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The Tomb of the Honey Bee

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Like your murder mysteries as sweet as honey but with a real sting in the tail? From acclaimed British author L.B. Hathaway comes this exciting new cozy murder mystery featuring the redoubtable Private Detective, Posie Parker.This is the second book in the Posie Parker Mystery Series, although it can be enjoyed as a stand-alone story. Set across a number of exotic locati Like your murder mysteries as sweet as honey but with a real sting in the tail? From acclaimed British author L.B. Hathaway comes this exciting new cozy murder mystery featuring the redoubtable Private Detective, Posie Parker.This is the second book in the Posie Parker Mystery Series, although it can be enjoyed as a stand-alone story. Set across a number of exotic locations during the summer of 1921, 'The Tomb of the Honey Bee' is a classic murder mystery set during the Golden Age of Crime which will appeal to fans of Agatha Christie and Downton Abbey.When Posie is asked to find a world-famous explorer who has gone missing, she finds herself in murky waters yet again: an aristocratic family torn apart by hatred, a bizarre murder at an English country house, and a cryptic clue left behind by the explorer which is sweet as honey, but deadlier than poison.In a case where simply everyone has a motive for wanting the explorer dead, Posie’s investigation starts off in the English Cotswolds, takes her through the glamorous South of France, on to the mysterious island of Ortigia in Italy, and then into the Tombs of the Pharaohs in Egypt. But is she being followed by a cold-blooded killer? And where has Len, her almost-boyfriend, disappeared to? If you love an action-packed historical cozy crime with a feisty protagonist, download a sample or buy 'The Tomb of the Honey Bee' now. ˃˃˃ Other books by L.B. Hathaway: 'Murder Offstage' (A Posie Parker Mystery #1) is also available on Amazon.'Murder at Maypole Manor' (A Posie Parker Mystery #3) and 'The Vanishing of Dr Winter' (A Posie Parker Mystery #4) are available late 2015.To be the first to hear about L.B. Hathaway's new releases sign up for the newsletter at: lbhathaway.comFollow L.B. Hathaway on: Twitter: @LbHathaway


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Like your murder mysteries as sweet as honey but with a real sting in the tail? From acclaimed British author L.B. Hathaway comes this exciting new cozy murder mystery featuring the redoubtable Private Detective, Posie Parker.This is the second book in the Posie Parker Mystery Series, although it can be enjoyed as a stand-alone story. Set across a number of exotic locati Like your murder mysteries as sweet as honey but with a real sting in the tail? From acclaimed British author L.B. Hathaway comes this exciting new cozy murder mystery featuring the redoubtable Private Detective, Posie Parker.This is the second book in the Posie Parker Mystery Series, although it can be enjoyed as a stand-alone story. Set across a number of exotic locations during the summer of 1921, 'The Tomb of the Honey Bee' is a classic murder mystery set during the Golden Age of Crime which will appeal to fans of Agatha Christie and Downton Abbey.When Posie is asked to find a world-famous explorer who has gone missing, she finds herself in murky waters yet again: an aristocratic family torn apart by hatred, a bizarre murder at an English country house, and a cryptic clue left behind by the explorer which is sweet as honey, but deadlier than poison.In a case where simply everyone has a motive for wanting the explorer dead, Posie’s investigation starts off in the English Cotswolds, takes her through the glamorous South of France, on to the mysterious island of Ortigia in Italy, and then into the Tombs of the Pharaohs in Egypt. But is she being followed by a cold-blooded killer? And where has Len, her almost-boyfriend, disappeared to? If you love an action-packed historical cozy crime with a feisty protagonist, download a sample or buy 'The Tomb of the Honey Bee' now. ˃˃˃ Other books by L.B. Hathaway: 'Murder Offstage' (A Posie Parker Mystery #1) is also available on Amazon.'Murder at Maypole Manor' (A Posie Parker Mystery #3) and 'The Vanishing of Dr Winter' (A Posie Parker Mystery #4) are available late 2015.To be the first to hear about L.B. Hathaway's new releases sign up for the newsletter at: lbhathaway.comFollow L.B. Hathaway on: Twitter: @LbHathaway

