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Who Comes with Cannons? (Historical Fiction for Teens: Illustrated Edition)

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When Truth Hopkins's father dies, she goes to live with her uncle and his family on their North Carolina farm. Like Truth, the Bardwells are Quakers. They oppose slavery but refuse to take up arms in the civil war that is now being waged to end this inhuman institution. Then one day, a runaway slave takes refuge on the Bardwell farm and, to Truth's amazement, her uncle hid When Truth Hopkins's father dies, she goes to live with her uncle and his family on their North Carolina farm. Like Truth, the Bardwells are Quakers. They oppose slavery but refuse to take up arms in the civil war that is now being waged to end this inhuman institution. Then one day, a runaway slave takes refuge on the Bardwell farm and, to Truth's amazement, her uncle hides him from the slave catchers. Even more puzzling, he asks her to accompany him when he deliverswagonload of hay to a neighbor late: that night. This ride, and the wagon's real cargo, involve Truth in a mysterious and dangerous underground movement -- and reveal how she can help further the cause of freedom without the use of a rifle. Patricia Beatty, best-selling author and winner of the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction, takes readers on an unforgettable trip aboard the Underground Railroad. Her powerful story of the Civil War captures the secrecy, suspense, and heroism of this little-known chapter in America's history and will long be remembered by readers.


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When Truth Hopkins's father dies, she goes to live with her uncle and his family on their North Carolina farm. Like Truth, the Bardwells are Quakers. They oppose slavery but refuse to take up arms in the civil war that is now being waged to end this inhuman institution. Then one day, a runaway slave takes refuge on the Bardwell farm and, to Truth's amazement, her uncle hid When Truth Hopkins's father dies, she goes to live with her uncle and his family on their North Carolina farm. Like Truth, the Bardwells are Quakers. They oppose slavery but refuse to take up arms in the civil war that is now being waged to end this inhuman institution. Then one day, a runaway slave takes refuge on the Bardwell farm and, to Truth's amazement, her uncle hides him from the slave catchers. Even more puzzling, he asks her to accompany him when he deliverswagonload of hay to a neighbor late: that night. This ride, and the wagon's real cargo, involve Truth in a mysterious and dangerous underground movement -- and reveal how she can help further the cause of freedom without the use of a rifle. Patricia Beatty, best-selling author and winner of the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction, takes readers on an unforgettable trip aboard the Underground Railroad. Her powerful story of the Civil War captures the secrecy, suspense, and heroism of this little-known chapter in America's history and will long be remembered by readers.

