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The Human Torch (Jim Hammond)

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The Torch is dead--buried with full military honors. But what does death mean for an artificial man? The Mad Thinker is determined to find out, with the reluctant help of the Torch's best and oldest friend--Tom (Toro) Raymond. COLLECTING: The Torch #1-8 The Torch is dead--buried with full military honors. But what does death mean for an artificial man? The Mad Thinker is determined to find out, with the reluctant help of the Torch's best and oldest friend--Tom (Toro) Raymond. COLLECTING: The Torch #1-8


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The Torch is dead--buried with full military honors. But what does death mean for an artificial man? The Mad Thinker is determined to find out, with the reluctant help of the Torch's best and oldest friend--Tom (Toro) Raymond. COLLECTING: The Torch #1-8 The Torch is dead--buried with full military honors. But what does death mean for an artificial man? The Mad Thinker is determined to find out, with the reluctant help of the Torch's best and oldest friend--Tom (Toro) Raymond. COLLECTING: The Torch #1-8

30 review for The Human Torch (Jim Hammond)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Two and a half stars. There’s nothing scientific (or rational) about the way I pick graphic novels out at the local library. Usually I’m picking my son up, the library is closing in five minutes, the librarians are all standing around giving me the stink eye and I’m rushing through the library’s selection in a kind of haphazard way – maybe I’ll read Superman, I haven’t read Spider-man in awhile, why the hell doesn’t this library have more Deadpool, I’ve never read this author/genre/hero before… W Two and a half stars. There’s nothing scientific (or rational) about the way I pick graphic novels out at the local library. Usually I’m picking my son up, the library is closing in five minutes, the librarians are all standing around giving me the stink eye and I’m rushing through the library’s selection in a kind of haphazard way – maybe I’ll read Superman, I haven’t read Spider-man in awhile, why the hell doesn’t this library have more Deadpool, I’ve never read this author/genre/hero before… Which is how I ended up choosing this volume. The Torch, Alex Ross, hmm, this might be interesting. The Torch was a Golden Age character who could ignite himself at will. He can also fly, melt stuff and throw flaming balls of fire at Nazis. A main player in the story is his once teen sidekick, Toro. Teen sidekicks were big back in the forties. Everyone had one, except Namor. Misanthropes generally worked alone. It seems that The Torch and Toro, no longer a teen, have both been brought back from the dead for the umpteenth time. The Torch is an android, who learns how to be human by interacting with people. Like Data on Star Trek, but less amusing. Toro is a mutant, who first discovered his latent flame abilities seeing The Torch, afire, come out of a circus tent. Naturally. The villain here is The Mad Thinker, another moniker that was the product of Stan Lee’s overworked imagination. If I’m an evil genius, I sure as hell wouldn’t even think of calling myself The Mad Thinker. “Mad” could mean you’re angry or insane, neither of which conjures respect from the super hero community. Anyway, the story revolves around The Mad Thinker’s scheme to not only bilk A.I.M out of a ton of cash but also to take over the world (Okay, mad = insane). Throw in cameos from Vision (he and The Torch are kind of like cousins), the Fantastic Four, a bunch of android Nazis, Namor, A.I.M lackeys with the beekeeper getups, mind control on planetary level and you have a hot (heh) mess. Alex Ross’s contribution are cool cover art (Nobody draws a guy enflamed quite as cool as Ross) and the basic storyline, which is how this mediocre tale was probably green lit by Marvel.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Connolly

    It was ok. I wish Alex Ross had done the art too but the story was descent. It also had some parallels with busiek’s Marvels that I liked. Not a bad read but it’s low on a long list of books I’d like the read again.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah-Jayne Briggs

