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Love Becomes a Funeral Pyre: A Biography of the Doors

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Spanning the entire history of the Doors, this book will long remain the definitive biography of a band that forever changed popular music. But it’s not the story you think you know. Yes, Jim Morrison died in Paris in 1971—but not in a bathtub. The other Doors were saddened and shocked but had already fired him anyway. It wasn’t Jim who wrote the hits; it was guitarist Robb Spanning the entire history of the Doors, this book will long remain the definitive biography of a band that forever changed popular music. But it’s not the story you think you know. Yes, Jim Morrison died in Paris in 1971—but not in a bathtub. The other Doors were saddened and shocked but had already fired him anyway. It wasn’t Jim who wrote the hits; it was guitarist Robby Krieger. It wasn’t Jim who saw a bright, acid-flared future for the band but keyboardist Ray Manzarek. And so, the band that started out as the “American Rolling Stones,” noted for their wildly unpredictable performances, their jazzy vibe, and the crazed monologues of their front man, ended as badly as did the sixties: abruptly, bloodily, cripplingly. Along with evoking the cultural milieu of Los Angeles in the sixties, in Love Becomes a Funeral Pyre bestselling writer Mick Wall captures the true spirit of that tarnished age with a brilliantly penetrating and contemporary investigation into the real story of the Doors.


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Spanning the entire history of the Doors, this book will long remain the definitive biography of a band that forever changed popular music. But it’s not the story you think you know. Yes, Jim Morrison died in Paris in 1971—but not in a bathtub. The other Doors were saddened and shocked but had already fired him anyway. It wasn’t Jim who wrote the hits; it was guitarist Robb Spanning the entire history of the Doors, this book will long remain the definitive biography of a band that forever changed popular music. But it’s not the story you think you know. Yes, Jim Morrison died in Paris in 1971—but not in a bathtub. The other Doors were saddened and shocked but had already fired him anyway. It wasn’t Jim who wrote the hits; it was guitarist Robby Krieger. It wasn’t Jim who saw a bright, acid-flared future for the band but keyboardist Ray Manzarek. And so, the band that started out as the “American Rolling Stones,” noted for their wildly unpredictable performances, their jazzy vibe, and the crazed monologues of their front man, ended as badly as did the sixties: abruptly, bloodily, cripplingly. Along with evoking the cultural milieu of Los Angeles in the sixties, in Love Becomes a Funeral Pyre bestselling writer Mick Wall captures the true spirit of that tarnished age with a brilliantly penetrating and contemporary investigation into the real story of the Doors.

30 review for Love Becomes a Funeral Pyre: A Biography of the Doors

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jim Cherry

    With a Grain of Salt Mick Wall’s new biography of The Doors “Love Becomes a Funeral Pyre” starts with a sensational scene, Jim Morrison’s body being dragged out of the Rock ‘n’ Roll Circus in the early morning hours of July 3, 1971. Wall states that Stephen Davis’s 2005 derivative biography “Jim Morrison: Life, Death, Legend” is ‘superb’, which sets the sensational tone for the rest of “Love Becomes a Funeral Pyre”. Continual misspellings of names, and errors in fact checking leaves a reader to wo With a Grain of Salt Mick Wall’s new biography of The Doors “Love Becomes a Funeral Pyre” starts with a sensational scene, Jim Morrison’s body being dragged out of the Rock ‘n’ Roll Circus in the early morning hours of July 3, 1971. Wall states that Stephen Davis’s 2005 derivative biography “Jim Morrison: Life, Death, Legend” is ‘superb’, which sets the sensational tone for the rest of “Love Becomes a Funeral Pyre”. Continual misspellings of names, and errors in fact checking leaves a reader to wonder what other details might not have been scrupulously checked by either author or editor? As you read further into the book you discover that is the case. A couple of quick examples, Wall tells his readers that the album that would come to be known as “Morrison Hotel” had a working title of “Hard Rock Café”, the problem is that The Doors had never heard of the Hard Rock Café until they went out on the “Morrison Hotel” photo shoot with Henry Diltz. Or when talking about the Miami incident, Wall states Lewis Marvin, who brought a lamb and the hat with skull and crossbones on it that Morrison was photographed with, was Jim Morrison’s ’new friend’ when in fact Marvin was an early supporter of the band and The Doors played one of their earliest gigs at Marvin’s house in 1966. Quick on the heels of this is Wall’s offering of alternate explanations of events, which is fine if you can support your hypothesis with some backing. However, Wall seems to offer alternate explanation from other biographies just for the sake of being different. A few things Wall does get right, is being aware of and skeptical of Ray Manzarek’s Pollyanna hindsight interpretations of Jim Morrison and The Doors, which he rightly credits with insuring The Doors are still a relevant musical entity almost 50 years after the fact but sometimes stretched credulity. While most of the biography of The Doors does focus on Jim Morrison, “Love Becomes a Funeral Pyre” does delve into the post-Morrison Doors especially looking at the Robby Krieger, and John Densmore s The Butts Band. And a look at Oliver Stones’ “The Doors” and Ray Manzarek’s initial involvement with the film. Where does this leave us? It is better written than Wall’s exemplar “Jim Morrison: Life, Death, Legend”. I think Mick Wall’s “Love Becomes a Funeral Pyre” is kind of like The Doors themselves, excessive in the sensational, but in what it gets right you long for more of.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Ozawa

