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From a Buick 8

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The state police of Troop D in rural Pennsylvania have kept a secret in Shed B out back of the barracks ever since 1979, when Troopers Ennis Rafferty and Curtis Wilcox answered a call from a gas station just down the road and came back with an abandoned Buick Roadmaster. Curt Wilcox knew old cars, and he knew immediately that this one was...wrong, just wrong. A few hours l The state police of Troop D in rural Pennsylvania have kept a secret in Shed B out back of the barracks ever since 1979, when Troopers Ennis Rafferty and Curtis Wilcox answered a call from a gas station just down the road and came back with an abandoned Buick Roadmaster. Curt Wilcox knew old cars, and he knew immediately that this one was...wrong, just wrong. A few hours later, when Rafferty vanished, Wilcox and his fellow troopers knew the car was worse than dangerous -- and that it would be better if John Q. Public never found out about it. Curt's avid curiosity taking the lead, they investigated as best they could, as much as they dared. Over the years the troop absorbed the mystery as part of the background to their work, the Buick 8 sitting out there like a still life painting that breathes -- inhaling a little bit of this world, exhaling a little bit of whatever world it came from. In the fall of 2001, a few months after Curt Wilcox is killed in a gruesome auto accident, his 18-year-old boy Ned starts coming by the barracks, mowing the lawn, washing windows, shoveling snow. Sandy Dearborn, Sergeant Commanding, knows it's the boy's way of holding onto his father, and Ned is allowed to become part of the Troop D family. One day he looks in the window of Shed B and discovers the family secret. Like his father, Ned wants answers, and the secret begins to stir, not only in the minds and hearts of the veteran troopers who surround him, but in Shed B as well.... From a Buick 8 is a novel about our fascination with deadly things, about our insistence on answers when there are none, about terror and courage in the face of the unknowable.


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The state police of Troop D in rural Pennsylvania have kept a secret in Shed B out back of the barracks ever since 1979, when Troopers Ennis Rafferty and Curtis Wilcox answered a call from a gas station just down the road and came back with an abandoned Buick Roadmaster. Curt Wilcox knew old cars, and he knew immediately that this one was...wrong, just wrong. A few hours l The state police of Troop D in rural Pennsylvania have kept a secret in Shed B out back of the barracks ever since 1979, when Troopers Ennis Rafferty and Curtis Wilcox answered a call from a gas station just down the road and came back with an abandoned Buick Roadmaster. Curt Wilcox knew old cars, and he knew immediately that this one was...wrong, just wrong. A few hours later, when Rafferty vanished, Wilcox and his fellow troopers knew the car was worse than dangerous -- and that it would be better if John Q. Public never found out about it. Curt's avid curiosity taking the lead, they investigated as best they could, as much as they dared. Over the years the troop absorbed the mystery as part of the background to their work, the Buick 8 sitting out there like a still life painting that breathes -- inhaling a little bit of this world, exhaling a little bit of whatever world it came from. In the fall of 2001, a few months after Curt Wilcox is killed in a gruesome auto accident, his 18-year-old boy Ned starts coming by the barracks, mowing the lawn, washing windows, shoveling snow. Sandy Dearborn, Sergeant Commanding, knows it's the boy's way of holding onto his father, and Ned is allowed to become part of the Troop D family. One day he looks in the window of Shed B and discovers the family secret. Like his father, Ned wants answers, and the secret begins to stir, not only in the minds and hearts of the veteran troopers who surround him, but in Shed B as well.... From a Buick 8 is a novel about our fascination with deadly things, about our insistence on answers when there are none, about terror and courage in the face of the unknowable.

30 review for From a Buick 8

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kemper

    You ever make a meal comprised only of a bunch of leftovers that don’t really match? That’s how you end up eating half a Salisbury steak with the sweet-n-sour chicken from last night’s take-out. Stephen King loves doing that only it’s with books instead of food. Here we have a hunk of Christine served up with stray bits from The Tommyknockers, and it’s all done using one of his preferred methods of having a character tell a long rambling story. Uncle Stevie then seasons it up with a lot of wistfu You ever make a meal comprised only of a bunch of leftovers that don’t really match? That’s how you end up eating half a Salisbury steak with the sweet-n-sour chicken from last night’s take-out. Stephen King loves doing that only it’s with books instead of food. Here we have a hunk of Christine served up with stray bits from The Tommyknockers, and it’s all done using one of his preferred methods of having a character tell a long rambling story. Uncle Stevie then seasons it up with a lot of wistful thoughts on days gone by. Call it King Casserole Surprise. The story here is told to the teenage son of a Pennsylvania State Police Trooper who was killed in the line of duty, and it’s about a strange car that his father impounded twenty years before. The car was abandoned at a gas station and at first glance was a 1954 Buick 8 Roadmaster in pristine condition, but closer examination shows a lot of odd things that indicate the car isn’t a car at all. After one of their troopers disappears they all believe that the Buick is somehow responsible, and they decide to keep the car stashed in a shed at their headquarters. Supposedly it’s to protect the public, but there’s also a healthy amount of curiosity that turns into near obsession on the part of some of the troopers including the dead boy’s father who spends the next two decades trying to unravel the secret of the Buick. This is not one of King’s best books, and one of the biggest problems is that he tries to have it both ways. A large point of the story is supposed to be that there are some mysteries that we’ll just never solve, and that we have to make peace with that when we run across it. Which is fine, but if you’re going to play it that way then the mystery of the Buick needs to really be unknowable. What King does instead is to beat us over the head with that theme of acceptance, but then he pretty much goes ahead and tells us what the car is anyhow. Plus, the weird things the Buick does get fairly predictable. Yeah, I know, that’s part of the point. The story makes it clear that the car and it’s occasional crazy happening became just part of the routine for everyone who knew it was back there, but then King has to have it unleash unspeakable horrors a couple of times which make it hard to believe that anyone could just go to work every day knowing it was back there instead of just being an oddity they deal with once in a while. The cops also seem to take the disappearance of one of their own fairly lightly. While this comes in at a relatively tight 350 pages for a later work by Uncle Stevie it just doesn’t feel like there’s enough story here to justify it. As it stands it would have made a better short story or novella, but at this length it feels like there’s both too much and not enough at the same time. Despite all my misgivings I kinda like this one, but it’s for mainly personal reasons. My mother worked as a dispatcher for the sheriff’s department of our rural Kansas county when I was growing up, and their office was just a block away from my grandmother’s house who would watch us when the folks were working. I spent a lot of time hanging around there, and this book, which details the humdrum everyday stuff that happens around any cop shop, reminds me of those times when I’d sit in their kitchen listening to the chatter of the guys in the office and on the radio. So it’s pure nostalgia that gets me to boost this from two stars to three. I make no apologies for that.

