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Head First Java

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Learning a complex new language is no easy task especially when it s an object-oriented computer programming language like Java. You might think the problem is your brain. It seems to have a mind of its own, a mind that doesn't always want to take in the dry, technical stuff you're forced to study. The fact is your brain craves novelty. It's constantly searching, scanning, Learning a complex new language is no easy task especially when it s an object-oriented computer programming language like Java. You might think the problem is your brain. It seems to have a mind of its own, a mind that doesn't always want to take in the dry, technical stuff you're forced to study. The fact is your brain craves novelty. It's constantly searching, scanning, waiting for something unusual to happen. After all, that's the way it was built to help you stay alive. It takes all the routine, ordinary, dull stuff and filters it to the background so it won't interfere with your brain's real work--recording things that matter. How does your brain know what matters? It's like the creators of the Head First approach say, suppose you're out for a hike and a tiger jumps in front of you, what happens in your brain? Neurons fire. Emotions crank up. Chemicals surge. That's how your brain knows. And that's how your brain will learn Java. Head First Java combines puzzles, strong visuals, mysteries, and soul-searching interviews with famous Java objects to engage you in many different ways. It's fast, it's fun, and it's effective. And, despite its playful appearance, Head First Java is serious stuff: a complete introduction to object-oriented programming and Java. You'll learn everything from the fundamentals to advanced topics, including threads, network sockets, and distributed programming with RMI. And the new. second edition focuses on Java 5.0, the latest version of the Java language and development platform. Because Java 5.0 is a major update to the platform, with deep, code-level changes, even more careful study and implementation is required. So learning the Head First way is more important than ever. If you've read a Head First book, you know what to expect--a visually rich format designed for the way your brain works. If you haven't, you're in for a treat. You'll see why people say it's unlike any other Java book you've ever read. By exploiting how your brain works, Head First Java compresses the time it takes to learn and retain--complex information. Its unique approach not only shows you what you need to know about Java syntax, it teaches you to think like a Java programmer. If you want to be bored, buy some other book. But if you want to understand Java, this book's for you.


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Learning a complex new language is no easy task especially when it s an object-oriented computer programming language like Java. You might think the problem is your brain. It seems to have a mind of its own, a mind that doesn't always want to take in the dry, technical stuff you're forced to study. The fact is your brain craves novelty. It's constantly searching, scanning, Learning a complex new language is no easy task especially when it s an object-oriented computer programming language like Java. You might think the problem is your brain. It seems to have a mind of its own, a mind that doesn't always want to take in the dry, technical stuff you're forced to study. The fact is your brain craves novelty. It's constantly searching, scanning, waiting for something unusual to happen. After all, that's the way it was built to help you stay alive. It takes all the routine, ordinary, dull stuff and filters it to the background so it won't interfere with your brain's real work--recording things that matter. How does your brain know what matters? It's like the creators of the Head First approach say, suppose you're out for a hike and a tiger jumps in front of you, what happens in your brain? Neurons fire. Emotions crank up. Chemicals surge. That's how your brain knows. And that's how your brain will learn Java. Head First Java combines puzzles, strong visuals, mysteries, and soul-searching interviews with famous Java objects to engage you in many different ways. It's fast, it's fun, and it's effective. And, despite its playful appearance, Head First Java is serious stuff: a complete introduction to object-oriented programming and Java. You'll learn everything from the fundamentals to advanced topics, including threads, network sockets, and distributed programming with RMI. And the new. second edition focuses on Java 5.0, the latest version of the Java language and development platform. Because Java 5.0 is a major update to the platform, with deep, code-level changes, even more careful study and implementation is required. So learning the Head First way is more important than ever. If you've read a Head First book, you know what to expect--a visually rich format designed for the way your brain works. If you haven't, you're in for a treat. You'll see why people say it's unlike any other Java book you've ever read. By exploiting how your brain works, Head First Java compresses the time it takes to learn and retain--complex information. Its unique approach not only shows you what you need to know about Java syntax, it teaches you to think like a Java programmer. If you want to be bored, buy some other book. But if you want to understand Java, this book's for you.

