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Bushcraft 101: A Field Guide to the Art of Wilderness Survival

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“With advice on not just getting along, but truly reconnecting with the great outdoors, Dave Canterbury’s treasure trove of world-renowned wisdom and experience comes to life within these pages.” —Bustle A New York Times Bestseller in Sports and Travel! The ultimate resource for experiencing the backcountry! Written by survivalist expert Dave Canterbury, Bushcraft 101 gets “With advice on not just getting along, but truly reconnecting with the great outdoors, Dave Canterbury’s treasure trove of world-renowned wisdom and experience comes to life within these pages.” —Bustle A New York Times Bestseller in Sports and Travel! The ultimate resource for experiencing the backcountry! Written by survivalist expert Dave Canterbury, Bushcraft 101 gets you ready for your next backcountry trip with advice on making the most of your time outdoors. Based on the 5Cs of Survivability--cutting tools, covering, combustion devices, containers, and cordages--this valuable guide offers only the most important survival skills to help you craft resources from your surroundings and truly experience the beauty and thrill of the wilderness. Inside, you'll also discover detailed information on: Choosing the right items for your kit. Manufacturing needed tools and supplies. Collecting and cooking food. Protecting yourself from the elements. With Canterbury's guidance, you'll not only prepare yourself for any climate and situation, you'll also learn how to use the art of bushcraft to reconnect with nature in ways you've never imagined.


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“With advice on not just getting along, but truly reconnecting with the great outdoors, Dave Canterbury’s treasure trove of world-renowned wisdom and experience comes to life within these pages.” —Bustle A New York Times Bestseller in Sports and Travel! The ultimate resource for experiencing the backcountry! Written by survivalist expert Dave Canterbury, Bushcraft 101 gets “With advice on not just getting along, but truly reconnecting with the great outdoors, Dave Canterbury’s treasure trove of world-renowned wisdom and experience comes to life within these pages.” —Bustle A New York Times Bestseller in Sports and Travel! The ultimate resource for experiencing the backcountry! Written by survivalist expert Dave Canterbury, Bushcraft 101 gets you ready for your next backcountry trip with advice on making the most of your time outdoors. Based on the 5Cs of Survivability--cutting tools, covering, combustion devices, containers, and cordages--this valuable guide offers only the most important survival skills to help you craft resources from your surroundings and truly experience the beauty and thrill of the wilderness. Inside, you'll also discover detailed information on: Choosing the right items for your kit. Manufacturing needed tools and supplies. Collecting and cooking food. Protecting yourself from the elements. With Canterbury's guidance, you'll not only prepare yourself for any climate and situation, you'll also learn how to use the art of bushcraft to reconnect with nature in ways you've never imagined.

30 review for Bushcraft 101: A Field Guide to the Art of Wilderness Survival

  1. 5 out of 5

    Carla

    I found this book to be very informative, however the other is SOOOOOOO fucking sexist it's unfucking real..... Sorry for the swearing but I don't think the author knows what a woman is... BUT he has great survival skills and great techniques that I have retained and will use in my future... I recommend this book to any man that thinks only they can survive the wild and that are also born in 1910... I would have given this 5 stars but I just can't get past the fact that the writer did not mentio I found this book to be very informative, however the other is SOOOOOOO fucking sexist it's unfucking real..... Sorry for the swearing but I don't think the author knows what a woman is... BUT he has great survival skills and great techniques that I have retained and will use in my future... I recommend this book to any man that thinks only they can survive the wild and that are also born in 1910... I would have given this 5 stars but I just can't get past the fact that the writer did not mention ONE woman! I am not a feminist but I also don't tolerate ignorance.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nikole

    This is a very informative book and an easy read. He covers all the basics without confusion and keeps it light. I wish there was a bit more detail with some of the subject matter but he did release another book called Advanced Bushcraft 101 so I'm hoping my additional detail will be in there. He should think about adding additional content online to accompany his books; video tutorials, drawings/ charts/ info graphs, etc. That would be a much more rounded offering for the novice survivalist suc This is a very informative book and an easy read. He covers all the basics without confusion and keeps it light. I wish there was a bit more detail with some of the subject matter but he did release another book called Advanced Bushcraft 101 so I'm hoping my additional detail will be in there. He should think about adding additional content online to accompany his books; video tutorials, drawings/ charts/ info graphs, etc. That would be a much more rounded offering for the novice survivalist such as myself. I will still buy his other books like (1) Advanced Bushcraft 101, (2) First Aid, and (3) Trapping, Gathering, and Cooking and the reference guides too!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Erin the Avid Reader ⚜BFF's with the Cheshire Cat⚜

