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Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Novels and Stories, Volume II

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Since his first appearance in Beeton’s Christmas Annual in 1887, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes has been one of the most beloved fictional characters ever created. Now, in two paperback volumes, Bantam presents all fifty-six short stories and four novels featuring Conan Doyle’s classic hero—a truly complete collection of Sherlock Holmes’s adventures in crime! Volum Since his first appearance in Beeton’s Christmas Annual in 1887, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes has been one of the most beloved fictional characters ever created. Now, in two paperback volumes, Bantam presents all fifty-six short stories and four novels featuring Conan Doyle’s classic hero—a truly complete collection of Sherlock Holmes’s adventures in crime! Volume II begins with The Hound of the Baskervilles, a haunting novel of murder on eerie Grimpen Moor, which has rightly earned its reputation as the finest murder mystery ever written. The Valley of Fear matches Holmes against his archenemy, the master of imaginative crime, Professor Moriarty. In addition, the loyal Dr. Watson has faithfully recorded Holmes’s feats of extraordinary detection in such famous cases as the thrilling The Adventure of the Red Circle and the twelve baffling adventures from The Case Book of Sherlock Holmes. Conan Doyle’s incomparable tales bring to life a Victorian England of horse-drawn cabs, fogs, and the famous lodgings at 221B Baker Street, where for more than forty years Sherlock Holmes earned his undisputed reputation as the greatest fictional detective of all time.


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Since his first appearance in Beeton’s Christmas Annual in 1887, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes has been one of the most beloved fictional characters ever created. Now, in two paperback volumes, Bantam presents all fifty-six short stories and four novels featuring Conan Doyle’s classic hero—a truly complete collection of Sherlock Holmes’s adventures in crime! Volum Since his first appearance in Beeton’s Christmas Annual in 1887, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes has been one of the most beloved fictional characters ever created. Now, in two paperback volumes, Bantam presents all fifty-six short stories and four novels featuring Conan Doyle’s classic hero—a truly complete collection of Sherlock Holmes’s adventures in crime! Volume II begins with The Hound of the Baskervilles, a haunting novel of murder on eerie Grimpen Moor, which has rightly earned its reputation as the finest murder mystery ever written. The Valley of Fear matches Holmes against his archenemy, the master of imaginative crime, Professor Moriarty. In addition, the loyal Dr. Watson has faithfully recorded Holmes’s feats of extraordinary detection in such famous cases as the thrilling The Adventure of the Red Circle and the twelve baffling adventures from The Case Book of Sherlock Holmes. Conan Doyle’s incomparable tales bring to life a Victorian England of horse-drawn cabs, fogs, and the famous lodgings at 221B Baker Street, where for more than forty years Sherlock Holmes earned his undisputed reputation as the greatest fictional detective of all time.

30 review for Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Novels and Stories, Volume II

  1. 5 out of 5

    Madeline

    Just as good as Volume One. I want someone to make me a tshirt with a picture of Holmes and Watson exchanging necklaces with "BFFs" inscribed on them. (actually, considering the time period, I suppose they'd exchange engraved watches or something.) Oh Watson, how I love you. And Now A Word On The Movie: It had so much potential. Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law are wonderful as Holmes and Watson, and their combined awesome can overcome Rachel McAdam's miscasting as Irene Adler. But everything else Just as good as Volume One. I want someone to make me a tshirt with a picture of Holmes and Watson exchanging necklaces with "BFFs" inscribed on them. (actually, considering the time period, I suppose they'd exchange engraved watches or something.) Oh Watson, how I love you. And Now A Word On The Movie: It had so much potential. Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law are wonderful as Holmes and Watson, and their combined awesome can overcome Rachel McAdam's miscasting as Irene Adler. But everything else is a stinking pile of action trash steampunk fail. They take Irene Adler, an awesome character from A Scandal in Bohemia (Volume I) and degrade her into a silly former fling of Holmes' (does. not. compute.); and the plot seems to have been stolen from a rejected Dan Brown novel. No, no, no, and NO.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Marwan