30 review for Head First Java

  1. 4 out of 5

    Allisonperkel

    I'm a fairly well versed programmer in some of the older style languages like C and C++. If you have some archaic C question, I may be your woman. I'm not so familiar with Java - in fact the last time I touched the language I could run to the local coffee shop, get a coffee, and get back to my program and it would just be starting up (back in the dark days, when java was really slow). Fast forward 12 years and not only is Java nimble and performant, but its something I need to know. Yesterday. K I'm a fairly well versed programmer in some of the older style languages like C and C++. If you have some archaic C question, I may be your woman. I'm not so familiar with Java - in fact the last time I touched the language I could run to the local coffee shop, get a coffee, and get back to my program and it would just be starting up (back in the dark days, when java was really slow). Fast forward 12 years and not only is Java nimble and performant, but its something I need to know. Yesterday. Knowing this, I turned to the Head first series as they get their points across quickly and cleanly. Head First really does teach the topics so that you'll remember them. Most into programming books give you an example and you work through it. In Head First, yes there is an example, but the examinations happen via stories, diagrams, pictures, games and really good (bad) humor. What this means is that no matter how you learn, you'll find something that helps the concepts stick. Each chapter builds upon the last and each chapter reinforces lessons from before. You can tell that people who really know how to teach designed these books. Now this book is basic. I personally didn't mind reading about Objects and Object-Oriented design yet again. I also didn't mind reading about polymorphism, encapsulation, et al. The main reason for this is the presentation. Well that and there are a few subtle differences between C++ and Java that they talk about that I need to know. But mostly its the fun way they present the topics. I mean even if you know these topics cold, I still found some of their examples and comparisons well thought out and memorable. So much so in fact that I can see using them to help explain concepts to people I'll mentor or to marketing folks. If, however, you have programmed in Java before and are comfortable in the world of OO, and are looking for something to take you to the next step, I'd suggest you keep moving onto other books (Effective Java by Bloch is amazing). However, if you are new to Java, and even new to programming, you'll love the Head First books. The writing is clear and engaging (and correct!), the examples make sense, and way they tailor lessons to trigger different parts of your learning brain is really well done.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    This book is much more than a book about programming Java. The beginning section really changed my perspective on learning. It goes into how people learn, how to make things stick in your mind and basically make something like learning computer programming actually fun. The gist is basically if your mind is bored its not going to remember much. Feelings, in this case humor or non-sequitors, are what create memories and of course analyzing from different points of view helps. There were many time This book is much more than a book about programming Java. The beginning section really changed my perspective on learning. It goes into how people learn, how to make things stick in your mind and basically make something like learning computer programming actually fun. The gist is basically if your mind is bored its not going to remember much. Feelings, in this case humor or non-sequitors, are what create memories and of course analyzing from different points of view helps. There were many times in this book that I felt the principles they were teaching about programming could apply to many things in life.