    FINAL RATING: 3.5 STARS REVIEW TO COME MOMENTARILY

  4. 4 out of 5

    Peter (Pete) Mcloughlin

    An excellent basic primer on survival skills and tools to live in the wilderness. It cuts to the chase and explains the most important necessities of surviving and gives clear guidance on what to do, what tools you will need, how to get food water and shelter and common medicinal plants. Excellent guide small easy to understand and essential.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dean M (Vox Poetica)

    Good overview for people completely new to the subject. Less so for those who already know a thing or two.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Don Gubler

    More of a 'gentleman's' survival guide. If you want useful information the Boy Scout Fieldbook is much better. If you want real survival information turn to Tom Brown Jr.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bookish

    I’ve been reading Dave Canterbury’s Bushcraft 101: A Field Guide to the Art of Wilderness Survival. The book is research for a project I’m working on but it’s also a personal passion of mine to study survival techniques. As such, I’ve read other books on bushcraft and wilderness survival/tracking/living before. I’ve found this one particularly useful and user-friendly, with easy to follow instructions and helpful illustrations. My son was also taken with the book and we plan on making tools and I’ve been reading Dave Canterbury’s Bushcraft 101: A Field Guide to the Art of Wilderness Survival. The book is research for a project I’m working on but it’s also a personal passion of mine to study survival techniques. As such, I’ve read other books on bushcraft and wilderness survival/tracking/living before. I’ve found this one particularly useful and user-friendly, with easy to follow instructions and helpful illustrations. My son was also taken with the book and we plan on making tools and recipes outlined within. —Myf (https://www.bookish.com/articles/curr...)

  8. 5 out of 5

    TJ Wilson

    This is a very good introduction of what you should expect to learn and know if you choose to be out in the wild. Definitely going to check out his YouTube channel and see some things demonstrated. I also got a good laugh concerning the wild varmint recipes in the back of the book, even though they are probably serious.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Whitney Boecker

    Very informative, want to read again to attain more info. If you are wanting to start out learning basic bushcraft and wilderness survival skills you will get a good taste in this book. It's more modernized than other bushcraft books that were written decades ago so it lists actual brands one can buy from and also comparisons with current hiking and camping gear.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Hugh Madsen

    Good intro into the subject. I like to highlight my how to/educational books and I went through a whole highlighter. From a survivalist stand point, it shows you what you need to think about in your area. Some sections are a bit monotonous but that's because they didn't apply to me personally. I don't plan to do trapping with commercial traps. Book is a great store of knowledge for beginners and should be reread until the information is internalized.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Clayton

    I was hoping there would be more about trapping and foraging for edible foods. More like a survival book. For those who never did scouting, this may be very informative.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Juan Castro

    Good info, but best if accompanied with YouTube channel Dave Canterbury sums up the "what you need to know and carry" very well. But since I've been watching a lot of Dave's videos on his YouTube channel I've understood a lot better several concepts and how-to's explained in the book. I think that more illustrations in the trapping and dressing game would be appreciated to further understanding. Good read overall.

  13. 4 out of 5

    A

    Do not buy this book. Lacking detail, instructions and diagrams Of the 20 traps the author decribes, only 3 come with instructions on how to make and set them. It’s also annoying that 2 of those were heavy iron traps - and he says “carry 12”. I was expecting a lot more detail about bush craft. Don’t buy or read this!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ben Wasilewski

    Great introduction to surviving in the wild.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Crafty but could have been more detailed and descriptive. An adequate introduction to the topic.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Matt Lynch

