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Fantasy Magazine, October 2014: Women Destroy Fantasy! Special Issue

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LIGHTSPEED is an online science fiction and fantasy magazine. In its pages, you will find science fiction: from near-future, sociological soft SF, to far-future, star-spanning hard SF—and fantasy: from epic fantasy, sword-and-sorcery, and contemporary urban tales, to magical realism, science-fantasy, and folktales. Funded as a stretch goal of LIGHTSPEED’s Women Destroy Sc LIGHTSPEED is an online science fiction and fantasy magazine. In its pages, you will find science fiction: from near-future, sociological soft SF, to far-future, star-spanning hard SF—and fantasy: from epic fantasy, sword-and-sorcery, and contemporary urban tales, to magical realism, science-fantasy, and folktales. Funded as a stretch goal of LIGHTSPEED’s Women Destroy Science Fiction! Kickstarter campaign, this month we’re presenting a special one-off issue of our otherwise discontinued sister-magazine, FANTASY, called Women Destroy Fantasy!: an all-fantasy extravaganza entirely written—and edited!—by women. Here’s what we’ve got lined up for you in this special issue: Original fantasy—edited by long-time FANTASY editor Cat Rambo—by Kate Hall, H.E. Roulo, T. Kingfisher, and Julia August. Reprints—selected by legendary editor Terri Windling—by Delia Sherman, Emma Bull, Carol Emshwiller, and Nalo Hopkinson. Nonfiction articles—edited by LIGHTSPEED managing editor Wendy N. Wagner—by Kameron Hurley, Galen Dara, Sandra Wickham, Shanna Germain, Sofia Samatar, Kat Howard, and Wendy N. Wagner. Plus an original cover illustration by Elizabeth Leggett.


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LIGHTSPEED is an online science fiction and fantasy magazine. In its pages, you will find science fiction: from near-future, sociological soft SF, to far-future, star-spanning hard SF—and fantasy: from epic fantasy, sword-and-sorcery, and contemporary urban tales, to magical realism, science-fantasy, and folktales. Funded as a stretch goal of LIGHTSPEED’s Women Destroy Sc LIGHTSPEED is an online science fiction and fantasy magazine. In its pages, you will find science fiction: from near-future, sociological soft SF, to far-future, star-spanning hard SF—and fantasy: from epic fantasy, sword-and-sorcery, and contemporary urban tales, to magical realism, science-fantasy, and folktales. Funded as a stretch goal of LIGHTSPEED’s Women Destroy Science Fiction! Kickstarter campaign, this month we’re presenting a special one-off issue of our otherwise discontinued sister-magazine, FANTASY, called Women Destroy Fantasy!: an all-fantasy extravaganza entirely written—and edited!—by women. Here’s what we’ve got lined up for you in this special issue: Original fantasy—edited by long-time FANTASY editor Cat Rambo—by Kate Hall, H.E. Roulo, T. Kingfisher, and Julia August. Reprints—selected by legendary editor Terri Windling—by Delia Sherman, Emma Bull, Carol Emshwiller, and Nalo Hopkinson. Nonfiction articles—edited by LIGHTSPEED managing editor Wendy N. Wagner—by Kameron Hurley, Galen Dara, Sandra Wickham, Shanna Germain, Sofia Samatar, Kat Howard, and Wendy N. Wagner. Plus an original cover illustration by Elizabeth Leggett.

30 review for Fantasy Magazine, October 2014: Women Destroy Fantasy! Special Issue