    (This review may contain spoilers). Up until being subscribed to this graphic novel collection, I'd actually had no idea there was an original Human Torch. But after meeting the Vision and becoming aware he was created from the original Human Torch, I was eager to have the opportunity to meet him. Although it would have been good to see the Human Torch's origins, I did think that the comics chosen for this book were a good set. I liked being able to meet Toro and seeing how badly affected he was b (This review may contain spoilers). Up until being subscribed to this graphic novel collection, I'd actually had no idea there was an original Human Torch. But after meeting the Vision and becoming aware he was created from the original Human Torch, I was eager to have the opportunity to meet him. Although it would have been good to see the Human Torch's origins, I did think that the comics chosen for this book were a good set. I liked being able to meet Toro and seeing how badly affected he was by the fact that he'd been brought back to life and was having to deal with the loss of his fire abilities. I couldn't help feeling some sympathy for Jim as I was reading this comic. Even though he was able to shake off the brainwashing, he seemed to come across as a lot more robotic. It was cool to see Vision there and giving both of them advice... though I would have liked to see a bit more of him, considering his connections to the Human Torch. It was nice to see a bit more of the Marvel characters and I especially liked seeing the three 'Torches' working together. The people with the glowing red eyes was a really creepy aspect of the comics. I did like seeing a bit of Namor, but I wasn't sure exactly what he was doing there at that point. The artwork in the comics was really good and I enjoyed seeing the characters in the different settings. The last couple of comics did confuse me a little, though. I wasn't sure what was going on with the New Berlin... or if all of the characters there were androids. There was a really good flashback scene where Jim faces off against Hitler, though. I would have liked the opportunity to see more of Jim and Toro interacting with each other, at least. I was a bit sad by Jim's apparent inability to feel emotions... and I could understand Toro questioning him about why he was going to help. I would have liked to get some answers along with Toro. There were a few emotional elements in this set, but on the whole, I was satisfied with the ending. And I'd be interested in seeing Jim in one of his original incarnations.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jean-Pierre Vidrine

    This story is the sort that revisits characters' origins and explains certain holes in their backgrounds that the original writers didn't concern themselves with in that earlier whimsical time, an idea already done with the Torch. Here, the creators go into far more depth, really exploring the science and pseudo-science and making some logical connections that fans might not have needed, but are still grateful to know. The book doesn't rest on mere retroactive continuity exploring. The story invo This story is the sort that revisits characters' origins and explains certain holes in their backgrounds that the original writers didn't concern themselves with in that earlier whimsical time, an idea already done with the Torch. Here, the creators go into far more depth, really exploring the science and pseudo-science and making some logical connections that fans might not have needed, but are still grateful to know. The book doesn't rest on mere retroactive continuity exploring. The story involving the Mad Thinker and his various machinations is thoroughly engaging. I had never read much of this particular villain before. This book has given me a great appreciation for him as a villain that I won't dare call a "mad" scientist. I always root for the hero, but I couldn't help admire the bad guy here. Even when his plans seem to be over, there's still more going on in his head. That's definitely a testament to the strong collaborative plotting by Ross, Carey, and Jim Krueger and Mike Carey's superb scripting. Guest appearances by other Marvel characters are not only fun, but logical (that second point might not apply to the Golden Age Vision, but I still liked seeing him). Let's talk about art! Alex Ross' painted covers are, of course, beautiful and energetic. The interior art by Patric Berkenkotter and Carlos Lopez is striking and perfect for this story. The line work is clean and conveys the action every bit as well as it should, felling a bit like older comics. The use of colors and shadows, however, is entirely modern. This gives us comic art that is firmly rooted in an earlier time, but is definitely looking toward the next era. Since my youngest days collecting comic books, I've been enamored with Golden Age characters. Hence, I've read a number of comics utilizing them, either set in that original time or reviving them in the current age. This books stands right up with the best of them, and towers over so many others.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    Marvel's Mightiest Heroes Book 2. Tom Raymond, the WWII-era hero known as Toro, struggles to cope with being brought back to life in the 21st Century and decides to seek revenge on the villain who originally killed him, the Mad Thinker. However, the Mad Thinker captures Tom and uses him to resurrect Tom's closest ally Jim Hammond, the original Human Torch, as a weapon under the control of A.I.M. The story of the original Human Torch is long and complicated and I'll spare you the details, however Marvel's Mightiest Heroes Book 2. Tom Raymond, the WWII-era hero known as Toro, struggles to cope with being brought back to life in the 21st Century and decides to seek revenge on the villain who originally killed him, the Mad Thinker. However, the Mad Thinker captures Tom and uses him to resurrect Tom's closest ally Jim Hammond, the original Human Torch, as a weapon under the control of A.I.M. The story of the original Human Torch is long and complicated and I'll spare you the details, however (as a childhood fan of 'Avengers West Coast') I always found the idea of his resurrection into the modern Marvel Universe to be an interesting one, exploring not only the same 'man-out-of-time' themes as Captain America, but also the nature of his humanity as an android. These are all themes that get explored here and I found it very enjoyable to revisit them, particularly when Jim is faced with the dark mirror of the so-called Inhuman Torch. I also found the Mad Thinker to be an excellent antagonist, being the quintessential amoral scientist concerned only with his experiment, even to the detriment of those who have employed him in their evil schemes. He is genuinely incapable of seeing how his actions in furthering science are in any way abhorrent and that makes him a particularly chilling villain. I honestly wasn't expecting too much of this story but with some compelling character beats for the protagonists, a brilliant villain and burning Nazi robots, there's a great deal to enjoy here. * More reviews here: https://fsfh-book-review2.webnode.com *