  3. 5 out of 5

    ARahman Rashed

    As expected from Head First series , another awesome book that serves as a great intro to the Java programming language. I could say honestly : this is one of the best technical books ever to read as an intro to Java . The general approach of "Make-it-visual" applied by the book makes it very interesting to read , with all these illustrating drawing , graphic scenarios that makes it easy to understand yet explaining heavy concepts ; and getting away from the traditional academic boring style , th As expected from Head First series , another awesome book that serves as a great intro to the Java programming language. I could say honestly : this is one of the best technical books ever to read as an intro to Java . The general approach of "Make-it-visual" applied by the book makes it very interesting to read , with all these illustrating drawing , graphic scenarios that makes it easy to understand yet explaining heavy concepts ; and getting away from the traditional academic boring style , the book feels like a joke : slight and funny , and never been that interested nor enthusiastic to read a technical book before. The book is great , although some points should be taken into consideration . The last couple of chapters (deployment & distribute computing)concepts were explained in a hurry ;in order to get most of the concepts covered in a small size , which I believe could get bigger and better if the first relatively long chapters were shortened ; to increase the content of more important chapters like the mentioned above. The I/O chapter was nice , yet not sufficient , and I think it would be perfectly understood with the guidance of Sun's I/O intro tutorials. The "collection" part was really good , although it focused mainly on the hierarchy of the collection interface & comparable/comparator concepts , but ignored some important concepts like stacks and vectors. also I think that the exercises at the end of the chapter had some syntax and logical mistakes. On the other hand , I really enjoyed every part in the Sockets part along with the Threads , with the general feeling of "Its weirdly easy to understand these concepts" . The networking part was awesome , which pointed to the powerfulness of Java's networking and remote classes. The GUI part was explained perfectly with all listener classes . The most important feature in this book was : develop your code using CMD tools ; which is way too important to get used to and understand before switching to your regular IDE , compiling, running and even deploying using cmd was a great approach . The bottom line is : this is the best intro book to Java for those beginning their way to the JavaLand , where concepts are crystally clear , the complaints above could be easily related to the author's will of keeping the size of the book relatively small ,concentrated , and preventing it from looking like a universal phone-book , and honestly I had a great time reading this book and surely I would miss this book :)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sowmya's book world

    Just Awesome :) Have ever read any Technical book like a comic novel ? Or U don't like to read big thick boring technical book ? Or Do u think Technical reading is boring ? then here is the book for you. A well written technical comic book. If you are just in start then i can tel you it is the best book to start with. all the concepts are very well explained. As u finish chapter by chapter u will read java like as if you are discussing it with some one. differences between two things are shown as if b Just Awesome :) Have ever read any Technical book like a comic novel ? Or U don't like to read big thick boring technical book ? Or Do u think Technical reading is boring ? then here is the book for you. A well written technical comic book. If you are just in start then i can tel you it is the best book to start with. all the concepts are very well explained. As u finish chapter by chapter u will read java like as if you are discussing it with some one. differences between two things are shown as if both the concepts are fighting with each other. I loved this book and it made my java concept still more stronger.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    I dropped this book at page 135. Some books are just unnecessary and this one is at the top of that list. Instead, I started reading Java: A Beginner's Guide by Herbert Schildt which is vastly superior and does not insult the reader's intelligence. I strongly recommend anyone interested in actually learning about the language instead of reading punny jokes do the same. More critical version of review: This book is a mess. It's like a teenager who is going through an identity crisis and is in the I dropped this book at page 135. Some books are just unnecessary and this one is at the top of that list. Instead, I started reading Java: A Beginner's Guide by Herbert Schildt which is vastly superior and does not insult the reader's intelligence. I strongly recommend anyone interested in actually learning about the language instead of reading punny jokes do the same. More critical version of review: This book is a mess. It's like a teenager who is going through an identity crisis and is in the process of putting together a mood board to try to figure it all out. What was going on? As someone who has used Java before and intended to use this book as a review, I couldn't tell you. When it comes to computer languages, I believe a methodical, logical approach is best. Since the Java language was written by people for specific purposes and is not an elephant that five blind scientists are trying to come to some consensus about, the sink or swim approach in this book makes no sense. That is the masochistic way to learn, and is completely unnecessary. It makes Java seem complicated and confusing, which it's totally not! The reason I recommend the Schildt book instead is simple: he tells you the story from beginning to end with all blinders off, not in a Cloud Atlas/Memento/Fight Club chaotic kind of way where you are constantly trying to figure out where you are, why you are there, how you got there, and why you care. Intro: Why does Java exist? Because it's the next logical step after C++ for secure, portable web development. *really good two paragraph explanation of the history/predecessors to Java* Bam! Got it! What are the most important features of object oriented programming? encapsulation, polymorphism, and inheritance *explanation of each of these* Bam! Got that, too! Tell me more! Anyway, please please please do yourself a favor and avoid this book at all costs. That is all.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    This book was recommended to me by my TA for a graduate level programming course. I knew the basics about programming, but certain areas were very confusing to me (like abstract classes, static vs. private, threads), so I bought this book in hopes that it would help me. Head First Java cleared up EVERYTHING for me and taught me so much about Java programming! It's not your typical programming book and that's what I love about it. There are a lot of pictures, interesting puzzles and questions to This book was recommended to me by my TA for a graduate level programming course. I knew the basics about programming, but certain areas were very confusing to me (like abstract classes, static vs. private, threads), so I bought this book in hopes that it would help me. Head First Java cleared up EVERYTHING for me and taught me so much about Java programming! It's not your typical programming book and that's what I love about it. There are a lot of pictures, interesting puzzles and questions to check your understanding, and weird/funny anecdotes. It doesn't take itself seriously, but it will seriously teach you something about Java in an entertaining and unconventional manner. I would absolutely recommend this book for beginners through intermediate level programmers.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    class ThisBookIsTerrible { public static void main (String[] args) { System.out.println("Please use your head and buy a book that is not one giant series of Microsoft Office Clippy™ comments."); System.out.print("This book is ridiculously overrated. "); System.out.print("Just use the API instead."); } }