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    Final review, as posted on www.FantasyLiterature.com: What if Cinderella were more interested in gardening and beekeeping than in dancing and dresses and noblemen’s sons? Sometimes it’s difficult to do your own thing when the world ― or your fairy godmother/dryad in the tree ― wants you to do or be something else. But a girl who’s sufficiently determined can figure out a way. Hannah's dryad keeps sending her lovely dresses to attend the Duke's ball and meet his son, but Hannah is more interested Final review, as posted on www.FantasyLiterature.com: What if Cinderella were more interested in gardening and beekeeping than in dancing and dresses and noblemen’s sons? Sometimes it’s difficult to do your own thing when the world ― or your fairy godmother/dryad in the tree ― wants you to do or be something else. But a girl who’s sufficiently determined can figure out a way. Hannah's dryad keeps sending her lovely dresses to attend the Duke's ball and meet his son, but Hannah is more interested in getting a key so she can go check out the Duke's orangery. The snippy conversations between Hannah and the magical titmouse sent by the sentimental dryad to help Hannah are entertaining:“Why didn’t you go to the ball?” squawked the bird. “That was the point!” Hannah rolled her eyes. “Don’t be ridiculous. What would I do at a ball? A bunch of people standing around being snippy at each other and not talking about anything of any purpose. I caught a bit of it from the servants as I was passing through the manor. No thank you.” “There’s dancing, though!” “I don’t dance,” said Hannah shortly. “Dancing’s not a thing you just pick up in a garden.”This is a humorous and quirky tale, with several twists on the old fairy tale. It’s heartening to see Hannah stick to her guns and continue pursuing her own dreams. “The Dryad’s Shoe” is a bit one-note, but it’s an entertaining read and carries a positive message. I initially rated this 3.5 stars, but it's definitely grown on me. It gets the full 4 stars. Free online short story/novelette at http://www.fantasy-magazine.com/new/n....

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kerri

    I really enjoyed this! A fun take on a very familiar tale!

  3. 4 out of 5

    E.

    Original and hilarious Cinderella retelling where... Hannah doesn't care about the prince one bit and takes care of her garden instead. She only gets convinced to go to a ball because she wants to see the orangery and when the duke's son chases after the girl who lost her shoe she dreads becoming his wife and not being able to actively practice gardening. If you're interested in seeing a girl with a passion, different relationships between women, talking birds, dryads who try to be helpful, and Original and hilarious Cinderella retelling where... Hannah doesn't care about the prince one bit and takes care of her garden instead. She only gets convinced to go to a ball because she wants to see the orangery and when the duke's son chases after the girl who lost her shoe she dreads becoming his wife and not being able to actively practice gardening. If you're interested in seeing a girl with a passion, different relationships between women, talking birds, dryads who try to be helpful, and lots of humour check this out!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Peter Tillman

    Review is solely for "The Dryad’s Shoe" (2014) by T. Kingfisher, a delightful retelling of the Cinderella story. Story link: https://www.fantasy-magazine.com/new/... Here Hannah, the girl in question, is a lot more interested in gardening than the Duke's son. I could go on, but if you've read any of T. Kingfisher/Ursula Vernon's stories, you already know they go off in unexpected directions: Hannah is visited by an enchanted titmouse: “I’m your fairy godbird. Apparently.” The dryad next to her moth Review is solely for "The Dryad’s Shoe" (2014) by T. Kingfisher, a delightful retelling of the Cinderella story. Story link: https://www.fantasy-magazine.com/new/... Here Hannah, the girl in question, is a lot more interested in gardening than the Duke's son. I could go on, but if you've read any of T. Kingfisher/Ursula Vernon's stories, you already know they go off in unexpected directions: Hannah is visited by an enchanted titmouse: “I’m your fairy godbird. Apparently.” The dryad next to her mother's grave is trying to get Hannah to dress up for the Ball: “You’ll have to take the dress, ” warned the titmouse. “The dryad will get very upset otherwise.” “She’s a tree,” said Hannah. “What’s she going to do, drop nuts on me?” Not to be missed, if you like fairy-tale retellings. And if you haven't yet tried T. Kingfisher/Ursula Vernon's stuff, this is a great opportunity. I love this sort of thing. 5 stars! ======================================== There's definitely more interesting stuff in the "Women Destroy Fantasy!" special issue: https://www.fantasy-magazine.com/new/... I'm surprised no one else has reviewed any of these stories. Well, in due time....

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kalin

    I relished the destruction here more than in its queer counterpart. ;) I may try more of: - Carol Emshwiller and Delia Sherman, for capturing the universality of sentient experience and our need to communicate--however different forms we may take - Tina Connoly's Silverblind, for bringing another hard-nosed (albeit curly-cute) heroine to the field I'll be watching for: - T. Kingfisher / Ursula Vernon, a mighty modern magician: she can turn a classical fairytale into a classy examination of the sterot I relished the destruction here more than in its queer counterpart. ;) I may try more of: - Carol Emshwiller and Delia Sherman, for capturing the universality of sentient experience and our need to communicate--however different forms we may take - Tina Connoly's Silverblind, for bringing another hard-nosed (albeit curly-cute) heroine to the field I'll be watching for: - T. Kingfisher / Ursula Vernon, a mighty modern magician: she can turn a classical fairytale into a classy examination of the sterotyping and silliness we still feed our children--and make it rather enjoyable. - Emma Bull, for investing such strength and sensibility and, well, sweetness in her Moon Very Thin that I'll no longer worry about my Yin (known to Bulgarian readers as Юна) being an outlandish creature. Well met, young sister; your witchery (and gardening and carpentry) have been missed. (Also, there's a list of recommended reads at the back which made my heart clench in despair. I'm trying to reduce my own list to less than 70, you know. :/)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Athena