    Wow, that was a long one, but it was worth it. I'mean we're talking Sherlock Holmes here; probably the most famous detective in mystery fiction. I usually don't stick to one writer, especially if it was as good as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. However, I don't like to leave a book unfinished so it can't be helped. "The Hound of the Baskervilles" was quite an adventure. I've never guessed who is the villain. I would have if I thought outside the box (which you should in mystery novels), but the author Wow, that was a long one, but it was worth it. I'mean we're talking Sherlock Holmes here; probably the most famous detective in mystery fiction. I usually don't stick to one writer, especially if it was as good as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. However, I don't like to leave a book unfinished so it can't be helped. "The Hound of the Baskervilles" was quite an adventure. I've never guessed who is the villain. I would have if I thought outside the box (which you should in mystery novels), but the author did a good job in misleading the reader with a lot of events going on at the same time. "The Valley of Fear" This one was amazing, and once again I failed to see the truth. The second half of the tale takes you back 20 years in to the past where a lot of things related to the story is explained. Among Sherlock Holmes novels, this was my favorite. The rest was a collection of short stories which were interesting enough to read. my favorites were " The Adventure of the Red Circle ", " The Adventure of the Dying Defective ", " The Adventure of the Devil's Foot", " The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire " and " The Adventure of the Bruce-Partingon Plans "

  3. 4 out of 5

    Zoe Artemis Spencer Reid

    Such a fun journey with my favorite couple.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    I've now read the complete canon of the Sherlock Holmes stories and novels. They are a true treat for all mystery lovers and all readers of good stories with quick plot developments and the portrayal of a quirky and devoted friendship between Holmes and his quiet, steadfast, and methodical biographer, Dr. Watson.

  5. 4 out of 5

    John

    If you know anything about Sherlock Holmes apart from the Robert Downey Jr. movie versions, then you will have a good idea of what you are getting into when you pick up this book. The Valley of Fear is the best Holmes novel, in my opinion, and it was interesting to read the two stories in this collection that are told by Sherlock himself. Nothing earth-shattering here, just good 'ol meat-and-potatoes mystery writing.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    Another great volume combining 2 feature length stories with short stories. I immensely enjoyed this volume and I'd recommend to anyone who is a fan of Sherlock Holmes.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tragedies

    I'd give this 4.5 stars and since it was indeed not as good than the first, it came down to 4. I just really prefer the novels to the short stories. The short stories were either too easy to solve or didn't give the reader enough information to solve it on their own. That being said, I really liked the two novels and my favorite short stories were: The Bruce-Partington Plans, The Devil's Foot, The Blanched Soldier, The Sussex Vampire, The Three Garridebs, Thor Bridge, The Lion's Mane and The Retir I'd give this 4.5 stars and since it was indeed not as good than the first, it came down to 4. I just really prefer the novels to the short stories. The short stories were either too easy to solve or didn't give the reader enough information to solve it on their own. That being said, I really liked the two novels and my favorite short stories were: The Bruce-Partington Plans, The Devil's Foot, The Blanched Soldier, The Sussex Vampire, The Three Garridebs, Thor Bridge, The Lion's Mane and The Retired Colourman. The Creeping Man seemed far too fantastical and far-fetched. The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax was good at first but then frustratingly obvious. Overall it was still entertaining and fascinating to see what Doyle came up with and I'm glad I finally read all the stories surrounding Sherlock Holmes.

  8. 5 out of 5

    David

    I have at last finished the Sherlock Holmes tales. After a while there comes a certain sameness to the method, but as it is an enjoyable sameness, it is not a significant drawback. In those few stories not narrated by Watson he is missed, never more so than when Holmes himself is the narrator—an experiment which, to me, fails. But, no matter what legitimate criticism might be voiced against the oeuvre, it seems to me more satisfying than not.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Roozbeh Estifaee

    As we proceed through his adventures, Mr. Holmes gradually lets go of his "art of deduction" and tends to lean toward the joy of thrill. Though the lost aspect is really missed, it still continues with being great read and sketching one of the loveliest characters of literature history.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Starfire

    I had fun trying to solve the mysteries. had to read the book in parts though since each story was quite detailed

  11. 4 out of 5

    Arpita

    This is one of the few novels which still has retained it's popularity among classics and is one of the favorite of many avid book readers. Sherlock Holmes will always be one of my favorite classics.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    4.5 stars, mainly because I love The Hound of the Baskervilles so much and I forgot how much I enjoy The Valley of Fear (the latter half of that sentence sounds so strange out of context).

