Hot Best Seller

Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That's Transforming Education

Availability: Ready to download

A revolutionary reappraisal of how to educate our children and young people by the New York Times bestselling author of The Element and Finding Your Element   Ken Robinson is one of the world’s most influential voices in education, and his 2006 TED Talk on the subject is the most viewed in the organization’s history. Now, the internationally recognized leader on creativity A revolutionary reappraisal of how to educate our children and young people by the New York Times bestselling author of The Element and Finding Your Element   Ken Robinson is one of the world’s most influential voices in education, and his 2006 TED Talk on the subject is the most viewed in the organization’s history. Now, the internationally recognized leader on creativity and human potential focuses on one of the most critical issues of our time: how to transform the nation’s troubled educational system. At a time when standardized testing businesses are raking in huge profits, when many schools are struggling, and students and educators everywhere are suffering under the strain, Robinson points the way forward. He argues for an end to our outmoded industrial educational system and proposes a highly personalized, organic approach that draws on today’s unprecedented technological and professional resources to engage all students, develop their love of learning, and enable them to face the real challenges of the twenty-first century. Filled with anecdotes, observations and recommendations from professionals on the front line of transformative education, case histories, and groundbreaking research—and written with Robinson’s trademark wit and engaging style—Creative Schools will inspire teachers, parents, and policy makers alike to rethink the real nature and purpose of education.


Compare

A revolutionary reappraisal of how to educate our children and young people by the New York Times bestselling author of The Element and Finding Your Element   Ken Robinson is one of the world’s most influential voices in education, and his 2006 TED Talk on the subject is the most viewed in the organization’s history. Now, the internationally recognized leader on creativity A revolutionary reappraisal of how to educate our children and young people by the New York Times bestselling author of The Element and Finding Your Element   Ken Robinson is one of the world’s most influential voices in education, and his 2006 TED Talk on the subject is the most viewed in the organization’s history. Now, the internationally recognized leader on creativity and human potential focuses on one of the most critical issues of our time: how to transform the nation’s troubled educational system. At a time when standardized testing businesses are raking in huge profits, when many schools are struggling, and students and educators everywhere are suffering under the strain, Robinson points the way forward. He argues for an end to our outmoded industrial educational system and proposes a highly personalized, organic approach that draws on today’s unprecedented technological and professional resources to engage all students, develop their love of learning, and enable them to face the real challenges of the twenty-first century. Filled with anecdotes, observations and recommendations from professionals on the front line of transformative education, case histories, and groundbreaking research—and written with Robinson’s trademark wit and engaging style—Creative Schools will inspire teachers, parents, and policy makers alike to rethink the real nature and purpose of education.

30 review for Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That's Transforming Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sean Blevins

    A book of anecdotes and ideas, not research and prescription. The vagaries and generalities make the book come across as fluff - far less substantial than Schmoker's Focus for example. Nonetheless, it is not without value. I find myself still thinking about Robinson's "Eight Core Competencies" - habits and skills that a proper education should instill in all students 1) Curiosity 2) Creativity 3) Criticism 4) Communication 5) Collaboration 6) Compassion 7) Composure 8) Citizenship And I appreciate the sig A book of anecdotes and ideas, not research and prescription. The vagaries and generalities make the book come across as fluff - far less substantial than Schmoker's Focus for example. Nonetheless, it is not without value. I find myself still thinking about Robinson's "Eight Core Competencies" - habits and skills that a proper education should instill in all students 1) Curiosity 2) Creativity 3) Criticism 4) Communication 5) Collaboration 6) Compassion 7) Composure 8) Citizenship And I appreciate the significance he attaches to a carefully chosen curriculum and pedagogy. On page 131, he writes that the curriculum should drive the schedule. On page 204, he indicates that curriculum and pedagogy are the expression of the school culture. On page 231, he writes that the "basic prerequisite for effective education is to cultivate students' enthusiasm for learning. This means providing...a diverse curriculum." I'm also stealing his idea that education should be about creating people who know what to do when they don't know what to do.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Matt Morley

    I found this book frustrating, although that may be because my expectations for it were misaligned from the start. I have watched Robinson’s TED talk and was excited by some of his ideas; ideas that push the envelope on current educational thinking and explore the potential that schools could have if we re-evaluated embedded policies and established norms. Why do we batch pupils by age-group? Why do we churn pupils through an academic-focused curriculum that’s ill-suited to many of them? These ar I found this book frustrating, although that may be because my expectations for it were misaligned from the start. I have watched Robinson’s TED talk and was excited by some of his ideas; ideas that push the envelope on current educational thinking and explore the potential that schools could have if we re-evaluated embedded policies and established norms. Why do we batch pupils by age-group? Why do we churn pupils through an academic-focused curriculum that’s ill-suited to many of them? These are really interesting questions – Robinson has seen a flaw with the prevalence of standardisation and is commending a new system of education based around personalisation. Unfortunately, this is what I knew before reading the book and this is roughly the extent of my understanding afterwards as well. The book is full of anecdotes and abstract ideas which left me crying out for research and an implementation plan. Robinson quite rightly wants to see education transformed but I’m not sure he knows how he wants to do it. Yes, he wants a personalised system, yes, he wants a well-rounded curriculum. But if you ask most educators or policy makers in the world I don’t think they would disagree with these ideals. The real question is, how do we get there in reality. How do we change the national curriculum or do we even need a national curriculum? Should we extend the school day to make space for a broader curriculum or make more subjects optional or is there another way to broaden education. I admire Robinsons intent and I agree with him on many things but in this book I grew weary of hearing about personalisation and creativity without any real action plan.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Aguilar

