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The Art of the Princess Mononoke

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Another in the popular line of Studio Ghibli artbooks, which include interviews with and concept sketches by the director of classics such as Spirited Away and My Neighbor Totoro, as well as finished animation cels from the movie. Princess Mononoke was the first Hayao Miyazaki film to break out into the mainstream. The journey from initial idea to the big screen is captured Another in the popular line of Studio Ghibli artbooks, which include interviews with and concept sketches by the director of classics such as Spirited Away and My Neighbor Totoro, as well as finished animation cels from the movie. Princess Mononoke was the first Hayao Miyazaki film to break out into the mainstream. The journey from initial idea to the big screen is captured here, in the hundreds of images from preliminary sketches to dynamic animation cels.


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Another in the popular line of Studio Ghibli artbooks, which include interviews with and concept sketches by the director of classics such as Spirited Away and My Neighbor Totoro, as well as finished animation cels from the movie. Princess Mononoke was the first Hayao Miyazaki film to break out into the mainstream. The journey from initial idea to the big screen is captured Another in the popular line of Studio Ghibli artbooks, which include interviews with and concept sketches by the director of classics such as Spirited Away and My Neighbor Totoro, as well as finished animation cels from the movie. Princess Mononoke was the first Hayao Miyazaki film to break out into the mainstream. The journey from initial idea to the big screen is captured here, in the hundreds of images from preliminary sketches to dynamic animation cels.

30 review for The Art of the Princess Mononoke

  1. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    I love all Hayao Miyazaki movies!! My favorite is Spirited Away and Whisper of the Heart. Then Totoro and Mononoke and Kiki! Forget it! We will be here all day!! Here is some of my room art of the movie! My pillows! My Tapestry Some artwork I got in a book box and framed it. Well crap! I forgot the cool keychain. Anyhoo! Happy Reading & Watching! Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾 I love all Hayao Miyazaki movies!! My favorite is Spirited Away and Whisper of the Heart. Then Totoro and Mononoke and Kiki! Forget it! We will be here all day!! Here is some of my room art of the movie! My pillows! My Tapestry Some artwork I got in a book box and framed it. Well crap! I forgot the cool keychain. Anyhoo! Happy Reading & Watching! Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾

  2. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    And so another entry in to my collection of Studio Ghibli books and I must admit as I sit here reading them and marvelling at the artwork I just wish I was more artistic, they are truly amazing. Okay wishful thinking aside - this series of books and the Art of Princess Mononoke is no exception - they are amazing. Now I know the more I dig on a subject the less I feel I know about it, but I have not come across many anime films or TV shows which have such books available for. Studio Ghibli is an i And so another entry in to my collection of Studio Ghibli books and I must admit as I sit here reading them and marvelling at the artwork I just wish I was more artistic, they are truly amazing. Okay wishful thinking aside - this series of books and the Art of Princess Mononoke is no exception - they are amazing. Now I know the more I dig on a subject the less I feel I know about it, but I have not come across many anime films or TV shows which have such books available for. Studio Ghibli is an incredibly influential studio which have (and I have said this many times before) influenced popular culture subtilely inserting their unique style and vision. I remember seeing this film many years ago and being spell bound not only by the scope of the story but also of the sheer beauty of the animation- something I can now stop and linger over with the help of this book. In short if you enjoy the film (or in fact any anime) books like this allow you to take in the enormity of the work put in to what could be only a mere few seconds of screen time. It almost feels criminal the amount of work a film like this requires and yet so little of it is recognised (or at least registered)as you sit there watching. This book I think is an essential recognition of that mammoth task.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    Another great art book. This was the second Miyazaki movie I saw, the first one being "Lupin III- Il Castello di Cagliostro", and after this one I had to see them all (which I did). My love for Miyazaki's animation goes further back in time. When I was little I watched on TV the post-apocalyptic anime series "Future Boy Conan", or to be precise the Italian dubbed version "Conan il Ragazzo del Futuro" (we on the Adriatic coast used to turn our analogue antennas towards the neighboring Italy- watc Another great art book. This was the second Miyazaki movie I saw, the first one being "Lupin III- Il Castello di Cagliostro", and after this one I had to see them all (which I did). My love for Miyazaki's animation goes further back in time. When I was little I watched on TV the post-apocalyptic anime series "Future Boy Conan", or to be precise the Italian dubbed version "Conan il Ragazzo del Futuro" (we on the Adriatic coast used to turn our analogue antennas towards the neighboring Italy- watched obscene amounts of anime that way). Every time someone asks me which was my favorite anime series, the immediate answer is Conan. And let's be clear, I watched everything and anything: from girl stuff such as Candy Candy, series with robots, aliens, animals (like Kimba the White Lion), historical (Lady Oscar-The Rose of Versailles), cross-dressing (Princess Knight, well "Oscar" fits here as well),space adventures (Captain Harlock, Star Blazers, Starzinger, Robotech), magical girls (Creamy, Emi, Gigi, Bia, you name it), witches, sports (soccer, baseball, boxing, volleyball, golf, basketball and professional wrestling-Tiger Mask), horror, martial arts (karate, kung-fu, judo), vampires, alternate dimensions, magical worlds, classic's adaptations (like Little Women or Anne of Green Gables, the latter also Miyazaki's) ninjas, samurais and formidable warriors/fighters/heroes sagas (like Dragon Ball or Ken il Guerriero - Fist of the North Star)....lost myself here (What was I saying?) ... yes ... , still ... Conan is the favorite anime series from my childhood or ever (love those old anime more than the new ones). I know this is a review of the "Mononoke" art book, but since I never found a " Conan" art book, and the series was the sole culprit for my love for Mr. Miyazaki's work, I just had to mention it during my marathon through his art books.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    I was very disappointed with this art book. It offered very little insight on the movie and was basically a retelling of the film (though not a very good one) with high quality images taken from the film and storyboards. Every so often you get a few concept sketched for characters, but these are very sparse. For whatever reason they're very selective in translating Japanese texts on the storyboards and concept sketches. For half of the book they go untranslated, then with no explanation they're s I was very disappointed with this art book. It offered very little insight on the movie and was basically a retelling of the film (though not a very good one) with high quality images taken from the film and storyboards. Every so often you get a few concept sketched for characters, but these are very sparse. For whatever reason they're very selective in translating Japanese texts on the storyboards and concept sketches. For half of the book they go untranslated, then with no explanation they're suddenly translated on every page. The layout job was terrible as well. I understand the creative design that they were going for, but it's a if they never considered how the layout would turn out in the finished book. This often leaves images spread across pages with the focal point falling in the gap between pages. There are some poems written by Miyazaki, meant to convey character points to the music composer. These poems I think were the highlight of the book as they actually presented new information about the characters. I feel too that this book could have been better researched. In the first ten pages of it's mentioned that the character of Mononoke is modelled after an ancient clay figure. There's no picture of this figure leaving the reader to research themselves what it looks like. If you are a fan of the film then it is enjoyable to flip through and see the art from the film, but don't expect any new insights. They could have done a much better job on this one.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    I quite love Princess Mononoke and was wrapped to have won a 20th Year Anniversary copy of the art book! Its very pretty to leaf through and look at, as Ghibli's style of painting their backgrounds and landscapes and designing their characters has always been rather pleasing to my eye. This is mostly a collection of stills and background images that recap the story of the film. I felt that the layout could have been improved a bit; the sketches and images would be arranged over the spread but on I quite love Princess Mononoke and was wrapped to have won a 20th Year Anniversary copy of the art book! Its very pretty to leaf through and look at, as Ghibli's style of painting their backgrounds and landscapes and designing their characters has always been rather pleasing to my eye. This is mostly a collection of stills and background images that recap the story of the film. I felt that the layout could have been improved a bit; the sketches and images would be arranged over the spread but only a small paragraph on the corner of one of the pages would tell me what everything was and I had to scan between image and explanation in the corner constantly rather than just having the line of sight flow throughout the images which are extremely beautiful and made me want to appreciate them more. The CG Digital Imaging section I feel is hindered by a similar design flaw in which now there are great paragraphs of text paired with small example images that, although were interesting, were a bit hard to get through. This could be due to the layout being changed to an English translated copy but I wouldn't really be able to conclude. By far my most favourite part of the art book was a collection of animation layouts for the climax of the story sketched out by Hayao Miyazaki due to story changes. Even though they're layout sketches, they're incredibly detailed and emulate such emotion and movement that I couldn't help but feel charmed by them. I definitely would have loved more storyboards and layouts to have been featured! Its ultimately up to you if you want to check this one out :)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jaimie