  13. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Believe it or not, even though I love mysteries, I had never read Sherlock Holmes! This was the second volume, and I enjoyed it a bit more than the first volume. I do want to go back to re-read the stories that featured Irene Adler and Moriarty.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elise

    I love Sherlock so much that it makes me sad to know that I’ve read all the stories. I wish there was more!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    The good: The Hound of the Baskervilles. The bad: The increasingly repetitive, formulaic and sensationalist nature of the later stories.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alexa Hamilton

    Classic reading at it's best.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa

    *5 out of 5 stars* "When you have eliminated all which is impossible, then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.” How can I possibly convey, in a set amount of words, how much I thoroughly enjoy the stories of Sherlock Holmes? I just can’t see that it’s possible to dislike them. However, I will attempt a brief review. Watson's narrative provides an unbiased telling of the various cases he shares with his eccentric, renowned pal, and we must follow along until Holmes is ready to d *5 out of 5 stars* "When you have eliminated all which is impossible, then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.” How can I possibly convey, in a set amount of words, how much I thoroughly enjoy the stories of Sherlock Holmes? I just can’t see that it’s possible to dislike them. However, I will attempt a brief review. Watson's narrative provides an unbiased telling of the various cases he shares with his eccentric, renowned pal, and we must follow along until Holmes is ready to divulge his process of analysis and unearth the true murderer or criminal. Sometimes we are even graced with the narrative of Holmes himself. I will mention one con I found before I move on and that was that it seemed for these latter stories (some, not all) Doyle rushed them, as if simply transcribing them rather than unfolding them. Okay, moving on. Some of the cases you could guess the motive and criminal before the end of the story, but most of the time you were blind-sided once you reached the end. Arthur Conan Doyle knew how to keep his audience guessing until the very end, and I think that’s what I like most about his stories. These ones, however, were a bit more violent than I remember Volume I being. Also, near the end of our beloved stories, as if Doyle seems to portray Holmes as more human than previously; that even the greatest detective sometimes makes mistakes and doesn’t always know the full answer. But I like that. He is human after all, despite his astute deductive reasoning. Rich with adventure and suspense, and wit and humor in all the right places, the stories of Sherlock Holmes are simply timeless. Nothing more to say. However, I’m sure you can guess that for yourselves - if you have not already. I'm sad to see it finally finished, and I just don't think that there are many sleuths that can compare. My favorites include The Hound of Baskervilles, The Valley of Fear, The Adventure of the Red Circle, The Adventure of the Dying Detective, The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire, The Adventure of the Three Garridebs, and the Adventure of the Creeping Man.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ajia McAferty

    Great stories, helped me brush up on my vocab - love it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Brit McCarthy

    The only thing I regret about reading the stories of Sherlock Holmes in two great big chunks is that I feel like it's all over too soon. How I wish I'd lived in the time where I would have had to wait, impatient and eager, for the next installment of the great detective's adventures. The wait would have been well worth it. While reading, I am in fact transported to Victorian England, to the apartment at 221B Baker Street which I can see clearly in my mind's eye (note: I have never watched any She The only thing I regret about reading the stories of Sherlock Holmes in two great big chunks is that I feel like it's all over too soon. How I wish I'd lived in the time where I would have had to wait, impatient and eager, for the next installment of the great detective's adventures. The wait would have been well worth it. While reading, I am in fact transported to Victorian England, to the apartment at 221B Baker Street which I can see clearly in my mind's eye (note: I have never watched any Sherlock inspired TV series). From that sitting room I embark on, with Holmes and Watson, so many mind boggling adventures where I try as I might, like Watson does, to keep up with the great Sherlock Holmes. He leaves me for dust just about every time, but that makes it no less enjoyable. I rather like watching him prove his talents time and again. John Watson faithfully chronicles the adventures of Sherlock Holmes for us, as Holmes is called to many a case where it is never about the money, only the mental exercise. Holmes likes to be challenged and more often than not he rises to the occasion. We are told that there are some cases that were not solved, which is interesting, but their tales have not been concluded because they lack completion. We also find in this volume, one story from the third person and a couple from Holmes', both which I enjoyed and had a distinctly different voice to that of Watson. I felt that these were interesting author choices but also reflective of the fact Watson and Holmes were not always together. As I'm sure you can tell, I loved every Sherlock Holmes story I read. Some of course were more thrilling than others, more adventurous, but they were all well written and very clever all the same. My hat off to Sherlock Holmes, John Watson and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kaye