  2. 5 out of 5

    trishtrash

    I often wonder if 'Buick' counts as metafiction: a story told within a story which is, in a way, about stories, and our obsession with endings and with finding out. Principally, though, it's a rollicking good horror yarn in which the creepy is layed on with a trowel until you just want it to stop... well, maybe after one more page. The premise of an alternative dimension has never been handled so diffidently. It's there, in the boot of a car, under a tarp, in a garage on the local sheriff's offic I often wonder if 'Buick' counts as metafiction: a story told within a story which is, in a way, about stories, and our obsession with endings and with finding out. Principally, though, it's a rollicking good horror yarn in which the creepy is layed on with a trowel until you just want it to stop... well, maybe after one more page. The premise of an alternative dimension has never been handled so diffidently. It's there, in the boot of a car, under a tarp, in a garage on the local sheriff's office lot. Don't get too close, don't get too interested and when stuff comes out of it... run. What's important here is the draw, the raw fascination that comes with the unknown. It's a mistake to compare Buick 8 to Christine simply because the two stories are about cars. For one thing, the Buick isn't really a car... it's a metaphor on one level, and an otherwordly artefact on another. Christine was full of murderous rage, both possessed by and possessing her owners - the Buick is never conclusively considered sentient. A further difference between Christine and Buick, is the ending - Christine is a fully formed story, with a beginning, lots of guts, and the perfect horror-story ending. Buick is a story about how stories really unfold (an increasing preoccupation in King's writing) and how they don't necessarily come tied up neatly with all four corners properly inside the wrapping. In this respect, Buick has more in common with later work, such as The Colorado Kid, and even Cell or the Dark Tower. Buick 8 is readable, thought-provoking and full of things that make you shudder. It's an important part of any King collection.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    From a Buick 8: a Novel, Stephen King From a Buick 8 is a horror novel by American writer Stephen King. From a Buick 8 is a novel about our fascination with deadly things, about our insistence on answers when there are none, about terror and courage in the face of the unknowable. First published on September 24, 2002, تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز دوازدهم ماه جولای سال 2004 میلادی عنوان: بیوک مرموز (بیوک اسرارآمیز)؛ نویسنده: استیفن کینگ؛ مترجم: مهین قهرمان؛ ویراستار: مهرانوش قهرمان؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، ع From a Buick 8: a Novel, Stephen King From a Buick 8 is a horror novel by American writer Stephen King. From a Buick 8 is a novel about our fascination with deadly things, about our insistence on answers when there are none, about terror and courage in the face of the unknowable. First published on September 24, 2002, تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز دوازدهم ماه جولای سال 2004 میلادی عنوان: بیوک مرموز (بیوک اسرارآمیز)؛ نویسنده: استیفن کینگ؛ مترجم: مهین قهرمان؛ ویراستار: مهرانوش قهرمان؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، عطایی، 1382، در 208 ص، موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان آمریکایی - سده ی 21 م یک نظامی ایالت «پنسیلوانیا» به نام: «ند ویلکاکس»، پس از اینکه پدرش، در تصادف رانندگی کشته میشود، میفهمد که اعضای گروهان «دی» راز پنهانی، پشت مرکز فرماندهی خود دارند. در آنجا، یک اتوموبیل بیوک قدیمی، که سالها پیش، در یک پمپ بنزین رها شده، نگهداری میشود که….؛ ا. شربیانی

  4. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    2.5 StarsOMGOSH, I really can't believe I'm rating a Stephen King novel 2.5 Stars, but From A Buick 8 turned out to be a real "clunker" of a read for me.The story begins enticingly when a mysterious man dressed in black rolls into a gas station for a fill-up and forthwith disappears leaving his evil vintage car behind. Unfortunately though, except for a few freaky monster moments and light shows, the plot was long, lacking and laborious.A rare disappointment from The King!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nataliya

    “It's funny how close the past is, sometimes. Sometimes it seems as if you could almost reach out and touch it. Only… Only who really wants to?” Unpopular opinion here, but for me From a Buick 8 has always been one of King’s favorites. What can I say - you love what you love. Well, how do I love thee? Let me count the ways, or something akin to that. Maybe it’s the lack of a traditional ending that neatly explains everything? Sometimes I do get a kick out of mysteries that insist on remaining “It's funny how close the past is, sometimes. Sometimes it seems as if you could almost reach out and touch it. Only… Only who really wants to?” Unpopular opinion here, but for me From a Buick 8 has always been one of King’s favorites. What can I say - you love what you love. Well, how do I love thee? Let me count the ways, or something akin to that. Maybe it’s the lack of a traditional ending that neatly explains everything? Sometimes I do get a kick out of mysteries that insist on remaining mysteries and stay unsolved even at the end of the story.I mean, Stephen King’s propensity for writing endings that fizzle when compared to usually fantastical buildup is so well-known that Uncle Stevie himself made a self-deprecating cameo in the latest movie version of “IT” (funnily enough, the end of that movie, although different from King’s version, was still less than satisfactory).So maybe one of the reasons why I always loved Buick 8 is that it does not really have a resolution. It’s really just the buildup, and the rest is up to you. The strange unknown remains mostly unknown. The mysteries that are never satisfactorily solved, the endings that are not conclusive, the questions that have no definite answers - these can be frustrating as hell, but can also ring true - and for me this one does. “Tell me everything. But — this is important — tell me a story, one that has a beginning and a middle and an end where everything is explained. Because I deserve that. Don't shake the rattle of your ambiguity in my face. I deny its place. I repudiate its claim. I want a story.” Or maybe it’s because it is one of King’s “quieter” action-light stories that has my favorite King’s trademarks, focusing mostly on the life of regular people in a small police force in a backwoods community. King is at his best writing about people in quaint towns going about their normal routines, living lives and just getting on - even in the face of some really weird shit happening. He shines here as usual - connections and relationships between people are his forte. “I knew what he was trying so say, and I knew something else at the same time: the boy would never quite understand the way it had really been. How mundane it had been, at least on most days. On most days we had just gone on. The way people go on after seeing a beautiful sunset, or tasting a wonderful champagne, or getting bad news from home. We had the miracle of the world out behind our workplace, but that didn't change the amount of paperwork we had to do or the way we brushed our teeth or how we made love to our spouses. It didn't lift us to new realms of existence or planes of perception. Our asses still itched, and we still scratched them when they did.” King is quite good touching on the themes of loss and grief. Does it consume you or do you move on? How do you process the loss? What and who do you hang on to? Who is there for you when everything is bleak and lost? “It killed my daddy!' he shouted in a child's voice, but it wasn't me he was shouting at. He couldn't find whatever it was he wanted to shout at, and that was precisely what was killing him.” Maybe it’s the writing which is solid as always. Some of his best, even. “Seen in that light, the whole idea of curious cats attaining satisfaction seemed slightly absurd. The world rarely finishes its conversations.” Maybe it’s the ability to show (not tell) what makes us human and what makes us monsters. Or both. “Up until then, what I'd mostly felt was sorry for him. Everything I'd done since he started showing up at the barracks had been based on that comfortable pity. Because all that time when he'd been washing windows and raking leaves and snowblowing his way through the drifts in the back parking lot, all that time he'd kept his head down. Meekly down. You didn't have to contend with his eyes. You didn't have to ask yourself any questions, because pity is comfortable. Isn't it? Pity puts you right up on top. Now he had lifted his head, he was using my own words back at me, and there was nothing meek in his eyes. He thought he had a right, and that made me mad. […] He thought he had a right and I wanted to make him sorry.” Maybe it’s the bits of nostalgia without romanticizing the past - as King knows how to do well. “But all that is in the yet-to-be. We are in the past now, in the magical land of Then.” Maybe it’s just that I love what I love. 'You don't know where you came from or where you're going, do you?' I asked him. 'But you live with it just the same. Don't rail against it too much. Don't spend more than an hour a day shaking your fists at the sky and cursing God.' 'But — ' 'There are Buicks everywhere,' I said.” All I know if that I re-read it multiple times and it still fascinates me. “We'll outwait you,' I said to the thing in the shed. 'We can do that.' It only sat there on its whitewalls, and far down in my head the pulse whispered: Maybe … and maybe not.” 4.5 stars.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Edward Lorn

