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Hamlet

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No Fear Shakespeare Graphic Novels is a series based on the translated texts of the plays found in No Fear Shakespeare. The original No Fear series made Shakespeare’s plays much easier to read, but these dynamic visual adaptations are impossible to put down. Each of the titles is illustrated in its own unique style, but all are distinctively offbeat, slightly funky, and ap No Fear Shakespeare Graphic Novels is a series based on the translated texts of the plays found in No Fear Shakespeare. The original No Fear series made Shakespeare’s plays much easier to read, but these dynamic visual adaptations are impossible to put down. Each of the titles is illustrated in its own unique style, but all are distinctively offbeat, slightly funky, and appealing to teen readers. Each book will feature:


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No Fear Shakespeare Graphic Novels is a series based on the translated texts of the plays found in No Fear Shakespeare. The original No Fear series made Shakespeare’s plays much easier to read, but these dynamic visual adaptations are impossible to put down. Each of the titles is illustrated in its own unique style, but all are distinctively offbeat, slightly funky, and ap No Fear Shakespeare Graphic Novels is a series based on the translated texts of the plays found in No Fear Shakespeare. The original No Fear series made Shakespeare’s plays much easier to read, but these dynamic visual adaptations are impossible to put down. Each of the titles is illustrated in its own unique style, but all are distinctively offbeat, slightly funky, and appealing to teen readers. Each book will feature:

30 review for Hamlet

  1. 4 out of 5

    Addison

    Hamlet is my all time favorite of Shakespeare's plays and I was a bit dubious when I picked it up at the library simple because I like the original version so much. Luckily I wasn't disappointed. While it does lack some of the quality of the orginal I thought it was a brilliant adaptation. The art style fits well and I especially found Ophelia's sudden descent into madness and suicide to be both very pretty and every chilling. While the dialouge has been changed slightly to suit younger readers t Hamlet is my all time favorite of Shakespeare's plays and I was a bit dubious when I picked it up at the library simple because I like the original version so much. Luckily I wasn't disappointed. While it does lack some of the quality of the orginal I thought it was a brilliant adaptation. The art style fits well and I especially found Ophelia's sudden descent into madness and suicide to be both very pretty and every chilling. While the dialouge has been changed slightly to suit younger readers the story still flows well and all the major lines Hamlet is famous for have been left mostly unchanged. All in all it was a quick and fantastic book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    I'm not a fan of graphic novels, but this adaptation makes Shakespeare's Hamlet very accessible. My friend, Gwen, recommended the "No Fear Shakespeare" series. I'm reading it to prepare for my high schooler's class on Shakespeare. I think this is a great introduction to the Bard and I highly recommend it for those who find Shakespeare unapproachable. Cautionary note to parents: Shakespeare wrote for the masses and the masses enjoyed vulgarity, which Shakespeare happily provides. This adaptation I'm not a fan of graphic novels, but this adaptation makes Shakespeare's Hamlet very accessible. My friend, Gwen, recommended the "No Fear Shakespeare" series. I'm reading it to prepare for my high schooler's class on Shakespeare. I think this is a great introduction to the Bard and I highly recommend it for those who find Shakespeare unapproachable. Cautionary note to parents: Shakespeare wrote for the masses and the masses enjoyed vulgarity, which Shakespeare happily provides. This adaptation makes the vulgarity more accessible as well.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bek MoonyReadsByStarlight

    This was a really neat read. I enjoyed getting to experience this story in a different medium and definitely made me want to re-read the play. I think I would have liked it better if the text were closer to the original, rather than the No Fear -- however, I also realize that I am probably one of the few people that would enjoy that, since the target audience is people who are more interested in the story with more modern text.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jillian Childs