30 review for Who Comes with Cannons? (Historical Fiction for Teens: Illustrated Edition)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I saw this on a sale cart at a local library and I like historical novels and expected this to be a great find on the topic of slavery and the Civil War, but it was nothing like that. I only spent 25 cents but there was no real reason for me to read this and I look forward to finding better novels on the subject. After reading They Loved to Laugh, I was thoroughly sick of the Friends, had never heard of them before and was turned off to discover they’re in here. It also reminded me of that book, I saw this on a sale cart at a local library and I like historical novels and expected this to be a great find on the topic of slavery and the Civil War, but it was nothing like that. I only spent 25 cents but there was no real reason for me to read this and I look forward to finding better novels on the subject. After reading They Loved to Laugh, I was thoroughly sick of the Friends, had never heard of them before and was turned off to discover they’re in here. It also reminded me of that book, because both heroines go to live with family, and have only male cousins. All of the "thee's" and "thy's" are really annoying and I don't like books so heavily religious. The beliefs people had back then are upsetting and I don't find it enjoyable to read them. Her cousin Robert accused her blonde hair of making her stand out, and her aunt Elizabeth said her hair and cheeks are too bright for a Friend and she'll need to wear a bonnet. Imagine being so stodgy and rigid that you think someone is anti-religious because their cheeks are naturally colored and they have blonde hair. It's truly sickening. They have to wear plain, dark clothes. Men and women set on separate sides of the meetinghouse. Her uncle was horrified that she had ridden astride a horse without a saddle. Ew. This lifestyle was making me sick. It's set in NC so that was another reason that I had to have it. Finding books in my home-state is really cool, especially an historical novel. Truth is 12 and Robert is 19. It was never said how old Todd was. Quakers don't believe in fighting, are peaceful people. Hay rides are for courting. After the meeting, Elizabeth mentioned that Todd was talking to Lucy, and Truth saw that he was leaning towards the girl and the girl had her head tilted, knew they were in love. She wondered if anyone would ever look at her like that. On the way home from school, Truth saw the Fields boy taking a coffle of fugitive slaves back. He hit on her and asked her to tip her bonnet back so he could see if she was pretty, noticed she had hair like gold. She ran away and noticed one of the slaves running after her. Squire knew the Bardwells and they had helped him before. Their house was a stop on the Underground Railroad. The big hearthstone could be moved aside, to reveal a hole in the floor for slaves to go in. Uncle Matthew told her she could come along with the boys on the hay ride. Truth didn't want to spend a hayride with Robert. But Elizabeth promised that Robert would treat her better, because he'd just been worried she’d reveal their abolitionist work and endanger them. Todd said he wanted to marry Lucy before the war comes, said she's willing. Robert said she'd been willing since she was 8. Todd told Truth to rest and put his arm around her. I thought something would happen with both boys. Martha, the girl who had been so cold with Truth at school, turned out to be a part of the Underground Railroad. Her family's home was Station Seven. Truth realized that Martha had just been worried about her secret, like Robert. I guess being an abolitionist made you mean to everyone...very odd. I hated when Truth caught Martha staring at Robert and could tell she liked him. Back up! But at least Robert smiled at Truth in the barn, so he was coming around to her. Perry told the schoolchildren about Daniel Fields visiting his home in search of the runaway slave. He blamed Truth, Martha, and Lydia, all of the Quaker kids. He said Quakers hide slaves and send them north, viewed it just like stealing an animal. They viewed them as stolen property. He threatened to beat up their men. Truth said Quaker men don't fight for any reason. Martha confirmed that Perry and the other boys would beat up Todd and Robert and that they wanted to tar and feather them. Quakers and other abolitionists were tarred and feathered. Todd got a black eye and bruised face from one of the Gibson's, Peter's family. In April Peter reported that the South had fired on Fort Sumter in SC and Yankees were inside. It was the start of the war. SC left the Union before Christmas and NC was to secede soon. I was hoping for more between her and Robert. One night the Gibsons broke their window and she saw Robert in his nightshirt, talking to Todd. Hello, thoughts! It was announced that NC had seceded in May, and their teacher let school out early because everyone got so rowdy. He knew it would be volunteers at first, and then if the war went on all able-bodied men would be drafted. Truth wore a black band on her arm after her dad died. Martha asked Truth what would happen to Todd and Robert and I was so mad! He's not yours! Truth said that Robert had no true love that she knew of and smiled at Martha and I wondered why she had no jealousy or feelings about the subject. Quakers couldn't get Confederates to help them with their farming. Truth did have some strong moments. She had some fire to her which I like in a heroine. That night the gang of men came with torches and threatened to burn their home if they didn't join the army, and they asked to see Todd and Lucy, newly married, who weren't there. Then they asked to see Truth and Elizabeth, to hug and kiss them but without their bonnets. Truth got mad and put her head out the window, told them to look at her and is this how southern gentlemen treats ladies and she's ashamed of them. Elizabeth told her it was bold but foolish, and Robert came in her room and praised her knowing just the right thing to say to make them leave. She'd hit right on to southern men valuing their respect for women without knowing it. Robert and Todd had to leave and flee to Canada to avoid becoming soldiers. Even the north would draft men at some point. Before they left, Todd and Robert picked her up off her feet in a hug. Robert whispered into her ear that he was proud of her last night and to keep her courage up, that he was glad she's come and that she'll be a comfort here. I wanted so much more but that was better than nothing. I was upset though that he said they'd send messages through the Buchans, which is Martha's family. Truth told them that she was proud of