    There are many problems with this book, but they can all be summed up with a quote from the actual text: From page 297 of the hardcover, third paragraph, starting fourth sentence in: But--this is important--tell me a story, one that has a beginning and a middle and an end where everything is explained. Because I deserve that. Don't shake the rattle of your ambiguity in my face. I deny its place. I repudiate its claim. I want a story. No. Fucking. Shit. King spends a great deal of this book explain There are many problems with this book, but they can all be summed up with a quote from the actual text: From page 297 of the hardcover, third paragraph, starting fourth sentence in: But--this is important--tell me a story, one that has a beginning and a middle and an end where everything is explained. Because I deserve that. Don't shake the rattle of your ambiguity in my face. I deny its place. I repudiate its claim. I want a story. No. Fucking. Shit. King spends a great deal of this book explaining to the reader that there's not always a definitive ending. He prepared us. But that doesn't mean I accept it. It doesn't mean I have to like it. Listen, friends and neighbors, I can get behind a short story or a novella that leaves me with an unsatisfactory ending because they aren't time sinks. To be in the audience of a magic show wherein the magic is only alluded to is a terrible trick. I don't need everything explained. I don't need my hand held. But I want a complete story. This is not a complete story. It is a rambling mess. The shifts in tone are jarring. You never know what kind of book you're reading. The characters are taken part and parcel from The Green Mile. If you've read both books, you'll probably see where I'm coming from. I mean even down to the wild fucker named Billy. Billy the Kid... Billy Lippin. And yes, Sandy Dearborn and Paul Edgecomb are the same fucking person. I don't care what their names are. Sweet baby Tom Cruise, the parallels are so obvious it feels like Desperation/The Regulators all over again. Only this time, the books aren't supposed to be that way! Fuck this book. Take it out back and put a goddamn bullet in its brain. Still, I cannot stand to give it any less than two stars. I want so badly to give it that single star, but I simply cannot allow myself to put anything King's written in the same category as the unedited garbage floating around out there. This was, according to Goodreads' star explanation, an okay read. I guess. I mean, I finished it. Twice. There are books out there (if you can even call them books) by authors (if you can even call them authors) who can't stay in tense for a single sentence. Some don't know the simple difference between their, there, and they're. These bumbling yucksters don't have a single fuck to give for their craft. King does. He's had his missteps, but he cares about the language. He cares about literature and the future of reading and readers. So no, I cannot bear to give this book anything less than two stars. Spoilers for books other than From a Buick 8 in the spoiler section. Click on "view spoiler" at your own risk. (view spoiler)[ Conspiracy theory: I believe the car comes from the same realm as the creatures from The Mist. I have no idea why the fucking thing looks like a buick, but there. That's how I connect it to the King-verse and the Dark Tower. Sorry, but I just can't be bothered to look any further into this trunk novel. (hide spoiler)] In summation: I can't believe I did it. I read From a Buick 8 twice. I might be the only numb fuck to have done such, but YAY ME! or some shit. Final Judgment: Only slightly better than a lemon juice enima.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    Although From a Buick 8 isn't my favourite King book and I think it could have done more to be original and memorable, I still really enjoyed reading it. This is a very ambiguous and somewhat strange novel, but contrary to its reputation, I didn't find it bad at all. It wasn't great but it's obviously a strong effort and it's still a fun story. What really brings From a Buick 8 to life in every respect are its characters and the connections they have together, although the sci-fi and fantasy asp Although From a Buick 8 isn't my favourite King book and I think it could have done more to be original and memorable, I still really enjoyed reading it. This is a very ambiguous and somewhat strange novel, but contrary to its reputation, I didn't find it bad at all. It wasn't great but it's obviously a strong effort and it's still a fun story. What really brings From a Buick 8 to life in every respect are its characters and the connections they have together, although the sci-fi and fantasy aspects were also quite interesting. Books like these often start out with the best ambitious ideas but the idea itself can't really hold up a whole book. Nonetheless, King does manage to bring this intriguing story to life with his usual horror magic, focusing on so many aspects. My only serious complaint that would probably put me off of reading it for a second time is that From a Buick 8 is very repetitive, choppy and transitions from scene to scene in a rather confusing and jumpy way. Still, this doesn't really make the book terrible, it's just not exactly up there in creativity with Pet Sematary and Carrie.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    I don't think this is the best novel I've read. It's not even Stephen King's best. It is my favorite though. It's the novel I've reread most often. This was at least my fifteenth reading of it and I still had fun.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    "How does it feel, how does it feel? To be on your own, with no direction home A complete unknown, like a rolling stone!" -- Bob Dylan Why do I choose Dylan lyrics to open a review? Two reasons - 1.) author King's title was inspired by the track called 'From a Buick 6,' from Dylan's 1965 album Highway 61 Revisited, which contained the classic tunes 'Tombstone Blues' and the above-quoted 'Like a Rolling Stone,' and 2.) by the book's conclusion I realized my time would've been better spent instead j "How does it feel, how does it feel? To be on your own, with no direction home A complete unknown, like a rolling stone!" -- Bob Dylan Why do I choose Dylan lyrics to open a review? Two reasons - 1.) author King's title was inspired by the track called 'From a Buick 6,' from Dylan's 1965 album Highway 61 Revisited, which contained the classic tunes 'Tombstone Blues' and the above-quoted 'Like a Rolling Stone,' and 2.) by the book's conclusion I realized my time would've been better spent instead just listening to said album. I've read a fair amount of King, but mostly his 70's and 80's output. (I consider IT one of my all-time favorites, and much enjoyed a dozen or so of his other books as well - I even read Gerald's Game in nearly one sitting over twenty year ago.) However, I have to wonder if my co-worker friend is onto something, as she has repeatedly advised me "His work after his [1999] accident isn't as good." The story here, in a superficial outline, sounds like a sure thing - highway patrol cops versus a likely supernaturally-powered old-school automobile in Pennsylvania (my home state - woot woot!). I can tell King did his research, both geographically and with the region's state police. There are some great, quotable lines like "[The old sergeant] called law enforcement 'a case of good men doing bad chores'" (page 335) and "[Cops] - we clean up the messes and we always know the truth" (page 345). But . . . I kept waiting for the expected "it was a normal day . . . and then EVIL came to town" moment - you know, maybe some shocking vehicular mayhem on the turnpike - but nearly the entire narrative was a talking-head, long-winded slow burn of a tale. The so-called suspense and/or action felt like it was non-existent until the final thirty pages. The title vehicle spends 99% of its time locked in a shed! How can this story feature a possibly demonic or evil alien '53 Buick Roadmaster (if that's what it really was) and have it parked / impounded for the duration of the book?! I guess I was simply hoping for something well-written but yet sort of schlocky like the 70's horror B-movie The Car (though NOT necessarily just a retread of King's Christine), so I was pretty disappointed by this effort.

