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Like A New Sun: New Indigenous Mexican Poetry

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Like A New Sun features poetry from Huastecan Nahuatl, Isthmus Zapotec, Mazatec, Tsotsil, Yucatec Maya, and Zoque languages. Co-edited by Isthmus Zapotec poet Víctor Terán and translator David Shook, this groundbreaking anthology introduces six indigenous Mexican poets—three women and three men—each writing in a different language. Well-established names like Juan Gregorio Like A New Sun features poetry from Huastecan Nahuatl, Isthmus Zapotec, Mazatec, Tsotsil, Yucatec Maya, and Zoque languages. Co-edited by Isthmus Zapotec poet Víctor Terán and translator David Shook, this groundbreaking anthology introduces six indigenous Mexican poets—three women and three men—each writing in a different language. Well-established names like Juan Gregorio Regino (Mazatec) appear alongside exciting new voices like Mikeas Sánchez (Zoque). Each poet's work is contextualized and introduced by its translator. Foreword by Eliot Weinberger. Poets include Víctor Terán (Isthmus Zapotec), Mikeas Sánchez (Zoque), Juan Gregorio Regino (Mazatec), Briceida Cuevas Cob (Yucatec Maya), Juan Hernández (Huastecan Nahuatl), and Enriqueta Lunez (Tsotsil).


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Like A New Sun features poetry from Huastecan Nahuatl, Isthmus Zapotec, Mazatec, Tsotsil, Yucatec Maya, and Zoque languages. Co-edited by Isthmus Zapotec poet Víctor Terán and translator David Shook, this groundbreaking anthology introduces six indigenous Mexican poets—three women and three men—each writing in a different language. Well-established names like Juan Gregorio Like A New Sun features poetry from Huastecan Nahuatl, Isthmus Zapotec, Mazatec, Tsotsil, Yucatec Maya, and Zoque languages. Co-edited by Isthmus Zapotec poet Víctor Terán and translator David Shook, this groundbreaking anthology introduces six indigenous Mexican poets—three women and three men—each writing in a different language. Well-established names like Juan Gregorio Regino (Mazatec) appear alongside exciting new voices like Mikeas Sánchez (Zoque). Each poet's work is contextualized and introduced by its translator. Foreword by Eliot Weinberger. Poets include Víctor Terán (Isthmus Zapotec), Mikeas Sánchez (Zoque), Juan Gregorio Regino (Mazatec), Briceida Cuevas Cob (Yucatec Maya), Juan Hernández (Huastecan Nahuatl), and Enriqueta Lunez (Tsotsil).

40 review for Like A New Sun: New Indigenous Mexican Poetry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    Phoneme has given us another wonderful window into a cultures with languages that like outside the mainstream. In this case several indigenous languages from southern Mexico. from ‘Jesus Never Understood my Grandmother’s Prayers’ My grandmother never learned Spanish was afraid of forgetting her gods was afraid of waking up in the morning without the prodigals of her offspring in her memory My grandmother believed that you could only talk to the gods in Zoque but she kneeled before the saints and prayed w Phoneme has given us another wonderful window into a cultures with languages that like outside the mainstream. In this case several indigenous languages from southern Mexico. from ‘Jesus Never Understood my Grandmother’s Prayers’ My grandmother never learned Spanish was afraid of forgetting her gods was afraid of waking up in the morning without the prodigals of her offspring in her memory My grandmother believed that you could only talk to the gods in Zoque but she kneeled before the saints and prayed with more fervor than anyone Jesus never heard her my grandmother’s tongue smelled like rose apples and her eyes lit up when she sang with the brightness of a star... by Mikes Sánchez (original in Zoque) and from 'The North Wind Whips' by Victor Terán Someone unthinkingly smoked cigatettes in heaven, left it overcast, listless. Here, at ground level, no one could take their shadow for a walk, sheltered in their houses, people are surprised to discover their misery. (original in Isthmus Zapotec) Each of the seven poets has a brief profile page, that includes a linguistic snapshot of their language (its subject/verb/object order, how many speakers, whether it is tonal, etc.). The ingenious images are sprinkled on every page: Delirious moon like a colander that dreams of overflowing with water from 'Moon’ by Terán and You disappeared the way a cigarette burns down. The smoke still lingers. from ‘The Plaza Without You’ by Briceida Cuevas Cob (original in Yucatec Maya: Bey binikech u náak’al chamal. U buuts’ile’ óoli’ ku chukik a paach. Finally, a set of poems by Juan Hernández Ramírez in Nahuatl create a magical sense of being in the traditional cycle of maize cultivation. An extract won’t convey the feeling of immersing yourself in one after another of these poems, but here is a sample. Yellow flowers on the altar Candle light. Copal smoke. Sowing consecrated. For earth, one offering of drink, for man, another. For abundance, flowers. Earth open, it receives the choice seed. You can hear an interview with poets Víctor Terán and David Shook (one of the translators and head of Phoneme) here, with Terán reading in Nahuatl, then Shook reading the translation. https://www.kcrw.com/news-culture/sho...