    “Dryads like things that come in threes.” “Poison ivy comes in threes.” “Magic’s similar. You don’t notice you’ve run into it, and then it itches you for weeks.” Wonderfully garden-themed sideways take on 'Cinderella', full of Kingfisher's (aka Ursula Vernon) quirky humor. A quick, delightful read at The Dryad's Shoe. Try it, you'll like it! “Dryads like things that come in threes.” “Poison ivy comes in threes.” “Magic’s similar. You don’t notice you’ve run into it, and then it itches you for weeks.” Wonderfully garden-themed sideways take on 'Cinderella', full of Kingfisher's (aka Ursula Vernon) quirky humor. A quick, delightful read at The Dryad's Shoe. Try it, you'll like it!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Melora

    Cute, silly take on the Cinderella story. I particularly enjoyed the twist of Kara, the servant girl. And this... "There's going to be a third dress," said the titmouse finally. "Dryads like things that come in threes." "Poison ivy comes in threes." "Magic's similar. You don't notice you've run into it, and then it itches you for weeks." Cute, silly take on the Cinderella story. I particularly enjoyed the twist of Kara, the servant girl. And this... "There's going to be a third dress," said the titmouse finally. "Dryads like things that come in threes." "Poison ivy comes in threes." "Magic's similar. You don't notice you've run into it, and then it itches you for weeks."

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sidsel Pedersen

    This is a retelling of Cinderella, basically, well it is if you sort of look at it sideways. This is the story of what that story could have been if Cinderella was a sensible girl and if the story had made sense. The protagonist loves gardening and as Kingfisher points out in the interview in the magazine, the kind of skill a girl working as the family’s servant girl might pick up is just not very useful in a formal ballroom setting. Imagine what would actually happen if somehow the prince did m This is a retelling of Cinderella, basically, well it is if you sort of look at it sideways. This is the story of what that story could have been if Cinderella was a sensible girl and if the story had made sense. The protagonist loves gardening and as Kingfisher points out in the interview in the magazine, the kind of skill a girl working as the family’s servant girl might pick up is just not very useful in a formal ballroom setting. Imagine what would actually happen if somehow the prince did marry Cinderella. Imagine the embarrassment of not knowing how to eat properly, how to talk in polite company, how to dance and not step on people – people trained all of their youth to learn how to behave in polite company. That makes it sound like this story might be dull social commentary. But it isn’t. It’s giggling funny and delightful! Just what I needed after a long day in a very long month.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kara

    A hilarious take on the Cinderella tale where the Cinderella character is more interested in gardens than parties.

  10. 4 out of 5

    katayoun Masoodi

    cute, fun take on cinderella story

  11. 5 out of 5

    Debrac2014

    Cute re-telling of Cinderella!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Okay, but can you believe there's actually a bird called titmouse? This was one of the most creative and funniest Cinderella retellings I've read, and it's freely available online. Please read it. Okay, but can you believe there's actually a bird called titmouse? This was one of the most creative and funniest Cinderella retellings I've read, and it's freely available online. Please read it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nancy O'Toole