    Of the two hiking books on this month’s list – buy this one. It succeeded in nearly every way the “Walker’s Guide” failed to. It doubles up as a useful how-to guide and instruction manual for wild camping whilst also delivering a series of interesting segments on everything related to bushcraft. Initially, the information provided on frontiersman techniques are impractical to the point of vestigial for the average hiker. It’s more of an interesting backstory rather than being directly applicable Of the two hiking books on this month’s list – buy this one. It succeeded in nearly every way the “Walker’s Guide” failed to. It doubles up as a useful how-to guide and instruction manual for wild camping whilst also delivering a series of interesting segments on everything related to bushcraft. Initially, the information provided on frontiersman techniques are impractical to the point of vestigial for the average hiker. It’s more of an interesting backstory rather than being directly applicable to the budding adventurer. It wasn’t a particularly long section and I didn’t mind learning a bit about the early days of bushcraft survival. This is not the type of book you should read in extended sittings, and it knows that. Hence it has a much clearer structure than “Walker’s Guide”. I read it in long bursts but I wouldn’t really recommended it. A lot of info probably went over my head and I’m sure I’ll have to dip back into it again. It’s better to flick through it, coffee-table style, or skip to certain sections you want to read up on before a trip. One area I didn’t enjoy was the long section on trapping. I’ve never liked traps due to their indiscriminatory nature. (Despite the author’s protest that you can weight the springs differently or use a variety of baits to target specific animals – I wasn’t sold.) I think they’re quite cruel and I didn’t want to read too deeply into it. But if this is something that interests you, the section is as well written and diagramed as the rest. In general it’s an excellent book. Great information, mostly relevant topics, easy to understand, not too wordy, and clear diagrams. A must-read for any hiker/camper/adventurer.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Zafer Göksel

    I've been trying to learn how people lived along (not fought) with nature mostly from TV and youtube, latter being the more difficult media to sort out what is "instructive" and what is "destructive". I had picked a handful of tutors from various countries who had been mostly concentrated on different areas of backcountry life. Canterbury's this "one doze medicine" reflected on what I have been collecting as knowledge over the past few years. Having bought the box set, I hope to have the same fr I've been trying to learn how people lived along (not fought) with nature mostly from TV and youtube, latter being the more difficult media to sort out what is "instructive" and what is "destructive". I had picked a handful of tutors from various countries who had been mostly concentrated on different areas of backcountry life. Canterbury's this "one doze medicine" reflected on what I have been collecting as knowledge over the past few years. Having bought the box set, I hope to have the same from the other 3 books. However, while reading the text, I involuntarily dreamed myself surrounded by North American wildlife, specifically temperate decidious forest climate with plenty of fresh water source. I think it is because, though having been around the globe, the writer might have intended to address his native fellows (or at least did not expect a "middleeastern aficionado" woud be interested in his work). But it should be kept in mind that even North America has grasslands. Summary of my view on book's parts: 1) Chapter 1 to 10, Appendix A: In its own way, a "Good sum up". 2) Appendix B: Inspired me to dive deeper into my own country's flora. I have been marginalized from my native soil, that's what I have learned from this book. 3) Appendix C: Skipped right off from the beginning. I hope I will never have to use those recipes.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Lord

    I know, “wild” to you means going to Piggly Wiggly and not Whole Foods. If you think that maybe Raisinettes grow in the woods, this primer might prove useful as it touches on pretty much everything to which the title refers. The 23 chapters cover food (purchased and foraged), cooking, fire, tools and utensils (purchased, created, and improvised), living off the land by hunting, trapping, butchering, foraging, making stuff like solar cookers. The most interesting bits are quite fun, such as “inse I know, “wild” to you means going to Piggly Wiggly and not Whole Foods. If you think that maybe Raisinettes grow in the woods, this primer might prove useful as it touches on pretty much everything to which the title refers. The 23 chapters cover food (purchased and foraged), cooking, fire, tools and utensils (purchased, created, and improvised), living off the land by hunting, trapping, butchering, foraging, making stuff like solar cookers. The most interesting bits are quite fun, such as “insects you can eat and insects you shouldn’t eat” and cooking using your car’s engine. All delivered with a dry, sardonic wit: “Without fire we are at the mercy of the sun to do our cooking unless we happen to be camped on a lava field….” It goes from simple stuff (e.g., making a rock broiler, recipes for cowboy coffee) to complicated projects that take forever (I would love to meet anyone who has ever caught any edible thing in a suspended deadfall trap). Question: Who reads this? Answer: Dunno. The dudes that I know who are most into this stuff can already make a bow-and-drill kit. They do so while on break from training eagles to kill dinner. They know that Mulberry is just as good as Bur oak for the fire and make funnel nets for fun. If you’re not that dude but want to be, this will help, similar as it is to Winter in the Wilderness: A Field Guide to Primitive Survival Skills. And to think this whole trend started with The Girls' Guide to Hunting and Fishing. VERDICT Someone much smarter than I summed this up perfectly: For all your dried acorn and fried squirrel needs. Find reviews of books for men at Books for Dudes, Books for Dudes, the online reader's advisory column for men from Library Journal. Copyright Library Journal.