    A pretty extensive catalog of examples of schools and institutions (mainly in the U.S. and the U.K., but also in other countries) who are pushing away from an education model too obsessed with grades and competition at all levels (between students, classrooms, schools, districts, states, countries), and who are trying to focus on the student real needs: self-confidence, curiosity, respect, creativity, sociability... The author provides an interesting collection of broad ideas and frameworks which A pretty extensive catalog of examples of schools and institutions (mainly in the U.S. and the U.K., but also in other countries) who are pushing away from an education model too obsessed with grades and competition at all levels (between students, classrooms, schools, districts, states, countries), and who are trying to focus on the student real needs: self-confidence, curiosity, respect, creativity, sociability... The author provides an interesting collection of broad ideas and frameworks which could be summarised like this: Interdisciplinary subjects: - Planetary conscience - Financial, economic, commercial and entrepreneurial culture - Civic culture - Health/wellness culture - Environmental culture Competences for learning - Creativity and innovation - Critical thinking and problem solving - Communication and collaboration Competences for life and work - Flexibility and adaptability - Initiative and autonomy - Social and transcultural competences - Productivity and responsibility - Leadership skills He makes a special emphasis in the teacher/educator role as someone who should facilitate learning by trying to provide each student with the customised experience and environment he or she needs, based on their interests and capacities. Specifically, the teacher should: - Motivate study - Help students find their true interests - Facilitate study (provide the means and resources) - Have and communicate expectations - Capacitate students to have confidence in themselves The book is mainly targeted to teachers and other education professionals but it has obvious implications and utility for government and family. The foot notes and bibliography are very extensive and interesting, providing many references to academic papers, books and multimedia resources.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brenda Hoffman

    I received an arc copy of Creative Schools. I found it very readable and well written. He combines teaching concepts with illustrations that demonstrate his points. It was optimistic compared Jonathon Kozol's Savage Inequalities. recommend this book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marta Kondryn

    The book is rather academic, than practical. It has a few frameworks on the better (creative schools) and what governments, parents and organisations could do to make the learning experience better, however it lacked practical examples of these frameworks. Apart of that, the book is also hard to read and I caught my mind wandering around while reading.

  6. 5 out of 5

    John Martinez

    This book is amazing. It's one of my top 5 edu-books. Sir Ken tells the story of schools in America from the beginning of mass schooling to the present. He shares lots of ways to make schooling more meaningful for students and better ROI for society. Sir Ken shares many examples from around the world to make his case.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nadia

    Eh... same old.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    The first time I heard of Ken Robinson was through his Ted Talk "Do schools kill creativity?" (https://www.ted.com/talks/ken_robinso...). I thought it was a brilliant talk and had been meaning to read more of his work since then. As written in the title, this book outlines Robinson's vision for an education reform. Note that many schools now have incorporated Robinson's concept of teaching/learning or have completely revamped their curriculum accordingly. What Robinson promotes is not just a theo The first time I heard of Ken Robinson was through his Ted Talk "Do schools kill creativity?" (https://www.ted.com/talks/ken_robinso...). I thought it was a brilliant talk and had been meaning to read more of his work since then. As written in the title, this book outlines Robinson's vision for an education reform. Note that many schools now have incorporated Robinson's concept of teaching/learning or have completely revamped their curriculum accordingly. What Robinson promotes is not just a theory anymore. It's applicable and practical, with astounding results. In this book, Robinson provides critics, vision, and theory of change to the current education system worldwide. This book is filled with Robinson's own experiences as well as works of other educators. Though a non-fiction, it is very engaging and irresistible. I listened to this book in its audiobook format. Yet, I found the content of this book so interesting and important that I actually took notes as I went along. So here is the concise version of Robinson's ideas (or at least the parts that I found most intriguing). Robinson starts off by differentiating education from training. According to Robinson, education has economical, cultural, social, and personal values, whereas trainging is simply equipping people with a specific set of skills or knowledge. He then compares the current education style to industrial farming. In his opinion, education should foster the same four operational pillars as sustainable, organic farming does: health, ecology, fairness, and care. - Health: promotes the wellbeing of the whole student intellectually, physically, spiritually, and socially. - Ecology: recognizes the importance of students and the education community as a whole - Fairness: cultivates the individual talents and potential of all students, whatever the circumstances or background they come from. Respect