  10. 4 out of 5

    The Face of Your Father

    I avoided this novel for years, in fear that it would be a 'Christine' part 2 situation. Well, I was wrong. It's actually an extremely better novel, in my opinion. Scarier? No. More exciting? Definitely not. More entertaining? No. Better written? Yes. George A Romero used zombies to explore deeper meanings of civilization in his films. Stephen King does the same thing in his novels, just with the supernatural/unexplained, and usually a car is involved in some way as well. Buick 8 is about dealin I avoided this novel for years, in fear that it would be a 'Christine' part 2 situation. Well, I was wrong. It's actually an extremely better novel, in my opinion. Scarier? No. More exciting? Definitely not. More entertaining? No. Better written? Yes. George A Romero used zombies to explore deeper meanings of civilization in his films. Stephen King does the same thing in his novels, just with the supernatural/unexplained, and usually a car is involved in some way as well. Buick 8 is about dealing with loss; whether you allow yourself to move on from death or let it become your life; themes explored in an earlier King novel 'Pet Sematary' as well as in 'Revival'. The major complaint to this novel is how nothing happens & it lacks resolution. King foreshadows this by having Ned Wilcox express his anger with Sandy; he begs for a story, for a beginning middle and end with everything explained. Sandy gets angry and explains how that isn't how it works. This tease should prepare the reader. The imagery of the creatures from the Buick is a love letter to Lovecraft that's beautifully signed by King; the overall imagery of the novel rivals the ones found in the phenomenal novel 'Insomnia'. The character building is, of course, front & center; Troop D is a great & underrated 'Ka-Tet' of the Stephen King Multiverse. Side note; for someone who grew up with no father, King writes father & child relationships so painfully well it can hurt one's heart. Overall, the novel lacks the action found in works like 'Misery' or 'The Dark Half' but is heavy on structure & characters & themes, I will re-read with glee. As further time has gone by, I consider 'From a Buick 8' to be my favorite King work post-accident. An important novel in King's career as it displays his maturity as an author. The boldest claim I can make about 'From a Buick 8' is this: it could just be the best written tale of King's career. To me, King will be remembered by literary snobs for three of his novels: 'Bag of Bones', 'Hearts in Atlantis', and 'From a Buick 8'.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Balzano

    Just finishing off another rereading of this one, which, I gotta say, stands up remarkably well to repeated readings ... in fact, I couldn't help but notice this time around that From a Buick 8 actually gets more and more frightening each time I read it. Quite counterintuitive. Knowing that 90-to-99% of readers will not understand what I'm about to say here, I just love this book. It has some of the most gorgeous writing SK has done anywhere, and when you compare it with, I don't know, Firestart Just finishing off another rereading of this one, which, I gotta say, stands up remarkably well to repeated readings ... in fact, I couldn't help but notice this time around that From a Buick 8 actually gets more and more frightening each time I read it. Quite counterintuitive. Knowing that 90-to-99% of readers will not understand what I'm about to say here, I just love this book. It has some of the most gorgeous writing SK has done anywhere, and when you compare it with, I don't know, Firestarter or another of his earlier offerings, it's quite clear that the man has very much become a writer over the years, a craftsman with a deep, deep knowledge of his craft. All those thousands (!) of pages of practice, well, he wasn't just crankin’ ’em out, he was learning along the way, getting better all the time. True, he could always scare the crap out of you, and he was arguably the best at this when he was a younger writer ... but sometimes I wonder how much of this was also due to the fact that he was specifically going for just that reaction, more even than trying to tell a story, or fashion a sentence. Also, we've — at least I've — gotten used to big Steve and his tricks, and it's harder to scare the crap out of me than it was when I read Pet Sematary, which did indeed scare the crap out of me and keep me up till 5am one fine night in early 1984. My initial review follows; it's less a review than a somewhat acerbic "counterpoint" to some know-nothing, dismissive pseudo-reviews of people who presumed to know what they were talking about even if they "dnf"-ed this book ... as if the very fact of their being unable to finish a book was itself evidence of its literary deficiencies. (Original Review) A much better book than most people think ... you just have to take it on its own terms. It's ridiculous to say "nothing happens" in this book just because (a) the action is subtler than most SK novels, and (b) the plot unfolds mostly through the telling of narrators relating stories of the past. Regarding the latter - that's exactly how the story of Wuthering Heights is told ... and nobody would try to argue that "nothing happens" in that book. So let's all grow up, relax a little, and maybe try again. This is really a wonderful book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Erik

