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Rad American Women A-Z: Rebels, Trailblazers, and Visionaries who Shaped Our History . . . and Our Future!

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The New York Times Bestseller! "This is The Most Inspiring Children’s Book We've Ever Seen."--Refinery29.com "The very first kids' book released by the iconic publishing house City Lights, Rad American Women A-Z navigates the alphabet from Angela Davis to Zora Neale Hurston with colorful illustrations and short, powerful narratives. The perfect gift for the junior riot grrl The New York Times Bestseller! "This is The Most Inspiring Children’s Book We've Ever Seen."--Refinery29.com "The very first kids' book released by the iconic publishing house City Lights, Rad American Women A-Z navigates the alphabet from Angela Davis to Zora Neale Hurston with colorful illustrations and short, powerful narratives. The perfect gift for the junior riot grrl in your life."--Bust Magazine "The History of Feminism--in an Awesome Picture Book. The ABCs just got a major girl-power upgrade."--Chantal Strasburger, Teen Vogue Like all A-Z books, this one illustrates the alphabet—but instead of "A is for Apple", A is for Angela—as in Angela Davis, the iconic political activist. B is for Billie Jean King, who shattered the glass ceiling of sports; C is for Carol Burnett, who defied assumptions about women in comedy; D is for Dolores Huerta, who organized farmworkers; and E is for Ella Baker, who mentored Dr. Martin Luther King and helped shape the Civil Rights Movement. And the list of great women continues, spanning several centuries, multiple professions, and 26 diverse individuals. There are artists and abolitionists, scientists and suffragettes, rock stars and rabble-rousers, and agents of change of all kinds. The book includes an introduction that discusses what it means to be "rad" and "radical," an afterword with 26 suggestions for how you can be "rad," and a Resource Guide with ideas for further learning and reading. American history was made by countless rad—and often radical—women. By offering a fresh and diverse array of female role models, we can remind readers that there are many places to find inspiration, and that being smart and strong and brave is rad. Rad American Women will be appreciated by various age groups. It is Common Core aligned for students grades 3 - 8. Pre-school and young children will be captured by the bright visuals and easily modified texts, while the subject matter will stimulate and inspire high-schoolers and beyond. "This is not a book. This is a guest list for a party of my heroes. Thank you for inviting us." —Lemony Snicket, author of A Series of Unfortunate Events books "I feel honored to be included in this book. Women need to take radical steps to become feminists, and to be strong to fight for their rights and those of others facing oppression and discrimination. The world needs rad women to create a just society." —Dolores Huerta, Labor Leader, Civil Rights Activist "It's almost always with a chuckle that I view a cartoon image of myself. But to see cartoon-me positioned (alphabetically) amongst so many of my women heroes and role models . . . well, I just broke down and cried. Happy tears. I surely hope that this one-of-a-kind collection of radical American women reaches the hands of all children who want to grow up and become amazing women." —Kate Bornstein, author of My New Gender Workbook "I was totally in rapture reading this book. Bold women, bold colors, and fierce black paper cutouts. I cheer these histories of women who fight not for war or country or corporation, but for EVERYONE! I can't wait for my son to read this." —Nikki McClure, Illustrator of All in a Day