them. Their neighbors knew the boys were gone and headed where they'd went. Some nights they'd ride by and yell out "Cowards!" and "Canada!" and throw things at their house. Quakers would be spat on and shoved in town. Some merchants refused to sell to them. A Quaker from Virginia came to tell them in July that Todd and Robert had been caught by militiamen and forced into the army, even though they were from another state. The army men said Quakers are only good for cannon fodder. The man said the war would start in Virginia and that's where the boys are. Letters and people could be sent by the Underground Railroad. Todd came by one night, had been shot and brought through the stations from Virginia. Todd stated that Friends weren't made to be soldiers, that they weren't given uniforms or guns, but were pushed to the front line with nothing but their bare hands. The Confederate army wanted them to be soldiers but they refused. They were underfed, made to stand up on barrels for a long time, tied up in ropes in the hot sun, and carry logs. One of their Confederate neighbors had noticed a pile of boulders in their pasture and remarked on what a waste it was to take away from land that could be farmed, and I knew that was going to be significant. Sure enough, Matthew and Elizabeth revealed that it was a hiding place and that Todd would be put there. I was so disappointed that Robert wasn't with him. But the good news was that the Virginia farmer had searched the battlefield for someone of Robert's description and hadn't found him among the dead. Todd would be considered a deserter even though he hadn't joined the army. They looked for deserters like they did slaves. Todd had said that Martha asked about Robert and I was further annoyed. And then stupid Truth told Martha's dad to tell Martha that Todd thought Robert was alive. She'd just a little matchmaker. The army came looking for Todd and Robert, both of which were considered deserters. So at least there was hope that he was alive. All of the young Quaker males had left or been forced into the army. By the new year the war had reached NC and the Union had set up base at Clark and Hatteras. The draft age had been raised to accept me 35-45 and they'd have to pay $500 to get out of serving. It was nice of Truth to offer her gold bar that her dad left her. They knew the horses would be taken by the Confederates because they were needed for the army. They knew it was better to sell them than to have them taken. They also knew the horses wouldn't live long in the war. They didn't being shoving money so Matthew had to take some of the steer to market as well. They'd be killed for food for the soldiers. I felt bad when Michael was taken away by the army. He couldn't raise the money so he knew they'd come for him and didn't fight it. Michael told Truth and Martha before he left that slaves could be hidden in the school loft and Martha said they knew that. Okay. Everyone just knew everything, even kids. Truth cried and told him she'd pray for him and to write to the school if he could. And she realized she had deeper feelings for him than she realized. He's a few years older than Robert! Come on! Where did this come from?! I know that Robert is her cousin but back then people didn't mind that and I liked him a lot better than the thin, boring teacher! He pulled Truth to his side and held her there for a moment, and he didn't touch Martha. Martha told her that he cared for her and Truth said like Martha cares for Robert. Ugh! The Emancipation Proclamation didn't reach NC until a month later, at the end of January 1863. Lincoln had proclaimed it on Jan 1 and made slavery illegal in the Rebel states. The Confederates considered it foolishness and the Quakers had to celebrate it privately. The war still went on though. They didn't go to Goldsboro often because there was no coffee, sugar or white flour. Honey was used as a sweetener. Bitter weeds were used to make coffee. Home-ground cornmeal was the only flour available. It had been 2 years since they'd seen Robert. They realized that letters to Quakers weren't delivered and that was why they weren't hearing from him. In August, Perry actually came to tell Truth that his brother had seen Robert. He'd been forced to fight and was a part of the Battle of Gettysburg, where he'd been put on the front line with no weapons just like before. But a Yankee took him prisoner by bayonet point, as a prisoner of war. Perry had come around a little bit. He still believed in the war and wanted the south to win, but he didn't take satisfaction in it. He'd rather be in school still instead of working on the farm and caring for his injured brother and dad, and one brother died. He even acknowledged that Robert was brave because he never took up a weapon even though they did bad things to him in camp. Matthew said that if Robert had said he was a Friend and had refused to fight for the Confederacy, the Yankees would have tried to get him to fight for them. And if he refused to fight then he'd be kept a prisoner. In Jan 1864 letters came from Michael to Lydia's family. He wrote that he was working as a male nurse. Todd said he bets that makes Truth happy and that she likes Michael better than she's ever said. The army took people's cows, horses and good wagons and paid them with Confederate money which wasn't worth much, and there wasn't much to buy anyway. Martha's dad brought news that Robert was being held in a prison in NY. President Lincoln had proclaimed that all Friends be released from prison. Matthew planned to use the Underground Railroad and take Truth with him, since she's a Northerner. Then he would go to President Lincoln. That was the first bit of excitement in the whole book, over halfway through. They had to be blindfolded along the way and at one point were put into a hearse. In the north they were able to get passes for the train. A soldier told her that when people get sick from the cigar smoke they open the window and throw up. It was annoying that they finally got to NY, the last leg of their journey to go to the prison, and a mob of men attacked Matthew and hurt him badly. It was a bit outlandish that Squire was there in NY. He's had word from Friends that they were coming. Wasn't he in Canada? Then Squire said they'd go to see Frederick Douglass in Washington. It got even more unbelievable. Douglass had argued with President Lincoln about having black men enlist in the Union Army. Lincoln finally agreed but Douglass thought he should have sooner. There were riots in NY about the draft. Quakers were hated because they helped black people to freedom. Blacks were treated terribly because they were seen as the cause of the war. Some black people were killed and an