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Hallada

    When I read this book the summer before my senior year of high school, I was curious about programming. But, I didn't really know where to start. Everything online confused me and I lacked fundamental knowledge. Head First Java was the most accessible technical book I've ever read. They use lots of images and stories to convey concepts that are notoriously hard to wrap your head around as a beginner programmer. And they work. Some of those images still come up in my head when I think about objec When I read this book the summer before my senior year of high school, I was curious about programming. But, I didn't really know where to start. Everything online confused me and I lacked fundamental knowledge. Head First Java was the most accessible technical book I've ever read. They use lots of images and stories to convey concepts that are notoriously hard to wrap your head around as a beginner programmer. And they work. Some of those images still come up in my head when I think about object oriented programming 4 years later. This book made my high school computer science classes and many of my freshman year computer science introductory courses redundant because a lot of time is spent in those trying to teach the same concepts that this book taught me in a few chapters. If you are just starting out, like I was, give this book a try. Really do all the exercises. Maybe it will give you the clarity and head start that it did for me.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Trey Decker

    This was somewhat an impulse buy: I didn't find it from researching the best Java books; I just found it on the shelf at my local bookstore and thought it looked interesting and fun. It's not. I found the method terrible and distracting. I'm always working my way through Accelerated C++ and compared to this book, Accelerated C++ is godsend. This is book is the opposite of concise, clear, and effective. It didn't show me good coding practice, and the code examples were often without much explanat This was somewhat an impulse buy: I didn't find it from researching the best Java books; I just found it on the shelf at my local bookstore and thought it looked interesting and fun. It's not. I found the method terrible and distracting. I'm always working my way through Accelerated C++ and compared to this book, Accelerated C++ is godsend. This is book is the opposite of concise, clear, and effective. It didn't show me good coding practice, and the code examples were often without much explanations. It does only one thing well, and that is clearing up a few concepts. Overall I found this to be a very distracting and slowly moving (despite that there is too much going on, and quick-paced reads, the content never gets anywhere). I would only recommend this to the most ADHD of consumers, and even then it'd be hard to pay attention. Don't buy it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    I think this is the best book for truly learning Java. By that I don't just mean an "I can write a Java program" kind of learning, I mean a deep understanding of how Java works kind of understanding. We just had a question pop up the other day on our team of 10+ year experienced folks - is Java pass by value or pass by reference. And what pops into my head, but the Head First pictures of remote controls and passing by value what is really a reference to an object. I can't count the number of tim I think this is the best book for truly learning Java. By that I don't just mean an "I can write a Java program" kind of learning, I mean a deep understanding of how Java works kind of understanding. We just had a question pop up the other day on our team of 10+ year experienced folks - is Java pass by value or pass by reference. And what pops into my head, but the Head First pictures of remote controls and passing by value what is really a reference to an object. I can't count the number of times that the way things were presented in this Head First book (or others) have stuck with me in ways that no other technical book has done.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Caleb Rogers