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The New York Times Bestseller! "This is The Most Inspiring Children’s Book We've Ever Seen."--Refinery29.com "The very first kids' book released by the iconic publishing house City Lights, Rad American Women A-Z navigates the alphabet from Angela Davis to Zora Neale Hurston with colorful illustrations and short, powerful narratives. The perfect gift for the junior riot grrl The New York Times Bestseller! "This is The Most Inspiring Children’s Book We've Ever Seen."--Refinery29.com "The very first kids' book released by the iconic publishing house City Lights, Rad American Women A-Z navigates the alphabet from Angela Davis to Zora Neale Hurston with colorful illustrations and short, powerful narratives. The perfect gift for the junior riot grrl in your life."--Bust Magazine "The History of Feminism--in an Awesome Picture Book. The ABCs just got a major girl-power upgrade."--Chantal Strasburger, Teen Vogue Like all A-Z books, this one illustrates the alphabet—but instead of "A is for Apple", A is for Angela—as in Angela Davis, the iconic political activist. B is for Billie Jean King, who shattered the glass ceiling of sports; C is for Carol Burnett, who defied assumptions about women in comedy; D is for Dolores Huerta, who organized farmworkers; and E is for Ella Baker, who mentored Dr. Martin Luther King and helped shape the Civil Rights Movement. And the list of great women continues, spanning several centuries, multiple professions, and 26 diverse individuals. There are artists and abolitionists, scientists and suffragettes, rock stars and rabble-rousers, and agents of change of all kinds. The book includes an introduction that discusses what it means to be "rad" and "radical," an afterword with 26 suggestions for how you can be "rad," and a Resource Guide with ideas for further learning and reading. American history was made by countless rad—and often radical—women. By offering a fresh and diverse array of female role models, we can remind readers that there are many places to find inspiration, and that being smart and strong and brave is rad. Rad American Women will be appreciated by various age groups. It is Common Core aligned for students grades 3 - 8. Pre-school and young children will be captured by the bright visuals and easily modified texts, while the subject matter will stimulate and inspire high-schoolers and beyond. "This is not a book. This is a guest list for a party of my heroes. Thank you for inviting us." —Lemony Snicket, author of A Series of Unfortunate Events books "I feel honored to be included in this book. Women need to take radical steps to become feminists, and to be strong to fight for their rights and those of others facing oppression and discrimination. The world needs rad women to create a just society." —Dolores Huerta, Labor Leader, Civil Rights Activist "It's almost always with a chuckle that I view a cartoon image of myself. But to see cartoon-me positioned (alphabetically) amongst so many of my women heroes and role models . . . well, I just broke down and cried. Happy tears. I surely hope that this one-of-a-kind collection of radical American women reaches the hands of all children who want to grow up and become amazing women." —Kate Bornstein, author of My New Gender Workbook "I was totally in rapture reading this book. Bold women, bold colors, and fierce black paper cutouts. I cheer these histories of women who fight not for war or country or corporation, but for EVERYONE! I can't wait for my son to read this." —Nikki McClure, Illustrator of All in a Day

30 review for Rad American Women A-Z: Rebels, Trailblazers, and Visionaries who Shaped Our History . . . and Our Future!

  1. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    this is lovely, unique, so wonderful, and very much needed. The "X is for the women whose names we don't know" page brought tears to my eyes and gave me goosebumps. I want to give this to every young girl that I know.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    an alphabet that spans from Angela Davis to Zora Neale Hurston? um, yeah. this is rad. RAD. #weneeddiversebooks

  3. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    This book was well-written and hit all the right notes. If I still taught middle school, I would read aloud a page from this every day during March for Women's History Month.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Leigh Anne