  6. 5 out of 5

    Comics Instrucciones de uso

    La antorcha humana en su versión de Jim Hammond es un personaje raro, bizarro (incluso para los parámetros de los comics de superhéroes), lo cual en cierto modo explica el que no haya alcanzado la fama de algunos de sus contemporáneos como Namor o el Capitán América. Básicamente, Jim Hammond es un androide con la capacidad de envolverse en llamas. Lo que Carey intenta acá es actualizar el personaje, situándolo décadas más tarde de su primera aparición, y a la vez exhibiendo su extrañeza y nostal La antorcha humana en su versión de Jim Hammond es un personaje raro, bizarro (incluso para los parámetros de los comics de superhéroes), lo cual en cierto modo explica el que no haya alcanzado la fama de algunos de sus contemporáneos como Namor o el Capitán América. Básicamente, Jim Hammond es un androide con la capacidad de envolverse en llamas. Lo que Carey intenta acá es actualizar el personaje, situándolo décadas más tarde de su primera aparición, y a la vez exhibiendo su extrañeza y nostalgia por hallarse en un mundo que no conoce, un poco como le ocurrió al Capitán. El problema es que el Capitán es humano, y su nostalgia se comprende, pero en la Antorcha el asunto es más complicado. Carey atiza más aún al personaje condenándolo a una muerte inevitable, mientras que el rasgo humano lo pone su compañero Toro (otro superhéroe bizarro, y una pareja bizarra: ambos tiene los mismos poderes). El comic es ágil, consciente de su origen (los villanos provienen de la Segunda Guerra Mundial), y el dibujo está bien. El problema es que se enreda en conflictos tras conflicto y si uno piensa demasiado nota en seguida los agujeros del guión. De todos modos es una historia muy disfrutable, sobre todo para los fanáticos acérrimos de Marvel. Un comic por sobre la media, pero que se queda corto con respecto a otras historias. Las portadas de Alex Ross son de otro planeta, como es usual.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Benja Calderon

    Tomo dedicado a uno de los primeros personajes del mundo (extendido si, ya que en esa época Marvel ni siquiera existía) Marvel, el androide Jim Hammond, conocido mejor como la Antorcha Humana Recoge la miniserie The Torch, donde Toro, Tom Raymond, el escudero de la Antorcha Humana ha sido resucitado por el Pensador Loco, volviendo a un mundo al que no pertenece, mientras el mismo villano, bajo las ordenes de I.A.M. de crear una nueva arma, resucita a la Antorcha Original, lo que lleva a una serie Tomo dedicado a uno de los primeros personajes del mundo (extendido si, ya que en esa época Marvel ni siquiera existía) Marvel, el androide Jim Hammond, conocido mejor como la Antorcha Humana Recoge la miniserie The Torch, donde Toro, Tom Raymond, el escudero de la Antorcha Humana ha sido resucitado por el Pensador Loco, volviendo a un mundo al que no pertenece, mientras el mismo villano, bajo las ordenes de I.A.M. de crear una nueva arma, resucita a la Antorcha Original, lo que lleva a una serie de eventos que podrían significar el fin de la vida en la Tierra Sin ser un gran conocedor del personaje, encuentro que la miniserie es muy interesante y cumple una función super importante, presentarnos en alma y cuerpo a La Antorcha Humana. Me gusto bastante