the responsibility of those who work with the students as well. - Care: provides the optimum condition of learning based on compassion, experience, and practical wisdoms. Sounds ambitious and lofty? Robinson follows that with what he believes teachers' roles should be: to engage, enable, expect, and empower. He says, teachers should: - Encourage learning through reasoning rather than memorization. - Foster conversation and collaboration. - Inspire students to learn and help them to become better learners. - Teach expectations of themselves (students). - Create conditions for learning, one that students want to learn in. - Adapt teaching technique that suits the moment/environment. - Be mentors that help students raise self-confidence, find sense of direction, and empower themselves By this point, though I believed what Robinson was saying to be true, I thought his expectations of the public education to be too high, and that he expected too much of the teachers. However, Robinson was able to change my mind later by addressing changes that needed to be made at the community/district/policy-making levels for his idea to work for all students. Robinson also defines the purpose of education as following: Education should enable students to be economically responsible and independent. It should teach students to appreciate their own culture and respect cultures other than their own. Socially, education should enable student to be active and compassion citizens. Students should engage not only with the world around them but in the world within themselves as well. Robinson believes that education is an individual affair that fosters personal interests and dispositions as well as a global interest. Conventional education mostly focuses on external education without helping students engage with themselves. This results in boredom, disengagement, stress, anxiety, dropping out, etc. Finally, Robinson says that education should prepare students for life after school by building up mental, emotional, social, and strategical resources so that students can enjoy and cope with challenges and uncertainties. Robinson then addresses what students should know and be able to do as a result of their education. Think of it as the competency profile that students should have upon their graduation: - Curiosity: the ability to ask how the world works - Creativity: the ability to generate new idea and put them into practice - Criticism: the ability to analyze information and ideas and to form reasonable arguments and judgements - Communication: the ability to express thoughts and feelings clearly and confidently in a range of media and forms. Also the ability to understand and appreciate other poetic forms of expression. - Collaboration: the ability to work constructively with others - Compassion: the ability to emphasize other others and to act accordingly - Composure: the ability to connect with inner life of feelings and develop a sense of personal harmony and balance - Citizenship: the ability to engage and participate in the process that sustains it With that in mind, Robinson then discusses how school curriculum can be designed in order to achieve the above very vast and "ambitious" (in my opinion) goals. Robinson does not believe in real academic subjects, only academic ways of looking at things. In his opinion, students should be taught disciplines, which consist of a mixture of theory and practice, rather than academic subjects. There are six disciplines in total: arts, humanities, language arts, mathematics, physical education, and science. Each discipline deserves the same amount of time and resources as each addresses major areas of intelligence, cultural knowledge, and personal development. Robinson pushed on the idea of personalized and project-based learning. He believes that when students learn through what interest them the most, the progress is unbound. Finally, Robinson addresses the idea of evaluation. He says that standardization is not the problem. The problem is what we choose to standardize. Robinson favours assessments that take note of progress and are student based. He thinks good assessments should have the following characteristics: - Motivation: spurs students on to do even better - Constructive feedback: allows students to see how they have done with respect to other students so they can make their own judgement on their progress - Standards: clear, understandable, and relevant expectations Funny enough, Robinson notes that push backs against new ways of evaluation (progress-based) are most often from students who do well with standardized testing because now they are required to shows true progress rather than simply getting high marks. Of the entire book, I think this is the most important take-way point for me that will help with my own personal growth moving forward and allow me to be a productive part of my child's education. Robinson is very hopeful with the public education system. I, on the other hand, do not share his optimism. What I know is that because of people like him, who believe in building a better education system for the future generation, I reap the benefit of their ingenuity. Now I can take his points in this book and implement (or supplement) them in my own home. I give this book 5 stars, and I am very interested in reading other books written by Ken Robinson as well.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    Ken Robinson is determined to help education, and I think Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That's Transforming Education is his best effort yet. Robinson seeks out schools and teachers and methodologies that produce fabulous results and shares these schools and teachers and methodologies with us. You can't help but be motivated to join Robinson's revolution after reading this book, I think.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Marlathemom