    I read this alongside the book, and I really loved having something visual to follow along with. The illustrator did an amazing job of capturing Hamlet's character in his leaps between mania, love, and vengeance, as well as his visual representation of metaphor and character development. The style, the design, all of it was done excellently and stuck true to the book. In addition, the mixing of both the original and translated dialogue was balanced extremely well. Absolutely a worthwhile compani I read this alongside the book, and I really loved having something visual to follow along with. The illustrator did an amazing job of capturing Hamlet's character in his leaps between mania, love, and vengeance, as well as his visual representation of metaphor and character development. The style, the design, all of it was done excellently and stuck true to the book. In addition, the mixing of both the original and translated dialogue was balanced extremely well. Absolutely a worthwhile companion to the original.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Teodora Lipciuc

    What a skilled adaptation of this classic tale. The art style was just right for it, with thoughtful imagery and great atmosphere. I read it all in one sitting, too.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Review originally posted at Dangerously Cold Tea There are probably few readers of this blog who are not at least halfway familiar with the story of Hamlet, but for those whose memory may be a bit murky, here's a recap: Hamlet's father, the king is dead. The king's ghost tells Hamlet that his killer is his brother, now the current king and new husband of Hamlet's mum. Hamlet vows to have his revenge, and goes freaking nuts in the process. Also, Ophelia, who is by far the craziest of them all (no Review originally posted at Dangerously Cold Tea There are probably few readers of this blog who are not at least halfway familiar with the story of Hamlet, but for those whose memory may be a bit murky, here's a recap: Hamlet's father, the king is dead. The king's ghost tells Hamlet that his killer is his brother, now the current king and new husband of Hamlet's mum. Hamlet vows to have his revenge, and goes freaking nuts in the process. Also, Ophelia, who is by far the craziest of them all (no one out-crazies Ophelia!). So, how well did Neil Babra actually do? I mean, he did not have an easy task: to take a work of the Bard and turn it into a graphic novel that is both true to the original source and still entertain reluctant readers. (No Fear Shakespeare is a whole line of like-minded GNs created by Sparknotes, which is a company well acquainted with the minds of lazy and unwilling students.) This GN version of Hamlet is startling close in spirit to the original play. Even as the language is simplified for a modern and young audience, a good deal of the most memorable lines are kept intact as they are timeless enough that anyone could understand them. It is not "dumbing down" in the least bit; all the humor and heartache from the original is still there in the dialogue and the story does not suffer at all from this treatment. The art is deeply intertwined with the story, even more so that a typical graphic novel. As Shakespeare was fond of wordplay and vivid imagery in his writing, so the artist makes great strides to incorporate these things into each and every panel. When Hamlet is off and running on one of his famous soliloquies, you can clearly see in the scene what he is illustrating with his words. In a way, the dialogue becomes the background for many scenes. And then there is Hamlet. Of all the cast, he is the best thing about this adaptation. His facial expressions show such emotion, whether he is deliriously happy or in another maniacal fit, that you cannot look away whenever he appears on page. From the way he is drawn to the pure power behind every movement and action, this is a most memorable Hamlet for the printed page. For both reluctant readers and avid Shakespeare fans, I honestly believe that this one is a winner. I greatly enjoyed reading this book and would recommend it to anyone looking to dip into the world of the Bard but is intimidated by his legacy and his language.

  7. 4 out of 5

    David

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The plot of the story was interesting. Hamlet basically was poking the bear until it woke from his slumber. His Uncle (The New King) poisoned his brother to earn the crown, and to steal his wife. Hamlet hinted that he new what his uncle has done, so his Uncle plans to kill Hamlet without him knowing. He poisons his drink and poisons the duelers sword, but that day when there was a duel everything went down. The entire Bloodline was diminished.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Heather Shembarger

    This famous tragedy by Shakespeare takes on a new look in this graphic novel version. The story itself is a sad one full of so many twists where innocent people end up in tragic situations. Although there is justice in that the main antagonist is defeated, it only happens through great loss of innocent life. In the end, the reader walks away with extreme sadness, and the only glimmer of hope that is left is that it appears the truth will be known.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dusty