30 review for The Tomb of the Honey Bee

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rosina

    If you want a taste of life in England in the 1920s do not read this book. It is so full of anachronisms, inaccuracies, and lack of research that I gave up about a third of the way through, having decided that when I can recognise so much as wrong, the rest could not be taken seriously, and there was no way of identifying a clue from a stupid error Examples: “Posie remembered how, years before, at the age of twenty-one, Alaric had decided he would become a politician, and had caused a huge scandal If you want a taste of life in England in the 1920s do not read this book. It is so full of anachronisms, inaccuracies, and lack of research that I gave up about a third of the way through, having decided that when I can recognise so much as wrong, the rest could not be taken seriously, and there was no way of identifying a clue from a stupid error Examples: “Posie remembered how, years before, at the age of twenty-one, Alaric had decided he would become a politician, and had caused a huge scandal by giving up his aristocratic title in order to do so.” Anyone who knows anything about British politcs knows that renouncing a peerage was not possible in the 1920s, which is why an Act of Parliament (The Peerage Act 1963) was necessary to allow Viscount Stansgate to revert to being simple Tony Wedgwood Benn. Moreover, there is nothing to stop a peer being a politician, even a Minister of the Crown. And it was not until 1923 – two years after this book is allegedly set – that the principle that the PM should be in the Commons was firmly set. So he neither needed to ronounce his peerage, nor could he have done so. “And when she tasted it, she realised just why Alaric Boynton-Dale’s honey had won all those awards, why it was famed as the best in the land, why one jar alone was worth paying eighty-four pence for.” In what currency? What on earth is this about? We have already been told that the honey cost 10/6 (ten shillings and six pence) which isn't 84 pence, and wouldn't be in New Money either. The 'historical note' shows that Ms Hathaway does not know much about money either ... "In England in 1921 there was decimalisation in place; a system involving the use of shillings, pence and pounds." Pounds, shillings and pence are about as far from 'decimalisation' as you can get. And still doesn't explain why suddenly honey is priced in pence. Hathaway, L.B.. The Tomb of the Honey Bee: A Posie Parker Mystery (The Posie Parker Mystery Series Book 2) (p. 258). Whitehaven Man Press London. Kindle Edition. “She pushed across some money for the first-class stamp to the British Museum and also to pay for the black wax.” Is the Post Mistress running some sort of scam, taking in more money than the value of the stamp, and pretending they are 'first-class'? In 1921 you could expect next day delivery (same day, in some cases) without paying extra. First class and second class stamps weren't introduced until 1968. Within living memory. “Posie turned and addressed the room: ‘I think there may well be something in what Mr Sharp says. It’s just as well that I have called in one of the best Inspectors from Scotland Yard. He’s on his way here now, together with his team.’” Posie seems to have been appointed as Chief Constable of Oxfordshire, since she has it in her power to 'call in' Scotland Yard. I did not wait to learn if the real Chief Constable would take the matter up with the Metropolitan Police, and send Lovelace packing, as he has every right to do. Indeed, I would be amazed if a Scotland Yard detective would be so foolish as to poke his nose in uninvited. Scotland Yard aren't a private investigation firm, brought in by anyone who feels like it! Anachronistic language includes “wingman” (1943 in aviation), 'moonlighting' (1957). Also, why can't writers who want to use members of the aristocracy in their fiction do the little bit of research needed to find out the correct forms of address. Lord Roderick would be the younger son of a Marquess or Duke and Lady Eve, his wife, is not the daughter of rough rich Texan millionaire Mr Burns: unless he is the Duke of Dallas or the Earl of Austin. . I am happy that some people enjoyed it, but do not take it seriously, or believe that it is in any way a realistic picture of 1921's England.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Corrie

    In the second installment of the Posie Parker Mystery Series, author L.B. Hathaway takes our plucky private detective of the Grape Street Bureau on quite an adventure. Posie Parker gets hired by Lady Violet Boynton-Dale to find her brother, the famous explorer Alaric Boynton-Dale. Alaric has gone missing and Violet fears he might have been murdered. In The Tomb of the Honey Bee, Posie travels to some pretty exotic locations. From a murder in the English Cotswolds, to heartbreak in the South of F In the second installment of the Posie Parker Mystery Series, author L.B. Hathaway takes our plucky private detective of the Grape Street Bureau on quite an adventure. Posie Parker gets hired by Lady Violet Boynton-Dale to find her brother, the famous explorer Alaric Boynton-Dale. Alaric has gone missing and Violet fears he might have been murdered. In The Tomb of the Honey Bee, Posie travels to some pretty exotic locations. From a murder in the English Cotswolds, to heartbreak in the South of France. Then following the trail to Ortigia in Sicily and lastly to the Valley of the Kings in Egypt. As usual the bodies keep piling up and it is for Posie to make sense of it all. Clare Wille was a feast for the ear. Her many voices and accents are a delight and she is the main reason I started this series. And the series is good! I praise L.B. Hathaway for the solid plot and the most fantastic (and highly original) names I’ve come across in a long time (Lady Cosima Catchpole winning the prize here). It was by pure luck I guessed who the murderer was, it certainly wasn’t given away. I loved the Agatha Christie style reveal at the end, where Posie gathers all the suspects in one room to explain how she got to the killer. Onwards to book 3! Audiobooks are available on Scribd. Themes: summer 1921, an altered will, Boynton Hall in the English Cotswolds, a gold honey bee coin, Dame Ianthe Flowers writes a tell-all book, we find out where Len has gone off to, it’s all about the honey. 4.4 Stars