    I’ll never stop reading about The Doors. As long as people write about The Doors and Jim Morrison, I will read about them. This is one of the better ones.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tyrone

    Typical Mick Wall fare. When he isn't coming across as an acerbic know it all, he is imparting his own fanciful nonsense on things. A few moments of interest, but if you want a Doors bio, read the ones written by the band members themselves

  4. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    The life of Jim Morrison was extraordinary enough without the need for embellishment. The reality is that embellishment is part of his life story, propagated by his fans, friends and mostly, of course, Jim Morrison himself. Myth-making was part of the theatre of life he strove to create. Mick Wall attempts to position himself as a dispassionate compiler of all these truths and myths and lays out the evidence as presented to him by first-hand sources, interviews and autobiographies. He mostly suc The life of Jim Morrison was extraordinary enough without the need for embellishment. The reality is that embellishment is part of his life story, propagated by his fans, friends and mostly, of course, Jim Morrison himself. Myth-making was part of the theatre of life he strove to create. Mick Wall attempts to position himself as a dispassionate compiler of all these truths and myths and lays out the evidence as presented to him by first-hand sources, interviews and autobiographies. He mostly succeeds although he is clearly not without his biases. His frequent cynical and mocking “yeah man, whatever” insertions in the text when quoting a sixties subculture trope or describing a fantastical LSD story, or depicting scenes involving a steady stream of reprobate characters betrays his wish to dilute the significance of these events as mere clichés. His portrayal of Morrison as continuously stoned, tripping or passed-out drunk is confronting. Strangely it seems he slowly warms to his subject as the book approaches it’s tragic conclusion. Where earlier he regards Morrison as little more than an excessive drug-saturated waster who embraced a dissolute vagabond lifestyle, he gradually comes to acknowledge his potential as a poet and that with The Doors he did make ‘great, timeless music’, although this admission is held off until the very final pages in the “Notes and Sources” section. And equally curious, after having routinely derided the admittedly fawning sycophancy of Doors keyboardist and keeper of the flame Ray Manzarek, Wall concedes that without his constant enthusiastic propagandising over the years the legacy of The Doors would be far less celebrated than it has become and generously quotes Manzarek in the closing paragraph of the book. It can’t help but be a fascinating story of an amazing life and Mick Wall has offered a worthy contribution to the study of the man and his times.

  5. 4 out of 5

    John

    Outstandingly written - one of the better bios of the band that I've read...and the only one that talks at any length about the post-Jim Doors (they did put out two LPs without him).