    *The* book on Java programming. I've tried it all: codeacademy, cs50x, a bunch of random Java books I found in the library. I settled on this. If you want to learn Java, read this book. It's not dumbed down, but it is readable, which very few other computer science books can claim. It's sometimes hilarious, always informative. There are no hanging questions. Something is stated in simple terms, and if you're more advanced, there'll be a little appendix that will have answers ready for you. There *The* book on Java programming. I've tried it all: codeacademy, cs50x, a bunch of random Java books I found in the library. I settled on this. If you want to learn Java, read this book. It's not dumbed down, but it is readable, which very few other computer science books can claim. It's sometimes hilarious, always informative. There are no hanging questions. Something is stated in simple terms, and if you're more advanced, there'll be a little appendix that will have answers ready for you. There's good example code and *fantastic* metaphors. No more of that "okay so an object is like a car" bullshit that everyone else tries. They throw metaphors at you until one sticks, then repeat ad-until-you-fucking-get-it. The book is long, but comprehensive. Coming out of it, you will not be as informed as someone who spent 4 years in a computer science program, but you will have every tool you need to get to that point on your own with further self-teaching. If you want to learn Java, read this book before any others. By the way, you'll have a much easier time with this if you do some basic research on your own. Dick around in codeacademy, read some wikipedia pages, that kind of thing. It's not necessary, but it'll make things easier.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    I am returning to this book determined to slog through all the tutorials and lessons. As a self taught programmer this task has already helped fill in some of the gaps in my skill set. Each of these self teaching books have a special method presentation and in this one the multi-method presentation of information by side notes, cute captioned snap shots of authors and their friends, and various mental challenge tasks and lessons works for me. I recommend individuals looking to program in Java su I am returning to this book determined to slog through all the tutorials and lessons. As a self taught programmer this task has already helped fill in some of the gaps in my skill set. Each of these self teaching books have a special method presentation and in this one the multi-method presentation of information by side notes, cute captioned snap shots of authors and their friends, and various mental challenge tasks and lessons works for me. I recommend individuals looking to program in Java survey this title to see if it would work for them too. Now to dig into the next lesson.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Danijela

    Five stars for the actual content, the unbelievable simplicity and comprehensibility of the material, fun exercises (with solutions!), all the times I've stirred in excitement about things that almost put me to sleep when talked of in other books, and one star for the revolting uncalled for sexist jokes. That's 3 stars, yeah? I don't know, my feeble feminine brain is unable of grasping mathematics. Why don't some of strong muscular brogrammers check it for me; I've got to go anyways, my cake is Five stars for the actual content, the unbelievable simplicity and comprehensibility of the material, fun exercises (with solutions!), all the times I've stirred in excitement about things that almost put me to sleep when talked of in other books, and one star for the revolting uncalled for sexist jokes. That's 3 stars, yeah? I don't know, my feeble feminine brain is unable of grasping mathematics. Why don't some of strong muscular brogrammers check it for me; I've got to go anyways, my cake is burning in the oven.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rahul Phulore

    My first programming book. :)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dmytro Turskyi

    "Head First Java" is a stunning example of a textbook in which the method of conveying complex information is presented in the simplest possible way. The best part is a beginning which includes amazing pieces of advice about the technics of studying IT literature. "Must read" for all Java programmers. The only flaw I can see here is that the subject is changing constantly and even this wonderful book is a bit outdated. If someone knows the updated version of this kind of book I would be grateful if "Head First Java" is a stunning example of a textbook in which the method of conveying complex information is presented in the simplest possible way. The best part is a beginning which includes amazing pieces of advice about the technics of studying IT literature. "Must read" for all Java programmers. The only flaw I can see here is that the subject is changing constantly and even this wonderful book is a bit outdated. If someone knows the updated version of this kind of book I would be grateful if you tell me its name.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gary Boland

    A really good introduction text to the Java language and one that I recommend especially to those coming to Java from a different language (in my case python/ruby). The style makes it memorable (which is the idea I'm sure) but it also somewhat distracts. Overall it is really worthwhile.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rohit Mishra