    As a lead-in or companion to Hamlet, this book is very good. It's one of the No Fear Shakespeare group's three graphic novelizations, and I'd say it falls smack in the middle -- not as good as the Romeo and Juliet version, which is itself a thing of beauty, yet better than the Macbeth version, which I just didn't like. It's no surprise that No Fear has commissioned artists to depict three of the bard's plays that are most taught and read in high schools; their point is to make these stories acce As a lead-in or companion to Hamlet, this book is very good. It's one of the No Fear Shakespeare group's three graphic novelizations, and I'd say it falls smack in the middle -- not as good as the Romeo and Juliet version, which is itself a thing of beauty, yet better than the Macbeth version, which I just didn't like. It's no surprise that No Fear has commissioned artists to depict three of the bard's plays that are most taught and read in high schools; their point is to make these stories accessible to youngsters who are removed not only from Shakespeare's early modern language but also his Elizabethan England. I am absolutely in support of this project and -- no surprise here -- I fully intend to photocopy and share a few excerpts of this Hamlet with the college students I'm reading the story with in a few weeks. Now, all compliments aside, let me say a few words about the artwork, which is to my mind this book's best and worst features. It's very attractive and ambitious, penned by the inventive Neil Babra. I like the artist's sense of space -- the way the pages are divvied up into smaller boxes with curves rather than straight lines, etc. And I especially like Babra's unusual but telling use of speech bubbles. When Hamlet shouts his vitriol at Ophelia and his mother, the words emanate from his mouth like frothy poison. When Laertes, in his dying breaths, implicates the King in their plot to kill Hamlet, the speech bubble wraps itself around the King's neck, like a noose. The visuals go a long way in bringing to life these characters and their words, which even in modernized translations are unusual. However, I think Babra overdoes the visuals just a bit, sometimes making too dramatic or flashy the events of the play, and this happens especially during the characters' monologues, when images from their speeches are collaged together behind the speakers' heads. How many times do I need to see Hamlet look into a mirror, a shiny floor, a pool of water, and see as his reflection a skull? I think once would have been adequate. But if you're interested in Hamlet or have plans to share the play with the so-called Great Unwashed, pick up this book. It could be an invaluable learning tool.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Briar's Reviews

    Book Review Book Title: Hamlet Book Author: William Shakespeare Adapter/Illustrator: Neil Babra Introduction: I love Shakespeare, and Hamlet has always been my favourite of all of his plays and sonnets so when I saw this little manga on sale at a location book shop I had to pick it up and read it. I read it about 3 years ago, but I finally found it again on my bookshelf and decided to read it again and review it. Review: This adaption is truly an adaption - it's not identical to the original, but it's Book Review Book Title: Hamlet Book Author: William Shakespeare Adapter/Illustrator: Neil Babra Introduction: I love Shakespeare, and Hamlet has always been my favourite of all of his plays and sonnets so when I saw this little manga on sale at a location book shop I had to pick it up and read it. I read it about 3 years ago, but I finally found it again on my bookshelf and decided to read it again and review it. Review: This adaption is truly an adaption - it's not identical to the original, but it's great for younger readers wanting to get into Shakespeare. The typical Shakespeare form is not used, but that makes it easier for read for those not fluent in his verses. This task of adapting the famous Hamlet into a shorter, simpler work would have been hard but Neil Babra makes it look so easy. The story is shortened into a perfect, young reader-friendly adaption. The famous lines are still in there, but they are so much easier to understand and read. The book is not dumbed down by any means, so readers do not have to worry - this book is a timeless, incredible adaption that should definitely be introduced to young readers. The artwork is fantastic and matches perfectly with the story. The wordplay that Shakespeare uses is often seen within the pages of this book in illustrated form, which can make any true Shakespeare fan get a true chuckle out of this work. Overall, this book was fantastic. The facial expressions, the artwork, the rewording, and the narrative are all fantastic. Five out of five stars.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Finn