    That moment when you’re super excited to start reading an art book, but open it only to realize that all the text is in Japanese… Especially when the Studio Ghibli art books are ones which I generally do read the text! I mean, I did study Japanese for a long time, but kanji is super complicated, and there’s no way that even at my prime I could have fooled myself into thinking I could read the text here! At least the wonderful artwork is not affected by the lack of textual material, even if I wis That moment when you’re super excited to start reading an art book, but open it only to realize that all the text is in Japanese… Especially when the Studio Ghibli art books are ones which I generally do read the text! I mean, I did study Japanese for a long time, but kanji is super complicated, and there’s no way that even at my prime I could have fooled myself into thinking I could read the text here! At least the wonderful artwork is not affected by the lack of textual material, even if I wish that I could have read about how they utilized the (new) CGI technology for this innovative film. The book is separated into various sections (meaning what I’m not entirely sure), but the material seems to flow naturally between segments, and topics like character development, layering imagery, etc are discussed throughout. Roughly I would say that the book is organized more chronologically than other examples from the “Art of…” series, which focus more clearly on topics like the development of characters and colour palettes. Without the text, I can’t really be sure how they’re organizing things and what the major themes they’re trying to discuss are, but compared to the other books this one seemed to be more of an overall celebration of the film than a serious study of animation and cinematographic techniques. Even with this lack of focus, it was a great opportunity to get back into the feudal Japan-inspired world of Princess Mononoke through the artwork.

  7. 4 out of 5

    fridasinvida

    I love this so much<333333

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jaslyn

    Message of the film was delivered more meaningfully than Avatar imo. Every party, even the hero, the animal and natural gods, had good intentions but bad consequences. also, the story is pretty relevant now that Singapore has a couple of wild boar attack incidents lately due to forest clearings.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Yan Li

    Easily my favorite film from Studio Ghibli and of course the art is brilliant as ever. Especially love all the mossy magic forest landscapes.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jan Pospíšil

    What you want from a movie artbook - great reproductions and a good ratio of concept art and animation backgrounds.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Edward Rathke

    Purely for people who already love the film, but there are some great poems written by Miyazaki inside, and lots of great concept art.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Curran