    You have a favorite restaurant. They serve a new four-course meal each time you visit (the fourth being dessert) and you always leave feeling full and satisfied. But this time you notice the "Under New Management" sign. But you're not worried. They're still doing great business and the line is around the block. Fortunately, you made reservations. As the courses progress, you notice the flavors are bland, uninteresting, and redundant. Maybe the chef is having an off night. You push through it, bec You have a favorite restaurant. They serve a new four-course meal each time you visit (the fourth being dessert) and you always leave feeling full and satisfied. But this time you notice the "Under New Management" sign. But you're not worried. They're still doing great business and the line is around the block. Fortunately, you made reservations. As the courses progress, you notice the flavors are bland, uninteresting, and redundant. Maybe the chef is having an off night. You push through it, because dessert is your favorite. Sometimes it hits your palette with a POW! and it's all you ever wanted in a dessert. Sometimes its flavors are elusive, mysterious, and that makes it just as delicious. The waiter removes the empty plate that held the third course and suddenly the "New Management" is standing at your table, smiling. "Sir," he says, "there will be no dessert tonight, I'm afraid. You see, our philosophy is that the destination is not nearly as important as the journey. We hope you've enjoyed your meal and that you learned something in the process." But, unexpectedly at this point, the waiter appears with your dessert after all, along with a small note card upon which is written a skeletal recipe for said dessert. It's not extensive, but it gives you a good enough idea of what it actually is, or could be. You realize this completely contradicts what the Management just told you, but you take a bite anyway only to discover it is just as disappointing as the rest of the dinner. Meanwhile, the chef is frowning from the kitchen and complaining how much fun he had making it and that should be enough. I get it. Honestly. But don't hand me a cake made from old flour, egg substitute, and sugar-free frosting then tell me it's the process used to create it that makes it worth eating.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Edgarr Alien Pooh

    Hard to classify this book as horror or science fiction. The story goes that a mysterious man drives into a service station in Pennsylvania in a beautiful Buick 8. The attendant fills the tank while the driver uses the bathroom but never returns to the car. Eventually the car is towed to a shed out back of the local Police Station but the driver is never found. The Buick is not what it seems as it occasionally emits a strange purple light and hums. Officer Curtis Wilcox is one of the two police o Hard to classify this book as horror or science fiction. The story goes that a mysterious man drives into a service station in Pennsylvania in a beautiful Buick 8. The attendant fills the tank while the driver uses the bathroom but never returns to the car. Eventually the car is towed to a shed out back of the local Police Station but the driver is never found. The Buick is not what it seems as it occasionally emits a strange purple light and hums. Officer Curtis Wilcox is one of the two police officers that tows the car back to the shed and over time he becomes fascinated with the car and what it is doing. Although the whole of the station look after the car, it is Curtis who records the events and they are becoming more bizarre. All of this happens some years ago and the book is divided between THEN and NOW by chapter. The THEN is the story as it runs, the NOW is a series of conversations held between police and the son of Officer Wilcox who has passed away. The story itself is not one of King's strongest but I respected it a little more when I read the Author's note at the end about how he arrived at writing it. The biggest gripe I had was that the story is mainly told through the conversations between the police and Ned Wilcox. It reads more like a tale told rather than a story followed.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Reanna

    First off, let me just say this book literally took me all month to get through and it was relentlessly slow. I kept hoping, wishing the story would pick up the pace but it just never did. If you're looking for one of those quick, enjoyable King fixes that we all know and love, this is not the book I'd recommend. I read it because it was the book selection of the month for the group and I would have eventually read it anyway. I really wanted to rip this book apart and rate it a 1 star but that's First off, let me just say this book literally took me all month to get through and it was relentlessly slow. I kept hoping, wishing the story would pick up the pace but it just never did. If you're looking for one of those quick, enjoyable King fixes that we all know and love, this is not the book I'd recommend. I read it because it was the book selection of the month for the group and I would have eventually read it anyway. I really wanted to rip this book apart and rate it a 1 star but that's really a knee-jerk reaction to my frustration at the slowness of the storytelling and the lack of a big, satisfying conclusion. To be fair, the writing is excellent, the promise is there, the weirdness that King likes to inject into his books is there, but I can fully understand why this book just misses the mark with some readers. I haven't read many reviews for this book because frankly I just don't bother reading reviews before I read something. It muddies my perception before I even dive in so I just don't do it anymore. This is a book about storytelling and that's the point (I believe...I am often considered wrong so don't take my word as fact!). The theme keeps slapping you across the face, (while dozing from the slow pace), when you're dragging yourself through the chapters. I liken this book to sitting on a old, rickety porch somewhere in a small town, where time seems to stand still and stories are the language of the land, listening to some weathered old timers filling the youngin's heads with exaggerated legends from a lifetime ago. That's how I feel walking away from this one anyways. I'd say if you're a King fan, go ahead and pick this sucker up...eventually, you know when you have absolutely nothing else to do or read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Abbie | ab_reads

    2.5 stars Even when King’s ideas are a little off, I will always appreciate his execution! He’s just such a gifted storyteller that I’ll always be happy to sit down and let him spin a yarn! This seems like quite an odd compliment to give if you happened to glance down at my rating for this one already, but I stand by it! . From a Buick 8 is certainly one of King’s strangest plots! A group of state troopers find themselves in possession of a bizarre car that seems just *off* somehow after it’s left 2.5 stars Even when King’s ideas are a little off, I will always appreciate his execution! He’s just such a gifted storyteller that I’ll always be happy to sit down and let him spin a yarn! This seems like quite an odd compliment to give if you happened to glance down at my rating for this one already, but I stand by it! . From a Buick 8 is certainly one of King’s strangest plots! A group of state troopers find themselves in possession of a bizarre car that seems just *off* somehow after it’s left at a gas station by a mysterious stranger who subsequently disappears... the story is told in Then and Now sections, which I found a bit redundant until the last 100 pages, as the the Now sections were just telling the reader who was narrating the Then sections... Anyway! After they acquire the Buick, a series of strange events take place over the years, with light storms, insidious thoughts in the heads of those who go near the car, and strange alien births from its trunk... Yeah, it’s bizarre! . Although I’m always pulled into King’s narration, I do think that 400 pages was too long for this particular story. He loves his possessed cars (Trucks, Mile 81) and I think this one would have worked better as another short story or perhaps a novella. Yes we all love reading about weird, alien creatures, but that’s not enough to hinge 400 pages on, and I didn’t feel the same connection to the characters as I usually do with King books, which is a shame! . BUT, it cannot be denied that I found it entertaining, a bit silly, sometimes a bit sad, and it moved along at a steadyish pace despite its over-length. I think if you’re not planning on reading all of King’s work anyway, maybe pass over this one unless you super love stories about alien cars.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joanne Harris