orphanage for black kids was burned down. Washington was hot and humid, with mosquitoes and a swampy smell. The Capitol wasn't even finished being built. Douglass liked Quakers because one had found him on the roadside and told him to get in the wagon. Douglass thought it would be best to go through Mary Lincoln, the president's wife, for this particular agenda. He sent a letter to her ahead of Truth and Squire. So that was Frederick Douglass contacting Mary Lincoln instead of President Lincoln on behalf of this little girl. Mary's maid brought them in to see Mary, who agreed to see them for Douglass. Mary heard her tale and shared that she has a kid named Robert and her maiden name was Todd. Truth wanted her to have Lincoln write a letter to the prison requesting that Robert be let free. Lincoln made an appearance as Mary went into the adjoining room, where Truth was able to hear his voice, and see his shadow on the drapes hand his letter to Mary. I was rolling my eyes. Mary told her that Lincoln has a fondness for Quakers. She read his letter, where he'd written that Robert be released to her. Imagine holding a letter the president wrote for you... Squire and his wife took up the Bardwell surname. They were going to travel to Africa because they wanted their kids to be born there. When she got through to see the commandant, Truth told him to tell Robert that his kettle cousin was here. That was a cute moment, because the very first page of the book had Truth overhearing Robert tell her mom that Truth was just a kettle cousin, another mouth to feed. The Union had the rebel prisoners drinking rotten pond water. Robert got malaria and was given quinine. So finally, in August of '64 Robert was free. The elders thought highly of Truth for all that she had done. She finally got to talk with the elders at the meeting, which is a big deal for a young person, especially a girl. Truth asked Lydia if Michael had written and Lydia said he should be writing to her and should have asked for her uncle's permission to write her, but there hadn't been time. She also thought Michael would become a Friend for her. By the fall they had heard that Matthew fractured his skull, and couldn't travel. Lincoln was reelected. Their hams and corn had been confiscated by the army and they were only left with their poor horse. Lucy had a baby in March and Truth had to go stay with her family, because her mom was sick. On the way there with Lucy's dad, they encountered a battle and had to dodge the soldiers. The fighting soon reached their house and they were stuck indoors for days. Cannons would hit the house, they had to stay inside and use a bucket of water to clean. The dad cut a hole in the floorboards to use as a privy. They had to stay on the floor and duck around through the house. The Yankees checked to see if anyone was alive in the house and they collected their dead. Later they noticed someone had left skinned rabbits on their porch, presumably a soldier. After Matthew came back, Martha and her dad stayed for supper and Truth noticed how Robert kept glancing at Martha and that he noticed her now. Wtf?! He showed no interest in her this whole time. Just because Martha likes him doesn't mean she has to get him. Just because you like someone doesn't mean they like you back. The war ended in April and the boys were able to come out of the cave. They went to meeting and Lydia gave Truth a letter from Michael. Truth felt strong and for the first time at meeting her thoughts didn't race to other things; she was silent and felt compelled to speak. The elders approved and she started by saying she's too young to speak but she wants to share how God took a poor servant and used her as His instrument. I was so not happy with that. I wanted her with Robert, because he was so much more interesting than Michael. And Michael didn't even come back into the story. At least tell us where he's at, what he went through, and what will become of them. Some romance where the two of them never even spoke! How lame and boring! It might as well have not even been in here. The author's note shared that Quakers are called such because they quake in the presence of the Holy Spirit. They believed whites, blacks and Indians could have God's Light. Quaker men who ran from the army were hidden all over the south. The Underground Railroad was called the railroad with no rails. The people who operated it were called conductors. They only knew the location of the next station and who brought them the slaves. Slaves going in one direction weren't blindfolded but it they were going to return then they were so the conductor's identity could be protected. Douglass really did know Lincoln and tried to get him to enlist black soldiers in the army, but Lincoln refused and that caused a coldness for a while. I didn't know that he was made the minister of Haiti. Mary Lincoln was considered to be vain and silly and was a trial at times for Lincoln. She was impulsive and had a favorite child. When Lincoln was killed she sent Douglass his walking cane. It was terrible to hear that she never recovered from her husband's assassination and that her son had her put in a mental institution. It's sad that the year before he died he was in failing health due to the stresses of his role. People noticed his pallor, gauntness, tiredness and cold handshakes. He favored the Society of Friends and said if someone was a Friend then they're not a prisoner of war. When he was killed he had a Quaker article in his pocket. He had the power to free prisoners and he did. She credited her source as a book she found at a college library and that it was about Quakers in the southern states. I kept wondering why the book was called Who Comes With Cannons? when there had been no cannons. Cannons didn't even come into the story until pg. 166 out of 186. I didn't get a feel like I really knew Truth. It's in 3rd person and the author barely wrote any of her thoughts and feelings about anything. Yes, she didn't believe in slavery. She's a hard worker. She wondered if a guy would look at her like Todd did Lucy. Truth was asking questions all the time and it was so annoying. Will the riders be back? Will the army come looking for Todd? The conversations they had were unrealistic and clumsy as the author tried to dispense information. For ex, Truth told Lucy that Todd had to stay in the cave because the army would be looking for him. Lucy replied that Todd would get well and then he could come out at night, which was weird that she knew that, because the others had already said that. All the characters had the same knowledge and just kept going around repeating it. I will never read this again.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Eva