    “It has long been an axiom of mine that the little things are infinitely the most important.” - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Fast-paced even with thorough storytelling. Simple yet baffling mysteries. These are just few of the reasons that will keep you flipping through this book to find answers, mysteries or sort of both. Considered as a great milestone in crime fiction, the Sherlock Holmes stories will surely have your thinking caps on. This book was written at a time when science was not yet prominently “It has long been an axiom of mine that the little things are infinitely the most important.” - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Fast-paced even with thorough storytelling. Simple yet baffling mysteries. These are just few of the reasons that will keep you flipping through this book to find answers, mysteries or sort of both. Considered as a great milestone in crime fiction, the Sherlock Holmes stories will surely have your thinking caps on. This book was written at a time when science was not yet prominently used in criminal investigations that some of Holmes' methods of deduction may seem common sense now. Nevertheless, the storytelling was perfectly done that it preserved the story's elegant air of mystery until modern times. Read the full review at my blog :) Until next bookdragons, K.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Zy Marquiez

    “A mind needs a book as a sword needs a whetstone if it is to keep its edge.” – George R.R. Martin BreakawayIndividual.com Zy Marquiez February 8, 2020 Ironically, it was through the most serendipitous of circumstances that this collection was suggested to me. Following a lengthy discourse with my economics professor a long time ago in which I asked what he thought was the best way to learn logic, he, in his classic fashion, suggests not a textbook, but Sherlock Holmes! At the time, thought it was a “A mind needs a book as a sword needs a whetstone if it is to keep its edge.” – George R.R. Martin BreakawayIndividual.com Zy Marquiez February 8, 2020 Ironically, it was through the most serendipitous of circumstances that this collection was suggested to me. Following a lengthy discourse with my economics professor a long time ago in which I asked what he thought was the best way to learn logic, he, in his classic fashion, suggests not a textbook, but Sherlock Holmes! At the time, thought it was a joke myself. Interestingly enough, he wasn’t joking. Here, now, many years later, the adventures of Sherlock Holmes was how I was introduced to logic through great fiction to boot. Arthur Conan Doyle’s magnum opus, Sherlock Holmes, features characters that are rather unique but very believable; the setting is always authentic, the mysteries abound, and there’s puzzles wrapped in enigmas all woven into phenomenal fiction as well. This is one of the great reasons rereading this series is so easy and serves as a fictional fall back for reading, especially when a lot of modern fiction is quite lacking in logical substance. In more modern times, there have been great mystery writers, and many imitators in countless ways, but none has truly come close to creating a fun, readable, witty, critically thinking, logical, and intriguing series in the way that Arthur Conan Doyle did when the Sherlock Holmes series. Those who attempt to follow in the author’s footsteps fall quite short, even when the authors have a template of what worked in the past. This is why, after my fourth reading of this series, it’s still a great as ever, and nothing really compares. And what’s more, there’s always something to learn from it, too. Let’s boil it down. Great fiction is great because it allows wonder and imagination to take flight, and sparks creativity like nothing else. Sherlock Holmes definitely creates auspicious and believable adventures upon which any curious mind would Love to venture. This fictional series does way more than that though. If it had only sparked imagination, it would have been a really good, or even a great series. But even so, it offers so much more. Sherlock Holmes is a veritable crashcourse into how to critically think and employ logic, wrapped up in a fantastic fictional package that is as timeless as it is robust. For me, this book falls within what Mortimer J. Adler & Charles Van Doren referred to as the top tier of books. As the authors note in their landmark How To Read A Book – The Classic Guide To Intelligent Reading: “Of the few thousand such books there is a much smaller number – here the number is probably less than a hundred – that cannot be exhausted by even the very best reading you can manage. How do you recognize this? Again it is rather mysterious, but when you have closed the book after reading analytically to the best of your ability, and place it back on the shelf, you have a sneaking suspicion that there is more there than you got….In fact, you cannot put your finger on it, but you know it is there. You find that you cannot forget the book, that you keep thinking about it and your reaction to it. Finally, you return to it. And remarkable things happen.”[1][Bold & Underline Emphasis Added] Just as so: “…if the book belongs to the highest class – the very small number of inexhaustible books – you discover on returning that the book seems to have grown with you. You see new things in it – whole new sets of new things – that you did not see before. Your previous understanding of the book is not invalidated; it is just as true as it ever was, and in the same ways that it was true before. But now it is true in still other ways, too.”[2] [Bold & Underline Emphasis Added] For me, this book – all of its fictional stories – accomplishes all of the above and more. Granted, there are many other books in classical and even modern literature that offer many life lessons. However, none teach the individual the foundation for critical thinking and logic like Sherlock Holmes does. This is why this stands above and beyond countless other books when it comes to those two crucial points. If you homeschool, if you’re an autodidact, a self-directed learner, or simply someone that wants to read a great book, then read this. You will not regret it. ____________________________________ Footnotes: [1] Mortimer J. Adler & Charles Van Doren, How To Read A Book – The Classic Guide To Intelligent Reading, p. 333. [2] Ibid., p. 333. ____________________________________ Socratic Logic V3.1 by Peter Kreeft Ph.D. How To Read A Book by Mortimer J. Adler & Charles Van Doren Philosophy 101b by Peter Kreeft Ph.D. A Workbook For Arguments – A Complete Course In Critical Thinking by David Morrow The Imaginative Argument – A Practical Manifesto For Writers By Frank L. Cioffi The Trivium – The Liberal Arts Of Logic, Grammar & Rhetoric by Sister Mary Joseph Ph.D. Dumbing Us Down by John Taylor Gatto Rotten To The Common Core by Dr. Joseph P. Farrell & Gary Lawrence A Different Kind Of Teacher by John Taylor Gatto Weapons Of Mass Instruction by John Taylor Gatto Drilling Through The Core by Sandra Stotski & Contributors Tavistock Institute: Social Engineering The Masses by Daniel Estulin A Mind Of Your Own – The Truth About Depression & How Women Can Heal Their Bodies To Reclaim Their Lives by Dr. Kelly Brogan