    The October 2014 issue of Fantasy magazine brings the retired periodical back for a special issue in the "Women Destroy" series (see also Women Destroy Science Fiction and Women Destroy Horror, all which celebrate women's contributions to said genres). The result is a really strong collection of original and reprinted fiction, plus some insightful author interviews and nonfiction pieces. Only one of the short stories didn't work for me, but the rest were great. Here's a break down of my favorite The October 2014 issue of Fantasy magazine brings the retired periodical back for a special issue in the "Women Destroy" series (see also Women Destroy Science Fiction and Women Destroy Horror, all which celebrate women's contributions to said genres). The result is a really strong collection of original and reprinted fiction, plus some insightful author interviews and nonfiction pieces. Only one of the short stories didn't work for me, but the rest were great. Here's a break down of my favorites three. The Dryad's Shoe by T Kingfisher- I love fairy tale retellings and The Dryad's Shoe is a perfect example of why. Recasting Cinderella as a practical young women with a love for gardening and no interest in balls or princes at all, completely recreates the original tale. It was also the most fun story in the whole collection. Miss Carstairs and the Merman by Delia Sherman- This story, about a woman naturalist who comes across a merman, reminded me a lot of Marie Brennan's Memoirs of Lady Trent Series. I found Miss Carstairs to be a very memorable protagonist and enjoyed reading about her studies with the mermaid, and the unique bond that formed between them as a result The Abominable Child's Tale by Carol Emshwiller- A story of a young yeti-like creature whose mother vanishes. As a result, she decides to leave the forest for the first time, and the result feel heartbreaking, yet realistic at the same time. I quite enjoyed this collection. Covering everything from fairy tales to superheroes, Women Destroy Fantasy is a worthwhile collection of stories and nonfiction.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    A humorous take on an older version of Cinderella - only the heroine here is a lot more down to earth, having more interest in the Dukes' orangery (greenhouse) than she does the lordling himself. ~*~*~*~ If you have kids you might be familiar with Kingfishers' work under her real name, Ursula Vernon - especially her "Dragon Breath" series. Her quirky sense of humour really shines through in this story, as it does with dragon breath, along with her own personality that you can see reflected in Hann A humorous take on an older version of Cinderella - only the heroine here is a lot more down to earth, having more interest in the Dukes' orangery (greenhouse) than she does the lordling himself. ~*~*~*~ If you have kids you might be familiar with Kingfishers' work under her real name, Ursula Vernon - especially her "Dragon Breath" series. Her quirky sense of humour really shines through in this story, as it does with dragon breath, along with her own personality that you can see reflected in Hannah (not to mention her love of gardening, which sneaks tendrils into a few of her works). Merged review: Read: The Glass Bottle Trick by Nalo Hopkinson 5/5 Stars. A Bluebeard re-telling set in the Caribbean. I loved this one. It holds true to the original story, but feels like a completely original work. I instantly put the author on my priority-reads list after I finished to find more of her work.

  15. 5 out of 5

    wishforagiraffe

    An equal blend of old and new short stories and old and new essays, this was a real treat to read. It made me seriously consider getting a genre magazine subscription, as looking at the included art on my kindle was just downright sad. Probably my favorite story from this issue was a Cinderella retelling, "The Dryad's Shoe" with a delightful twist. It also contained the first chapter of "Silverblind" which hooked me. An equal blend of old and new short stories and old and new essays, this was a real treat to read. It made me seriously consider getting a genre magazine subscription, as looking at the included art on my kindle was just downright sad. Probably my favorite story from this issue was a Cinderella retelling, "The Dryad's Shoe" with a delightful twist. It also contained the first chapter of "Silverblind" which hooked me.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Don't miss this well-written twist on the classic Cinderella! Full of humor, sarcasm, and charm, this short story about a no-nonsense girl who prefers gardening to royal balls is worth the read. Don't miss this well-written twist on the classic Cinderella! Full of humor, sarcasm, and charm, this short story about a no-nonsense girl who prefers gardening to royal balls is worth the read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Koch

    What a fun and twisted version of Cinderella! I loved the heroine and her no nonsense matter. Also, once again, the author's prose is absolutely on point. What a fun and twisted version of Cinderella! I loved the heroine and her no nonsense matter. Also, once again, the author's prose is absolutely on point.

  18. 5 out of 5

    august

    Umm why was this so damn cute!?

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chrisanne

    The Dryads Shoe. Just... real. And lovely in its own quirky way.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mr Esa Manley

    Not worth your time There are 3 good stories here. The rest are not worth your time. I had high hopes of an Arabian tale, possibly even Muslim characters shown in an interesting light This was due to the cover. There is a story featuring a Muslim woman and the author seems to be attempting to convey a message about body confidence and oppose bigotry. Yet they speak about religion with disdain and make a point of the main character saying loose clothing is restrictive and being clad in only a righ Not worth your time There are 3 good stories here. The rest are not worth your time. I had high hopes of an Arabian tale, possibly even Muslim characters shown in an interesting light This was due to the cover. There is a story featuring a Muslim woman and the author seems to be attempting to convey a message about body confidence and oppose bigotry. Yet they speak about religion with disdain and make a point of the main character saying loose clothing is restrictive and being clad in only a right bodysuit s "freeing" it appears the author could not escape her own bias(possibly unconscious bias). I thought this may have been addressed in the author spotlight later I the magazine. It was not. The cover is misleading and I genuinely wish I had spent my time reading something else.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Riju Ganguly