    WOW. This is really a fantastic adaptation of Hamlet! Hamlet is my favorite play, so I was hoping the graphic novel would be done well—and I was not at all disappointed. The art is beautiful and works perfectly with the story, and I especially love how the artist was able to fit so much action and emotion into it. Everyone had great facial expressions. I especially loved the character of Hamlet—he's manic yet dark, and everything I think Hamlet should be. Most of the characters were very well-do WOW. This is really a fantastic adaptation of Hamlet! Hamlet is my favorite play, so I was hoping the graphic novel would be done well—and I was not at all disappointed. The art is beautiful and works perfectly with the story, and I especially love how the artist was able to fit so much action and emotion into it. Everyone had great facial expressions. I especially loved the character of Hamlet—he's manic yet dark, and everything I think Hamlet should be. Most of the characters were very well-done and intelligently adapted... I thought Laertes and Gertrude were a little weak, but that didn't distract from the best parts of the book. The swordfights, deaths, soliloquies, and Ophelia's madness were especially compelling! Recommended for everyone who likes Hamlet—and also for everyone who wants to get into Hamlet, but feels intimidated by the Early Modern English. This adaptation is in contemporary English, making it easier to understand—it's not as beautiful as Shakespeare's language, but it's more clear to a modern reader.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    Overall, this was a very good adaptation of Shakespeare´s Hamlet to young readers. I really enjoyed reading Hamlets soliloquies with those beautiful illustrations. It certainly made it more dramatic. Nonetheless, I encounter a few errors and typos on the written dialogues. I guess that was bad editing but it was very distracting. Having read Hamlet before I recommend this to any reader that has read this famous play. Like any movie or visual adaptation it gives you a pretty good idea at how woul Overall, this was a very good adaptation of Shakespeare´s Hamlet to young readers. I really enjoyed reading Hamlets soliloquies with those beautiful illustrations. It certainly made it more dramatic. Nonetheless, I encounter a few errors and typos on the written dialogues. I guess that was bad editing but it was very distracting. Having read Hamlet before I recommend this to any reader that has read this famous play. Like any movie or visual adaptation it gives you a pretty good idea at how would it be if you were watching it. It makes you comprehend and reflect more. Still, this graphic novel is understandable to any non-Hamlet reader.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mara