    Attention subversive moms and dads: this is the children's book you give to your kids if you want them to start off on the socially conscious left foot, as it were. Each letter of the alphabet is attached to a woman who helped change the world. A one-page short essay, faced by a gorgeous illustration of the woman in question, explains who she is and why she's awesome. The letter X, which stands for all the unknown women who did great things, moved me to tears - I'm photocopying that two-page spr Attention subversive moms and dads: this is the children's book you give to your kids if you want them to start off on the socially conscious left foot, as it were. Each letter of the alphabet is attached to a woman who helped change the world. A one-page short essay, faced by a gorgeous illustration of the woman in question, explains who she is and why she's awesome. The letter X, which stands for all the unknown women who did great things, moved me to tears - I'm photocopying that two-page spread and hanging it up somewhere I can see it all the time. There's also a bibliography of kids' books for further reading, and a list of web resources I'll be photocopying as well. Solid stuff all around, highly recommended for all kids' collections.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    Quite an interesting book about some great American women who have lived courageous and influential lives. I'd heard of some but most were new to me. It's the sort of book that every young boy and girl should be given. It's written for young readers who are just moving from picture books to chapter books.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC from Edelweiss Above the Treeline Covering 25+ American women who influenced a wide variety of public arenas, this book is a great choice for middle grade readers to introduce them to a diverse group of women they may not have heard of! From the somewhat well known (Billie Jean King, Bessie Coleman, Nellie Bly) to women of whom I had never heard, each entry gives a brief overview of the woman's life and how she influenced the world. Accompanied by brightly colored illustrations, this would E ARC from Edelweiss Above the Treeline Covering 25+ American women who influenced a wide variety of public arenas, this book is a great choice for middle grade readers to introduce them to a diverse group of women they may not have heard of! From the somewhat well known (Billie Jean King, Bessie Coleman, Nellie Bly) to women of whom I had never heard, each entry gives a brief overview of the woman's life and how she influenced the world. Accompanied by brightly colored illustrations, this would be a fantastic book to use in the classroom for Women's History Month. Since the entries are short, teachers could read one a day. I wouldn't be at all surprised if teachers bought an extra copy to cut up and laminate for a bulletin board. In fact, I think City Lights should consider packaging the illustrations this way-- on one page with the text! If my youngest daughter ever has children, this would be the sort of thing she would take to the hospital to read to a newborn, in much the same way I read her D'Aulaire's Greek Myths! In fact, I may have to go buy multiple copies for just such gift giving purposes! What a great book for #WeNeedDiverseBooks. And I particularly appreciated how the title specified the descriptive "American", although "US" would have been even better.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    A really fantastic book, written for I'd say 4-6th graders, this book looks at 25 amazing American women (both cis and trans). I have to admit I hadn't heard of a lot of them, which I guess is the point, so I definitely learned a lot from reading. Of particular importance was X which stands for "For the women who aren't in the history books or the Hall of Fame, or on posting stamps and coins. for the women who didn't get credit for their ideas and inventions, who couldn't own property or sign th A really fantastic book, written for I'd say 4-6th graders, this book looks at 25 amazing American women (both cis and trans). I have to admit I hadn't heard of a lot of them, which I guess is the point, so I definitely learned a lot from reading. Of particular importance was X which stands for "For the women who aren't in the history books or the Hall of Fame, or on posting stamps and coins. for the women who didn't get credit for their ideas and inventions, who couldn't own property or sign their own names. The women who weren't taught to read or write but managed to communicate anyway, who weren't allowed to work but still supported their families, or who worked every day but weren't paid as much as men" I highly recommend this book regardless of if you have children of your own. Buy it, read it, educate yourself and become the rad Aunt (or Uncle) who gets to teach the lil ones in your life about these women who kicked ass

  8. 5 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    An excellent collection of brief profiles of great women, some well-known and some not. There were a few, like Jovita Idar, Lucy Parsons, and Virginia Apgar, that I'd never heard of, and most of the others have not been widely covered for children in singular biographies or other anthologies. The author also does an excellent job with the dreaded X.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Hatch

    3.5 stars. There were some really great things about this book, and then there were some poorly-executed things. I think the thing that confused me the most was it's intended audience. It uses an ABC format and bright colors, so it feels like it's intended for children, but some of the vocabulary and inferred background knowledge seemed way too advanced for a child. It was weird to have some words explained in really simple terms stand in sentences next to other words or references that were jus 3.5 stars. There were some really great things about this book, and then there were some poorly-executed things. I think the thing that confused me the most was it's intended audience. It uses an ABC format and bright colors, so it feels like it's intended for children, but some of the vocabulary and inferred background knowledge seemed way too advanced for a child. It was weird to have some words explained in really simple terms stand in sentences next to other words or references that were just as out of reach for that age group. So I am rating it a little lower than I expected because it seemed a little rushed/disorganized/confused about what it's real purpose should be. The other thing that was a little off-putting was how preachy and even propaganda-like it felt sometimes. It was just a little too repetitive and in your face for my taste. BUT I did, of course, love reading about some amazing women and their accomplishments. There were a couple that I hadn't heard of, and I loved feeling inspired by them. A wonderful idea--a little sloppy in the execution.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jazmyne

    What a great book!! I'm very glad my bf gave it to me for our anniversary :) I wish it weren't limited to 26 women, but the list of 26 they wrote about is so inclusive and amazing. There were diverse races, cultures, sexualities, and more on every page. Plus, the language of this book makes it super accessible to readers from ages 10-100, and the content is still thought provoking. Additionally, the resources at the back of this book make it easy to find more materials about rad women in and out What a great book!! I'm very glad my bf gave it to me for our anniversary :) I wish it weren't limited to 26 women, but the list of 26 they wrote about is so inclusive and amazing. There were diverse races, cultures, sexualities, and more on every page. Plus, the language of this book makes it super accessible to readers from ages 10-100, and the content is still thought provoking. Additionally, the resources at the back of this book make it easy to find more materials about rad women in and out of the book. Rad American Women A-Z definitely has a spot in my future classroom library.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Darcy

