Hot Best Seller

The Future of Comics, the Future of Men: Matt Fraction's Casanova

Availability: Ready to download

Matt Fraction, Gabriel Bá, and Fábio Moon’s CASANOVA is a stylish adventure about a sexy, amoral, universe-hopping, time-traveling, science-fiction spy caught in a war between the militaristic E.M.P.I.R.E. and the decadent and villainous W.A.S.T.E., led by a be-suited and bandaged cackling madman in sunglasses. THE FUTURE OF COMICS, THE FUTURE OF MEN argues that beneath it Matt Fraction, Gabriel Bá, and Fábio Moon’s CASANOVA is a stylish adventure about a sexy, amoral, universe-hopping, time-traveling, science-fiction spy caught in a war between the militaristic E.M.P.I.R.E. and the decadent and villainous W.A.S.T.E., led by a be-suited and bandaged cackling madman in sunglasses. THE FUTURE OF COMICS, THE FUTURE OF MEN argues that beneath its pop surface, CASANOVA is doing more. It challenges the corporate-driven comic book production model, in which Disney and Time-Warner own all the major super-heroes. And it critiques the vision of masculinity, limited and damaging, that informs so much of modern super-hero comics and movies. From Sequart Organization. More info at http://sequart.org


Compare

Matt Fraction, Gabriel Bá, and Fábio Moon’s CASANOVA is a stylish adventure about a sexy, amoral, universe-hopping, time-traveling, science-fiction spy caught in a war between the militaristic E.M.P.I.R.E. and the decadent and villainous W.A.S.T.E., led by a be-suited and bandaged cackling madman in sunglasses. THE FUTURE OF COMICS, THE FUTURE OF MEN argues that beneath it Matt Fraction, Gabriel Bá, and Fábio Moon’s CASANOVA is a stylish adventure about a sexy, amoral, universe-hopping, time-traveling, science-fiction spy caught in a war between the militaristic E.M.P.I.R.E. and the decadent and villainous W.A.S.T.E., led by a be-suited and bandaged cackling madman in sunglasses. THE FUTURE OF COMICS, THE FUTURE OF MEN argues that beneath its pop surface, CASANOVA is doing more. It challenges the corporate-driven comic book production model, in which Disney and Time-Warner own all the major super-heroes. And it critiques the vision of masculinity, limited and damaging, that informs so much of modern super-hero comics and movies. From Sequart Organization. More info at http://sequart.org

35 review for The Future of Comics, the Future of Men: Matt Fraction's Casanova

  1. 4 out of 5

    K. Thomas

    Geoff Klock is the rarest of writers: he writes about pop culture without ever being condescending or pretentious. Klock's passion and energy leap off the page, he gets you excited about what he's seeing and the connections he's making. Klock writes with a terrific rhythm and pace, which makes the writing flow. Some academic types tend to act like they're slumming it by writing about Hollywood movies or comic books. But Geoff Klock clearly respects the source material, he admires creators Matt F Geoff Klock is the rarest of writers: he writes about pop culture without ever being condescending or pretentious. Klock's passion and energy leap off the page, he gets you excited about what he's seeing and the connections he's making. Klock writes with a terrific rhythm and pace, which makes the writing flow. Some academic types tend to act like they're slumming it by writing about Hollywood movies or comic books. But Geoff Klock clearly respects the source material, he admires creators Matt Fraction, Gabriel Ba and Fabian Moon. The book is made up of two essays -- the first looks at Cassanova in the context of the comic book industry, comparing Matt Fraction's place in the business with giants like Alan Moore and Grant Morrison. This essay probably came first because it lays ground work which we revisit in the second essay -- a look at how masculinity is used in the genre (or genres, since Cassanova is a blend of spy-action-science-fiction.) What I especially like is how the book includes a third section using stray observations that otherwise didn't fit into the two essays. Klock has a sharp eye, no references go unturned whether it's Mountain Goats lyrics or an allusion to the original-but-replaced title of a David Bowie song. Loved this book and can't wait to see what Klock does next.

  2. 4 out of 5

    John

    Commentary of one of the best comic books on the stands, that no one seems to read. It does an excellent job analyzing, summarizing and extrapolating from the comic. Casanova is a fun and layered comic--and Klock deconstructs and celebrates it with relish with discussions on Trash culture vs. High Art, Art vs. Corporate America I.e.; the drastic volume between Mainstream superhero films and independent comics (i.e. Avengers made $500 Million in 23 Days, the average theater made $47,000 on a singl Commentary of one of the best comic books on the stands, that no one seems to read. It does an excellent job analyzing, summarizing and extrapolating from the comic. Casanova is a fun and layered comic--and Klock deconstructs and celebrates it with relish with discussions on Trash culture vs. High Art, Art vs. Corporate America I.e.; the drastic volume between Mainstream superhero films and independent comics (i.e. Avengers made $500 Million in 23 Days, the average theater made $47,000 on a single day. The 4th Issue of Casanova sold netted a total of $28,000). "How can a bunch of stupid comic books compete with drugs and girls that let you take their clothes off?" comments Casanova. How can they, indeed? Comics should be creator-owned, need consistent high-quality art and need to be structured with a clear beginning, middle and end. Klock offers some examples of superlative books that are innovative, as well as corporate work that pushed the industry forward. He shares many views I have about problematic areas and how comics can be a better industry. He then moves into masculinity; and how it intertwines with male wish fulfillment, superhero comics and nerd culture. GOOD STUFF

  3. 4 out of 5

    Burgoo

    So it's an analysis of Fraction's Casanova, maybe the best modern comic series that no one seems to read. Casanova itself is pumped full of references and symbols, so it is just begging for this type of treatment. Read Casanova & then read this. So it's an analysis of Fraction's Casanova, maybe the best modern comic series that no one seems to read. Casanova itself is pumped full of references and symbols, so it is just begging for this type of treatment. Read Casanova & then read this.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jack Reickel

    Still elite, still 5/5. Yes. Great work Dr. Klock --- Wow. I grew up under two English teaches/professors/librarians, and the depth of this analysis blew me away. I read this before treating myself to the continuation of Casanova, beyond the initial trilogy, and I can't express how happy I am with that decision.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tim Lott

  6. 4 out of 5

    Julian Darius

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alice Hudson

  8. 4 out of 5

    Julian Darius

  9. 5 out of 5

    B. Johnston

  10. 4 out of 5

    Adam

  11. 4 out of 5

    Paul Grimsley

  12. 4 out of 5

    James Montague

  13. 4 out of 5

    Aviv Zippin

  14. 4 out of 5

    Barry Saunders

  15. 4 out of 5

    Zach

  16. 5 out of 5

    Matt J

  17. 5 out of 5

    John Hurles

  18. 5 out of 5

    Scott Ashworth

  19. 4 out of 5

    Craig

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nick

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Doyle

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hopkins

  24. 4 out of 5

    Reuvenc

  25. 5 out of 5

    nnmhj

  26. 4 out of 5

    Beamish13

  27. 4 out of 5

    Zion

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

  29. 5 out of 5

    Darah

  30. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Souza

  31. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Dossenback

  32. 4 out of 5

    Master Profile

  33. 5 out of 5

    Max Washington

  34. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  35. 5 out of 5

    Brad

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.