  3. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Jane

    Historically inaccurate bit clichéd If you choose to write in an era you really ought to make sure that you don't change the dates of significant events. All it does is suspend belief and cast doubt on your capacity to research accurately.. padding out the back with excuses doesn't make it ok.. move the story date by a year instead.. that would be much more believable. Declaring the price of a jar of honey at 84p when it would have been stated in shillings and pence.. decimalisation happened in 19 Historically inaccurate bit clichéd If you choose to write in an era you really ought to make sure that you don't change the dates of significant events. All it does is suspend belief and cast doubt on your capacity to research accurately.. padding out the back with excuses doesn't make it ok.. move the story date by a year instead.. that would be much more believable. Declaring the price of a jar of honey at 84p when it would have been stated in shillings and pence.. decimalisation happened in 1971 not 1921.. some 50 years away and when you remove these basic staples of life in the 1920's it removes the period feel.. by switching them for your own convenience you are removing the very things that provide the reality, the authenticity and the character to your story. On the one hand you state that a flat in Bloomsbury would have cost a few hundred pounds.. on the other you state she sank her entire capital (£10,000) into the flat.. it would have been a few hundred pounds.. this really needs fixing.. there's no way she went through all of that on the flat.. it was enough as you stated for her to be set for life based on the era. Christie wrote in the now, which made this much simpler, to achieve even a modicum of her success you need to immerse yourself in the period and write it as if you are living it. Until you can get the full flavour of the era accurately and naturally into the background the full impact of the surface story will be lost and they will continue to disappoint those of us who seek truly compelling reads set in specific eras such as Christie's and Marsh's.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Anna Aurora

    uh I have so many feeling right now.First,I did really like the story,Posie is one of the most real book main leads I have ever read about,I just love her.But...I did figure out who is the killer in the beginning of the book,that was a disappointment(I do like to be surprised at the end).Overall really interesting book,if you like detective stories and mystery this is for you . 4/5

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amina

    In this second settlement, Posie takes us to some amazingly exotic places.. Italy for example. It's true, I was able to point out who did it in the very first beggining of the book, but still, I enjoyed following her every move throughout the chapters, but, if you read it for more than its "mystery" part, you might find some innacurecies, so proceed cautiously. The one thing I don't really like in this series so far is the way it revolves around Posie's love life, I mean, it doesn't value the fact In this second settlement, Posie takes us to some amazingly exotic places.. Italy for example. It's true, I was able to point out who did it in the very first beggining of the book, but still, I enjoyed following her every move throughout the chapters, but, if you read it for more than its "mystery" part, you might find some innacurecies, so proceed cautiously. The one thing I don't really like in this series so far is the way it revolves around Posie's love life, I mean, it doesn't value the fact that she is one of the most renowned "female" detectives but only that she's always and desperately chasing love, it's nice a to have a great partner, but, the world won't come to an end if you spend some time by yourself right?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    I loved the setting in 1921! It is so refreshing to read a mystery that is powered by the players and not what they figured out from using tech. It is evocative of Christie and Allingham. Looking forward to the next book!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    Lots of fun as Posie travels to exotic Sicily and Egypt, following the mystery of Alaric's disappearance. I thoroughly enjoyed it. The style is light and charming. Read the last third of the book in one sitting, and couldn't put it down. The climax was also amusingly melodramatic. (view spoiler)[In the book I ran across a couple of small but obvious-to-me anachronisms in use of idioms, which I'd be happy to point out if Ms Hathaway contacts me. Also one rather larger technological gaff that made Lots of fun as Posie travels to exotic Sicily and Egypt, following the mystery of Alaric's disappearance. I thoroughly enjoyed it. The style is light and charming. Read the last third of the book in one sitting, and couldn't put it down. The climax was also amusingly melodramatic. (view spoiler)[In the book I ran across a couple of small but obvious-to-me anachronisms in use of idioms, which I'd be happy to point out if Ms Hathaway contacts me. Also one rather larger technological gaff that made me roll my eyes while smiling. Oh! The Tutankhamen thing: yes, I read the footnotes so at least I know that's a known historical liberty. ;-) (hide spoiler)]