  19. 4 out of 5

    guitarmanencino

    Cool overview and breakdown of core concepts and principles of wilderness survival. I haven't read many on the topic, so I'm not going to pretend like an authority in my review, but I have strapped on a pack and been on a few intermediate excursions. My only critique would be that a lot of techniques described in the book came without pictures or diagrams. It is was difficult to visualize from the descriptions alone, especially with concepts that were totally new to me. I found myself using this Cool overview and breakdown of core concepts and principles of wilderness survival. I haven't read many on the topic, so I'm not going to pretend like an authority in my review, but I have strapped on a pack and been on a few intermediate excursions. My only critique would be that a lot of techniques described in the book came without pictures or diagrams. It is was difficult to visualize from the descriptions alone, especially with concepts that were totally new to me. I found myself using this text to "bookmark" certain ideas that I hope to further explore with other resources. I did happen to find the author Dave Canterbury's Youtube channel which looks much more in depth, so I look forward to diving in deeper there. Perhaps an interactive playlist could accompany the text(s) and have those listed in the book next to key concepts that require demonstration.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Dyer

    Bushcraft 101: A Field Guide to the Art of Wilderness Survival is an introduction to key skills that all good outdoorsman should know. It covers all the basics from making shelter and starting a fire to catching game and finding medicinal plants. A mile wide and an inch deep the book covers all the areas you would need without going in depth enough, for this reader at least, to be confident he would be able to reproduce the desired results. There are some diagrams but there could do with being m Bushcraft 101: A Field Guide to the Art of Wilderness Survival is an introduction to key skills that all good outdoorsman should know. It covers all the basics from making shelter and starting a fire to catching game and finding medicinal plants. A mile wide and an inch deep the book covers all the areas you would need without going in depth enough, for this reader at least, to be confident he would be able to reproduce the desired results. There are some diagrams but there could do with being many more as, if you're new to the topic, some of the things described are complex to understand. Bushcraft 101: A Field Guide to the Art of Wilderness Survival when combined with the authors YouTube channel gives you all the skills you need to not only survive but thrive in the wild. However, on it's own it is just too high-level to be a one stop shop for true beginners.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Enikő

    This is a great book and a quick read. It is easily understandable and has plenty of drawings to clarify how things need to look, from fire pits to notches and knots. (Although, there were a few places where I would have liked more illustration.) It definitely is a field guide, as the title states, since it doesn't go into too much detail, but gives you the basics. It is also a sturdy binding with a cover that has a plastic feel to it. The reason I really like it is because it is full of things This is a great book and a quick read. It is easily understandable and has plenty of drawings to clarify how things need to look, from fire pits to notches and knots. (Although, there were a few places where I would have liked more illustration.) It definitely is a field guide, as the title states, since it doesn't go into too much detail, but gives you the basics. It is also a sturdy binding with a cover that has a plastic feel to it. The reason I really like it is because it is full of things that we can try out during out camping trip next month. In other words, it will come very much in handy for keeping the kids busy!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kristaps

    Well, probably not the most objective review as I enjoy going in the wild. However this was a really well structured book with down to earth information that will be useful when going out into the wilderness. It has wide range of suggestions, tips and tricks that can be applied in almost every situation and even with minimal set of tools available. Definitely will come in handy for me from time to time to quickly go through and remind most of the basic principles of bushcraft. Also it is useful Well, probably not the most objective review as I enjoy going in the wild. However this was a really well structured book with down to earth information that will be useful when going out into the wilderness. It has wide range of suggestions, tips and tricks that can be applied in almost every situation and even with minimal set of tools available. Definitely will come in handy for me from time to time to quickly go through and remind most of the basic principles of bushcraft. Also it is useful not only for "beginners" but those who already feel very comfortable in the wild (like myself).