  22. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I actually only got one story into this volume before I had to turn it back in to the library. I couldn't renew it because someone else wanted it! At this point, my Sherlock furor has eased up a bit, but I will eventually recheck and finish this volume.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Scribble Orca

    Sometimes a little slow going. But you just can't go past all those lovely plots. Such a pity technology these days renders most of Doyle's twists and turns obsolete.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gerasimos Reads

    I love Sherlock Holmes. Some stories were better than others, but I truly enjoyed it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Yami

    Ahhhh! am done , I feel so accomplished it took me tremendous time to finish this volume, over three months with 11 other novels in-between, you can't tackle Sherlock Holmes novels, you have to take it slowly, piece be piece, adventure by adventure, enjoy each one, and indulge yourself with the old Victorian British narrating of Doyle. if any one is going to read Sherlock Holmes I would recommend to get the books one at a time, other wise it might overweight you as intriguing as it is , but it i Ahhhh! am done , I feel so accomplished it took me tremendous time to finish this volume, over three months with 11 other novels in-between, you can't tackle Sherlock Holmes novels, you have to take it slowly, piece be piece, adventure by adventure, enjoy each one, and indulge yourself with the old Victorian British narrating of Doyle. if any one is going to read Sherlock Holmes I would recommend to get the books one at a time, other wise it might overweight you as intriguing as it is , but it is too much to take in one setting, and the joy of it will be backfires, so YES take is Slowly, I wish I had a living room as the one in Baker St. with a warm fire and a comfy chair, reading it in a cold evening sipping tea .Sigh~ delightful would be the word.... as for this Volume , well it IS Sherlock Holmes, and its brilliance lies in its simplicity, you keep reading and you find that the answer in every mystery is so simple yet genius. I had my share of favorites in this one , but I think my favorite is "the adventure of the three Garridebs"loved this one how it showed Holmes's emotions was so sweet to the point that I wanted to hug the book, but I was in a Bank "people everywhere" and I couldn't . and the "the Lying Detective " too. my least favorite was "the adventure of the veiled lodger" but what made me think and felt a bang of sadness was the "the adventure of the lion's mane" putting the mystery aside, the idea of Sherlock's retirement and him becoming that distant from Waston, to the point of rarely seeing each other was really depressing , after all these years even their friendship was challenged, to be a far timed visit, that was really unfortunate. now that am finished with the complete works and adventures of Sherlcok HOlmes, I think I will go back to it from time to time, just to re-visit Baker Street, and refresh my memory with certain adventure, especially after watching and adaptions here or there. cos I know my memory will betray me and I will not remember most of then after a while, so it wont be the end of it ,,the Game is STILL afoot.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Eleanor