  8. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    (Grr the internet ate my review) This is a version of a classic British mystery that sets off at a Country House Murder, moves to a Blue Train adventure, before high tailing it off to Luxor and the Valley of the Kings before making its way back to the Country House. It also makes a quick side trip to Sicily that makes Michael Corleone's look peaceful. We have a bunch of murders, a long lost lover, a pre-Roman coin, a Bee God and hidden tomb. And we can't forget jealous lovers, grasping relatives, (Grr the internet ate my review) This is a version of a classic British mystery that sets off at a Country House Murder, moves to a Blue Train adventure, before high tailing it off to Luxor and the Valley of the Kings before making its way back to the Country House. It also makes a quick side trip to Sicily that makes Michael Corleone's look peaceful. We have a bunch of murders, a long lost lover, a pre-Roman coin, a Bee God and hidden tomb. And we can't forget jealous lovers, grasping relatives, degenerate gamblers, and the intrepid men of Scotland Yard. I couldn't stop reading.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Voirrey

    This was fun, and I enjoyed it, even though I figured out the villain by half way through the book. My major gripe is that everything is clearly labelled with months in 1921 and yet the wonders discovered in the tomb of Tutankhamen is referenced - the discovery was made in November 1922, and the burial chamber not opened until February 1923.... And it would have been so easy to check the date and just not mention it, as it wasn't a major plot point. This was fun, and I enjoyed it, even though I figured out the villain by half way through the book. My major gripe is that everything is clearly labelled with months in 1921 and yet the wonders discovered in the tomb of Tutankhamen is referenced - the discovery was made in November 1922, and the burial chamber not opened until February 1923.... And it would have been so easy to check the date and just not mention it, as it wasn't a major plot point.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Fercarranza

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The plot pushes you through the book because it is interesting enough. The setting and atmosphere are nice though not historically accurate. But Posie feels like an undeveloped character, people around her call her intuitive even though she is clueless half of the book. She can’t even figure out her love interest has moved on. The most frustrating bit of the story to me was the “Serafina” inscription on the bee coin. She goes asking people (about a really ancient, hundreds of years ancient coin) The plot pushes you through the book because it is interesting enough. The setting and atmosphere are nice though not historically accurate. But Posie feels like an undeveloped character, people around her call her intuitive even though she is clueless half of the book. She can’t even figure out her love interest has moved on. The most frustrating bit of the story to me was the “Serafina” inscription on the bee coin. She goes asking people (about a really ancient, hundreds of years ancient coin) “Who is Serafina? Where can I find her? Is she protecting Alaric?”... why would a person dedicated to investigation assume that Serafina was a living person... what is wrong with her common sense.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Linda Baker

    3.5 rounded up

  12. 4 out of 5

    Susie

    This book was kind of a charmer! It was well paced and engrossing. Posie grows up a bit. I missed her gaggle of London pals and colleagues in this one, though. A few times the writing felt immature or repetitive, but it didn’t stop me from enjoying the plot. I did have the mystery solved by the end, which always bums me out a bit. But still a solid and enjoyable read!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nick D

    (audiobook with a fairly good reader) This reads like it started as an atrocious rambling mess that got turned into something approaching mediocrity by a good editor. What's left still rambles, but some of the excesses have been sewed up into dead ends and silly coincidences. What kept me going to the end was the comical entertainment of the anachronisms - both factual and linguistic. They reached a pinnacle when the action (pointlessly) moved to a Egypt (an Egypt in which commoner tombs are found (audiobook with a fairly good reader) This reads like it started as an atrocious rambling mess that got turned into something approaching mediocrity by a good editor. What's left still rambles, but some of the excesses have been sewed up into dead ends and silly coincidences. What kept me going to the end was the comical entertainment of the anachronisms - both factual and linguistic. They reached a pinnacle when the action (pointlessly) moved to a Egypt (an Egypt in which commoner tombs are found in the Valley of the Kings, and in which the Nile longer forms a barrier to road transport between the tombs and the town of Luxor), with one character borrowing a jet aircraft, and another speaking of the treasures of Tutankhamun - in 1921.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Fiona