    I read this aloud to my kids when we traveled to Georgia (from CA) and toured several historical sites. Though the book doesn't take place in Georgia, it really helped us to get into the time period. Both my 10 yr old daughter & 8 yr old son enjoyed it. I read this aloud to my kids when we traveled to Georgia (from CA) and toured several historical sites. Though the book doesn't take place in Georgia, it really helped us to get into the time period. Both my 10 yr old daughter & 8 yr old son enjoyed it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    I loved this book! It's the Quaker perspective during the American Civil War and I really enjoyed the story and characters. I loved this book! It's the Quaker perspective during the American Civil War and I really enjoyed the story and characters.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Lessner

    A nice way to introduce how the Quakers 'participated' in the Civil War. A nice way to introduce how the Quakers 'participated' in the Civil War.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    This was not a stellar story, but it did do an effective job of showing the realities of the Civil War from a civilian perspective. My second-grader liked it. I appreciated the scope of the story in showing the family dynamic of a southern Quaker family, the nobility and hostility of both northern and southern people, the nitty-gritty of the Underground Railroad, and even the cameos of Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. It's not a book I'd return to again, but I always do appreciate when a novel ca This was not a stellar story, but it did do an effective job of showing the realities of the Civil War from a civilian perspective. My second-grader liked it. I appreciated the scope of the story in showing the family dynamic of a southern Quaker family, the nobility and hostility of both northern and southern people, the nitty-gritty of the Underground Railroad, and even the cameos of Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. It's not a book I'd return to again, but I always do appreciate when a novel can be the history teacher.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    Deeply tedious. Full of clunky exposition and an extremely odd plot point where then-13 year-old Truth’s crush on her schoolteacher is apparently requited. We’re given the impression at the end of book that a now-16 year-old Truth will marry him when he comes home from war. Probably historically accurate (and her teacher could well have also been a teenager, although his age is never specified) but such an odd thing to include in a book for middle-schoolers.