    I can see why some Stephen King fans found this book unsatisfactory. It is relatively slow-moving, inconclusive, relies on implict, rather than explicit menace, and seems at times almost existential in its depiction of death and the mundane. It dares to tell a story that ends on a question mark, and challenges and subverts all the standard tropes of the standard horror novel. However, to me these are the very things that make the book stand out as it does - in fact, I think this may be the most I can see why some Stephen King fans found this book unsatisfactory. It is relatively slow-moving, inconclusive, relies on implict, rather than explicit menace, and seems at times almost existential in its depiction of death and the mundane. It dares to tell a story that ends on a question mark, and challenges and subverts all the standard tropes of the standard horror novel. However, to me these are the very things that make the book stand out as it does - in fact, I think this may be the most interesting and adventurous of King's novels so far (and yes, I count myself a fan). So don't read it expecting another CHRISTINE; don't expect to come away with too many answers, and do read it with an open mind. I think it's an extraordinary piece of literary fiction - and published under a different name, would probably have won awards.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gregor Xane

    I know. I know. I'm reading it anyway.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jerry B

    One-idea book tires -- way too long for small plot... Like a burlesque sketch that is funny for a minute or two but gets boring when nothing new happens for another half hour, King gives us an interesting premise that goes almost nowhere for the rest of the book. An old Buick is left at a gas station by a mysterious person who disappears, as does one of the investigating State Police of Troop D in Western PA; thereafter, the car is stored at the barracks and occasionally puts on laser light show One-idea book tires -- way too long for small plot... Like a burlesque sketch that is funny for a minute or two but gets boring when nothing new happens for another half hour, King gives us an interesting premise that goes almost nowhere for the rest of the book. An old Buick is left at a gas station by a mysterious person who disappears, as does one of the investigating State Police of Troop D in Western PA; thereafter, the car is stored at the barracks and occasionally puts on laser light shows, emits strange creatures from its trunk, and similar horrible stuff. The story is told through the voices of the many troopers who have watched it over a period of twenty years or so. Other than drawing out the characters of that diverse group, as well as that of the young dead trooper's son, Ned, sort of the central listener, we're not treated to much other action or plot development. Sure, signs of King's effective rendering of scary events sparked our interest from time to time, but overall the whole book was like a one line gag repeated ad nausea. As far as we're concerned, this tale would have fit nicely into one of Kings many short story compilations; but we didn't feel the story and events were meaty enough to warrant some 350 pages, culminating in a fairly lackluster ending. This was by no means one of King's scary, suspenseful, gripping novels of the bizarre and terrible -- it was just one small idea that burned brightly for a few minutes then went out. For our money, we'd skip it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kit★

    This was a re-read for me, the only other time I had read this book was when it was first published, back in 2002. So, needless to say, I didn't remember much aside from the basic premise of the story: the car and the things it does. So it was nice sinking into this story all over again, getting to know the characters, the "Troop D Family". Stephen King does such a good job of creating and fleshing out characters, I feel like I know them, this whole story felt like I was there at the barracks, s This was a re-read for me, the only other time I had read this book was when it was first published, back in 2002. So, needless to say, I didn't remember much aside from the basic premise of the story: the car and the things it does. So it was nice sinking into this story all over again, getting to know the characters, the "Troop D Family". Stephen King does such a good job of creating and fleshing out characters, I feel like I know them, this whole story felt like I was there at the barracks, sitting on the smoking bench with the group while they told their story. They had a good bond, which made the story even better, they were people who knew each other well, and even though the parts were told from different characters' points of view, it all flowed so well together. A sucker for animals, I even loved Mister Dillon, the barracks dog, and got a little teary eyed for him. But of course the best part was the car. The car was what made me keep flying through the pages, desperately clinging to the hope that I would get some answers, just like Curt and Ned, even though I knew I wouldn't get the answers I wanted. I know what it was that drove the car to the gas station, but why did he disappear? What other world did the car belong to, I wanted more than the tiny glimpse Sandy Dearborn got into that world towards the end. I wanted more information! But, I do get greedy like that sometimes, and have to learn to deal with leaving things up to my own imagination... All in all, it was a great story, held together by great characters, with a tiny sprinkling of another world tossed in.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kandice