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I’m sorry but this felt sloppy. Obvious clues that were ignored by the detective and police - the manuscript. And why an author of murder mysteries would write a whole book about a murder, announce she has something important to tell you tomorrow in a crowded room when she knows who did it (and they are in the room) and not expect to get killed or not have a back up planned is just silly. And then no one bothers to read it???? And someone who has had 3 attempts on his life keeps running away but I’m sorry but this felt sloppy. Obvious clues that were ignored by the detective and police - the manuscript. And why an author of murder mysteries would write a whole book about a murder, announce she has something important to tell you tomorrow in a crowded room when she knows who did it (and they are in the room) and not expect to get killed or not have a back up planned is just silly. And then no one bothers to read it???? And someone who has had 3 attempts on his life keeps running away but not very carefully? And an ineffective killer who is apparently ruthless and terribly clever but only poisons one glass? And a detective who ignores clues and doesn’t press people further on what they know? Because he seems a bit sad? Where is her gumption? Where are her great detective skills when it comes to Len or the flowers? I tried to give Posey another go but she doesn’t give you much to connect with or cheer for. It sort of gets resolved despite her rather than because of her actions or cleverness. Disappointing.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Geraldine Sidoli

    Did nobody proof read this story? This story works well enough as a light-hearted romp, but having set it in the 1920s why does the author riddle it with anachronistic language and details? Tutankhamen’s tomb was discovered in November 1922, so would hardly be commonplace knowledge a year earlier. Radar - discovered in the 1940s, so what are the chances anyone would be advised to stay under the radar in 1921? Stepping out of turn instead of speaking out of turn, twitching on your heels for nippin Did nobody proof read this story? This story works well enough as a light-hearted romp, but having set it in the 1920s why does the author riddle it with anachronistic language and details? Tutankhamen’s tomb was discovered in November 1922, so would hardly be commonplace knowledge a year earlier. Radar - discovered in the 1940s, so what are the chances anyone would be advised to stay under the radar in 1921? Stepping out of turn instead of speaking out of turn, twitching on your heels for nipping at your heels. I may be pedantic but why would I read anything else by this author when Christie, Allingham, Sayers et al are still in print? Not even Posie is interesting enough to be memorable, so this will my last Posie Parker mystery

  16. 4 out of 5

    Paula Curran

    Good who dunnit but irritating anachronistisms This is second book in the series I have read. Enjoyed the first but had to try and forget the contemporary phrases that jarred in a 1921 setting. I cannot believe that any working class woman at that time would refer to her "CV". Similarly in this book I've faltered at a valet however unconventional calling himself his employer's "wingman". But I assumed this was a conscious choice by the author. However having an archaeologist in June 1921 linking Good who dunnit but irritating anachronistisms This is second book in the series I have read. Enjoyed the first but had to try and forget the contemporary phrases that jarred in a 1921 setting. I cannot believe that any working class woman at that time would refer to her "CV". Similarly in this book I've faltered at a valet however unconventional calling himself his employer's "wingman". But I assumed this was a conscious choice by the author. However having an archaeologist in June 1921 linking the discovery of Tutankhamun's grave with increased tourist interest in his own work when Carter didn't discover the Tut site until November 1922 is just carelessness.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Keeley

    Another enjoyable mystery featuring the unpredictable Posie Parker. The exotic locations and varied new characters made for a fun read. The storytelling techniques -- like allowing the detective to discover something that is not shared with the reader -- are appropriate to the genre, even if the plot sometimes leaps oddly as a result. I continue to love how Posie seems stronger than a heroine written in the Twenties would have been, without acting totally inappropriately to her time (as, say, Li Another enjoyable mystery featuring the unpredictable Posie Parker. The exotic locations and varied new characters made for a fun read. The storytelling techniques -- like allowing the detective to discover something that is not shared with the reader -- are appropriate to the genre, even if the plot sometimes leaps oddly as a result. I continue to love how Posie seems stronger than a heroine written in the Twenties would have been, without acting totally inappropriately to her time (as, say, Lindsay Davis' delightful characters sometimes do).

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bebe (Sarah) Brechner

    Excellent 1920's mystery! This second entry of the Posie Parker series is a thrilling throwback mystery in the classic Agatha Christie tradition - a stately manor home, aristocratic suspects, and plenty of dead bodies cleverly murdered. Add to the mix, exotic locations (Sicily, Egypt), archeology, a touch of delicious honey, and the finesse of 1920 details, and we have a winning potion! Truly engrossing read. More of Miss Posie Parker, please! Excellent 1920's mystery! This second entry of the Posie Parker series is a thrilling throwback mystery in the classic Agatha Christie tradition - a stately manor home, aristocratic suspects, and plenty of dead bodies cleverly murdered. Add to the mix, exotic locations (Sicily, Egypt), archeology, a touch of delicious honey, and the finesse of 1920 details, and we have a winning potion! Truly engrossing read. More of Miss Posie Parker, please!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Regina M Sword