  8. 4 out of 5

    Judah Radd

    A little bumpy, but overall, not half bad! This leans heavily on the past. For a Marvel historian like myself who has read Marvel Mystery Comics, All-Winners comics as well as oldschool Invaders, this was a true pleasure. It was fun to see these characters again, especially deep cuts like the original Vision. The story ebbed and flowed. The first half had tough plot. Namor didn’t have much of a purpose except to be like “hey look, Namor is here.” No worries. The second half, with all the Nazi shit A little bumpy, but overall, not half bad! This leans heavily on the past. For a Marvel historian like myself who has read Marvel Mystery Comics, All-Winners comics as well as oldschool Invaders, this was a true pleasure. It was fun to see these characters again, especially deep cuts like the original Vision. The story ebbed and flowed. The first half had tough plot. Namor didn’t have much of a purpose except to be like “hey look, Namor is here.” No worries. The second half, with all the Nazi shit, was really cool. Art, dialogue, character... all good. Plot? Inconsistent. Overall, I liked this. I liked the nostalgia especially. I’d definitely read it again some day. 4 stars.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jose Espinosa

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Me gusto. Al inicio no entendía a Visión, luego buscando vi que es otro personaje de la Edad de Oro. Me parece la historia fluye bien, se entiende el paso por el que atraviesa la Antorcha para ser más humano y como Toro intenta descifrar su pasado, ambos tiene buena dinámica. El villano también fue interesante, no es malo en si, solo da prioridad a la exploración científica sobre todo. En resumen, buenos personajes con buena instaría. Seguro buscaré más para continuar con su historia.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    The book opens with the Torch dead and his Sidekick Tor newly resurrected by the Cosmic Cube and unsure what to do with his life when the Mad Thinker kidnaps Toro and steals the body of the Torch in order to fulfill his latest mad scheme. The book is really a lot of fun. It examines Toro and the Torch's past and provides new insights and fills in some holes in their origin story and golden age adventures while also sending both on a character journey. The Mad Thinker has never been written better The book opens with the Torch dead and his Sidekick Tor newly resurrected by the Cosmic Cube and unsure what to do with his life when the Mad Thinker kidnaps Toro and steals the body of the Torch in order to fulfill his latest mad scheme. The book is really a lot of fun. It examines Toro and the Torch's past and provides new insights and fills in some holes in their origin story and golden age adventures while also sending both on a character journey. The Mad Thinker has never been written better, as this cold, calculating villain ready to double cross whoever is required to get what he wants. The art is very good. Alex Ross provides the covers. The Interiors are by Patrick Berkenkoffer who does a brilliant capturing all these characters. The only real flaw in the art is Reed Richards' absurdly muscular arms. The more you know of the Golden Age Human Toruch, the more you'll like this book. However, the book isn't too burdened down that someone looking to discover an interesting book about an obscrue character couldn't enjoy it. Overall, a very nice read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Randall Smith

    Really a 3.5 but I'm rounding up to a 4 because I feel generous and it doesn't seem right to round it down to a 3. Ross's art was amazing as usual. Story was decent. Really a 3.5 but I'm rounding up to a 4 because I feel generous and it doesn't seem right to round it down to a 3. Ross's art was amazing as usual. Story was decent.