    This was our required summer teacher reading; what an enlightening, informative, and interesting reflection on schools today! There were some parts were repetitive, and there were some parts I was super curious to know more about, but on the whole, the message of reinvention and creating a new path in education is as necessary as it is timely. Worth the read - or let's collaborate, and you can borrow mine ;)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Gilbert

    While there is some good information in this book, I found that I could have read the dust jacket and gotten the idea. I kept coming back to it, hoping that I was missing something, but finally finished it grudgingly and wish I could just have the time back.

  12. 5 out of 5

    David Rowney

    I very much respect and support Ken Robinson's views on Education and the problems we face with it. This book allows the author to share out examples of the good work that he has observed across the US and wider world.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ilib4kids

    370.973 ROB eAudio. After his TED talk, "Do Schools Kill Creativity". Author is a U.K English speaker and international advisor on education in the arts to government, non-profits, education and arts bodies. Summary: This book is mainly focused on early childhood to the end of high school of education. The drives of raising achievement are motivation and expectation of students. All successful education examples come from low income families, there is few or no examples of education reform for mid 370.973 ROB eAudio. After his TED talk, "Do Schools Kill Creativity". Author is a U.K English speaker and international advisor on education in the arts to government, non-profits, education and arts bodies. Summary: This book is mainly focused on early childhood to the end of high school of education. The drives of raising achievement are motivation and expectation of students. All successful education examples come from low income families, there is few or no examples of education reform for middle-classes families, are these high-achiever students doing fine at school? Current education system: 1. teaching by age group, fixed teaching periods, sharp subject divisions, linear assessment patters), design is based on industrial character of public eduction to meet the labor need of the Industrial period. more detail on chap 2. 2. Two pillars of the mass education . p 76 organizational culture and intellectual culture. organizational culture is rooted in industrialism. intellectual culture is rooted Plato's Academy. 3 principles in academic work: Propositional knowledge; focus on theoretical analysis; focus on desk studies. Propositional knowledge is called knowing that, fields of study vs. procedural knowledge called knowing how, fields of practice. 3. Formal education has 3 elements: curriculum, teaching, assessment. 4. p133 think current curriculum in terms of structure, content, mode, ethos (or hidden curriculum). structure: organized around discrete subjects, hierarchy, compulsory or optional or formally assessed. At the top are math, languages, science. next humanities - history, geography, social studies and religion. At the bottom -- arts, music, physical education, lowliest are drama, dance. content: material has to be learned. focus on academic learning, so it is theory and analysis rather than on practical or vocational skills. mode:: desk or project based, individual or collaborative. ethos:: general atmosphere and characters of schooling: silent messages about priorities and values that the curriculum conveys. often called hidden curriculum. The dominant ethos of the is a kind of steeplechase. ...as a result, students think school is boring, an experience to be endured rather than enjoyed. School should cultivate p135-140 curiosity, creativity, criticism, communication, collaboration, compassion, composure, citizenship. Citizenship education is not about promoting conformity and status quo. it is about championing the need for equal rights, the value of dissent, and the need to balance personal freedom with the rights of others to live in peace. p141-156 In a sense, there is really no such things as an academic subject. There are only academic ways of looking at things.... Schools have evolved to place great emphasis on this mode of study, but it is not the subjects as such that are inherently academic but how they are looked at. I prefer ideas of disciplines instead of subjects: a mix of theory and practice. School should address: art, humanities, language arts,mathematics, physical education, science. Notes in this book 1. pxvii learning vs. education vs. training, vs. school learning: is the process acquiring new knowledge and skill.s education: organized programs of learning, without it, people would not be able to do things. training:a type of education that's focused on learning specific skills. schools: any community of people that comes together to learn, include homeschooling, un-schooling. 2. pxxii, in order to change, one need have 3 forms of understanding: a critique of the way things are; a vision of how they should be; a theory of change. 4 basic purposes of education: personal; culture; social; economic. The aims of education are to enable students to understand the world around them and the talents within them so that they can become fulfilled individuals and active, compassionate citizens. 3. p11 3 strategies for reformer to use: standardization, competition, corporation. formal education is made of 3 main elements: curriculum, teaching, assessment. Recently increase of national curriculum. 4. p19 The adaptability to change and creativity in generating new ideas that current reformers do not value so much. 5. p52-53 As human being we live in two worlds. The world around you which is objectivity and facts, the world within you, which is subjective and value. these 2 worlds interact each other, affect how we see and act. -- very good, could read again and again. 6. p74 In ordinary circumstance, most children at 2 or 3 years old speak with remarkable fluency. 7. p171 Assessment is the process of making judgments about students' progress and attainment. has 2 components: a description and a comparison. Description: someone can run a mile in 4 miles and can speak French. Comparison: she is best athlete in the district or speaks French like a native. The assessments compare individual performances with others and rate them against particular criteria. Assessments has several roles: Diagnostic (to help teachers understand students' aptitudes and levels of developments; Formative (to gather information on students' work and activities and to support their progress.); Summative (making judgments on overall performance at the end of a program of work). -- my words: that is why assessment is so bad, it pit students against other students, artificially create unnecessary mental pressure on themselves. Real learning should always be a progress about improving oneself. One reason I do not want kids go to school, peer pressure of comparison, huge negative effect on kids in learning. 8. p200 Instead of freshman year, establish 3 developmental phases. transition (establishing yourself as part of the academic university community); growth and exploration ("breaking frame" and discovering your deepest passions and interests); synthesis and demonstration (pulling together what you have learned in your major and non-major courses putting that to work in a practical way) 9. p248 For all the rhetoric of promoting individual fulfillment and the public good, there is well-documented history in education of social control, conformity, and mass compliance. In some respects, mass education is, and always was, a process of social engineering. ..education is an "essentially contested concept'. It is, and sometimes we disagree not only about means but also about the ends of education. No amount of debate on strategy will result in consensus if the purpose we have in mind are opposed. Some data and examples 1. in 50s or 60s, 1 in 20 go to colleges, now 1 in 3 go to colleges. 2. in U.K "secondary Modern School" is for service, blue-colar work students, "Grammar schools" for business and professions students. 3. Arts in Schools projects in U.K. 4. Alternative assessment: Learning record. p173, originated from London used in inner-city with immigrant students learning English as Primary Language Record based on Lev Vygotsky's theory. 5. Fresh Grade https://www.freshgrade.com/ digital Portfolio. 7. Fairtest 8. p133 Rome till middle Ages, education was based on the 7 liberal art or science. grammar: the formal structures of language. rhetoric: composition, presentation of argument dialectic: formal logic arithmetic geometry music astronomy 11. p147 The Wolf Report by Alison Wolf: a review of vocational education. 12. NASSP Breaking Ranks Framework 13. Progressive education vs. traditional education. School Examples: 1. Ken Danford North Star, also Liberated Learners based on North Star Model. 2. Slow Education (Slow movement) p92, p150 Matthew Moss High School in Rochale 3 . p148 Big Picture Learning by Elliot Washor Leaving to Learn: How Out-Of-School Learning Increases Student Engagement and Reduces Dropout Rates by Elliot Washor 4. p129 High Tech High , San Diego, California. 5. p152 Democracy School, Brooklyn Free School, IDEC (International Democratic Education Conference) by Yaacov Hecht No Homework and Recess All Day: How to Have Freedom and Democracy in Education by Jerry Mintz The Teenage Liberation Handbook: How to Quit School and Get a Real Life and Education by Grace Llewellyn The Arts in Schools: Principles, Practice and Provision by Ken Robinson The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything by Ken Robinson Out of Our Minds: Learning to Be Creative by Ken Robinson In Praise of Slowness: Challenging the Cult of Speed by Carl Honoré Free to Learn: Why Unleashing the Instinct to Play Will Make Our Children Happier, More Self-Reliant, and Better Students for Life by Peter Gray Teach Like Your Hair's on Fire: The Methods and Madness Inside Room 56 by Rafe Esquith Professional Capital: Transforming Teaching in Every School by Andy P. Hargreaves Change by Design: How Design Thinking Transforms Organizations and Inspires Innovation by Tim Brown (design thinking) The Year of Learning Dangerously: Adventures in Homeschooling by Quinn Cummings