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amelia

    This was pretty good, and nice to read right after Woodcraft and Camping, which the author obviously draws from heavily. As a more modern text, this one is more practical and would be a good reference, but, with a few exceptions, it lacks the charming anecdotes of the books from a century or more ago. I checked it out of the library and might buy a copy. This was pretty good, and nice to read right after Woodcraft and Camping, which the author obviously draws from heavily. As a more modern text, this one is more practical and would be a good reference, but, with a few exceptions, it lacks the charming anecdotes of the books from a century or more ago. I checked it out of the library and might buy a copy.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nixie

    A lot of tips about all things bushcraft, from picking your backpack to making traps. Some of them pretty US-specific but that's expected (e.g. in the overview of plants to use as medicine or brands of knives). I was lucky to have someone who practiced bushcraft to answer my questions about the stuff I was reading. While a lot of general principles were confirmed, on a lot of details I got either different or better information. Still, I think this book is a good high-level introduction to the to A lot of tips about all things bushcraft, from picking your backpack to making traps. Some of them pretty US-specific but that's expected (e.g. in the overview of plants to use as medicine or brands of knives). I was lucky to have someone who practiced bushcraft to answer my questions about the stuff I was reading. While a lot of general principles were confirmed, on a lot of details I got either different or better information. Still, I think this book is a good high-level introduction to the topic, and it reads very easily.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Austin

    An exceptionally thorough whistle stop tour of everything you need to know about bushcraft survival. Some parts are hard to visualise without practice, but I think that's just the nature of the beast. I already had a lot of these skills, but having them brought together really helped see them as part of a wider skill set. So for the first time in my life, I've bought a compass and am learning to use it. It is US focused, so not all the flora and fauna match the UK, and there's a whole section on An exceptionally thorough whistle stop tour of everything you need to know about bushcraft survival. Some parts are hard to visualise without practice, but I think that's just the nature of the beast. I already had a lot of these skills, but having them brought together really helped see them as part of a wider skill set. So for the first time in my life, I've bought a compass and am learning to use it. It is US focused, so not all the flora and fauna match the UK, and there's a whole section on trapping, which is illegal here in the UK. Still fascinating, though.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brian Knox

    I'm a connoisseur of bushcrafting and survival books. My bookshelf is loaded with them. I was excited when my wife got me this book directly from The Pathfinder School's website for Christmas. First, it's a good book for basic bushcrafting. I think this is what Mr. Canterbury intended (especially given the title including "101"). It is a 101 level bushcrafting read. I was hoping for a bit more, since I pretty much knew this stuff, but am encouraged that there is an advanced version. For what it I'm a connoisseur of bushcrafting and survival books. My bookshelf is loaded with them. I was excited when my wife got me this book directly from The Pathfinder School's website for Christmas. First, it's a good book for basic bushcrafting. I think this is what Mr. Canterbury intended (especially given the title including "101"). It is a 101 level bushcrafting read. I was hoping for a bit more, since I pretty much knew this stuff, but am encouraged that there is an advanced version. For what it purports to be (a basic guide to bushcrafting), it excels.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dylan Cordova

    Bushcraft 101 really shows you how to survive, and thrive off the natural world. Basically, this book tells you how to to master the art of wilderness survival. A very enjoyable book, and very interesting to read. The book even comes with special recipes, that you can use to cook in the wilderness when food is scarce. This book was a very good read, and I will read it again in the future. I thought it was a very thorough book, and the information it provides is valuable!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Basically, take a copy of this slim book with you if you hike/camp/wish to survive in the woods for any extended period of time. Some of it is common sense (keep a spare set of socks and don't hike with wet socks) but the more detailed info (starting a fire, trapping game, etc) are vital to survival. 4/5 stars.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Randy Watkins

    This is my first true Bushcrafting book and I loved it. Great information, tips, and advise from Dave Canterbury. Can't wait to try out a lot of new stuff! I was also very impressed with Dave's writing. I recommend this book to anyone who camps/backpacks even if they don't get into extreme survival type scenarios.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    I will probably retain less than 5% (1% let's be honest) of what this book has to offer knowledge-wise. I can only write about it in terms of how relaxing it was to read. I enjoyed living in its reality (or fantasy?). I wish I learned skills like these rather than the boring-ass skills I learned to survive in the wilds of office and suburban domestic living. This book made me so relaxed.

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