    Highly recommended I've read both of the Posey Parker mysteries, and loved them. They're well-written with plots twisting enough I couldn't put either book down. The characters are engaging and well-drawn, and the settings are intelligent. Whopping good stories. Highly recommended I've read both of the Posey Parker mysteries, and loved them. They're well-written with plots twisting enough I couldn't put either book down. The characters are engaging and well-drawn, and the settings are intelligent. Whopping good stories.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Belinda Vlasbaard

    4 stars- English Ebook The Tomb of the Honey Bee: A Posie Parker Mystery, is the second book in this series. Posie Parker is a detective living in London in the 1920s. Lady Violet asks Posie to find her brother, Alaric. First, Posie goes to Boynton Hall to meet the family. What a nasty bunch of people! It’s obvious that husbands, wives, brothers, and sisters don’t get along, and the atmosphere is absolutely evil. So, Posie leaves as soon as she can—after a writer is murdered in the house. She sta 4 stars- English Ebook The Tomb of the Honey Bee: A Posie Parker Mystery, is the second book in this series. Posie Parker is a detective living in London in the 1920s. Lady Violet asks Posie to find her brother, Alaric. First, Posie goes to Boynton Hall to meet the family. What a nasty bunch of people! It’s obvious that husbands, wives, brothers, and sisters don’t get along, and the atmosphere is absolutely evil. So, Posie leaves as soon as she can—after a writer is murdered in the house. She stays in touch with Scotland Yard, and continues her search for Alaric. It leads her to France, where she’s in for a surprise, and then to Sicily. She knows someone is following her, but she’s not sure who it is. She is successful in finding Alaric in Sicily, but she tries to keep it a secret while she unravels the rest of the mystery. Before she knows it, she and Alaric flee danger to Egypt, where an amazing archeological find is made in the Valley of the Kings. Disaster and death follow, and Posie finds a clue that leads her back home to London and to Stowe in the Cotswolds to solve the mystery. There’s more to the story, of course. What does the coin with the honeybee mean? Why did Alaric leave his home? Where is his sanctuary, and why does he need to go to Egypt? What is the golden find? And, who murdered Ianthe and the archaeologist? Most important, why is the murderer trying to kill Alaric? I love the British speech in this book series, references to places I’ve actually visited, and the distinctly English feel to her books. Even though this novel takes place in varying points on the globe, the reader feels rooted in England and British customs. I also love her book covers, fittingly illustrated in Art Deco style. I am not sure this is considered a “Christian book,” but it is absolutely clean. There are no ugly words, no sexual innuendo, and no negative moral tone.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Juliette

    Rating : 1,5 ⭐ This book was an overall disappointment. All the issues I had with the first book are still present in the sequel. The plot was too convoluted and didn't make enough sense for me to suspend my disbelief. I figured out who the murderer was very early in the story, which made it difficult to care about everything that was happening. I also wasn't a fan of the character development. The person being set up as a love interest in the first book was revealed to be totally unsuitable for Rating : 1,5 ⭐ This book was an overall disappointment. All the issues I had with the first book are still present in the sequel. The plot was too convoluted and didn't make enough sense for me to suspend my disbelief. I figured out who the murderer was very early in the story, which made it difficult to care about everything that was happening. I also wasn't a fan of the character development. The person being set up as a love interest in the first book was revealed to be totally unsuitable for the role, and I didn't like the way it was integrated in the story. It really shows that the author changed her mind between the two books. I don't disagree with the choice to go in a different direction, but it could have been written in a less jarring way. Although my favourite part was definitely the reveal. Not because it was satisfying, but because it's the only part of the book that actually made me laugh out loud, even if I wasn't supposed to. (view spoiler)[ The big reveal felt like a Riverdale shitpost! The murderer's actions are literally explained away by saying she has the serial killer gene. Also, she killed all those people simply because she wanted to be a Girlboss™ so badly. She would fit right in on that stupid show. How am I supposed to take that seriously? (hide spoiler)] I'm glad I got some enjoyment out of it, but that ending really put me off reading the rest of this series. I don't even care enough to find out what's gonna happen with the big nemesis thing that's being set up. I'm officially giving up.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Deb