    Posted : 8 years, 4 months ago on 10 December 2009 08:11 (A review of Princess Mononoke) ''You cannot change fate. However, you can rise to meet it, if you so choose.'' On a journey to find the cure for a Tatarigami's curse, Ashitaka finds himself in the middle of a war between the forest and Tataraba, a mining colony. In this quest he also meets San, the Mononoke Hime. Yôji Matsuda: Ashitaka Mononoke Hime(1997)Princess Mononoke is quite simply not just a Japanese animation; It is however a phenomen Posted : 8 years, 4 months ago on 10 December 2009 08:11 (A review of Princess Mononoke) ''You cannot change fate. However, you can rise to meet it, if you so choose.'' On a journey to find the cure for a Tatarigami's curse, Ashitaka finds himself in the middle of a war between the forest and Tataraba, a mining colony. In this quest he also meets San, the Mononoke Hime. Yôji Matsuda: Ashitaka Mononoke Hime(1997)Princess Mononoke is quite simply not just a Japanese animation; It is however a phenomenon. During it's box office run in Japan 1997 it didn't only become the highest grossing Japanese film of the year, but the highest grossing Japanese film...ever to be released. Mononoke Hime takes place in 15th century Japan and opens with a warrior named Ashitaka in fierce battle with a Tatari Gama (a huge boar with worms covering it's body). Ashitaka kills the demon and successfully defends his village from it, but in the battle he is touched by the gigantic monster on his arm; leaving a dark scar as a reminder. The village doctor tells Ashitaka that it is a curse and is slowly killing him. Convinced that there must be a cure, Ashitaka leaves the village never to return....Thus begins the epic story of Mononoke Hime. So what makes this film so amazing? First of all, the obvious: the writer/director and animator: Hayao Miyazaki. Known for revolutionizing the animation world with his non-conventional children's films (Kiki's Delivery Service, My Neighbor Totoro, Spirited Away), this is his most mature film, and I don't just mean in terms of content. Yes, this film is violent, deep and not for the squeamish but it's beside the point. The story is dark and deeply personal. Miyazaki had stated that after all his more family-friendly films were out, this was the film he felt he just had to make. There is an air of deep seriousness that comes with this film that is hard to miss. Please remember this, most of all: Miyazaki's films are not strictly Anime. Miyazaki is completely different in style, animation, texture and story. The one thing that angers more than anything are the people whom hurl abuse at this project because they do not like Anime. A reminder to everyone who hasn't seen this film is to take this into account. Miyazaki's paints a world like no one has ever seen, and always beautiful and fascinating. What really brings his films to life is the resonating music. Half of what makes his films so beautiful is the score of Joe Hisaishi; perhaps one of the most gifted musicians in films around. His music is intriguing, mysterious and impossible to ignore. With films like this, I get to thinking his music was made for Miyazaki, and Miyazaki's films were made for Hisaishi. They balance each other perfectly and mirror each other in harmonic art. Visually it's got so much going on to practically experience the abstractions that Hayao Miyazaki folds up into the rest of the story. The story itself trails along with the best of epic fantasy, with this crucial, earth-shattering quest that works on that level of action-adventure; as well as the mythological side of things. Some have stated that it is a piece of complex ideology in structure and storytelling; bordering on confusing and puzzling bewilderment. I would disagree, although I can see what they mean; You have to pay closer attention. On a more profound level, if one could call it such, it's really not hard to follow. The protagonist of the film, is the type of tragic hero, though with one clear sight amid the chaos in his mind - peace. He is cursed by a sort of worm resembling jelly demon that runs amock in the darker recesses of the world. He searches for something to rid him of his scars while on the human side at some points (mostly dominated by the women impressed- or against- his skills); and with those of the wolves on the other side. The title character is part of the latter, though also human, bringing a little more of the underlying symbolism with a character. Then there are also the boars ready to destroy the humans; even tat the expense of their lives. Amid the battles that rage on, leading to the significance of a certain Deer God as the centerpiece of the balance of the forests and civilizations; not too much is made explicit. At the same time, the side taken by the cursed hero is even questioned by one character; with that part connected among the others, the story elevates what could have been a kind of smothering over-symbolic representation into what is necessary and spectacular about the whole story. Quite simply, another masterpiece of Hayao Miyazaki's Studio Ghibli; that echoes a sensational message about our treatment of animals and the Environment. ''In ancient times, the land lay covered in forests, where, from ages long past, dwelt the spirits of the gods. Back then, man and beast lived in harmony, but as time went by, most of the great forests were destroyed.''

  13. 4 out of 5

    MechaComicReviews

    For those with a love of the Japanese films and animation, this book, particularly these series of books, are a must have. Mononoke is probably my favorite of the action/adventure/fantasy genre of Ghibli films since, for some strange reason, Whisper of the Heart is my favorite Ghibli film of all time. Mononoke’s meditation on nature vs industry, life and death, and sickness is really impactful. What’s interesting about the book is that it provided more clarity of what Miyazaki and the other artis For those with a love of the Japanese films and animation, this book, particularly these series of books, are a must have. Mononoke is probably my favorite of the action/adventure/fantasy genre of Ghibli films since, for some strange reason, Whisper of the Heart is my favorite Ghibli film of all time. Mononoke’s meditation on nature vs industry, life and death, and sickness is really impactful. What’s interesting about the book is that it provided more clarity of what Miyazaki and the other artists were going for. Normally I’m not too into authorial intent and more about audience interpretation, but the book definitely pointed out some stuff that made the film even more rich or stuff I haven’t gotten on all of my viewings. It’s a nice complement to the film. All of the pre-production, character sketches, and background art are definitely worth just staring at for hours on end. They are so richly detailed and wonderfully animated. Two of my favorite parts happened at the end of the book: the entire section on how they utilized computer graphics to enhance some shots of the film, in which they had to develop new technology to even do it, and also Miyazaki’s storyboards for the ending of the film done at the last moment. For those interested in the history of animation, both these sections and the book as a whole provide a lot of value to your book and movie collection. I would definitely recommend.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nina