    This book is a historically significant document that records the journey and visions of women righters writing fantasies. Expectedly, the strongest parts of it contained the non-fiction pieces, especially the 'Artist Gallery' and Wendy N. Wagner's handy guide "Read the Destruction". But one story that overcame the utter mediocrity of others and single-handedly brightened this boom was T. Kingfisher's "The Dryad's Shoe"— a stunning retelling of the Cinderella story. [As a matter of fact, most of t This book is a historically significant document that records the journey and visions of women righters writing fantasies. Expectedly, the strongest parts of it contained the non-fiction pieces, especially the 'Artist Gallery' and Wendy N. Wagner's handy guide "Read the Destruction". But one story that overcame the utter mediocrity of others and single-handedly brightened this boom was T. Kingfisher's "The Dryad's Shoe"— a stunning retelling of the Cinderella story. [As a matter of fact, most of the five-star ratings and reviews gathered by this book pertain ONLY to that story!] Overall, a significant book from feminist perspective, but just acceptable as a fantasy anthology.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

    Only read the Dryads Shoe. A retelling of Cinderella. But if she's aroace and loves to garden. Also he step sisters dont suck nearly as much. They arent bulky really. They just are people with vastly different interest. Only read the Dryads Shoe. A retelling of Cinderella. But if she's aroace and loves to garden. Also he step sisters dont suck nearly as much. They arent bulky really. They just are people with vastly different interest.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Duncan

    I love me some short stories and these series of compendiums spotlighting women authors are great. Wonderful collection.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Loved the collection of short stories my favorite was definitely The Dryad’s Shoe.

  25. 4 out of 5

    l

    Should have been much longer and had much more original fiction (or reprint fiction! more fiction is the important thing). The short essays/interviews were okay, but not reasons to pick up the magazine. Re: the original fiction, Ursula Vernon's 'The Dryad's Shoe' was exactly the kind of Cinderella retelling I would have loved as a kid/still love (I need to read her books/short fiction!), Kate Hall's story was a bit obvious but ok, I wasn't sure what to make of Julia August's 'Drowning in the Sky' Should have been much longer and had much more original fiction (or reprint fiction! more fiction is the important thing). The short essays/interviews were okay, but not reasons to pick up the magazine. Re: the original fiction, Ursula Vernon's 'The Dryad's Shoe' was exactly the kind of Cinderella retelling I would have loved as a kid/still love (I need to read her books/short fiction!), Kate Hall's story was a bit obvious but ok, I wasn't sure what to make of Julia August's 'Drowning in the Sky' - I liked the ideas but it seemed like it should have been part of a much longer novel tbh (also I realized that I followed her on tumblr for quite some time because she ran a classics-heavy blog, lol), and I hated everything about 'Making the Cut' by HE Roulo. Re: the reprint fiction, Delia Sherman's amateur marine biologist woman meets merman tale was by the numbers imo, Emma Bull's story was apparently first published in a Tolkien tributes collection and I see that and it bored me to tears tbh (doesn't bode well for her books on my tr-f-sff shelf), Carol Emshwiller's story left me deeply unimpressed & Nalo Hopkinson's 'The Glass Bottle Trick' is obviously great but I wonder at its inclusion here? It's really well-known, isn't it? I don't think the other stories are though that may be the case... So okay, I guess. They could have done much better though.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sergej

    I always thought Cinderella would pick up some useful skills, what with living as servant and all. I found Hannah's gardening rather interesting, and I wonder how much of techniques presented is real. Cook and gardener are rather nice and provide interesting banter. I loved titmouse. He is fantastic little bird, and if we could get whole tale about him... I love that Duke's son wasn't presented as jerk or fool, just incompatible with Hannah. I hope he and Kara have happy life. We could have gotten I always thought Cinderella would pick up some useful skills, what with living as servant and all. I found Hannah's gardening rather interesting, and I wonder how much of techniques presented is real. Cook and gardener are rather nice and provide interesting banter. I loved titmouse. He is fantastic little bird, and if we could get whole tale about him... I love that Duke's son wasn't presented as jerk or fool, just incompatible with Hannah. I hope he and Kara have happy life. We could have gotten more about Kara, her personality and everything. Style was average. There were bits where it was really nice, but it was simple most of time. Dryad was rather interesting. Combination of Aschenpuntel and Cendrillion. I loved how she was portrayed as sentimental and set on repeating tales. And even if she interfered with lives of people, I was happy Hannah didn't follow on her threat of ax. So why three stars ( 2.5 actually)? Because whole plot with abuse was taken out? I'm sorry, but for me, that is crux of Cinderella-story how to overcome abuse and stay kind.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Fantasy Literature