    Now I really want to go to Sicily! Take one missing explorer, mix in a mysterious will, an American heiress, a murdered author whose most recent manuscript has gone missing, various disgruntled British aristocrats and a very suspicious valet, and you have the makings of a delightful summer entertainment. Private detective Posie Parker is hired to find the missing explorer. As her investigation broadens, she is sure that the deaths of the author, the author's publisher and an archaeologist are al Now I really want to go to Sicily! Take one missing explorer, mix in a mysterious will, an American heiress, a murdered author whose most recent manuscript has gone missing, various disgruntled British aristocrats and a very suspicious valet, and you have the makings of a delightful summer entertainment. Private detective Posie Parker is hired to find the missing explorer. As her investigation broadens, she is sure that the deaths of the author, the author's publisher and an archaeologist are all related to her case. When she follows the clue of an ancient coin belonging to the explorer and incised with a honeybee design to Syracuse, Sicily, a coin expert then joins the victims. It would seem that the famous explorer is the intended victim of at least two of these murders. Although he cannot himself be the murderer since he was far away from each of the first two victims and quite clearly the intended victim in the third and fourth cases, Posie rightly feels she needs to keep her eye on hm. After a further trip to Luxor, Egypt, they both realize who the murderer must be. They return to England to set a trap at the explorer's ancestral home. Posie is clever and indefatigable and the 1921 settings are great fun.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Virginia Tican

    After the publicity generated by the finding of the believed~to~be~cursed Maharajah Diamond and the breaking up of a notorious counterfeit and smuggling gang, though the mastermind, Count Caspian dela Rosa is still at large and still shadowing Posie's life and career... Posie's Detective Agency was inundated with calls and cases despite the absence of Len Irving whom she was about to embark into a Romance with but as he is still in France with his ailing father then he altogether stopped writing After the publicity generated by the finding of the believed~to~be~cursed Maharajah Diamond and the breaking up of a notorious counterfeit and smuggling gang, though the mastermind, Count Caspian dela Rosa is still at large and still shadowing Posie's life and career... Posie's Detective Agency was inundated with calls and cases despite the absence of Len Irving whom she was about to embark into a Romance with but as he is still in France with his ailing father then he altogether stopped writing back to her. Strange, that... though a long distance love affair plus with the knowledge that he had a girlfriend, heart~ache awaits across the English Channel. Then Lady Violet Boynton~Dale asked for Posie's help to locate her missing famous explorer brother, Alaric... and the Fun and Adventure begins BUT first a detour to sort out the suddenly uncommunicative Len Irving. This is truly a very Entertaining and Brilliant work... sort of Indiana Jones~ish plus the epitome of the adages "blood will out" in relation to the "cuckoo in the nest."

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nichole Carrier

    What a fantastic read! Posie is tasked with trying to locate a famous explorer, Alaric, who has disappeared. Posie quickly realizes that things are not quite as they seem after she learns that Alaric has recently survived several near death experiences. Posie is further drawn in when she visits Alaric's home and finds a dead body, disheveled rooms and a coin that has some kind of significance but none she can figure out. The author takes is through so many wonderful locations. I won't mention th What a fantastic read! Posie is tasked with trying to locate a famous explorer, Alaric, who has disappeared. Posie quickly realizes that things are not quite as they seem after she learns that Alaric has recently survived several near death experiences. Posie is further drawn in when she visits Alaric's home and finds a dead body, disheveled rooms and a coin that has some kind of significance but none she can figure out. The author takes is through so many wonderful locations. I won't mention them for fear of spoiling the story, but each location is brilliantly described. The author takes her time to describe each setting and the people there without going overboard and spending too much time on the extras. The story flows quickly and really draws the reader in. I was sucked in and spent many hours over the past two days reading this novel.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Great mystery! Posie Parker is very refreshing! I usually listen to audio books because I used to have an hour and twenty minute commute to work, so it helped to pass the time. I haven’t read an actual book in probably six months. My husband and I moved to Cheyenne, Wyoming recently and I had already had the book downloaded to my kindle app but hadn’t read it yet. So, I thought I would give it a go and read while we traveled. I read the book in 3 days, which is good for me. I am a big fan of Agat Great mystery! Posie Parker is very refreshing! I usually listen to audio books because I used to have an hour and twenty minute commute to work, so it helped to pass the time. I haven’t read an actual book in probably six months. My husband and I moved to Cheyenne, Wyoming recently and I had already had the book downloaded to my kindle app but hadn’t read it yet. So, I thought I would give it a go and read while we traveled. I read the book in 3 days, which is good for me. I am a big fan of Agatha Christie and after reading this, I am a fan of L.B. Hathaway. I plan on going back and reading book one as well as reading the rest of the Posie Parker series. I highly recommend L.B. Hathaway!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Phil B