    Hamlet is one of my favorite plays and I enjoy reading and watching different adaptations of it. I like that this text kept many of the more famous lines from the original and updated them to fit with the more contemporary English used in the rest of the work. The illustrations and footnotes helped to explain many of the literary devices and illusions that modern audiences may struggle with (Biblical references, comparisons to Greek dieties, meanings of different flowers). This is an easily read Hamlet is one of my favorite plays and I enjoy reading and watching different adaptations of it. I like that this text kept many of the more famous lines from the original and updated them to fit with the more contemporary English used in the rest of the work. The illustrations and footnotes helped to explain many of the literary devices and illusions that modern audiences may struggle with (Biblical references, comparisons to Greek dieties, meanings of different flowers). This is an easily read companion book to help students understand the original play, and an enjoyable read for fans of the Bard.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    Fantastic! Neil Babra's art was delightful. I loved how he used the medium to explain some of the intricacies of Shakespeare's language, speaking of language, it was mostly updated and shortened, but not necessarily simplified. It definitely took me longer to read this than most graphic novels. I haven't read Hamlet since like high school, and I definitely did not catch on to some things in high school (even though I read it and discussed it in ENGLISH CLASS, but whatevs), namely that Hamlet is a Fantastic! Neil Babra's art was delightful. I loved how he used the medium to explain some of the intricacies of Shakespeare's language, speaking of language, it was mostly updated and shortened, but not necessarily simplified. It definitely took me longer to read this than most graphic novels. I haven't read Hamlet since like high school, and I definitely did not catch on to some things in high school (even though I read it and discussed it in ENGLISH CLASS, but whatevs), namely that Hamlet is a massive JERK to Ophelia. My goodness, no wonder the poor girl went mad. And can we even talk about how the entire cast assumes Hamlet is driven mad because Ophelia denies his advances (because her da and brother told her to do so) like that is a completely reasonanble reason to go off the edge! Plus, let's put the blame on poor Ophelia who is just super confused now. Sheeshhhh! I wanna go read Ophelia now because at least that gives her some Agency. Er, I mean Dating Hamlet: Ophelia's Story... My bad. I also may have been watching Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead while reading this. I mean, that movie was probably my favorite part of English class that entire year. And one of my new life goals is to see a production of Hamlet and RaGaD with the same cast. I have lofty goals.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    Really an adaptation of an adaptation, this is a graphic novel version of the No Fear Shakespeare simplified version of the original play. I'm pleased to note that it isn't too simplified. This is not in any way dumbed down or an easy version, just an easier version. That's maybe a difficult distinction to make, but it's immediately obvious what the intention is on the first page. The art in this graphic novel is a bit on the simple side, but does a good job of illustrating both the action and t Really an adaptation of an adaptation, this is a graphic novel version of the No Fear Shakespeare simplified version of the original play. I'm pleased to note that it isn't too simplified. This is not in any way dumbed down or an easy version, just an easier version. That's maybe a difficult distinction to make, but it's immediately obvious what the intention is on the first page. The art in this graphic novel is a bit on the simple side, but does a good job of illustrating both the action and the implication of the original. I couldn't help but compare this to Manga Classics Hamlet, which I read just a few months ago. The Manga Classics version is a straight adaptation, using the original, full text of the play. I preferred the experience to reading this one, and I think a lot of people would not only find this a more enjoyable read, but get more out of it. On the other hand, the Manga Classics version had better art, which would itself be very helpful in understanding the play. Obviously, they both have their places, and I would recommend either to a student struggling through the play.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amber Suszycki

    I’m going to review this graphic novel based on its interpretation of the play, and not the storyline itself (which I gave three stars in a past review....I’m not the most enthusiastic Shakespeare fan but I certainly appreciate him). I began reading this while simultaneously teaching Hamlet to my students to see if I could use parts of it for summaries, etc. To be frank, I think the graphics make the play even more confusing than it already is at times. I know the distortion of the characters’ f I’m going to review this graphic novel based on its interpretation of the play, and not the storyline itself (which I gave three stars in a past review....I’m not the most enthusiastic Shakespeare fan but I certainly appreciate him). I began reading this while simultaneously teaching Hamlet to my students to see if I could use parts of it for summaries, etc. To be frank, I think the graphics make the play even more confusing than it already is at times. I know the distortion of the characters’ faces is to emphasize their words but man, was I lost. Poor Gertrude never looked queenly and Hamlet’s madness was a whole other entity. Part IV was actually the best interpretation of the play. I recall my students being totally confused over Ophelia’s madness and death, so I think next year I’ll share these scenes with them to help explain her grief. I’m partial to O’s storyline to begin with, but the drawings really did establish her loss of innocence and maddening sorrow. Ultimately, this graphic novel is an okay refresher while teaching (who doesn’t love supplementary materials!) but as a substitute for the play, it doesn’t make the cut.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stefanie

