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Horrible Gods: The Little Book of Atheist Horror Stories

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“The Evidential Argument From Evil against the existence of God was summed up quite succinctly two thousand years ago by the Greek philosopher Epicurus: “Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why c “The Evidential Argument From Evil against the existence of God was summed up quite succinctly two thousand years ago by the Greek philosopher Epicurus: “Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?” In Horrible Gods, Wrath James White poses these questions again and adds yet another, “What would the world be like if God were real? How terrifying a place would it be if an all-powerful being as selfish, capricious, egotistical, and insecure as the one described in the bible were actually running things?” The result are stories that are both terrifying and depressing, hilarious, and disturbing, thought-provoking and infuriating. From the story of a woman who has been told all her life that her sexuality was a “demon” inside of her that needed to be exorcised, to a man set on freeing mankind from the tyranny of a higher power that has manifested itself on earth, to the story of a computer program that allows the players to create their own worlds with intelligent life and a “freewill button” that gives the gamer the option to blame any mistakes on the beings they create, absolving the gamers of all guilt and responsibility, Wrath takes the question of God’s existence and benevolence for a ride in one gruesome tale after another.


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“The Evidential Argument From Evil against the existence of God was summed up quite succinctly two thousand years ago by the Greek philosopher Epicurus: “Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why c “The Evidential Argument From Evil against the existence of God was summed up quite succinctly two thousand years ago by the Greek philosopher Epicurus: “Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?” In Horrible Gods, Wrath James White poses these questions again and adds yet another, “What would the world be like if God were real? How terrifying a place would it be if an all-powerful being as selfish, capricious, egotistical, and insecure as the one described in the bible were actually running things?” The result are stories that are both terrifying and depressing, hilarious, and disturbing, thought-provoking and infuriating. From the story of a woman who has been told all her life that her sexuality was a “demon” inside of her that needed to be exorcised, to a man set on freeing mankind from the tyranny of a higher power that has manifested itself on earth, to the story of a computer program that allows the players to create their own worlds with intelligent life and a “freewill button” that gives the gamer the option to blame any mistakes on the beings they create, absolving the gamers of all guilt and responsibility, Wrath takes the question of God’s existence and benevolence for a ride in one gruesome tale after another.

44 review for Horrible Gods: The Little Book of Atheist Horror Stories

  1. 5 out of 5

    Karl

    This copy is signed by Wrath James white This copy is one of 80 copies printed.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sinister Grin

    Outstanding read. Thought provoking and terrifying.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Castagna

    I received an advanced copy of this for the purpose of an honest review. First I want to say that there are a lot of Atheist writers out there, and some write horror, such is the case with Ray Garton, who delivers a great introduction to this anthology. Saying that, their outlook, or their Atheistic views do not tend to play directly into the fabric of their writing. With Wrath, it is a whole different ballgame. In many stories by Wrath James White, the characters are struggling to survive in a I received an advanced copy of this for the purpose of an honest review. First I want to say that there are a lot of Atheist writers out there, and some write horror, such is the case with Ray Garton, who delivers a great introduction to this anthology. Saying that, their outlook, or their Atheistic views do not tend to play directly into the fabric of their writing. With Wrath, it is a whole different ballgame. In many stories by Wrath James White, the characters are struggling to survive in a godless universe. With the first story, "He Who Increases Knowledge" you get an immediate sense of what an Atheist horror story is, and it is more frightening, visceral and extreme than anything I have read. The anthology has several amazingly bleak, but insightful pieces in it including a poem that may or may not give us some glimpse into the Wrath himself. All in all this is an amazing themed anthology by an author that has never been boring, redundant or relied on the tired old tropes of the genre. This is a must have for all horror fans, and dare I say readers of religious fiction as well. I say that because this gives some frightening looks into what can happen to the human psyche when religiosity is forced upon them. A definite must read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Todd Charlton

    If gods were real Mr Wrath James White shows us just how horrible they would be. Who needs them.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Allan

    A very nice collection of short stories, with a special gem 'Munchausen by Proxy'. Highly recommend for anyone interested in stories on the horrors of a god and how destroying it can be. A very nice collection of short stories, with a special gem 'Munchausen by Proxy'. Highly recommend for anyone interested in stories on the horrors of a god and how destroying it can be.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Josh Warfel

    Some repeats from other Wrath books, but not a stinker in the bunch.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Fran Broaders

  8. 4 out of 5

    Noor

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jovany Agathe

  10. 5 out of 5

    bethany beroldi

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kim

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stevie

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nick

  14. 4 out of 5

    James Harper

  15. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Arnold

  16. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Glover

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Barbour

  18. 5 out of 5

    Richard Martin

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michael Myett

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bill

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mandy Fistner

  25. 5 out of 5

    Edwardky

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jim Morey

  27. 4 out of 5

    Andyhat

  28. 5 out of 5

    xxxashleyxxx

  29. 4 out of 5

    David Bridges

  30. 5 out of 5

    James Campbell

  31. 4 out of 5

    Ricardo Lane

  32. 5 out of 5

    Gary Mc

  33. 4 out of 5

    Pramod Lahot

  34. 5 out of 5

    Shelby Maritt

  35. 4 out of 5

    Cooper

  36. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

  37. 4 out of 5

    Jazz

  38. 4 out of 5

    Marco

  39. 4 out of 5

    Siobhan

  40. 4 out of 5

    Eli

  41. 5 out of 5

    Sháy The Obscure Bookworm

  42. 4 out of 5

    Wes Brown

  43. 5 out of 5

    Gene

  44. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

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