    This is the best programming book I have ever read. Head First's visual approach to learning make everything fun and exciting. The whole book revolved around projects - the biggest of them was making a synthesizer in Java. Puzzles, crosswords, cartoons are all over. Don't take all that for the book being light on content. It is just that they believe that it is much better to learn while having fun instead of cursing your book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Head First Series is your best friend. If you're not as much of a coding prodigy as you'd like, this book will make you feel just smart enough to keep turning the pages. Plus, it will make you laugh! Sure the humor can be a bit...nerdy...but it's always worth a smirk and an eye roll at it worst; that's still an emotional response that isn't "FUCK MY LIFE, THIS CODE CAN GO TO HELL!" which is nice.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    I am a n00b programmer but this book was very detailed and went over all the details to learning the java language and object oriented programming in general. Learned about concepts such as multithreading, generics, and networks which is more than I ever thought I would! Very fun read. The authors keep java entertaining and I laughed many times while reading this text. Highly recommend!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Andre Laurin

    When I was trying to learn how to develop for Android I quickly came to the decision that I needed to learn Java if I wanted to be any good at coding for Android. I really did like the way this book was formatted, made it a bit easier to learn.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Effy Feng

    I don't like it, the book style too entertained, the format is irregular tht it is hard to seize useful information. I simply need a book to disaplay the content of each function, maybe I'll just read things on oracle.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gene De Lisa

    Of of the few development books in which the author's focus is for the reader to learn. Most of the time technical book authors simply want to show off. Not here.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Elliot

    This book is the only way to go! Any other book just tells you what to do, this book teaches it to you in an entertaining way.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Abhisek

    If I were to go back in time and recommend myself a book to study Java when I knew nothing about it or OOP in general, this would be it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    Really good book for people just starting to learn Java.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Meeran Manuchehri

    ==== I had already done a review on this... and it isnt here anymore.... so im quickly doing another one!!!=== 1. Why did you decide to read this book? I wanted to learn how to code 2. Describe a setting or a character in the book that you found interesting. Make sure that you explain why you found it (or that person) interesting.(Provide at least 2 quotations to support your answer). There arent any real characters but there are these made up scenarios that help you understand code,. 3. Provide 2 D ==== I had already done a review on this... and it isnt here anymore.... so im quickly doing another one!!!=== 1. Why did you decide to read this book? I wanted to learn how to code 2. Describe a setting or a character in the book that you found interesting. Make sure that you explain why you found it (or that person) interesting.(Provide at least 2 quotations to support your answer). There arent any real characters but there are these made up scenarios that help you understand code,. 3. Provide 2 DIFFERENT memorable quotations from the book and explain why it is worth remembering (or why they stuck in your head). REMEMBER – ALL QUOTATIONS BEGIN AND END IN “...” QUOTATION MARKS. "By forcing everyone to call a setter method, we can protect the cat from unacceptable size changes" I didnt exactly remember all of this but i remembered most of it and only because of how stupid and funny the example was for using "Encapsulation" in java. "The 3 steps of object declaration, creation and assignment." this stuck in my head because i use it when i forget what i need to do when im coding and attempt to make an object. 4. If you could ask the author anything, what would that be and why? (You must think of something! This question cannot be left unanswered.) I would ask why he didnt start of teaching me how to code in a REAL IDE (Integrated development environment) because it would have helped me so much more if i learned from ide and not some trashy notepad. 5. The author has given you permission to make their text even better by changing one of the key moments in the text. What is that moment, how would you change it and why? To work on the visuals a bit the visual are a bit dull and i dont enjoy how it looked too much black and white