    Any time a four-hour play is abridged into a short graphic novel, there is going to be a lot left out. For the most part, this graphic novel adaptation was successful. I wish that No Fear Shakespeare would retain the most iconic monologues and phrases in their original form, however. A major reason why we still teach Shakespeare is its cultural relevance, and if the famous lines are changed, students aren't building their cultural literacy. I expected that to happen, however, from teaching No Fe Any time a four-hour play is abridged into a short graphic novel, there is going to be a lot left out. For the most part, this graphic novel adaptation was successful. I wish that No Fear Shakespeare would retain the most iconic monologues and phrases in their original form, however. A major reason why we still teach Shakespeare is its cultural relevance, and if the famous lines are changed, students aren't building their cultural literacy. I expected that to happen, however, from teaching No Fear Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet adaptation. Between the two, I enjoyed Hamlet even more. The art was amazing and did a great job exemplifying the themes. Very creepy!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    Bought this graphic version of Hamlet to help my son access the play. I read it because I was intrigued to see how the play would translate to the graphic medium. I loved the illustrations; the stark black and white theme lent itself to the intense mood of events and I liked the creative way frames were set out in the page. There were some beautiful splash pages between acts. Note to Amazon, if you're selling a graphic novel you should show a couple of pages of the artwork, just displaying the co Bought this graphic version of Hamlet to help my son access the play. I read it because I was intrigued to see how the play would translate to the graphic medium. I loved the illustrations; the stark black and white theme lent itself to the intense mood of events and I liked the creative way frames were set out in the page. There were some beautiful splash pages between acts. Note to Amazon, if you're selling a graphic novel you should show a couple of pages of the artwork, just displaying the cover doesn't really cut it!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    The stars are for the wonderfully powerful artwork of this graphic novel. Yet I personally do not care for the adaptation of Shakespeare into graphic novel form. I miss all the narrative and description in the original Shakespeare. On the other hand, I can see how a graphic novel could get younger readers more interested in the classics. It is a quicker introductory format that will hopefully get them to explore the originals.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Klwoody

    I normally do not like reading Shakespeare, hence why I've gotten to this point and have never read Hamlet. I really enjoyed this version. The dialouge is easy to follow, and they kept the memorable quotes in there so you're not missing out on the real Shakespearian-ness. The black and white illustrations are creepy and do make the characters look mad. I found myself being able to hold a conversation about Hamlet with someone who has seriously studied the play in its original format. Go me!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dan DalMonte

    This is a good introduction to Shakespeare for those who are somewhat intimidated by him. The drawings are great although there is no color. Babra does not do that much violence to Shakespeare's language, and retains some of the puns and imagery. Hamlet captures how one evil deed leads to a supernatural visit, constant and mutual spying, indecision, accidental deaths, a suicide by drowning, and eventually the loss of a kingdom to an invading power.

  22. 4 out of 5

    KaroLin (Fiktion fetzt)

    What a brilliant adaptation! It certainly succeeds at its goal to make Shakespeare's work more appealing and accessible, especially for younger readers. I wish we would have had something like this at school. I'm pretty sure there would have been more enthusiasm about reading Shakespeare then. The language is easy to understand without being bland and the artwork is simply beautiful. I love it!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Momina Ahmed

    this is the first graphic novel I've read and I'm pretty much sure that nothing will ever beat Hamlet's graphic novel. it was great, although I'm not sure if this is the abridged version or mixed with the real text. I think it was a mix, I doubt Shakespeare text can purely fit into a graphic novel. excellently executed, brilliant story as ever. Shakespeare's genius at his finest.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Marci Laevens

    Great way to read Shakespeare! I can definitely see high school kids connecting to this genre more that the classical Shakespeare. My only complaint is that the font was waayyy too small for my old eyes.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I am really not a fan of graphic novels. However, this was a good adaptation of Hamlet and would be a great introduction for students. I liked that much of the language was preserved from the original.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Graphic Novel of Shakespeare's Hamlet. It was well done. Read for LIS 5577 Graphic Novels, FSU Summer 2017

  27. 4 out of 5

    LAKISHA VAUGHN-WHITE

    Such a sad and heart breaking story. I really wanted to cry for Hamlet.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Greta

    I was much more able to understand the story because this was told in graphic novel, and the drawings were all nice and well done.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Debi

    Ready for Shakespeare on the Saskatchewan! And why didn't we have graphic novels when we studied this in high school?

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Roberts

    Cool artwork

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