  12. 5 out of 5

    John

    The Ross Kreuger effect doesn't always catch fire. And even Mike Carey can't save it. The Ross Kreuger effect doesn't always catch fire. And even Mike Carey can't save it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    The Human Torch was a comic book hero from the 1940s – an android who could burst into flame. When Johnny Storm of the Fantastic Four got his flame powers, he named himself after the old World War II hero. This story (reprinted as a graphic novel) is a revival of the old hero in modern times. All comic book heroes in 1940 hade sidekicks, and The Human Torch had a sidekick named Toro (Thomas Raymond), a teen who could also burst into flame. Thomas Raymond was ressurected in our time and so was The Human Torch was a comic book hero from the 1940s – an android who could burst into flame. When Johnny Storm of the Fantastic Four got his flame powers, he named himself after the old World War II hero. This story (reprinted as a graphic novel) is a revival of the old hero in modern times. All comic book heroes in 1940 hade sidekicks, and The Human Torch had a sidekick named Toro (Thomas Raymond), a teen who could also burst into flame. Thomas Raymond was ressurected in our time and so was alive in our time when Evil Nazis, in league with the Mad Thinker, resurrected the Human Torch as a vehicle by which they could overcome nations. Feeling the need to help his old friend, Toro was horrified to discover that the Human Torch was now an unfeeling automaton carrying out the wishes of those who controlled him. But Toro stuck around to try to ameliorate the situation, and, as it happened, it was part of the Human Torch's programming to learn emotions and moral judgement from the human he is closest to – and his connection with Thomas Raymond gave him the strength and judgement to defy his new programming and turn on his Evil Nazi owners. Then they go to a hidden city in South America, a population of constructed humans who will combust on exposure to the sun... It all felt like a 1940s story, and didn't leave me wanting more Human Torch stories. But I liked the theme: of an android absorbing his humanity from those who cared about him. There are some good moments, too. For instance, a scene in which Johnny Storm and the Fantastic Four, Toro, and the Human Torch all team up to fight Namor. Ben Grimm says, “Hey, this is great. We kinda had a shortage of people who could catch fire. Now I think we're all good.”

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dony Grayman

    Los Héroes más poderosos de Marvel, tomo 15. Traduce ni más ni menos que The Torch.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sorcha

    The Torch is dead - buried with full military honors. But what does death mean for an artificial man? The Mad Thinker is determined to find out, with the reluctant help of the Torch's best and oldest friend - Tom 'Toro' Raymond. Picked up in my local comic book store as a retelling of one of the original superheroes. Jimmy Storm from the Fantastic Four (the Human Torch that people are more familiar with) named himself after this character who is an android with the ability to set himself on fire. The Torch is dead - buried with full military honors. But what does death mean for an artificial man? The Mad Thinker is determined to find out, with the reluctant help of the Torch's best and oldest friend - Tom 'Toro' Raymond. Picked up in my local comic book store as a retelling of one of the original superheroes. Jimmy Storm from the Fantastic Four (the Human Torch that people are more familiar with) named himself after this character who is an android with the ability to set himself on fire. He's been resurrected by The Mad Thinker, who is trying to dominate the world - naturally - and his best friend Tom has been resurrected along side him. Both have to confront the modern world, whilst confronting The Torch's demise (The Mad Thinker is destroying his cell structure) and deal with the grand children of the original Nazis who have set up a New Berlin in South America stocked with androids. It's not the most deep or complex of stories - the Mad Thinker and his associates seem to be able to double cross each other with regularity and ease, and the Torch's struggles with human thinking and emotion makes him like Data/Spock but much less engaging. The graphics are good, Toro looks remarkably like Clark Kent, and situations have to be resolved by using brains as well as brawn. The contacts with the Resistance seem to accept remaining in New Berlin rather easily but.....mid level story for a lazy afternoon read