  14. 4 out of 5

    Teo 2050

    2020.06.18–2020.06.20 Contents Robinson R & Aronica L (2015) (08:13) Creative Schools - The Grassroots Revolution That's Transforming Education Dedication Acknowledgments Epigraph Introduction: One Minute to Midnight 01. Back to Basics • The Standards Movement • Taking Control • Raising Standards • • Standardization • • Competition • • Corporatization • How’s It Going? • Externalities • • The School-to-Prison Pipeline • • Disengagement • • Anxiety and Pressure • Back to Basics 02. Changing Metaphors • Alternative Ed 2020.06.18–2020.06.20 Contents Robinson R & Aronica L (2015) (08:13) Creative Schools - The Grassroots Revolution That's Transforming Education Dedication Acknowledgments Epigraph Introduction: One Minute to Midnight 01. Back to Basics • The Standards Movement • Taking Control • Raising Standards • • Standardization • • Competition • • Corporatization • How’s It Going? • Externalities • • The School-to-Prison Pipeline • • Disengagement • • Anxiety and Pressure • Back to Basics 02. Changing Metaphors • Alternative Education • Industrial Education • Industrial Purposes • Industrial Structures • Industrial Principles • Human Problems • Paying the Real Price • Mechanisms and Organisms • • Economic • • Cultural • • Social • • Personal 03. Changing Schools • Rules with Room • A Tale of Two Systems • Living with Complexity • A Tale of Two Projects • • The Root of the Matter 04. Natural Born Learners • The Ecstasy and Agony of Learning • • Whose Problem Is This? • • Free to Learn • This Time, It’s Personal • The Diversity of Intelligence • • Enabling Students to Pursue Their Own Interests and Strengths • • Adapting the Schedule to the Rates at Which Individual Students Learn • • Assessment That Supports Personal Progress and Achievement • • It’s Child’s Play 05. The Art of Teaching • What Are Teachers For? • The Power of Teaching • • Engage • • Enable • • Expect • • Empower • The Flipped Classroom • Creative Teaching • Teaching in a Different Key • Teaching as Entertainment • Learning to Teach 06. What’s Worth Knowing? • What Is the Curriculum For? • A Constant Controversy • Where to Begin? • • Curiosity—The Ability to Ask Questions and Explore How the World Works • • Creativity—The Ability to Generate New Ideas and to Apply Them in Practice • • Criticism—The Ability to Analyze Information and Ideas and to Form Reasoned Arguments and Judgments • • Communication—The Ability to Express Thoughts and Feelings Clearly and Confidently in a Range of Media and Forms • • Collaboration—The Ability to Work Constructively with Others • • Compassion—The Ability to Empathize with Others and to Act Accordingly • • Composure—The Ability to Connect with the Inner Life of Feeling and Develop a Sense of Personal Harmony and Balance • • Citizenship—The Ability to Engage Constructively with Society and to Participate in the Processes That Sustain It • Proposing a Structure • • The Arts • • Humanities • • Language Arts • • Mathematics • • Physical Education • • Science • Finding the Right Mode • A Different Ethos • Living Democracy • The Principles of Curriculum 07. Testing, Testing • Standards and Standardization • Raising the Stakes Even Higher • High Stakes and a High Bottom Line • The Mother of All Tests • The Need for Assessment (and Testing) • Real Instead of Symbolic—At Least for a Moment • Assessment as Learning • A Snapshot of the Future 08. Principles for Principals • Roles for Principals • Changing Cultures • • Habits • • Habitats • Cultivating the Ground • Beyond the Gates • Breaking Ranks and Breaking Through • The Roots of Achievement 09. Bring It All Back Home • See the Individual • Life Is Not Linear • What’s Your Choice? • Parental Guidance • Hovering Overhead • Home to School • Teach Your Children Well 10. Changing the Climate • The Roots of Achievement • Policies for Growth • • Fostering Health • • • Enthusiastic Learners • • • Expert Teachers • • • Uplifting Vision • Nurturing the Ecology • • Inspiring Leaders • • Alignment and Coherence • • Well-Focused Resources • Promoting Fairness • • Partnership and Collaboration • • Strategic Innovation • • Advocacy and Permission • • Providing Care • • High Standards • • Intelligent Accountability • • Continuous Professional Development • Changing Course • Doing It Differently • • Lightning Strikes in Argentina • • Creative China • • Asking for Change in the Middle East • • Transforming Scotland • • Listening to Ottawa • What’s the Problem? • • Risk Aversion • • Culture and Ideology • • Profits and Influence • • Politics and Ambition • • Command and Control • Organizing Change • Your Move Afterword Notes Index

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    It's not that I disagree with Ken Robinson necessarily. I certainly think that vocational courses should be taught with rigor and dedication. I also think the arts and recess and play are important components in education. Heaven knows, I've seen enough floundering graduate students (and Marys on summer break...) to know that the ability to self direct is crucial. It's just he's so glib about it all. The TED-talk-isms (Name dropping, relating stories of atypical turnaround stories,"Our children a It's not that I disagree with Ken Robinson necessarily. I certainly think that vocational courses should be taught with rigor and dedication. I also think the arts and recess and play are important components in education. Heaven knows, I've seen enough floundering graduate students (and Marys on summer break...) to know that the ability to self direct is crucial. It's just he's so glib about it all. The TED-talk-isms (Name dropping, relating stories of atypical turnaround stories,"Our children aren't failing our schools; our schools are failing our children" made me physically gag). The putting PhD after your name on the title. The "studies can't capture the importance of what it means to this one child" dismissal (or downplaying--sometimes he vaguely cites research in the "science shows..." way of Redbook or Self) of empirical research. I think he's probably right on many many ways--if testing and compartmentalization hasn't helped students noticeably, we should try something else, and anyone involved at all in schools can be part of it--but I rolled my eyes through most of the book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Burke-Saulnier

    I have to admit that I am biased in regards to Dr. Robinson’s work. His vision of what education should and can be is not only research-based but also situated in current stories of educational success. What I particularly appreciate in this text is how Dr. Robinson’s explains how each educational stakeholder (teachers, administrators, parents and policy makers) can contribute positively to the students’ success - academically and developmentally. A must read for anyone interested in the evoluti I have to admit that I am biased in regards to Dr. Robinson’s work. His vision of what education should and can be is not only research-based but also situated in current stories of educational success. What I particularly appreciate in this text is how Dr. Robinson’s explains how each educational stakeholder (teachers, administrators, parents and policy makers) can contribute positively to the students’ success - academically and developmentally. A must read for anyone interested in the evolution of effective education systems.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tena Edlin

    Ken Robinson always makes me think. I know education can be different... so many of us know this. But how and where do we start? Ken Robinson gives me some good ideas, and it's been fun (in a frustrating way) to discuss those ideas with my colleagues and administration. Industrial Revolution era schools are not going to meet the needs of a changing world. We have to be part of the solution.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tianhong Shi

    Expert teachers fulfill four roles: engage, enable, expect and empower. The best teachers are "mentors and guides who can raise the confidence of their students, help them find a sense of direction, and empower them to believe in themselves."

  19. 4 out of 5

    Louis House

    Other readers, perhaps less involved in the world of education, may find this book a good initiation into what can be a contentious topic. Robinson lays out his philosophy well enough, but I found myself skimming large portions of text. Anecdotal and not all that radical.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Weatherly

    I had a hard time with this book. While I agreed with many of his points, there wasn't a lot of actionable items to implement. I like professional development books where I can implement an idea the next day. This one was full of philosophical ideas & lacked a clear action plan for me. I had a hard time with this book. While I agreed with many of his points, there wasn't a lot of actionable items to implement. I like professional development books where I can implement an idea the next day. This one was full of philosophical ideas & lacked a clear action plan for me.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shiloah

    An excellent book with good ideas and research. I recommend it to parents who want to help their children rise above the conveyor belt ideology of the public school system. Great recommendation for educators as well.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ricardo Garcia

    Brilliant man, schools absolutely need to change and should look at ways to do so.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Pradyuman Singh Rajput

