennet and Charles Bingley, unhappily married to the ambitious, jealous and domineering Mr. David Wilson, a member of Parliament. His older brother James, a lawyer, looks after Emma and her two young daughters, Victoria and Stephanie. Emily Gardiner, widow of young Frenchman, Paul Antoine, married to James Courtney, theological scholar at Pemberly, now rector at Kympton. Children: Elizabeth, Willian and Jessica. Greatly involved in library, hospital village school. Brother Robert back from Ceylon, is attracted to Rose Fitzwilliam. Cassandra - Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet's daughter married to Dr. Richard Gardiner, son of Elizabths aunt and uncle Garinwr. Isabella - daughter of Darcy's cousin Colonel Fitzwilliam and his wife Caroline Gardiner, Elizabeth's cousin. Eldest of their four children, David, Amy and James. Josie Tate, daughter ofNewspaper magnate Anthony Tate and Rebecca Collins, aspires to be a serious writer, not a novelist. Her serious, non- flirtatious demeanor attracts the eye of Pemberley heir Julian Darcy.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    Good lord, what a mixed up family tree - cousins marrying second cousins, granddaughters marrying sons. I also have to agree with another review that the whole family seems to be very forward thinking, which I find unusually. Certainly, my circle of friends is forward thinking as well, but not every single person I'm friends with. I have plenty of people I'm friends with who don't share my opinions. That being said, I felt that Rebecca's reaction to an aspect Josie's story was completely out of Good lord, what a mixed up family tree - cousins marrying second cousins, granddaughters marrying sons. I also have to agree with another review that the whole family seems to be very forward thinking, which I find unusually. Certainly, my circle of friends is forward thinking as well, but not every single person I'm friends with. I have plenty of people I'm friends with who don't share my opinions. That being said, I felt that Rebecca's reaction to an aspect Josie's story was completely out of character and much more how Mrs. Bennet would have reacted to something similar. They had it split into chapters based on different people, but I sometimes felt, especially with Emily's chapter, there wasn't a whole lot about her. She just happened to be on the fringe of the story, but we didn't actually know the woman who the story was really about.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bron

    Every time I try reading a Jane Austen follow on story I try so hard to be open, but the reading styles never seem right. In this case each sentence felt stilted, and in my head I sounded like someone learning to read. The story couldn't flow very well because the writing was all wrong!! I read through 1/3rd of the book, because I was a little interested in what would happen, but when I found the story wrapped up and someone else's story was just beginning, I gave up. Although I didn't think it r Every time I try reading a Jane Austen follow on story I try so hard to be open, but the reading styles never seem right. In this case each sentence felt stilted, and in my head I sounded like someone learning to read. The story couldn't flow very well because the writing was all wrong!! I read through 1/3rd of the book, because I was a little interested in what would happen, but when I found the story wrapped up and someone else's story was just beginning, I gave up. Although I didn't think it right that a book following on from Jane Austen's work should have so much political and current content present, I did love reading about the potato famine, I was surprised that anyone in England had even been aware that it was occurring!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Becca Jane

    I would not have purchased this book after reading the first, however I bought the books at the same time so I didn't know I would be wasting my money. Since I already own the book I decided to go ahead and read it. It was more of the same, "Oh Darcy if it wasn't for my Aunt and Uncle Gardiner taking me along on Holiday we may never have married!" This book was the same as the other, only it tells in more detail about a different female character with each chapter. The book does reference a lot I would not have purchased this book after reading the first, however I bought the books at the same time so I didn't know I would be wasting my money. Since I already own the book I decided to go ahead and read it. It was more of the same, "Oh Darcy if it wasn't for my Aunt and Uncle Gardiner taking me along on Holiday we may never have married!" This book was the same as the other, only it tells in more detail about a different female character with each chapter. The book does reference a lot of what was happening politically in England at the time.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    This is a companion novel to Pride and Prejudice. I will tell you I am not as big a fan of Pride and Prejudice as most people seem to be, and think I would have liked this novel better if I had reread Pride and Prejudice first to refresh myself. It is still a good story in itself, however, and you don't have to read original novel to enjoy it. Also, I mistakenly thought this was the only companion book to Pride and Prejudice, but instead it is one of several. I do think I will eventually read th This is a companion novel to Pride and Prejudice. I will tell you I am not as big a fan of Pride and Prejudice as most people seem to be, and think I would have liked this novel better if I had reread Pride and Prejudice first to refresh myself. It is still a good story in itself, however, and you don't have to read original novel to enjoy it. Also, I mistakenly thought this was the only companion book to Pride and Prejudice, but instead it is one of several. I do think I will eventually read the others.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Aditi