    Yesssssss this book was so rad, you guys! I learned so many things and the simple, bold illustrations were perfect for my infant eyesight. Only complaint: I have lots of questions after hearing about all of these women and I can't talk yet. Will have to reread again and again!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dov Zeller

    What is black and white and blue and red and yellow and green and fuschia and orange and starts with Angela Davis and ends with Zora Neale Hurston? This wonderful little book of mini-biographies. Wow. The writer speaks eloquently and intelligently about many revolutionary women and the contexts in which they lived and loved and fought and did a lot of great things. Queerness and transness are addressed in ways that are perhaps not perfect, but certainly thoughtful and it's wonderful that Kate Bo What is black and white and blue and red and yellow and green and fuschia and orange and starts with Angela Davis and ends with Zora Neale Hurston? This wonderful little book of mini-biographies. Wow. The writer speaks eloquently and intelligently about many revolutionary women and the contexts in which they lived and loved and fought and did a lot of great things. Queerness and transness are addressed in ways that are perhaps not perfect, but certainly thoughtful and it's wonderful that Kate Bornstein is in here (between Jovita Idar and Lucy Parsons.) The main thing I'm struggling with in terms of choices of people for this book, is that Isadora Duncan is in here. It seems strange for a book like this to include someone who is known for saying seriously racist stuff. I mean, that's not all she's known for, but I kind of wish it could have been Ida B. Wells or Isabella Friedman or... Schatz's text is nicely complemented by Miriam Klein Stahl's papercut illustrations. This is not necessarily a picture book in the conventional sense, and the illustrations are not really "Story-book" illustrations. It's more of a mini reference book/tiny encyclopedia (if one can say such a thing). In any case, I recommend this book to just about anyone. And I hope many adults share it with the kids in their lives (regardless of gender). And I look forward to checking out Kate Schatz's other work.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kerfe

    Of course you could argue about the women who are included/not included in this alphabetical survey. But that's a good thing--we now know more about and recognize the contributions women have made to the world. The text for each woman is brief, but full of information, asking the readers to explore more deeply themselves the individuals that resonate with them. A short list of resources in the back of the book will help them get started in their searches. The illustrations appear to be linocuts, a Of course you could argue about the women who are included/not included in this alphabetical survey. But that's a good thing--we now know more about and recognize the contributions women have made to the world. The text for each woman is brief, but full of information, asking the readers to explore more deeply themselves the individuals that resonate with them. A short list of resources in the back of the book will help them get started in their searches. The illustrations appear to be linocuts, although there is no information given that I could find about the way they were done. It's in a block print style, anyway, and the contrast of the black and white figures with the flat bright backgrounds is eye-catching and effective.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mateen Mahboubi

    What a wonderful book providing brief bios of various women who left their mark on the US. Was appreciative of the diversity represented but felt like it would have benefited from more Native american representation. I am greatly looking forward to reading Rad Women Worldwide. Initially we got this to read with my eldest but it didn't really work out. At three and a half, there was just so much about the world that he didn't understand to make it a worthwhile read. While we had no issue answering What a wonderful book providing brief bios of various women who left their mark on the US. Was appreciative of the diversity represented but felt like it would have benefited from more Native american representation. I am greatly looking forward to reading Rad Women Worldwide. Initially we got this to read with my eldest but it didn't really work out. At three and a half, there was just so much about the world that he didn't understand to make it a worthwhile read. While we had no issue answering his questions, we thought that it would be best to leave it for another few years and try again. I can't wait to share it with him then.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Kotkin

    Children's nonfiction book featuring female firsts, activists, and role models. Using the A to Z format, this book presents one-page bios of a wide diversity of women who have all left an important mark. A variety of fields are represented, and this book reaches beyond the usual names found in children's biographies. Text is clear and inspiring. I like the modern-looking illustrations, but I do wish that photographs of each woman had also been included.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    A great introductory book for young girls. The author created an alphabet book providing a one-page overview of each RAD woman. Hopefully this will entice the reader to learn more about the women highlighted. I particularly like the author's list of 26 Things That You Can Do to Be Rad and her challenge to the young reader to think about what she or he may do to make a difference in the community or in the world.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ali

    Super short bios on rad women! Great for 3rd-6th graders but probably would work for even younger if they've got their grown up to help read aloud. Fell in love with the '26 things you can do to be rad' part at the end. Want to steal and hang in the library. Bold colors and easy to understand text. Just a great little book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amy!