    2002 - I just didn't "get" it. October 2014 The first (and second) time I read this book the extent of my thoughts were “Hmmm...I just didn’t get it.”. I gave it 2 stars and called it good. I’ve always felt a little guilty about that. Not only because I generally adore everything King writes on principal, but also because I obviously didn’t care enough to write a bit more. I have been on a Colorado Kid/Haven kick for the last ten months or so. For anyone unfamiliar with either of those, the novel 2002 - I just didn't "get" it. October 2014 The first (and second) time I read this book the extent of my thoughts were “Hmmm...I just didn’t get it.”. I gave it 2 stars and called it good. I’ve always felt a little guilty about that. Not only because I generally adore everything King writes on principal, but also because I obviously didn’t care enough to write a bit more. I have been on a Colorado Kid/Haven kick for the last ten months or so. For anyone unfamiliar with either of those, the novel was written by King specifically for the Hard Case Crime label and is basically the telling of an insolvable mystery. There simply is no answer to the questions that arise from the tale. Unlike King’s normal dare there is also not a drop of anything supernatural or magical. It’s “the facts and just the facts ma’am.” at their most basic level. Haven is a television show based on the town and characters he created in the book that actually explains the mystery. Quite a bit of supernatural WTFery is used to explain, but I love it. The reason I explained all that is that I feel this was King’s practice for The Colorado Kid. Nothing much happens in Buick 8. The entire novel, just like CK, is a re-telling of events that happened long ago. Well, to be fair, one new thing happens at the end, but it hardly adds anything to the story. In Buick 8, a car is abandoned and the owner is never found. Unlike CK supernatural WTFery abounds. The Buick is obviously from another place. An “other” place. It occasionally gives off light storms, lowers the temperature in it’s vicinity and even “births” other worldly creatures and things from it’s trunk. The car is kept and cared for by a troop of patrolmen. They keep all mention of it off the books, but are aware of it’s quirks and take measures to keep it safe and keep those in it’s vicinity safe. One particular trooper, Curt, becomes a bit obsessed with it. He logs the cars activity, dissects it’s physical offerings and basically just studies it. The troopers take turns guarding the Buick when it’s in it’s active phases and keep the Buick’s secrets. When the Buick actually takes a few things from our world back to wherever it came from, the troopers cover that up as well. The reason I feel this book shares so much with The Colorado Kid is that there is no resolution. We never know where the car came from, how it got here, why it’s here in the first place, and really we get no end to the story. The narrative just sort of stops. It’s a pretty freaky coincidence that a character is run over in the story and his “accident” share many details with King’s own van mow down despite the book being begun before said accident and not finished until well into his recovery. King was amazed himself at how little he needed to change or add to make the accident in the book realistic. I enjoyed the novel being set in Pennsylvania instead of King’s more natural Maine or Florida locales. He says the idea came to him while he was in Pennsylvania and so that’s where the story stayed. Good for him!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    You don't have a be Stephen King fan to enjoy this book. The plot was intriguing, the characters were likeable, and the story involves a true mystery. This is the kind of story that only Stephen King could pull off successfully. Make no mistake - this is not "Christine" revisited. This is a whole-new, remarkable story about a not-of-the-world Buick... but, not really a Buick. The story revolves as much around the complex lives of its characters as it does the mysterious Buick... that's not reall You don't have a be Stephen King fan to enjoy this book. The plot was intriguing, the characters were likeable, and the story involves a true mystery. This is the kind of story that only Stephen King could pull off successfully. Make no mistake - this is not "Christine" revisited. This is a whole-new, remarkable story about a not-of-the-world Buick... but, not really a Buick. The story revolves as much around the complex lives of its characters as it does the mysterious Buick... that's not really a Buick. I enjoyed this book thoroughly.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cody | CodysBookshelf

    This is why I reread Stephen King. I read From a Buick 8 back in 2010, maybe 2011? I was still very new to King, and had not yet experienced his backlog as a whole—therefore I wasn’t privy to just what an important summary of his career this book was when it released in ‘02. It was on the promo tour for this book King, addled with pain from getting run over in ‘99 and facing down the Dark Tower finale, threatened retirement and seemed frustrated with the whole damn thing, the business of telling This is why I reread Stephen King. I read From a Buick 8 back in 2010, maybe 2011? I was still very new to King, and had not yet experienced his backlog as a whole—therefore I wasn’t privy to just what an important summary of his career this book was when it released in ‘02. It was on the promo tour for this book King, addled with pain from getting run over in ‘99 and facing down the Dark Tower finale, threatened retirement and seemed frustrated with the whole damn thing, the business of telling stories and trying to find answers in them. This book isn’t widely loved because it isn’t neatly “wrapped up”. The Buick is never fully explained . . . at this point is that even a spoiler? I hope not! Yeah, King allows his characters to make guesses, but the titular “Buick 8” is nothing more than an avatar of the unexplainable, inexplicable bad shit life sometimes throws at us. As one character points out late in the novel, we know not from where we came or where we’ll go after we die, and we have to try living with that the best we can. This book simply wouldn’t have worked had it been written by a younger writer, or a more inexperienced writer. If King had published this even a decade earlier it would’ve been totally different—and probably not so successful. It’s King‘s sure character work and ability to evoke dread (along with lessons learned after that 1999 accident) that brings this book to life. It explores themes that would become prevalent for King later in the 2000s: pain and mourning, existential dread, the horror of human illness. You can maybe fight a supernatural monster; fighting Cancer or Alzheimer’s sometimes seems a helluva lot scarier. Buick 8 is fueled with Dreamcatcher‘s anger and confusion, but this is the work of a writer with a clearer head. It doesn’t hurt it features some of King’s best prose, rivaling Bag of Bones and Duma Key. Has this book entered my top 10? Yeah, maybe; the competition is awfully fierce, but this book really spoke to my soul. This is the exploration of a son grieving his father, looking for answers when there really are none. I can’t think of anything more human than that.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jay Jessmer

    OK, I've said before that Stephen King is a genius, and he has now shown me another reason why, albeit probably unintentionally. This book grabbed me immediately, and sucked me in, then about a third of the way in I thought, ok, this is going nowhere and I am going to be let down. There was nothing really happenning and I could feel that it was just going to be a LONG short story. Then about 2/3 of the way through, I realized what was happenning: I became a character in the book. Alright, that' OK, I've said before that Stephen King is a genius, and he has now shown me another reason why, albeit probably unintentionally. This book grabbed me immediately, and sucked me in, then about a third of the way in I thought, ok, this is going nowhere and I am going to be let down. There was nothing really happenning and I could feel that it was just going to be a LONG short story. Then about 2/3 of the way through, I realized what was happenning: I became a character in the book. Alright, that's a little out there, but here it is in simplest form. He turned me into both Ned and Calvin. I was obsessed with the Buick and even though I knew nothing would be solved, I kept waiting for an explanation. At one point Sandy makes a the statement to Ned--"Don't keep waiting for the punchline"--this simple statement wrapped up the entire novel. King was able to imprint in me the same mindset that Ned and his father shared, it was eerie and magical at the same time. Once this happenned, the story fed itself to me. It is beautifully written and I felt every word directed at me and felt the impact of every tale shared. I don't do spoilers, so I can't really explain to anyone who hasn't read this, but for those who have, I wonder if anyone else felt this way. The final 3 chapters were the perfect ending to this story. King stopped the ride in the proper way and left me completely satisfied. This book had all of the elements that have made his works the classics that they are. His mind is able to take us, the readers, into his world and let us live in a totally separate universe from what we call home. I thank him profoundly for this gift he has, and am awed by his abilities.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Baker

    Oh boy. I used to think that The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon was the most boring Stephen King novel until I read this one. This is the new winner in that category. I love Stephen King and with over 80 novels or so, there’s bound to be a couple of flops.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Osman