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nayema

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The only reason I gave this a 4 star is because I desperately want this book to be updated! This book is based on Java 5 and now we’re on Java 9. As a noob in programming, learning Java as her first language, I resort to this book as my go to/ lookup resource book for Java programming principles. This book also does a great job in keeping the reader engaged with its dorky animations and cheesy jokes. As a result of this being outdated, I had to take a few extra courses on Lynda to learn more rec The only reason I gave this a 4 star is because I desperately want this book to be updated! This book is based on Java 5 and now we’re on Java 9. As a noob in programming, learning Java as her first language, I resort to this book as my go to/ lookup resource book for Java programming principles. This book also does a great job in keeping the reader engaged with its dorky animations and cheesy jokes. As a result of this being outdated, I had to take a few extra courses on Lynda to learn more recents ways of programming with Java Swing and Networking. For example, HFJ teaches you to implement an inner class for Action Listeners, however the quicker way to do this now is to implement the ActionListener as part of the GUI’s constructor. However I did run into examples during Networking and Threading chapter where I prefer HFJ example over stack-overflow examples of implementing reading and writing streams from a socket. I highly recommend this book for all level programmers to have it as a resource book. When I started reading this book, I finally understood what a dot operator is better than my husband’s explanation.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ramu Vairavan

    This is the first Head First book I have read, and I must say it was interesting. I like the approach of this series, as opposed to say the For Dummies series. Nobody likes being called a dummy in the first place but the real problem is they are all too dense. Before picking this up I tried reading Thinking in Java, a classic Java reference. It was hard to get through – the pages were packed with words, many of them technical. A chapter in, I put that down and picked this up – a great decision i This is the first Head First book I have read, and I must say it was interesting. I like the approach of this series, as opposed to say the For Dummies series. Nobody likes being called a dummy in the first place but the real problem is they are all too dense. Before picking this up I tried reading Thinking in Java, a classic Java reference. It was hard to get through – the pages were packed with words, many of them technical. A chapter in, I put that down and picked this up – a great decision in retrospect. This book makes learning easy and effortless. It is technical, yet light. Sounds impossible but it's true. And I found it hilarious too. It exploits the innocence of pictures like none other.. making pictures of dogs, men and women say all sorts of funny things. Another feature I liked was dialogues between inanimate objects. Though the book is less dense than other books on Java I feel it doesn’t compromise on the content quality. It may not be comprehensive about Java/OOP but whatever it teaches, it teaches well! If you are a visual learner, this book will suit your learning just right!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brian Leet

    I regret spending money on this title. I was duped into buying "Head First Java" after reading countless of positive feedback/reviews made by other readers. It certainly does not live up to its hype or flawlessness. The text and images are all over the place, and often very distracting. There is no semblance of order or formality that you find in most books. My eyes are constantly pouncing left and right, up and down; to mentally arrange and gauge the importance of each information in order. I f I regret spending money on this title. I was duped into buying "Head First Java" after reading countless of positive feedback/reviews made by other readers. It certainly does not live up to its hype or flawlessness. The text and images are all over the place, and often very distracting. There is no semblance of order or formality that you find in most books. My eyes are constantly pouncing left and right, up and down; to mentally arrange and gauge the importance of each information in order. I felt mentally exhausted after reading half of a chapter and achieved little to no, newfound understanding of Java. The worst of all: The written exercises given in the book are not useful! I gave up on this book after 2 months of reading, re-reading and dreading. There are other Java books out there that are far more "hands-on" and practical than this. Don't expect to get good on Netbeans, Eclipse and IntelliJ as this title teaches you none!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rushain Sovis

    I selected this book for studying the basic concepts of Java while getting my hands dirty with coding in Java. Unlike a lot of Programming books, this one explains things with graphics and comical way which is very easy to grasp the facts. Learning Java syntax is easy if anyone already know any programming language. But the under the hood part of Java is not easy to understand at once. So If anyone want to understand the scenes, behind the scene and If anyone has an intention to understand the O I selected this book for studying the basic concepts of Java while getting my hands dirty with coding in Java. Unlike a lot of Programming books, this one explains things with graphics and comical way which is very easy to grasp the facts. Learning Java syntax is easy if anyone already know any programming language. But the under the hood part of Java is not easy to understand at once. So If anyone want to understand the scenes, behind the scene and If anyone has an intention to understand the OOP concepts, then I personally recommend this book. Because after I refer this book it was very easy for me to understand the OOP concepts. So I believe anyone can understand the advanced Java concepts effortlessly with the help of this book.

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