    This was a great introduction to a lot of ladies with whom I wasn't familiar. I loved the really graphic illustrations that accompanied each one page bio, and my only real complaint is that I would have liked to read MORE about all the women featured.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shelly

    I previously read Rad Women Worldwide and liked it a lot. This one isn't written quite as well but it's still good and I would recommend it to middle grade kids. The variety of people chosen is excellent and I was especially happy to see Temple Grandin for the letter T.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    ARC supplied by publisher via Edelweiss

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rhea

    An incredible book that is so essential. My review and interview with the author will be forthcoming in Hip Mama! Just pre-order your copy now.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Moll

    This is the sort of children's book that I would be proud to share with the little ones in my family. Catch my review in the March issue of Baltimore Gay Life.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lilla

    This is a great book to have in the classroom. Can't wait to receive Rad Women Worldwide later this week!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sanja_Sanjalica

    Just great, learned a lot.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    This was a quick and informative read! I enjoyed learning about all of the different amazing women making a difference in the world despite their hardships. Really empowering.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Devann

    Really great book that I think is informative for kids and adults alike. I'm sure it was really hard to narrow it down, but I thought there was a really good spread of different kinds of women from different and races and backgrounds and who achieved things in different areas. Also the "X is for women whose names we don't know" page definitely made me tear up a little bit. Would definitely recommend checking it out!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jenni V.

    I read this with my 10-year-old daughter Megan. Even though this was in the Adult Non-Fiction section of my library I had no hesitation reading this with her and would say it's very well suited to middle/upper elementary kids. Each person had a page of illustration and a page of text devoted to them and it was a great starting point for deeper conversations/research on the ones that interested her. I didn't take notes on every letter/person but here are our thoughts... I didn't know 10 out of the I read this with my 10-year-old daughter Megan. Even though this was in the Adult Non-Fiction section of my library I had no hesitation reading this with her and would say it's very well suited to middle/upper elementary kids. Each person had a page of illustration and a page of text devoted to them and it was a great starting point for deeper conversations/research on the ones that interested her. I didn't take notes on every letter/person but here are our thoughts... I didn't know 10 out of the 26 women and it was troubling to me that most of the 10 were minorities; I really need to brush up on some areas of the women's rights movement. I knew the work of another 3 of the 26 but either didn't know their name or didn't know a woman was involved (for example, I've heard a lot about Cesar Chavez but didn't know he actually co-created the United Farm Workers Association union with a woman, Dolores Huerta). So while the information was very basic, I learned many things as well. Megan's comments are in quotes. On Angela Davis ~ "She's like me because she's strong, confident, and stands up for what she believes." On Dolores Huerta ~ "She was very interesting with she did and how she dealt with things." We looked up videos of Florence Griffith Joyner's runs and outfits. On Isadora Duncan ~ "She's cool", after watching videos of her dancing. On Kate Bornstein ~ The concept of transgender was a little out of Meg's realm; it's not that she's against it, it's that she couldn't understand at all why someone would feel that way. We looked up some "before and after" pictures of Caitlyn Jenner, Jazz Jennings, and Chaz Bono to help illustrate the concept as best we could and then tabled it for further discussion in the future. On Nellie Bly ~ "I liked her because she was cool and a good person and she set a world record." On "Queen Bessie" Coleman ~ "She's cool." On Sonia Sotomayor ~ "I like her. She's brave and I can't get over how she gave herself shots!" Forget being on the Supreme Court, it really really impressed Megan that she began giving herself insulin shots at a young age, haha! On Yuri Kochiyama ~ This led to a big discussion about internment camps, another concept that was (thankfully) hard to grasp because she couldn't imagine our country treating their own citizens that way. The letter X, a tribute to the women whose voices weren't heard and stories aren't known, was very interesting and a good way to acknowledge the history lost when women's lives didn't matter and weren't recorded. The list of websites at the end was a great source and I look forward to perusing them with my daughters and my son. The alphabet list of 26 things we can do to be rad was great as well. Megan asked me what my favorite piece of advice from the list was and I said Q for "Questions are awesome. Raise your hand and ask away!" Hers was M for "Make mistakes, learn from them, and keep on trying." Quote from the Book "American history is filled with stories of brave and powerful men...but have you ever wondered where the women are? In this book you will find the stories of 26 women who have made a big impact on our nation." Find all my reviews at: http://readingatrandom.blogspot.com