  2. 4 out of 5

    World Literature Today

    "The publication of Like a New Sun, edited by Víctor Terán and David Shook, is cause for celebration. Such translators as Jerome Rothenberg and Eliot Weinberger effortlessly transfer the exuberant imagery of poems by Terán, Cuevas Cob, and others into English. The Zoque poet Mikeas Sánchez demonstrates how the indigenous poetry of Mexico weaves the ancient with such contemporary imagery as “My memory is the black box of a plane without return / How did it reach the libation of sea water of such "The publication of Like a New Sun, edited by Víctor Terán and David Shook, is cause for celebration. Such translators as Jerome Rothenberg and Eliot Weinberger effortlessly transfer the exuberant imagery of poems by Terán, Cuevas Cob, and others into English. The Zoque poet Mikeas Sánchez demonstrates how the indigenous poetry of Mexico weaves the ancient with such contemporary imagery as “My memory is the black box of a plane without return / How did it reach the libation of sea water of such sweet saltpeter,” as rendered into English by Shook. All through the anthology, the poems emphasize that indigenous poetry in Mexico is not an outsider art but a vibrant gathering of voices." - Anthony Seidman This book was reviewed in the January 2016 issue of World Literature Today magazine. Read the full review by visiting our website: http://www.worldliteraturetoday.org/2...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Murphy

    This book, Like a New Sun, intrigued me when I saw it at the Marfa book store—the vibrant image of the cover and the lively words inside. I was not disappointed. Though the English translations were present, it made me wish I could read the words of the Mexican and tribal dialects. Feel the resonance and nearness of their words. Nevertheless, the English words touched me with their candor, the juxtaposition of joy, desires, and pain. The presence of passion and mysticism, of the agony of loss wi This book, Like a New Sun, intrigued me when I saw it at the Marfa book store—the vibrant image of the cover and the lively words inside. I was not disappointed. Though the English translations were present, it made me wish I could read the words of the Mexican and tribal dialects. Feel the resonance and nearness of their words. Nevertheless, the English words touched me with their candor, the juxtaposition of joy, desires, and pain. The presence of passion and mysticism, of the agony of loss within stories such as “The Plaza Without You.” These voices divulged how we are all the same, and I will re-read their words, again and again.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Fabiola Rivera

  5. 5 out of 5

    Herb

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jim

  7. 4 out of 5

    ImJaclyn

  8. 5 out of 5

    Diane

  9. 4 out of 5

    David Shook

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Tayrien

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alysa

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tesni

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarah May

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth C. Fericy

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Fericy

  16. 4 out of 5

    Greg

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mark Allen Jenkins

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sirama

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dbg

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lili

  22. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kendall

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ching-In

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amir

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sonia Allison

  28. 5 out of 5

    Li

  29. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Springs

  30. 4 out of 5

    Edita

  31. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  32. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

  33. 5 out of 5

    Mary Ellen Sanger

  34. 5 out of 5

    Mayuri

  35. 4 out of 5

    Clare

  36. 5 out of 5

    Mona

  37. 5 out of 5

    Nichole

  38. 4 out of 5

    Iryna Shuvalova

  39. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

  40. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

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