  6. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Stahl

    The Doors would have to be the first band I specifically found a liking for. Funnily enough, I was a fan before I was even five. They always carried a nostalgic mystique for me - I retain an image in my mind of following my father, three or four years old, through the streets of Leighton Buzzard, England, amongst the shouts of fruit vendors, the intoxicating aroma of fish markets and cigarettes, Soul Kitchen playing in my head. Along with Nirvana, Blur and several others, my dad managed to infus The Doors would have to be the first band I specifically found a liking for. Funnily enough, I was a fan before I was even five. They always carried a nostalgic mystique for me - I retain an image in my mind of following my father, three or four years old, through the streets of Leighton Buzzard, England, amongst the shouts of fruit vendors, the intoxicating aroma of fish markets and cigarettes, Soul Kitchen playing in my head. Along with Nirvana, Blur and several others, my dad managed to infuse the Doors into my young subconscious mind, which I am very grateful for. The Doors have been the subject of countless books, and their story has indeed become steeped in legend, plagued with subjectivities and lies. This book is the latest of many, and the most recent, to try and pin down exactly what happened between these four extremely talented men. Numerous typos and editorial errors notwithstanding, Mick Wall has written a very good, highly readable work here. Just like another astounding rock bio I read (Lou Reed's Transformer), it is impossible to feel envy for the notorious Jim Morrison. This book doesn't shy away from condemning him at times - it sheds light on many glorious details regarding the man that are apparently outright false - but you are encouraged all the same to feel sympathy for this lost little boy of a man. I loved reading this and it has infused within me a renewed desire to listen to the Doors' dark, majestical contribution to American music. Easily, always have been and probably always will be, my favourite band from the sixties.

  7. 4 out of 5

    David Rullo

    No doubt about it, Mick Wall is a hack writer. When he cares about his subjects his books are better than some, when he's just making a quick money grab like he is here and with his Led Zeppelin bio, they're pretty bad. Wall has utter contempt for Morrison and Manzarek, he gets simple facts like the title of the bands first box set and the year 'No One Here Gets Out Alive' was published incorrect which makes it hard to believe anything he writes. Wall does spend a fair amount of print trying to No doubt about it, Mick Wall is a hack writer. When he cares about his subjects his books are better than some, when he's just making a quick money grab like he is here and with his Led Zeppelin bio, they're pretty bad. Wall has utter contempt for Morrison and Manzarek, he gets simple facts like the title of the bands first box set and the year 'No One Here Gets Out Alive' was published incorrect which makes it hard to believe anything he writes. Wall does spend a fair amount of print trying to convince the reader that Morrison was gay, which may or may not be true but Wall simply has no facts to support his claim. Additionally, he disputes the accepted facts of Morrison's death, using third and fourth generation sources and hanger on's and wanna be's now that everyone else is dead. Stay far away from this trash.

  8. 4 out of 5

    B. Cheng

    Mick Wall is an excellent story teller, if at times it seems what he is telling is stories and not facts, but this was an entertaining read on the life and work of The Doors and its lead singer. I think it could have used a better editor on some of the fact checking as well as cutting out a lot of the post-Morrison content which sort of felt like it was dragging on, but that's why it didn't get a fifth star. It seems that everyone who came into Morrison's orbit, be it former lovers or bandmates, Mick Wall is an excellent story teller, if at times it seems what he is telling is stories and not facts, but this was an entertaining read on the life and work of The Doors and its lead singer. I think it could have used a better editor on some of the fact checking as well as cutting out a lot of the post-Morrison content which sort of felt like it was dragging on, but that's why it didn't get a fifth star. It seems that everyone who came into Morrison's orbit, be it former lovers or bandmates, ultimately wrote their own story of The Doors, this does a good job in taking from all of them and giving an overall picture ot the reader.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jess Piert

    I’m a big fan of doors music, grew up listening to it and hold some songs very close to my heart with the memories attached to them. Especially riders of the storm and my since passed amazing auntie. Anyway was a little hardbreaking to read that every moment of Jim’s adulthood adult life he was drunk or high? I find this very surprising and not even sure why he wasn’t brain fried. But it’s the writer who has come across that way. Loved hearing about the songs and how they come about. 🖤

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lois Crockett

    Unvarnished Doors Probably the best book I've read about The Doors. Wall takes off the beer goggles, strips the varnish off to expose a patina of timeless classic rock this band brought to us lucky enough to be part of The Doors first go-round in the 1960's. No fanboy magazine artcle this but a compassionate in-depth look at the rise, fall and continuation of one of rock's driving forces whose music is enjoyed even today.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Peter Pinkney