    Make sure to watch his Ted talk

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    This book has been sitting on my bookshelf for over a year, I think. I borrowed it when I went on mat leave, thinking I'd be all interested in doing some professional reading to keep me invested in my teaching career while I was off. Needless to say, with a brand new baby to keep me busy, somehow the priority of this book dropped down a bit. :) However, now with just six and a half weeks remaining until I go back to work, I've begun to start thinking about teaching again and happened to toss thi This book has been sitting on my bookshelf for over a year, I think. I borrowed it when I went on mat leave, thinking I'd be all interested in doing some professional reading to keep me invested in my teaching career while I was off. Needless to say, with a brand new baby to keep me busy, somehow the priority of this book dropped down a bit. :) However, now with just six and a half weeks remaining until I go back to work, I've begun to start thinking about teaching again and happened to toss this one in my bag when we left on vacation last week. I'm glad that I finally got to it. There was a ton in this book that resonated with me, about how the school system is not necessarily well suited any longer to the needs of our students. Robinson provides plenty of examples of how teachers are and can work within the existing system to effect change. By the end of the book, I found it dragging. The last couple of chapters didn't really hold my interest, but overall I really found it useful and inspiring. Favourite quotes: "If you design a system to do something specific, don't be surprised if it does it. If you run an education system based on standardization and conformity that suppresses individuality, imagination, and creativity, don't be surprised if that's what it does." (xx) "As we face a very uncertain future, the answer is not to do better what we've done before. We have to do something else. The challenge is not to fix this system but to change it; not to reform it but to transform it. The great irony in the current malaise in education is that we actually know what works. We just don't do it on a wide enough scale. We are in position as never before to use our creative and technological resources to change that. We now have limitless opportunities to engage young people's imaginations and to provide forms of teaching and learning that are highly customized to them." (xxvi) "One effect of the emphasis on academic work in schools is that the education system is not focused on these roles [electricians, builders, plumbers, chefs, paramedics, carpenters, etc.] and typically considers them second-rate options for people who don't make the academic cut. As the story goes, the smart kids go to college. The others may leave school early and look for a job or apply for a vocational course to learn a trade of some sort. Either way, they have taken a step down the status ladder in education. This academic/vocational caste system is one of the most corrosive problems in education." (17) "This is one of the core issues in promoting a culture of strict compliance in education. I'm not talking here about standards of behaviour and social conduct, but about whether and how students are encouraged to ask questions, to look for alternative and unusual answers, and to exercise their powers of creativity and imagination. Strict compliance is essential in manufacturing products, but people are different. It's not just that we come in all shapes and sizes. In the right circumstances, we are also highly imaginative and creative. In a culture of compliance ,these capacities are actively discouraged, even resented. The principle of linearity works well for manufacturing; it doesn't for people. Educating children by age group assumes that the most important thing they have in common is their date of manufacture. In practice, different students learn at different rates in different disciplines. A child with natural ability in one area may struggle in another." (36-37) "Education is about living people, not inanimate things. If we think of students as products or data points, we misunderstand how education should be. Products, from screws to airplanes, have no feelings about how they are produced or what happens to them. People do. They have motivations, feelings, circumstances, and talents. They are affected by what happens to them, and they affect life right back. They can resist or cooperate, tune in or tune out." (41) "The best place to start thinking about how to change education is exactly where you are in it. If you change the experiences of education for those you work with, you can change the world for them and in doing so become part of a wider, more complex process of change in education as a whole." (66) This was a big one for me. I loved how Robinson focused in on how to effect change within the system by making modifcations to your own practice. He didn't say that you had to be an administrator or superintendent in order to create change, but that anyone can create change from where they are. Of course, administrators and superintendents are not off the hook, either. They too have big responsibilities for creating change in the culture and climate of their schools. But the reminder that the changes I make in my own classroom are important in the lives of my students was a good one. "The fundamental purpose of education is to help students learn. Doing that is the role of the teacher. But modern education systems are cluttered with every sort of distraction. There are political agendas, national priorities, union bargaining positions, building codes, job descriptions, parental ambitions, peer pressures. The list goes on. But the heart of education is the relationship between the student and the teacher. Everything else depends on how productive and successful that relationship is. If that is not working, then the system is not working." (71) "We all have a wide range of natural aptitudes, and we all have them differently. Personalization means teachers taking account of these differences in how they teach different students. It also means allowing for flexibility within the curriculum so that in addition to what all students need to learn in common, there are opportunities for them to pursue their individual interests and strengths as well." (88) "Good teachers know that however much they have learned in the past, today is a different day and you cannot ride yesterday's horse. This sort of responsiveness can rarely be achieved by standing in the front of a room talking at a group of twenty-five or thirty kids for lesson after lesson." (107) "Creativity is not a linear process, in which you have to learn all the necessary skills before you get started. It is true that creative work in any field involves a growing mastery of skills and concepts. It is not true that they have to be mastered before the creative skills can begin. Focusing on skills in insolation can kill interest in any discipline.... The real driver or creativity is an appetite for discover and a passion for the work itself. When students are motivated to learn, they naturally acquire the skills they need to get the work don. Their mastery of them grows as their creative ambitions expand." (119-120) An especially important reminder for me in Comm Tech. I can't wait until the end of the year once all of the skills have been mastered to ask the students to do creative work! "Design thinking... show[s] that the common divide in schools between academic and vocational programs is misconceived and can be disastrous. It also marginalizes students whose real talents and enthusiasms are for the practical application of knowledge. Fostering that dynamic should be at the center, not at the edges, of the curriculum." (147) "'There are two opposite paradigms involved with this that have to do with the way people look at learning. The one that we're involved with is that kids are natural learners. That's the paradigm we know is true, and modern brain research reinforces that at every step. But the one that schools operate under almost everywhere is that kids are naturally lazy and need to be forced to learn. What happens over the course of seven or eight years is that this becomes self-fulfilling. If you force kids to learn things they're not interested in for seven or eight years, after a while you tend to extinguish that natural ability to learn.'" (154) "One problem with the systems of assessment that use letters and grades is that they are usually light on description and heavy on comparison. Students are sometimes given grades without really knowing what they mean, and teachers sometimes give grades without being completely sure why. A second problem is that a single letter or number cannot convey the complexities of the process that it is meant to summarize. And some outcomes cannot be adequately expressed in this way at all. As the noted educator Elliot Eisner once put it, 'Not everything important is measurable and not everything measurable is important.'" (171) On a portfolio-based assessment program practiced in Surrey, BC: "Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, the biggest push back is coming from those for whom the traditional form of grading worked. 'I heard from teachers that the students who struggled the most with it were the high-achieving students in the old system, because under this new paradigm, you can't get an A without progress. For a student who was accustomed to doing well in the old system because they were very good at playing the game and could identify what the teacher wanted, the rules have completely changed. The middle kids and the lower kids responded to it wonderfully, because all of a sudden they were able to set their own goals and see progress." (180) On creating the climate for a culture of innovation: "Culture is abotu permission. It has to do with what's acceptable and what's not, and who says so." (194) "This is the value in bringing the community into the classroom and why it is important for parents to offer themselves up to their children's schools. There is no substitute for a great, trained, dedicated teacher. If a parent or another member of the community can supplement what the school is offering, everyone wins." (212) "[Benjamin] Franklin once said that there are three sorts of people in the world: those who are immovable, those who are movable, and those who move. We know what he meant. Some people don't see the need for change and don't want to. They squat like boulders in a stream while the flow of events rushes around them. My advice is to leave them alone. Tide and time are on the side of transformation, and the currents of change may leave them behind. There are those who are movable. They see the need for change. They may not know what to do, but they're open to being convinced and to act if they are. Work with them and go where their energy is. Form partnerships and make dreams and plans. And there are those who move: the change agents who can see the shape of a different future and are determined to bring it about through their own actions and by working with others. They know that they don't always need permission." (251)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Abby Franks