    It was good, I really want to give it 3.5 stars instead of 4 though. I liked the sketches and cels but I wish there was a little more included about the inspirations for various aspects of the film. It does mention field visits to Yakushima’s cedar forests, but it doesn’t include much textual explanation of historical context, design elements from Japan’s archaeology/anthropology, etc. Some things that are relatively self-explanatory in Japanese language (what Mononoke means, for instance) don’t It was good, I really want to give it 3.5 stars instead of 4 though. I liked the sketches and cels but I wish there was a little more included about the inspirations for various aspects of the film. It does mention field visits to Yakushima’s cedar forests, but it doesn’t include much textual explanation of historical context, design elements from Japan’s archaeology/anthropology, etc. Some things that are relatively self-explanatory in Japanese language (what Mononoke means, for instance) don’t translate well into English. But maybe I’m expecting more from a book that is titled “The Art of Princess Mononoke” and was translated from Japanese. It delivers what it implies, and the character sketches, background paintings, and explanations of the groundbreaking use of computer graphics were really interesting. It basically has a selection of images from the film, arranged chronologically, and the end of the book also includes one of the producer’s(?) work journal. The journal really helps to drive home just how much work was put into this film. This is one of my favorite films and I always find something new when I watch it. It was a good read, so maybe 4 stars is apt...

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joel Hansen

    This is a brilliant companion book to my favorite movie. The artwork is superb, and the book is filled with interesting details. I especially loved the last three sections of the book, on digital animation (the movie, produced in the mid-90's, was made using a hybrid of hand-drawn and digital animation), the last scene's layouts drawn by Miyazaki, and a production log by Kazuyoshi Tanaka. Overall, this book is just a glimpse of incredible amount of work that went into making the movie, and it ma This is a brilliant companion book to my favorite movie. The artwork is superb, and the book is filled with interesting details. I especially loved the last three sections of the book, on digital animation (the movie, produced in the mid-90's, was made using a hybrid of hand-drawn and digital animation), the last scene's layouts drawn by Miyazaki, and a production log by Kazuyoshi Tanaka. Overall, this book is just a glimpse of incredible amount of work that went into making the movie, and it makes me appreciate the film even more.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Felix Robinson

    in a book meant to break down the arts and process / production of a film, this is (almost) everything I could want :) I adore the artwork, the breakdowns of character design / building, the balance of hand drawn and VFX, but most of all the production diary. I love being able to see into the team and hear about all the small details, often with films (especially now) it feels like there’s less and less people behind films, like it’s all the same checklist of production companies creating and act in a book meant to break down the arts and process / production of a film, this is (almost) everything I could want :) I adore the artwork, the breakdowns of character design / building, the balance of hand drawn and VFX, but most of all the production diary. I love being able to see into the team and hear about all the small details, often with films (especially now) it feels like there’s less and less people behind films, like it’s all the same checklist of production companies creating and acting in the film, but books like these make the process so real :) Mwah

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mya

    It is exactly what it says on the cover, so I am unsure why anybody would be disappointed. It has screencaps from the movie, concept art, gouache backgrounds and details about the production process. Quite handy if you want to relive the story but don't have time to watch the movie, or for artists who want to use the illustrations for reference since these are some of the finest gouache illustrations out there. It is exactly what it says on the cover, so I am unsure why anybody would be disappointed. It has screencaps from the movie, concept art, gouache backgrounds and details about the production process. Quite handy if you want to relive the story but don't have time to watch the movie, or for artists who want to use the illustrations for reference since these are some of the finest gouache illustrations out there.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Zian B.