    This book purports to be a biography of The Doors, it isn’t, it’s yet another tawdry take down of Jim Morrison. At times I thought I was reading the News of the World. Wall’s dislike of Morrison is evident all the way through. His sarcasm is appalling, he should stick to writing about heavy metal bands. There are lots of good biographies of JM out there, read one of them, not this.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Juan Martin Sanchez

    Boring... Sadly, everything that tries to tell the "The Doors" story is destined to be boring as hell... I couldnt even finish it! It repeats the same things OVER AND OVER THROUGHOUT THE WHOLE BOOK!!! Or at least until the middle, like I said, I couldnt read the rest.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Macke

    Expertly written ... I'm a rock & roll junkie but my habit never really included Jim Morrison and the Doors, still probably doesn't, but Wall creates a cultural sideshow that you just can't look away from ... Jim Morrison is simply the biggest trainwreck in rock & roll history ... Riveting Expertly written ... I'm a rock & roll junkie but my habit never really included Jim Morrison and the Doors, still probably doesn't, but Wall creates a cultural sideshow that you just can't look away from ... Jim Morrison is simply the biggest trainwreck in rock & roll history ... Riveting

  14. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Muller

    Big Doors fan. Great to read a book which is not just a big Jim morrison love fest, but focuses on the other members of the band too.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Erin Hotovy

    The author seems obsessed with Jim’s preference for anal intercourse. Make of that what you will.

  16. 5 out of 5

    mike hopkins

    Great read I have read a few other Door’s books previously, and this is the most in-depth and detailed yet. I enjoyed it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Glenn Schryver

    Informative and entertaining!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Except for a few minor proofreading errors, a new take on the Lizard King. Recommended.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    MY COPY HAS 502 PAGES AND IS A LARGE SOFTCOVER BOOK. 1st Read: September 29, 2016 - October 7, 2016 Having read about Mick Wall's reputation of telling his own stories, I wasn't sure how I'd receive this book, in regards to enjoying it. along with John Densmore's book and Ray Manzarek's book, this one, Love Becomes A Funeral Pyre rates as equals to them in my opinion. Many Doors fans would disagree with me on this! Having been a fan of The Doors for over thirty years, I've read many books on th MY COPY HAS 502 PAGES AND IS A LARGE SOFTCOVER BOOK. 1st Read: September 29, 2016 - October 7, 2016 Having read about Mick Wall's reputation of telling his own stories, I wasn't sure how I'd receive this book, in regards to enjoying it. along with John Densmore's book and Ray Manzarek's book, this one, Love Becomes A Funeral Pyre rates as equals to them in my opinion. Many Doors fans would disagree with me on this! Having been a fan of The Doors for over thirty years, I've read many books on the band and have acquired much merchandise and arsenal for my collection. However, in each book, on various pages and various paragraphs tells how much of an asshole Jim could be. He is described as the type of person I always hated being at the same house party as that person was: arrogant, cocky, cruel, yet intelligent and charming all the same. I'm pretty certain he had multiple personalities because of the things written about him. That is my take on this book....a good one at that. Well worth the read and more truth has surfaced as far as I am concerned. This will not dissuade my love and passion for The Doors music in any way. Aside from a few dates and years being wrong, didn't bother me really. Though one in particular, the release of No One Here Gets Out Alive being released in 1998 (page 473) is incorrect. It was released eighteen years earlier.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Carol D'Amico

    I’ve never cared for the Doors music, not even a little. I find it boring at best and have never felt anything positive or likable towards Jim Morrison. I have always been perplexed by Jim, ‘The Poet’ and The Doors stardom. But I was intrigued to read ‘Love Becomes Funeral Pyre’ by Mick Wall copyright 2014, which I give 4 stars. Even though the book confirms my feelings stated above with even more conviction, the writer and his story line is well put together and reads very smoothly. This excerp I’ve never cared for the Doors music, not even a little. I find it boring at best and have never felt anything positive or likable towards Jim Morrison. I have always been perplexed by Jim, ‘The Poet’ and The Doors stardom. But I was intrigued to read ‘Love Becomes Funeral Pyre’ by Mick Wall copyright 2014, which I give 4 stars. Even though the book confirms my feelings stated above with even more conviction, the writer and his story line is well put together and reads very smoothly. This excerpt below is one example of fleeting comments of people with the same notion as myself, that Jim was not a poet. If you are a lover of ‘Jimbo’ and The Doors, I’m sorry if you don’t like my opinion. I do understand his internal, unbalanced and tortured mind, I just cannot find what it is that you all see. ‘People try to say he was a poet. A lot of poets I know look at his poems and are like ‘please! Get over it’. Some of them are better in songs. Some of them are sophomoric, I guess you’d call them, or just embarrassing – on a real poetry level. Some of them I just go ‘oh dear’ – Judy Huddleston