    Sir Ken Robinson (and Lou Aronica)’s book Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That’s Transforming Education was exactly how it sounds. It highlighted what is currently wrong with our education system (not just in the U.S., but around the world) and then what different levels of stakeholders (parents, teachers, administrators, policy-makers, or community members) can do about it. The book was a review of Robinson’s other books/talks and added a few more examples of schools/districts/leade Sir Ken Robinson (and Lou Aronica)’s book Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That’s Transforming Education was exactly how it sounds. It highlighted what is currently wrong with our education system (not just in the U.S., but around the world) and then what different levels of stakeholders (parents, teachers, administrators, policy-makers, or community members) can do about it. The book was a review of Robinson’s other books/talks and added a few more examples of schools/districts/leaders that we might not have heard of before. It highlights that we need to be centering our educational system around creativity and not around standards, or even subject areas. Although, I did not find this book revolutionary or even super applicable, I did pull out a few tidbits. As the previous reviewer mentions, what struck me the most was the rethinking of curriculum. Instead of looking at curriculum as what each subject should be teaching and why, he highlights eight competencies that each student should leave school with. They are: 1. Curiosity- The ability to ask questions and explore how the world works 2. Creativity- The ability to generate new ideas and to apply them in practice 3. Criticism- The ability to analyze information and ideas and to form reasoned arguments and judgements 4. Communication- The ability to express thoughts and feelings clearly and confidently in a range of media and forms 5. Collaboration- The ability to work constructively with others 6. Compassion- The ability to empathize with others and to act accordingly 7. Composure- The ability to connect with the inner life of feeling and develop a sense of personal harmony and balance 8. Citizenship- The ability to engage constructively with society and to participate in the processes that sustain it I agree that these skills/competencies are much more important than their ability to recognize the characterization in Lord of the Flies. Putting these at the center of what and how we teach will make for better people, world citizens, and hopefully life-long learners. However, I never got an answer on how we actually do this? What “rubbed me the wrong way” about everything that he was saying in the book is that it was just a list of examples and anecdotes. He gave many stories of classrooms, schools, districts, and programs that went towards being more creative, getting rid of the way schools have been/are being run and have revolutionized education as we know it. What was frustrating is that none of it was really new. He has written multiple books before on the topic (and chose to reference them repeatedly). If you are well-read in education and care about our students as people and not just products, you have heard all of what he has to say before. Yes, it is better to teach in an interdisciplinary model instead of with closed doors and multiple choice tests. Yes, it is better to ensure that our students are engaged, active, and exploratory. Yes, it is better to do what is best for our students and think outside the parameters of what our governments/districts are asking us to do if it is in the best interest of the students’ growth, future, and learning. BUT he never gives ways to actually attain it (and does admit to that). I do not argue with anything that Sir Ken Robinson is saying in his book. I am just saying that if you are up to date in the educational community on what good teaching is and how we can best serve our students, then this book is both redundant and already dated. He is trying to make a call for educational reform and if you have not read what is needed, then this book is a perfect place to begin. It will not leave you with a lot of application, but with a lot of big ideas that you might be able to start your search for what you can do in your classroom, school, or community. Overall, I still gave this book three stars because at the core it is trying to make education better through ensuring that our students are treated as the creative, innovative, and curious people that they are before the industrial form of education tries to stifle it out of them.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gail

    A must-read for my friends who care about education. Sir Ken Robinson provides for the education system "a critique of the way things are, a vision of how they should be, and a theory of change for how to move from one to the other." He shows a course to a more dynamic, personalized, and effective way of educating the world's children. I love that this book promotes creativity, human individuality, and the arts while also being structured throughout. Thoughtful structure and creativity complemen A must-read for my friends who care about education. Sir Ken Robinson provides for the education system "a critique of the way things are, a vision of how they should be, and a theory of change for how to move from one to the other." He shows a course to a more dynamic, personalized, and effective way of educating the world's children. I love that this book promotes creativity, human individuality, and the arts while also being structured throughout. Thoughtful structure and creativity complement each other here, as they should. His perspectives come from a lifetime of practicing and thinking about education as well. He also draws on the experiences of teachers, school districts, policymakers, and students who are making often dramatic change in their own parts of the system. I like his perspective that anyone who is involved with education can move from where they are and make a difference: I'm fully aware of the intense political pressures bearing down on education. The policies through which these pressures exert themeslves must be challenged and changed. Part of my appeal (as it were) is to policymakers themselves to embrace the need for radical change. But revolutions don't wait for legislation. They emerge from what people do at the ground level. Education doesn't happen in the committee rooms of the legislatures or in the rhetoric of politicians. It's what goes on between learners and teachers in actual schools. If you're a teacher, for your students you are the system. If you're a school principal, for your community you are the system. If you're a policymaker, for the schools you control you are the system. I'm certainly inspired. And he believes there is lots of room for innovation within the system as it is, which makes the system as a whole more likely to evolve. Almost everything Sir Robinson writes in this book rings true to me. I've been a student in some really quite extraordinary schools with many wonderful and effective teachers, yet I've still seen many peers for whom schooling the way we do it now just didn't work. Everyone should read this book because we need to create a climate where every student can learn and grow. This is a well-articulated picture of that urgency, an inspiring vision, and how we get from here to there.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Wilson