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Breseman

    In school, I used to get assignments to pick a "hero" and write about them. I wish, at that time, I'd had this book. The obvious choices were George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, maybe Gandhi if you were excited about more recent history. (Side rant, but what's up with the heavy focus on the American Revolution and Founding Fathers in our education system? I didn't get to learn about anything post-pioneer times until junior high. And what a weird slant, at that: I, a girl of native heritage, always In school, I used to get assignments to pick a "hero" and write about them. I wish, at that time, I'd had this book. The obvious choices were George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, maybe Gandhi if you were excited about more recent history. (Side rant, but what's up with the heavy focus on the American Revolution and Founding Fathers in our education system? I didn't get to learn about anything post-pioneer times until junior high. And what a weird slant, at that: I, a girl of native heritage, always wanted to be one of those pioneer women venturing out where "people hadn't gone before".) I never had a specific hero from history I looked up to. Somehow, I couldn't identify strongly with any of the (old white American male) heroes. I specifically picked a woman, not out of some nascent feminism, but because it didn't seem likely that I'd grow up to be a George Washington. There was nearly nothing I could identify with. I had two books that someone gave me: one, on Helen Keller's teacher, and the other, on Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman doctor. The books were okay, and I didn't care especially about these women's causes. But that's who I picked to write about. I didn't know of any other famous women worth looking up to. Rad Women A-Z would have been great for me to own at age six or eight. Reading it now, even though it's clearly written for kids, I'm still inspired and impressed. I would have picked a favorite: Nellie Bly, perhaps, a rebellious woman who knew how to write. Or the Grimke sisters, who spoke out often in active defiance. I don't identify with all of the women in this book, and that's great. I get to identify with a few of them by their qualities, their actions, and the stories they created by living radical lives. I don't have to be inspired by all of them, because now there's a whole set of interesting women to choose from. And they're all, indeed, rad.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nolan Alber

    Picking up this book, I wasn't sure what to expect. From an outward glance, it appears to be a simple coffee table book, but I assure you it can be so much more than that. Rad American Woman A-Z has a variety of compelling, motivating, and diverse stories that could be read by any age group. The impressionistic portraits are beautiful, and each page narrative gives a good general overview of who each woman is or was. My main gripe with the book is that a barrage of short, page-long biographies can Picking up this book, I wasn't sure what to expect. From an outward glance, it appears to be a simple coffee table book, but I assure you it can be so much more than that. Rad American Woman A-Z has a variety of compelling, motivating, and diverse stories that could be read by any age group. The impressionistic portraits are beautiful, and each page narrative gives a good general overview of who each woman is or was. My main gripe with the book is that a barrage of short, page-long biographies can can start to feel formulaic and repetitive when reading straight through (which, however, does make page X stand out like a brilliant shining diamond). Still, the book is quick enough that the feeling is short-lived. Simply put, though, this book has a Rad American Woman that represents everyone -- so read it, no matter who you are. (And since you were surely wondering, mine is Patti Smith -- the "punk poet laureate." So awesome.)

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This book will quickly become a favorite gift for me - simply illustrated with powerful stories of amazing women...you just can't go wrong! I was also pretty impressed that I only knew about half of these stories well before reading this book, which is great because that means there are a whole bunch more people I can go find books and read about! That being said, my favorite page was X - dedicated to all the women whose names we don't know and may never know and all the women who never became f This book will quickly become a favorite gift for me - simply illustrated with powerful stories of amazing women...you just can't go wrong! I was also pretty impressed that I only knew about half of these stories well before reading this book, which is great because that means there are a whole bunch more people I can go find books and read about! That being said, my favorite page was X - dedicated to all the women whose names we don't know and may never know and all the women who never became famous yet made a difference. A quick read overall, but well worth it.

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