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dale Stonehouse

    Relatively comprehensive review of the Doors collectively and individually throughout their musical careers, with new interviews and material, along with a pretty definitive clarification of the details of Jim Morrison's death. There are some language anomalies and many seemingly necessary words left out, but the content is clear in most cases. One drawback is Wall's predilection to accept facts and stories that seem plausible to him while rejecting those he finds implausible. To wit: he seems to Relatively comprehensive review of the Doors collectively and individually throughout their musical careers, with new interviews and material, along with a pretty definitive clarification of the details of Jim Morrison's death. There are some language anomalies and many seemingly necessary words left out, but the content is clear in most cases. One drawback is Wall's predilection to accept facts and stories that seem plausible to him while rejecting those he finds implausible. To wit: he seems to accept without reservation Patricia Kennealy's assertion that she and Morrison married in a Wicca hand-fasting ceremony in NYC, which many people would consider a paranormal event. But at the same time he rejects out of hand Morrison's story of feeling the spirits of dying Indians jump into his body on a SW USA highway when he was a child, an event no more or less paranormal than a Wicca ceremony. Overall this is a worthwhile read as a first look at the Doors' mystique, or as additional history.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Malcolm Frawley

    Having already consumed Wall's biographies of both Sabbath & Zeppelin I thought I knew what I was in for but the first shock here is how little he liked any of the 4 major players. Or their music. Not that I would have preferred a pathetic fan boy idolisation of this band. I was just confused as to why any author would devote months, or even years, to a subject that gave him so little pleasure. The Doors might not have made a Beatles-sized mark on rock history but their music is still remembered Having already consumed Wall's biographies of both Sabbath & Zeppelin I thought I knew what I was in for but the first shock here is how little he liked any of the 4 major players. Or their music. Not that I would have preferred a pathetic fan boy idolisation of this band. I was just confused as to why any author would devote months, or even years, to a subject that gave him so little pleasure. The Doors might not have made a Beatles-sized mark on rock history but their music is still remembered, & played, 50 years after their brief time in the spotlight. That said, this appears well researched & offers copious verbatim quotes from those both inside & immediately outside the group. And it opens with a dramatic, if not sensational, re-writing of the popularly held belief that Morrison succumbed to a heart attack while resting peacefully in a hot bath. Wall's style is easy to read while never playing to the lowest common denominator so I never once considered not finishing this book but it left me feeling vaguely disappointed. Strange days indeed.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hal

    I have read a number of books about Jim Morrison and The Doors, there are a lot of them out there. This one by Mick Wall was the best. Not sure where he came by so much of the detail he provided but it was certainly a page turner. Particularly interesting is his coverage of the circumstances surrounding Morrison's death. It is unlikely we will ever no what really happened but his explanation sounds very plausible. The fascination with The Doors story and music, particularly Jim Morrison, is the i I have read a number of books about Jim Morrison and The Doors, there are a lot of them out there. This one by Mick Wall was the best. Not sure where he came by so much of the detail he provided but it was certainly a page turner. Particularly interesting is his coverage of the circumstances surrounding Morrison's death. It is unlikely we will ever no what really happened but his explanation sounds very plausible. The fascination with The Doors story and music, particularly Jim Morrison, is the iconic story of that era. Morrison not only was The Doors but epitomized so much of the evolution of rock during that tumultuous time. But stripped of his theatrics and wannabe poet obsession we have what he was, a destructive alcoholic unable to run his life and destined for destruction. Like the others that went down in flames at that time, despite their musical genius they could not come to grips with the pressure of the stardom in a positive way. Wall narrates this biography as if he was right there witnessing the highs and the crushing lows that played out in this real life melodrama.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I won this through the Goodreads giveaways as an advanced reader's copy. I've never read any other books about bands I listen to, but I've always enjoyed listening to the Doors and thought it would be an interesting read. It is definitely interesting. It's not the type of book that kept calling me back to the story though which resulted in me taking longer to get through it than I would have liked. That being said, my favorite part was the last few chapters. It's well organised and does a good j I won this through the Goodreads giveaways as an advanced reader's copy. I've never read any other books about bands I listen to, but I've always enjoyed listening to the Doors and thought it would be an interesting read. It is definitely interesting. It's not the type of book that kept calling me back to the story though which resulted in me taking longer to get through it than I would have liked. That being said, my favorite part was the last few chapters. It's well organised and does a good job of telling the story reported by others as well as what is thought to be the more controversial side of what happened. In the end, it's definitely another book I'm glad to have been able to read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Julie_ian_curtis