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Mike Carey is a fine writer of comics, and I'm told (as MR Carey) prose, but few would claim his superhero work was his best. Alex Ross, the noted if limited artist, gets to go first on the credits, despite only supplying covers and (with his usual helpmeet Jim Krueger, unmentioned on cover or spine) plot. Patrick Berkenkotter, whose name is new to me, provides the unremarkable and occasionally outright wonky sequential art. The story, as you'd expect from Ross' involvement, consists of the orig Mike Carey is a fine writer of comics, and I'm told (as MR Carey) prose, but few would claim his superhero work was his best. Alex Ross, the noted if limited artist, gets to go first on the credits, despite only supplying covers and (with his usual helpmeet Jim Krueger, unmentioned on cover or spine) plot. Patrick Berkenkotter, whose name is new to me, provides the unremarkable and occasionally outright wonky sequential art. The story, as you'd expect from Ross' involvement, consists of the original WWII Human Torch being resurrected. And his no-longer-kid sidekick, Toro. Who then team up with Johnny Storm at one point because, like the multi-telepath Brian Wood line-up of the X-Men, or the time the Avengers had three people who shrunk, surely a team consists of people who all do the same thing, right? Some of what ensues is quite fun (especially a new twist on that old mainstay, the escaped Nazi scientist in South America) but too much of it is either drab (the old mind-controlled-hero plot), out-of-place (the synthetic zombie plague), or just a reminder why the Thinker is so often called the Mad Thinker. Really, the main point of interest was that the library copy I read had been very precisely scorched on the early pages, as if Jim Hammond himself had read it and lost patience.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Johnny Andrews

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Really enjoyed reading something new-ish from the original Human Torch. Before Fantastic Four's young hot head, Johnny Storm, there was the android also known as Jim Hammond. The art work on this is sublime, each detail a piece of art that helps visualize the compelling story. Jim's friend and young ward, Toro has been brought back to life in a new age, however he feels lost and abandoned even when the Vision turns up and offers some words of advice. Then the mad genius of the Thinker is hired by A Really enjoyed reading something new-ish from the original Human Torch. Before Fantastic Four's young hot head, Johnny Storm, there was the android also known as Jim Hammond. The art work on this is sublime, each detail a piece of art that helps visualize the compelling story. Jim's friend and young ward, Toro has been brought back to life in a new age, however he feels lost and abandoned even when the Vision turns up and offers some words of advice. Then the mad genius of the Thinker is hired by A.I.M to devise such a weapon of one time catastrophe to wipe out some small village, the Thinker resurrects Jim Hammond to control and turn into said weapon as a front, what he really wants to do is unleash compound D and turn the world into mindless puppets bent to his will. However Jim breaks free of the trance and him, Toro and help from some friends manage to put an end to it and chase the whole thing back to an underground Berlin, New Berlin, where they believe Hitler's Germany won the war. All along, Jim isn't quite feeling how he once was and throughout all this is the underlying story of Jim's mimicry, adaptability to absorb the traits of what makes us Human.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Devero

    Miniserie, seguito di Avengers/Invaders, tutta incentrata sulla Torcia Umana Originale e sul suo redivivo protetto, Toro. Contro di loro, nazisti in un rifugio segreto in sudamerica che non sono quello che sembrano, ed un magnifico Pensatore (Pazzo). Qui, l'antico avversario di Reed Richards dei FF torna ad assurgere alle vette che il suo nickname implica, cosa che non accadeva da decenni. Decisamente una bella storia. Miniserie, seguito di Avengers/Invaders, tutta incentrata sulla Torcia Umana Originale e sul suo redivivo protetto, Toro. Contro di loro, nazisti in un rifugio segreto in sudamerica che non sono quello che sembrano, ed un magnifico Pensatore (Pazzo). Qui, l'antico avversario di Reed Richards dei FF torna ad assurgere alle vette che il suo nickname implica, cosa che non accadeva da decenni. Decisamente una bella storia.

  19. 4 out of 5

    J.

    Revisiting some very classic characters is a good idea, but this book just never made me care enough about the characters to really hold my attention. I was sort of waiting on it to be over most of the time.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Reuben Thomas

    A good introduction to The Human Torch if you've not come across him before. Not the best Marvel romp I've had but it was a pretty decent way to pass a few hours. A good introduction to The Human Torch if you've not come across him before. Not the best Marvel romp I've had but it was a pretty decent way to pass a few hours.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    The Torch is back, as is the Thinker and Namor briefly. The story felt a bit rushed, but it was a good read with some great artwork.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Christophe

  23. 5 out of 5

    Red Equis

  24. 4 out of 5

    Christie

  25. 5 out of 5

    Guido

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Manley

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nissa

  28. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

  29. 4 out of 5

    Troy-David Phillips

  30. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

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