    I picked this book up because Ken Robinson is a man with much more conviction and talent than I, who managed to make a place in the world which I very much value. This book gets 4 stars because I agree with him and his message. I do not however agree with this book in total. It was inspiring, but shallow. It was informed but not necessarily detailed. Ken (and Aronica) said a lot of things that are hard to disagree with, but I still don't know quite what I gained from this book. Perhaps my circum I picked this book up because Ken Robinson is a man with much more conviction and talent than I, who managed to make a place in the world which I very much value. This book gets 4 stars because I agree with him and his message. I do not however agree with this book in total. It was inspiring, but shallow. It was informed but not necessarily detailed. Ken (and Aronica) said a lot of things that are hard to disagree with, but I still don't know quite what I gained from this book. Perhaps my circumstance as a student of education makes me different, but I'm sure I know less about it than most of the teachers, head-teachers, and advisors who this book was targeted at. The phrase "as I mentioned in [my other book(s)]" cropped up an awful lot, and while there is overlap, certainly, it made it hard to see exactly what the book was presenting that was new. There were no detailed interviews or analyses, but rather short clips of speech or overviews of scenarios. No doubt Gladwell has spoiled me on those expectations though. With that said, I still feel positively. It's a step in the right direction: an acknowledgement that the way we see schools at the moment isn't necessarily as they could be best seen. That we need to change what we expect, reserve snap judgements, and allow freedom and trust in visionaries to do what they believe is best. It is not one size fits all, and the book makes very compelling arguments, from many different angles, to this point. In all, yes, I enjoyed the book, and yes I will recommend it to people.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michèle

    Ever since I watched Ken Robinson's famous TED Talk he has been an inspiration to me. This book was a good refresher on education transformation with a bit more practical advice on how to go about making changes in education. The best quote and piece of good advice from his book for me was this one: "Benjamin Franklin once said that there are three sorts of people in the world: those who are immovable, those who are movable, and those who move. We know what he meant. Some people don't see the nee Ever since I watched Ken Robinson's famous TED Talk he has been an inspiration to me. This book was a good refresher on education transformation with a bit more practical advice on how to go about making changes in education. The best quote and piece of good advice from his book for me was this one: "Benjamin Franklin once said that there are three sorts of people in the world: those who are immovable, those who are movable, and those who move. We know what he meant. Some people don't see the need for change and don't want to. They squat like boulders in a stream while the flow of events rushes around them. My advice is to leave them alone. Tide and time are on the side of transformation, and the currents of change may leave them behind. There are those who are movable. They see the need for change. They may not know what to do, but they're open to being convinced and to act if they are. Work with them and go where their energy is. Form partnerships and make dreams and plans. And there are those who move: the change agents who can see the shape of a different future and are determined to bring it about through their own actions and by working with others. They know they don't always need permission. As Gandhi said, if you want to change the world, you must be the change you want to see. Because when enough people move, that is a movement. And if that movement has enough energy, that is revolution. And in education, that's exactly what we need."

  29. 4 out of 5

    David

    There are so many great things about this book that I don't know where to start. I thought one of the advantages of this is that you don't have to be a teacher to create meaning--you don't even have to work at a school. There were ways that Robinson mentioned community members can impact and improve the school, in addition to teachers, principals, and others. Of the many takeaways from this book, what I really liked was the idea of academic play. Allowing students to have unstructured play withi There are so many great things about this book that I don't know where to start. I thought one of the advantages of this is that you don't have to be a teacher to create meaning--you don't even have to work at a school. There were ways that Robinson mentioned community members can impact and improve the school, in addition to teachers, principals, and others. Of the many takeaways from this book, what I really liked was the idea of academic play. Allowing students to have unstructured play within a discipline and learn on their own through experience. Of course, it certainly helps when a teacher facilitates a discussion after academic play. But how often do teachers allow their class the autonomy to discover, wonder, and create in the ways they find interesting and appealing? Unfortunately I believe it doesn't happen often because 1.) it's unconventional and 2.) it's hard to measure, and takes away time from the systematic memorization of the standardized tests that we do measure and, unfortunately, judge our teachers, students, and schools too harshly. All in all, a book worth reading.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Hassan Tahir

    This book should be a must-read for anyone working in the education sector or interested in it. Ken Robinson uses a multitude of case studies and research projects to expound his views on the need to revamp the discussion on education. He argues that education and learning in the 21st century must meet the demands of the 21st century. We cannot adhere to the same old standards and curricula that we've been following for several decades; we must incorporate new research and innovative ideas into This book should be a must-read for anyone working in the education sector or interested in it. Ken Robinson uses a multitude of case studies and research projects to expound his views on the need to revamp the discussion on education. He argues that education and learning in the 21st century must meet the demands of the 21st century. We cannot adhere to the same old standards and curricula that we've been following for several decades; we must incorporate new research and innovative ideas into the way we approach education. Whether one is an educator, a policymaker or a stakeholder, it is imperative to grasp the need of the hour and learn to unlearn and relearn. As someone working with high school students this book was an insightful read. I quite liked the many ideas he put forth and cannot wait to implement them in whatever way I can.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.