    I just couldn't get into this book. I tried to read through the first chapter, but everything from the weak writing - I don't think I've read the words "her husband" and "Mr. Darcy" so many times on the same page referring to the same person - to the surplus of characters that aren't properly introduced just makes this a very difficult read. This might be good read if you haven't actually read Austen and don't love her prose. It sort of reads like a teenage YA book, to be honest. But if you have I just couldn't get into this book. I tried to read through the first chapter, but everything from the weak writing - I don't think I've read the words "her husband" and "Mr. Darcy" so many times on the same page referring to the same person - to the surplus of characters that aren't properly introduced just makes this a very difficult read. This might be good read if you haven't actually read Austen and don't love her prose. It sort of reads like a teenage YA book, to be honest. But if you have read the original P&P book, this one is going be a hard one to get down.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

    Fantastic! Just as engrossing and as enjoyable as the first book in the series (The Pemberley Chronicles.) Ms. Collins weaves such an incredible story, using Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" as her sound building block. Her continuation of everyone's lives and their stories is magnificent. Truth be told, I found myself laughing, gasping in shock, and cheering at several different times while reading. I truly cannot say enough wonderful things about this book, the series, or of Ms. Collins her Fantastic! Just as engrossing and as enjoyable as the first book in the series (The Pemberley Chronicles.) Ms. Collins weaves such an incredible story, using Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" as her sound building block. Her continuation of everyone's lives and their stories is magnificent. Truth be told, I found myself laughing, gasping in shock, and cheering at several different times while reading. I truly cannot say enough wonderful things about this book, the series, or of Ms. Collins herself.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

    While I find I love the characters that represent the Bennet sisters' progeny, there are too many of them. This book was much like a collection of tied short stories ... I would have preferred fewer characters with more detailed stories. In addition, all of the characters are social reformers, which I find a little credulous, and even though I appreciate a political and socioeconomical background context in British history, it became tedious quickly. Lastly, as much as I love Elizabeth and Jane, While I find I love the characters that represent the Bennet sisters' progeny, there are too many of them. This book was much like a collection of tied short stories ... I would have preferred fewer characters with more detailed stories. In addition, all of the characters are social reformers, which I find a little credulous, and even though I appreciate a political and socioeconomical background context in British history, it became tedious quickly. Lastly, as much as I love Elizabeth and Jane, aren't they getting old yet? Not sure that I will continue with this series.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    I like this series, and will continue reading it. This book was better than the first one, but they both move at a rather slow and even pace, and I expect the next ones to be about the same. That being said, I did enjoy this book and will look forward to reading the others. I think the author tries to combine too much history into the lives of the Darcy's and it gets lost in her Austen writing style. I like this series, and will continue reading it. This book was better than the first one, but they both move at a rather slow and even pace, and I expect the next ones to be about the same. That being said, I did enjoy this book and will look forward to reading the others. I think the author tries to combine too much history into the lives of the Darcy's and it gets lost in her Austen writing style.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Samantha McNulty

    Continuing on from The Pemberley Chronicles, Collins continues to write about the lifes of the familes associated with the the Pemberley estate. As years go on, love blooms, children are born and major events happen in the lifes of Elizabeth and Jane, their children, granchildren and friends. Entwining polictical and social happenings with the lifes of the Pemberley estate and its people, Collins' work, once again is superb. Continuing on from The Pemberley Chronicles, Collins continues to write about the lifes of the familes associated with the the Pemberley estate. As years go on, love blooms, children are born and major events happen in the lifes of Elizabeth and Jane, their children, granchildren and friends. Entwining polictical and social happenings with the lifes of the Pemberley estate and its people, Collins' work, once again is superb.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Supanora

    I was really not a fan of this book. To be honest, I only managed to get through the first story about 'Emma' and then I could take any more. For me, it read to much like a "modern day writer trying to mimic Jane Austen" or just a poorly done fan-fiction. The story was predictable and dry. Perhaps my expectations were too high but sorry I didn't like it. I'd love to hear what other people thought though. I was really not a fan of this book. To be honest, I only managed to get through the first story about 'Emma' and then I could take any more. For me, it read to much like a "modern day writer trying to mimic Jane Austen" or just a poorly done fan-fiction. The story was predictable and dry. Perhaps my expectations were too high but sorry I didn't like it. I'd love to hear what other people thought though.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Jane Austen's books always had a direction and purpose to the narrative, in order to elaborate the theme, but this book, while having a definite plot, does not focus on one purpose to the exclusion of others. In other words, Austen used an entire book to look at one issue from different angles, while Collins' book is more plot-oriented. That's OK with me--pseudo-Austen is better than no Austen at all! (and it's a good pseudo-Austen) Jane Austen's books always had a direction and purpose to the narrative, in order to elaborate the theme, but this book, while having a definite plot, does not focus on one purpose to the exclusion of others. In other words, Austen used an entire book to look at one issue from different angles, while Collins' book is more plot-oriented. That's OK with me--pseudo-Austen is better than no Austen at all! (and it's a good pseudo-Austen)

  30. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    My biggest complaint about this book is how many characters there are & that so many of their names are close or the same. However, the book deals with a different female character in each chapter. That makes things alittle bit easier to keep straight. It is hardto believe that Lizzie, Darcy, Jane & Bingley are grandparents. While this may not be my favorite spin-off of Pride and Prejudice, I will continue to read it.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.