  7. 5 out of 5

    C.

    This is a lovely book about the Quaker community and their participation in the Underground Railroad. It was a quick, fun read that I think would be a great way to introduce children to the issues of slavery, abolition, personal choices, civil disobedience, and the civil war. It’s a book I would read with a grandchild. This is a safe, family-focuse, book with limited scenes of violence.

  8. 4 out of 5

    6thbreed

    (3.5 stars)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Interesting look into the life of Quaker families, as well as the underground railroad and the horrors of war.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    A very interesting Civil War story from an unusual perspective! The Friends had a part to play on both sides.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlyn

    Title: Who Comes with Cannons Author: Patricia Beatty Genre: Historic Theme(s): US History Opening line/sentence: “Kettle cousin indeed! The name stung” Brief Book Summary: A story of an orphaned girl who goes to live with family during the Civil War. This is a story of courage as a young girl learns about how to deal with the loss of her parents as well as her family's involvement in Underground Railroad. Professional Recommendation/Review #1:When orphaned Truth comes to live with her uncle's fa Title: Who Comes with Cannons Author: Patricia Beatty Genre: Historic Theme(s): US History Opening line/sentence: “Kettle cousin indeed! The name stung” Brief Book Summary: A story of an orphaned girl who goes to live with family during the Civil War. This is a story of courage as a young girl learns about how to deal with the loss of her parents as well as her family's involvement in Underground Railroad. Professional Recommendation/Review #1:When orphaned Truth comes to live with her uncle's family in North Carolina, she soon learns of their involvement with the Underground Railroad. Admiring their courage, she aspires to help, and her commitment to the Quaker ideals guides her on several abolitionist missions. The story is believable, nicely paced, and rich in historic detail. Professional Recommendation/Review #2: Beatty's posthumous Civil War novel will be welcomed by readers of her earlier works, such as Charley Skedaddle and Jayhawker . Truth Hopkins, a Quaker, is sent to North Carolina relatives on the eve of the Civil War; her mother is dead and her father dying. Doubly an outsider, she watches and helps in small ways as her kin run a station on the Underground Railroad. When war comes her two male cousins are forced into the Confederate army; later--in a rather improbable journey north and back again--Truth rescues one of them from a Union prison in Elmira, N.Y. The once-timid Truth can then take her place in the family and in the local Meeting for Worship. The risky choice to create a heroine who plays a passive role for much of the story succeeds in the end--Truth's quiet determination allows readers to view the Civil War from the perspective of a group persecuted by both sides. Ages 10-up. (Oct.) Response to Two Professional Reviews: The professional reviewers were right when they mentioned the how good the historic detail was. This topic can be a very dry part of history. Having the students connect to the story by using a character who they can relate to makes it more interesting. Evaluation of Literary Elements: The literary elements in this book are perfect for students in third and fourth grade. In each chapter there is at least one picture. For example in Chapter 2 there is a picture of a bonnet. This is a very good visual just in case there is a student who doesn't know what one looks like. Students will connect with this story , although the Civil War is not something the students would have lived through, students will be able to show empathy with the main character because they share roughly the same age. Feeney, S., & Moravcik, E.. (2005) Consideration of Instructional Application: If my class were learning about the Civil War I would have at least four or five books the students could choose from. This book would be one of them. I would then have a meet and greet with the students as they dress up as their favorite character from the story and have conversation with the other characters from other stories.

  12. 5 out of 5

    The History Mom

    A middle grade novel about Quakers living in North Carolina during the Civil War. The language was a little stilted (lots of thees and thous) but the premise of the book was very interesting. I learned a lot about Quakers and how they were treated in the Civil War.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    This is the third of Patricia Beatty's historical novels set in the Civil War. Charley Skedaddle was set with a young boy from the north who runs off to war only to find out it wasn't what he expected. Turn Homeward Hanna was set with a young girl from the south who is taken prisoner and sent north accused of treason because she worked at a southern cloth mill. In Who Comes With Cannons, we are introduced to Quakers in North Carolina who were part of the Underground Railroad. I found this book an This is the third of Patricia Beatty's historical novels set in the Civil War. Charley Skedaddle was set with a young boy from the north who runs off to war only to find out it wasn't what he expected. Turn Homeward Hanna was set with a young girl from the south who is taken prisoner and sent north accused of treason because she worked at a southern cloth mill. In Who Comes With Cannons, we are introduced to Quakers in North Carolina who were part of the Underground Railroad. I found this book an easy read once you get into cadence with the "Friends" language use of "thee". While it does seem improbable that the young girl in this story would actually be able to meet Frederick Douglass and see Abraham Lincoln, the story about Quaker beliefs and how they aided the north in their own way was extremely believable. While I still like Charley Skedaddle best, this is a good historical novel for those interested in the Civil War, and it shows the war from an very different vantage point that one does not often hear about.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Miss Amanda

    gr 4-8 178 pgs 1861-1865, North Carolina. When her father becomes ill and must go to California for treatment, Truth is sent to live her aunt, uncle and cousins the Bardwells. At first, her cousin seems to resent her and Truth can't figure out why. She also can't figure out why the hearthstone for the fireplace is so large and why they never use it. Like her, the Bardwells are Quakers and oppose slavery. Could the Bardwell house be a stop on the Underground Railroad? Really great story showing the gr 4-8 178 pgs 1861-1865, North Carolina. When her father becomes ill and must go to California for treatment, Truth is sent to live her aunt, uncle and cousins the Bardwells. At first, her cousin seems to resent her and Truth can't figure out why. She also can't figure out why the hearthstone for the fireplace is so large and why they never use it. Like her, the Bardwells are Quakers and oppose slavery. Could the Bardwell house be a stop on the Underground Railroad? Really great story showing the Civil War from another perspective that is anti-slavery but not pro Union or pro Confederate.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Reagan Smith