    I feel like this book could’ve gotten a better review if there was less still-shots from the movie itself and more production sketches (or even larger ones). It also doesn’t seem as informative as it first appeared since most of the pages in this artbook are stills of the movie. Regardless of that, I did still enjoy reading and looking through the entirety of the book. Princess Mononoke is a very lovely movie and this book is almost just as lovely.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Books

    Again, these books are incredible. I am so happy they exist, as they give me new insight to the beloved Studio Ghibli films. It is so cool to get to see preliminary sketches of the characters, such as Princess Mononoke herself and the kodama spirits. The illustrations are beautiful, and I love the ecological message of the film. Even though this was an art book, my favorite section involves several poems written by Hayao Miyazaki that encompass the spirit of the story. Loved this!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mella

    "I am not attempting to solve the entire world's problems. There can never be a happy ending in the battle between humanity and ferocious gods. Yet, even amidst hatred and carnage, life is still worth living. It is possible for wonderful encounters and beautiful things to exist." Impeccably put together, the production diary and the emergency layouts by Miyazaki for the end of the film being particular highlights. "I am not attempting to solve the entire world's problems. There can never be a happy ending in the battle between humanity and ferocious gods. Yet, even amidst hatred and carnage, life is still worth living. It is possible for wonderful encounters and beautiful things to exist." Impeccably put together, the production diary and the emergency layouts by Miyazaki for the end of the film being particular highlights.

  21. 5 out of 5

    j

    A thorough and complete overview of Princess Mononoke's art, ranging from concept sketches to in-film stills to how they used computer graphics to generate particular scenes and elements. It is excellently laid out, discussing each character in order of their appearance in the film. I love the production diary at the end of it! A thorough and complete overview of Princess Mononoke's art, ranging from concept sketches to in-film stills to how they used computer graphics to generate particular scenes and elements. It is excellently laid out, discussing each character in order of their appearance in the film. I love the production diary at the end of it!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mollie

    The insight into the inner workings of the studio at the end is wonderful - though the inclusion of a 3 act story snippet about a bird’s nest is heartbreaking. Missed the usual screenplay that tends to come at the end of these books, but forgive the omission for it’s reveal that Miyazaki is a serial CD stealer. Your fav could never 😂

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michael Harring

    A beautiful reference for the film but, like the Art of Nausica, the genesis of the ideas and characters takes place before the book. Instead this does a good job of using pre-production and film grabs to illustrate most aspects of the film in easy to grab form. Also contains a production diary, which is a quirky read and more interesting than you might expect.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Autumn

    Delightful.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michael David

    I loved pouring through this beautiful art book. Princess Mononoke is one of those films that stay with you, and the art from this piece in particular is absolutely beautiful. If you want an in-depth analysis of the decisions made when developing this film, be sure to pick this up as you won’t regret it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Coraline

    Absolutely love the movie and seeing the process behind it is really fantastic. Great for people who love the movie and animation fans in general

  27. 4 out of 5

    C.S. O'Leary

    I love this movie with all my heart, but the book itself isn't what I expected at all. It's more akin to a picture book with screenshots from the movie plastered into the pages with a few notes added to explain what they were going for; there's very little concept art at all to be found here. Also, reading through the making of film notes at the end, someone should tell Miyazaki that acupuncturists don't work. I love this movie with all my heart, but the book itself isn't what I expected at all. It's more akin to a picture book with screenshots from the movie plastered into the pages with a few notes added to explain what they were going for; there's very little concept art at all to be found here. Also, reading through the making of film notes at the end, someone should tell Miyazaki that acupuncturists don't work.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Neatia

    This was recounting the story of the film accompanied by screenshots from the movie. Every 30?50? pages or so there might have been a new piece of concept art and a poem, but most of the stuff in this book is in the movie and there isn't much about the making of the film at all. This was recounting the story of the film accompanied by screenshots from the movie. Every 30?50? pages or so there might have been a new piece of concept art and a poem, but most of the stuff in this book is in the movie and there isn't much about the making of the film at all.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Firman Widyasmara

    One of the best animation film, ever! Cari filmnya, baca bukunya..keren sangat!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I recently found a copy of this at a nearby bookstore and instantly scooped it up. includes many screen shots from the movie as well as concept sketches of the major characters in watercolors.

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