    With any compilation of stories, there will be ones you like more and ones you like less. The Hound of the Baskervilles, The Adventure of the Cardboard Box and The Adventure of the Lion’s Mane stand out as really good stories, but others were less interesting or highlighted the time the books were written in negatively. This is particularly the case with racist descriptions of black men, suggesting their inferior intelligence and portraying them as thugs. It speaks to the early 20th century when With any compilation of stories, there will be ones you like more and ones you like less. The Hound of the Baskervilles, The Adventure of the Cardboard Box and The Adventure of the Lion’s Mane stand out as really good stories, but others were less interesting or highlighted the time the books were written in negatively. This is particularly the case with racist descriptions of black men, suggesting their inferior intelligence and portraying them as thugs. It speaks to the early 20th century when these stories were being written, but it’s not okay to just pass over the fact and pretend that it doesn’t matter. Having said that, the friendship between Holmes and Watson was lovely to read about and made me tempted to push up my rating. Holmes is often seen as cold and calculating but in these stories, you could also see how much he valued Watson and his opinions. It is a shame in a way that there aren’t more stories, but with the countless adaptations there’s plenty still to dive into if the temptation arises.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kermina Philip

    With pride i can say i finished this volume together with first one which were my company in various occasions. no matter where you were just opening the book takes you to another place and takes your mind with it to try and solve what problems that may lay . and for this we should give credit to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle whom i will forever wonder how does such things come to his mind :) . picturing Holmes as an ingenious , methodical man and yet a humble, tender hearted that may appear to only th With pride i can say i finished this volume together with first one which were my company in various occasions. no matter where you were just opening the book takes you to another place and takes your mind with it to try and solve what problems that may lay . and for this we should give credit to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle whom i will forever wonder how does such things come to his mind :) . picturing Holmes as an ingenious , methodical man and yet a humble, tender hearted that may appear to only those who deserve. and picturing Watson the loyal companion,that no one would be ever lucky to have a friend like . but i was that lucky to have both of them as companions through this time and for this i'm grateful . *But i would also advice to read the stories seperately so as not to get bored with a 700 page book

  28. 5 out of 5

    KJ

    *Maybe 3.5? I love the character of Holmes and Watson and those they face together but I have recently discovered that read Detective stories aren't my cup of tea. I used to binge tv shows of a similar nature but I don't know if it's because im bored or just not paying attention but I couldn't really say any case particularly stood out to me. But that's not saying it isn't highly enjoyable, during several cases I chuckled at what was being said, and Sherlock is truly an interesting character, so *Maybe 3.5? I love the character of Holmes and Watson and those they face together but I have recently discovered that read Detective stories aren't my cup of tea. I used to binge tv shows of a similar nature but I don't know if it's because im bored or just not paying attention but I couldn't really say any case particularly stood out to me. But that's not saying it isn't highly enjoyable, during several cases I chuckled at what was being said, and Sherlock is truly an interesting character, so I suppose I came for the characters and not so much the story which was great. So who knows what I'm trying to say but it was great to finally read the original source material to find them still likeable and engaging characters who get up to crazy hyjinks.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rituraj

    The part I had better stories, but that does not mean that this one is not good. Lucky are the people who are yet to read the tales of Mr Holmes and Dr Watson for the first time! Even though I remember reading some of the stories long back, the crisp writing and elaborate scene-setting of Sir Doyle always does the charm. Some of the explanations may challenge the logician inside you, but the writer inside you will keep on turning the pages. This was the first collection of stories in which I shif The part I had better stories, but that does not mean that this one is not good. Lucky are the people who are yet to read the tales of Mr Holmes and Dr Watson for the first time! Even though I remember reading some of the stories long back, the crisp writing and elaborate scene-setting of Sir Doyle always does the charm. Some of the explanations may challenge the logician inside you, but the writer inside you will keep on turning the pages. This was the first collection of stories in which I shifted to its audiobook for some of the tales. Even if you are not a fan of audiobooks, try listening to some of the stories (especially 'Sign of Four') in Audible. Nothing compensates the boring house chores better than these stories told by Stephen Fry.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Puneet

    I did not enjoy this as a whole volume as much as the first volume. I didn't find the novels to be that enjoyable and after reading them found it difficult to find the motivation to continue the rest of the book. The short stories were much better, and especially enjoyed that two short stories were in the point of view of Sherlock Holmes, which was interesting to see. I also liked the change in, I think it was, one or two of the short stories being in third person was also interesting.

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