    I loved the premise of this story. Stephen King usually takes an interesting situation and then throws characters at it and watches how it develops. Sometimes, especially in his early novels the characters develop the situation and we move on into what might be called plot line. (King doesn't start with a plot line fixed, he creates as he goes along so he says in 'On Writing') This development does not happen in 'From a Buick 8' Perhaps it has something to do with the way the narrative is told- a I loved the premise of this story. Stephen King usually takes an interesting situation and then throws characters at it and watches how it develops. Sometimes, especially in his early novels the characters develop the situation and we move on into what might be called plot line. (King doesn't start with a plot line fixed, he creates as he goes along so he says in 'On Writing') This development does not happen in 'From a Buick 8' Perhaps it has something to do with the way the narrative is told- all in flashback; but what we stay with is the initial situation- weird car- and it doesn't develop into anything like a plot. This may have been sustainable in short story format but it sure as hell don't cut the mustard (to use a King-ism) in a novel of this length. King is obviously in love with the way cops talk and act and this comes out in his beautiful description and language observation (although I get slightly tired of his 'down-home good ol' American characters- just a little too corny sometimes). He is really trying to write about how a kid learns to cope with the death of his father I think, but that novel is not interesting, it's not what we come to King for, and it's not something that he is capable of writing (frankly)and should have been firmly kept in sub-plot. Alarm bells started ring for me about half-way through (when I was still hoping for the plot to pick up) the main character began to harp on the fact that not all interesting questions in life will be answered. This trope came up more and more as the book progressed- I think King realised that he couldn't develop the tale in a interesting way- and lo and behold: there are no answers at the end of the book. No reason for the intial premiss at all- a fat zero. It leaves you feeling let down, a feeling which the, very silly, attempt to create a false/trick ending through misdirection (where one of the main characters might have died in a crash)only exacerbates. Sorry Stephen- could do better.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Siobhan

    If the truth is to be known there are a number of Stephen King books that I sit and think ‘why, and more importantly how, did I work my way through all of this’. I was expecting this to be one such book, meaning I was more than a little bit surprised when I managed to go against everyone who seems to think it is a rather drab book. It is a slow starter. In fact, I will change that to say the book is rather slow as a whole. Events seem to take place in fits and starts as details are relayed to us. If the truth is to be known there are a number of Stephen King books that I sit and think ‘why, and more importantly how, did I work my way through all of this’. I was expecting this to be one such book, meaning I was more than a little bit surprised when I managed to go against everyone who seems to think it is a rather drab book. It is a slow starter. In fact, I will change that to say the book is rather slow as a whole. Events seem to take place in fits and starts as details are relayed to us. In a way, the book can be seen as being a little bit like Inception. With Inception it is a dream within a dream, yet with From a Buick 8 it is a story told within a story. I was expecting to dislike the constant back and forth, but within a very short period of time I managed to get into the flow of it. A couple of chapters passed me by and I decided the book could not have been told in any other way. The changes in time and the changes in the people sharing the details is what made this book. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not the kind of horror that most people associate with King. It does not leave you scared of the dark, especially with how there are no truly terrifying moments. The scariest part was the ‘oh gosh’ moment at the end where our heartstrings are pulled through deception (a deception which I managed to see through, even if I did have a small worry of being wrong). It’s not my favourite Stephen King book but it is very far from being his worst. Overall, I was not expecting to enjoy this one anywhere near as much as I did.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Patricio

    In Pennsylvania, the State Police of Troop D finds a mysterious car that has some peculiar aspects and behaviors. The car -a Buick 8- is a portal between our world and other dimension, and sometimes it aborts strange things. From a Buick 8 is a different book from all the Kings I've read before. It is quite slow, there are unanswered questions and it deals with the absurd. However, it also had good aspects and it was better than what I was expecting. YES, it was slow -I say it again-, but it arose In Pennsylvania, the State Police of Troop D finds a mysterious car that has some peculiar aspects and behaviors. The car -a Buick 8- is a portal between our world and other dimension, and sometimes it aborts strange things. From a Buick 8 is a different book from all the Kings I've read before. It is quite slow, there are unanswered questions and it deals with the absurd. However, it also had good aspects and it was better than what I was expecting. YES, it was slow -I say it again-, but it arose many questions and that made it intriguing too. I loved the friendship between the members of Troop D, and the way they kept that secret between them during all those years, and the experiments they made. The "abortions" were fascinating but I wanted to know how was the other side -the side where they came from-, and I would have liked if Stephen King had explored that. However, he didn't. I don't think there is nothing else to say, besides I really liked From a Buick 8 in a strange way.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Spencer

    I’m surprised I enjoyed this as much as I did as From a Buick 8 doesn’t have much of a plot; it’s essentially the observations of a car that ain’t a car. One day a mysterious stranger leaves a car at a gas station and disappears, the police take it and keep it locked up in a shed as there’s a lot of strangeness about the vehicle. That’s essentially it, people recount the unusual and horrific things that happen in and around the car and …that’s it! The pacing can be a bit frustrating but King’s i I’m surprised I enjoyed this as much as I did as From a Buick 8 doesn’t have much of a plot; it’s essentially the observations of a car that ain’t a car. One day a mysterious stranger leaves a car at a gas station and disappears, the police take it and keep it locked up in a shed as there’s a lot of strangeness about the vehicle. That’s essentially it, people recount the unusual and horrific things that happen in and around the car and …that’s it! The pacing can be a bit frustrating but King’s imagination and prose kept me reading as I wanted to know more about the Buick and what the hell it was. This isn’t a book for everyone but I think Lovecraft fans would enjoy this, I certainly did!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Daviau

    I definitely don’t remember enjoying this book this much the first time I read and I’m glad I revisited it. It felt like I was reading a whole new book and i absolutely loved it! I know this book gets a lot of hate it as one of King’s least favourite novels for a lot of readers but I’m on the other side of the spectrum, I adore it. Something about the story just gets under my skin and gives me the creepy crawlies and I live for every sinister second of it! Definitely 100x better than Christine i I definitely don’t remember enjoying this book this much the first time I read and I’m glad I revisited it. It felt like I was reading a whole new book and i absolutely loved it! I know this book gets a lot of hate it as one of King’s least favourite novels for a lot of readers but I’m on the other side of the spectrum, I adore it. Something about the story just gets under my skin and gives me the creepy crawlies and I live for every sinister second of it! Definitely 100x better than Christine in my books!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jocelyn

    This is my second attempt at From A Buick 8. Not sure why I’m having such a hard time with it. 😕

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