    The beginning of this book was slow, but as I read on it got more exciting. This story takes place in North Carolina in 1861. Truth was sent there to live with her uncle after her farther died, and arrived just at the on set of the Civil War. To no ones surprised war breaks out and suddenly Truth is now a part of her uncles secret station stop in the underground railroad. Believing that slaves should be free, Truth is helping run away slaves escape and is also trying to prevent her cousins from The beginning of this book was slow, but as I read on it got more exciting. This story takes place in North Carolina in 1861. Truth was sent there to live with her uncle after her farther died, and arrived just at the on set of the Civil War. To no ones surprised war breaks out and suddenly Truth is now a part of her uncles secret station stop in the underground railroad. Believing that slaves should be free, Truth is helping run away slaves escape and is also trying to prevent her cousins from going to Union prison camp. This is a great and easy to read historical fiction that I would recommend to those of you who like reading about history, but with a twist!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This book was often difficult to read because of the Quaker language of Thees and Thous. It was a story about a Quaker girl from the north who is sent to live with her family in the South when her family dies. The Quakers are involved in the Underground railroad. Two of the Quaker boys are kidnapped and forced in to the Southern army, and then captured by the Northerners and put into Yankee prison. The main character must make a dangerous journey to rescue her cousins. She gets help from Frederi This book was often difficult to read because of the Quaker language of Thees and Thous. It was a story about a Quaker girl from the north who is sent to live with her family in the South when her family dies. The Quakers are involved in the Underground railroad. Two of the Quaker boys are kidnapped and forced in to the Southern army, and then captured by the Northerners and put into Yankee prison. The main character must make a dangerous journey to rescue her cousins. She gets help from Frederick Douglas and the President himself! Very fun. Great for discussion of the Civil war period.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nina

    I really enjoyed this book even as an adult. It gives a fictional account of a young woman during the time of the civil war who is a Quaker. When both her parents pass away she is sent to live with her aunt and uncle and 2 cousins in North Carolina. It talks about slavery, the civil war, Lincoln, and gives a good account of how people lived back then. I would recommend it for any classroom covering the civil war.

  18. 4 out of 5

    10-11 Adrian

    This book is about a girl in the Civil War.When her dad dies she goes to live with her dad's sister.While she's there she finds out that everyone living there is a conductor on the Underground Railroad.She also becomes a conductor on the railroad.Soon her two cousins go into war and something badhappens to both of them or so theythought.Finnally they are able to know where they are and are on a mission to find them. This book is about a girl in the Civil War.When her dad dies she goes to live with her dad's sister.While she's there she finds out that everyone living there is a conductor on the Underground Railroad.She also becomes a conductor on the railroad.Soon her two cousins go into war and something badhappens to both of them or so theythought.Finnally they are able to know where they are and are on a mission to find them.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Elisabeth Bridges

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Overall I liked this, although I didn't think it was up to Patricia Beatty's usual standard of excellence. I thought it got a little cheesy toward the end, what with her personally meeting Frederick Douglass and Mary Lincoln, and ALLLLMOST meeting the president. But hey, if I was 13, I would probably think it was amazing. Overall I liked this, although I didn't think it was up to Patricia Beatty's usual standard of excellence. I thought it got a little cheesy toward the end, what with her personally meeting Frederick Douglass and Mary Lincoln, and ALLLLMOST meeting the president. But hey, if I was 13, I would probably think it was amazing.

  20. 4 out of 5

    EquineChick

    I loved this book, because also like "Number th Stars" it takes you back. It lets you see how some families lived back then. It makes me feel fortunate to live the way I live. Great book! I loved this book, because also like "Number th Stars" it takes you back. It lets you see how some families lived back then. It makes me feel fortunate to live the way I live. Great book!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    This isn't a bad book for kids - I remember when I was younger that I had a stronger fascination with it. This isn't a bad book for kids - I remember when I was younger that I had a stronger fascination with it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Abby

    A good book to read while studying the CIvil War, it was a good perspective of a girl's life back then. A good read altogether. A good book to read while studying the CIvil War, it was a good perspective of a girl's life back then. A good read altogether.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Santiago

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sally Burnell

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joslyn

  26. 4 out of 5

    Meghan Johnson

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amy Christ

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Kuznicki

  29. 4 out of 5

    Beth

  30. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

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