    A sweet mystery of greed and murder In this second book of the Posie Parker series, Posie is hired by Lady Violet to investigate the disappearance of her brother, Alaric, a World War One Fluing Ace. After multiple attempts on his life, he has disappeared, and Lady Violet begs Posie to investigate even though she has no money to pay her. And so the hunt is on. Hathaway once again demonstrates her control over language, and does an admirable job describing both her characters and the multiple setti A sweet mystery of greed and murder In this second book of the Posie Parker series, Posie is hired by Lady Violet to investigate the disappearance of her brother, Alaric, a World War One Fluing Ace. After multiple attempts on his life, he has disappeared, and Lady Violet begs Posie to investigate even though she has no money to pay her. And so the hunt is on. Hathaway once again demonstrates her control over language, and does an admirable job describing both her characters and the multiple settings. The plot contains suspense and danger, and both are portrayed with a deft touch. The romance is, as is to be expected in this type of novel, is handled gently, perhaps too gently.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Argum

    Posie is still waiting for Len to return from France, but the agency is ticking along nicely without him. A socialite appears in her office asking for free help in finding her adventurer brother. He is missing after a series of nasty occurences - a plane crash that was delibrate, a ruined beehive that nearly killed him along with his bees, and now he is gone without a trace. Posie agrees because she has decided not to use her vacation to go track down Len. Instead she goes to the home of the mis Posie is still waiting for Len to return from France, but the agency is ticking along nicely without him. A socialite appears in her office asking for free help in finding her adventurer brother. He is missing after a series of nasty occurences - a plane crash that was delibrate, a ruined beehive that nearly killed him along with his bees, and now he is gone without a trace. Posie agrees because she has decided not to use her vacation to go track down Len. Instead she goes to the home of the missing man and a pot of suspects all with good motives given the possible changing of a will. Lots of adventure here in multiple countries. The resolution made sense but had a big twist that seemed a touch out of nowhere.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nom de Plume

    Exceedingly readable I do very much like these books. I will certainly be reading all six in the series. There were a few anachronistic moments that took me out of the story though. And, frankly, I'm not one to keep an eye out for those things. So, if I caught a few, I can only imagine there were at least several more of them that I missed. In particular, there was a repeated use of "they" and "them" as singular pronouns that would have NEVER been uttered by the characters as such. Likewise, alth Exceedingly readable I do very much like these books. I will certainly be reading all six in the series. There were a few anachronistic moments that took me out of the story though. And, frankly, I'm not one to keep an eye out for those things. So, if I caught a few, I can only imagine there were at least several more of them that I missed. In particular, there was a repeated use of "they" and "them" as singular pronouns that would have NEVER been uttered by the characters as such. Likewise, although it's currently acceptable, a well turned out girl like Posy would have NEVER ended sentences with prepositions... (Just to cite two specifics--from the several anachronisms found herein.)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Martin Watts

    Posie Parker is asked to investigate the disappearance of a famous aviator, explorer and beekeeper. The trail leads from the Cotswolds to the South of France, to Sicily and on to the Valley of the King's, bringing a trail of murders with it before culminating back in the Cotswolds. There are one or two niggling anachronisms, apart from the excitement in the archaeological community caused by the discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamen the following year, which is acknowledged in the author's notes. Posie Parker is asked to investigate the disappearance of a famous aviator, explorer and beekeeper. The trail leads from the Cotswolds to the South of France, to Sicily and on to the Valley of the King's, bringing a trail of murders with it before culminating back in the Cotswolds. There are one or two niggling anachronisms, apart from the excitement in the archaeological community caused by the discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamen the following year, which is acknowledged in the author's notes. There is mention of an Avro jet and one of the characters has renounced his peerage, something that I believe was not possible until 1963 with the Peerage Act. Otherwise the historical background seems to be well handled

  30. 5 out of 5

    SLS

    Honey from a dangerous bee! This book was very suspenseful throughout, and kept you guessing all the day through. I had figured out the possible antagonist but I was far off as to this character's real motivation. This is the second book in the series and the author has developed a possible mini cliffhanger which I had forgotten about from the end of the first book. So I would recommend reading these books in order, even though the main plot of this book was resolved. These type of golden age, hi Honey from a dangerous bee! This book was very suspenseful throughout, and kept you guessing all the day through. I had figured out the possible antagonist but I was far off as to this character's real motivation. This is the second book in the series and the author has developed a possible mini cliffhanger which I had forgotten about from the end of the first book. So I would recommend reading these books in order, even though the main plot of this book was resolved. These type of golden age, historical British mysteries are my favourite that don't have any foul language or sexual situations. This second book was an improvement in suspenseful mystery from the first book, and I will continue with the series.

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