    I paid money for this and despite my reservations it was worth it. starts slow but stick with it.Read this in one sitting 320 pages. this does what it says on the tin this is "the doors" if u want just jim read 'break on through' by rioirdan or "life and death" by davis. although I don't agree with the 'death jim location" stuff it's about time pam was portrayed correctly same for ray was done well Didn't agree with the harsh treatment of waiting for the sun or soft parade but loved the Janis in I paid money for this and despite my reservations it was worth it. starts slow but stick with it.Read this in one sitting 320 pages. this does what it says on the tin this is "the doors" if u want just jim read 'break on through' by rioirdan or "life and death" by davis. although I don't agree with the 'death jim location" stuff it's about time pam was portrayed correctly same for ray was done well Didn't agree with the harsh treatment of waiting for the sun or soft parade but loved the Janis info. 28 nov 2014, 12 feb 2015,

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marsmannix

    Mick Wall hits it out of the park again with his crackling sharp writing, trippy metaphors, and top-notch detective skills. His insights into the psyches and dynamics of all the players: musicians, producers, lovers, are intuitive and ring completely true. In this biography of the Doors, though Jim Morrison looms large, Walls deftly addresses the noxious brew surrounding all the members of the group, charting their conception, rise, and denouemont. Mick Walls is the premier rock writer for today's Mick Wall hits it out of the park again with his crackling sharp writing, trippy metaphors, and top-notch detective skills. His insights into the psyches and dynamics of all the players: musicians, producers, lovers, are intuitive and ring completely true. In this biography of the Doors, though Jim Morrison looms large, Walls deftly addresses the noxious brew surrounding all the members of the group, charting their conception, rise, and denouemont. Mick Walls is the premier rock writer for today's reader. Break on through!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jim Tracy

    Wall puts you back to the time of Jim Morrison and The Doors and what it was like; the turmoil, the reality that Jim Morrison self-immolated and was for a time before he died perceived as a has-been drunk. He went to Paris not for creativity like the great artists before him such as Hemingway, F.Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein, etc. etc. - but simply because he was on the lam from the law. He could not do the time. His love for America, and his inability to return, destroyed him.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mr Shahabi

    Well most of the content are ALREADY present in the Jim Morrison: A Biography book, hence why I didn't enjoy reading this one as much as I enjoyed reading the last one, but this is Chief Mojo Risin, it's always a good idea to get into Jim's Head "you give this man a ride Sweet family will die Riders on the storm There's a killer on the row.." That's the last line Jim wrote for The Doors

  29. 5 out of 5

    Drew

    My full and detailed review is on my site at http://rnrchemist.blogspot.com/2015/0... A very enjoyable and informative book, controversial (what about the Doors isn't?) and probably the best comprehensive look at their entire career. My full and detailed review is on my site at http://rnrchemist.blogspot.com/2015/0... A very enjoyable and informative book, controversial (what about the Doors isn't?) and probably the best comprehensive look at their entire career.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Mcbroom

    The thing I liked best was how Wall used symbolism with each of the group's personality to represent the elements. Okay that is all I liked. Wall just takes a mishmash of other biographies and puts them into the book! Ver poorly written!

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