    Fantasy Magazine was folded into Lightspeed Magazine in 2012, but it came out of retirement in October 2014 for the Women Destroy Fantasy issue, one of the stretch goals of a Kickstarter for an all-women edition of Lightspeed. I was one of the contributors to the Kickstarter, and, as my review last week revealed, I greatly enjoyed the Women Destroy Horror issue of Nightmare Magazine that was another stretch goal of the same Kickstarter. I’m pleased to report that the fantasy issue is just as “de Fantasy Magazine was folded into Lightspeed Magazine in 2012, but it came out of retirement in October 2014 for the Women Destroy Fantasy issue, one of the stretch goals of a Kickstarter for an all-women edition of Lightspeed. I was one of the contributors to the Kickstarter, and, as my review last week revealed, I greatly enjoyed the Women Destroy Horror issue of Nightmare Magazine that was another stretch goal of the same Kickstarter. I’m pleased to report that the fantasy issue is just as “destructive” and enjoyable. Cat Rambo guest-edited the new fiction for this issue of Fantasy. Her editorial remarks on the difficulty of seeing the shape of a field when you’re smack in the middle of it. You can see fine details, but the overall structure, size and scope tend to escape you. That means that sexism in genre literature... Read More: http://www.fantasyliterature.com/maga...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Great stories with many surprises. The "fantasy" genre hasn't been particularly appealing to me lately (since college, really). Occasional exceptions (China Miéville, George R.R. Martin) only underscored the fact that most fantasy stories were schlocky derivatives. This collection, however, casts doubt on that presumption and has rekindled my interest in the genre. These stories were all over the map: superheroes, Greek myths, Sasquatch, Bluebeard, mermen, and the best, most badass Cinderella I' Great stories with many surprises. The "fantasy" genre hasn't been particularly appealing to me lately (since college, really). Occasional exceptions (China Miéville, George R.R. Martin) only underscored the fact that most fantasy stories were schlocky derivatives. This collection, however, casts doubt on that presumption and has rekindled my interest in the genre. These stories were all over the map: superheroes, Greek myths, Sasquatch, Bluebeard, mermen, and the best, most badass Cinderella I've ever met. Great non-fiction essays and author interviews flesh out the volume.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    When Fantasy Magazine closed and became enfolded into Lightspeed Magazine, the science fiction and fantasy and content of the merged product divided fairly equitably. I therefore found it disappointing that Women Destroy SF was so much larger than this, effectively making it impossible to cover anywhere near all major branches (styles) of fantasy here. But for the content that is included it is a good varied showing of excellent stories old and new. The nonfiction pieces in here are particularly When Fantasy Magazine closed and became enfolded into Lightspeed Magazine, the science fiction and fantasy and content of the merged product divided fairly equitably. I therefore found it disappointing that Women Destroy SF was so much larger than this, effectively making it impossible to cover anywhere near all major branches (styles) of fantasy here. But for the content that is included it is a good varied showing of excellent stories old and new. The nonfiction pieces in here are particularly strong and a list of female fantasy authors gives any prospective reader great ideas for authors they may enjoy discovering.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Another solid collection of fantasy stories from the Women Destroy! series. I read the SF one before this. This volume does not have as many stories as the SF. But the few stories and reprints here are very meaty, and much longer. Each one had such a fully realized and well thought out world, I was completely lost in it. I was sad when the stories were done! The interviews and non fiction essays were excellent. The one that really caught my attention was the interview with all of the artists, whic Another solid collection of fantasy stories from the Women Destroy! series. I read the SF one before this. This volume does not have as many stories as the SF. But the few stories and reprints here are very meaty, and much longer. Each one had such a fully realized and well thought out world, I was completely lost in it. I was sad when the stories were done! The interviews and non fiction essays were excellent. The one that really caught my attention was the interview with all of the artists, which included a gallery. My favorite story was by J August, weaving mythology and history in such a beautiful way.

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