Hot Best Seller

Becoming a Learner: Realizing the Opportunity of Education

Availability: Ready to download

Too often students begin college without a clear understanding of the purpose of higher education. As a result, many students talk about college in ways that cause them to overlook some of their most important learning opportunities. Becoming a Learner asks students to carefully reconsider conventional common sense about college and learning, and invites them to consider a Too often students begin college without a clear understanding of the purpose of higher education. As a result, many students talk about college in ways that cause them to overlook some of their most important learning opportunities. Becoming a Learner asks students to carefully reconsider conventional common sense about college and learning, and invites them to consider a new conversation about college and learning that focuses on who they are becoming and their ability to learn.


Compare

Too often students begin college without a clear understanding of the purpose of higher education. As a result, many students talk about college in ways that cause them to overlook some of their most important learning opportunities. Becoming a Learner asks students to carefully reconsider conventional common sense about college and learning, and invites them to consider a Too often students begin college without a clear understanding of the purpose of higher education. As a result, many students talk about college in ways that cause them to overlook some of their most important learning opportunities. Becoming a Learner asks students to carefully reconsider conventional common sense about college and learning, and invites them to consider a new conversation about college and learning that focuses on who they are becoming and their ability to learn.

30 review for Becoming a Learner: Realizing the Opportunity of Education

  1. 5 out of 5

    Trisha

    Great ideas. A bit repetitive.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Schow

    I had to read this book for a class last semester and was pleasantly surprised at how much I enjoyed it. My liking may have been entirely selfish in that this book reaffirmed much of my reasoning for finally deciding to go back to college, but it did have a few tips and insight into being proactive in the exploration of knowledge and the ways in which you can actively learn, much like learning how to actively listen. This book especially helped me push on after our classes went remote this spring I had to read this book for a class last semester and was pleasantly surprised at how much I enjoyed it. My liking may have been entirely selfish in that this book reaffirmed much of my reasoning for finally deciding to go back to college, but it did have a few tips and insight into being proactive in the exploration of knowledge and the ways in which you can actively learn, much like learning how to actively listen. This book especially helped me push on after our classes went remote this spring. I bought the book instead of renting it too, so I will probably flip through it again as I start the new semester. I imagine this being very formative for kids fresh out of highschool jumping into college, and I'm glad my university requires it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Becca McCulloch

    An excellent book that should be required of any student heading to a university. I love the analogy of a university and a gym. We get out of our membership what we put in. As a professor, I found him on point and his suggestions are exactly what I'd love for every student in my class to understand.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dallin Cowles

    "The primary purpose of college isn't learning a specific set of professional skills; the primary purpose of college is to become a learner." I only wish this book would have been written before I began my undergraduate studies. Although my time in college was amazing and I learned so much, I can only imagine how much better it would have been with this in the back of my mind for those four and a half years. Great points on the importance of how students become learners in the classroom and then "The primary purpose of college isn't learning a specific set of professional skills; the primary purpose of college is to become a learner." I only wish this book would have been written before I began my undergraduate studies. Although my time in college was amazing and I learned so much, I can only imagine how much better it would have been with this in the back of my mind for those four and a half years. Great points on the importance of how students become learners in the classroom and then transfer as learners to life and professional settings. I'm glad I took all those general education classes. I definitely understood my major classes because of the foundation they provided, especially my economics classes. I really dislike when someone says or thinks that general education classes are a waste of time and money. I completely disagree with that. I remember more from those classes and am able to apply concepts learned in those classes to my everyday life and profession than most of my major classes. If we think that the only outcome of college is to obtain an expensive piece of paper to hang on the wall, we have completely missed the point.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anny

    Read this because it is required Freshman reading for USU students and I was supposed to "speak the same language" as an instructor. It reads like a sermon of the most pedantic sort. Not sure what the students were supposed to take away from it other than "Hey, it's college! You're here to learn, not to hang out."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jared

    This book is a game-changer! If all high school and college students would read this book and apply the principles, they would get so much more out of their college experience. The author makes a simple thesis that "the primary purpose of college is to become a learner." The author supports this by analyzing common discussions we have that undermine the ability to become a learner and emphasizes how our attitude changes the we recognize the purpose of college is to become a learner. It is a simp This book is a game-changer! If all high school and college students would read this book and apply the principles, they would get so much more out of their college experience. The author makes a simple thesis that "the primary purpose of college is to become a learner." The author supports this by analyzing common discussions we have that undermine the ability to become a learner and emphasizes how our attitude changes the we recognize the purpose of college is to become a learner. It is a simple idea that can have drastic affects! Trust an inspiring book that I will be recommending to my students!

  7. 5 out of 5

    kasia

    A straightforward (somewhat repetitive) and useful pamphlet for people about to start college. Sanders' main argument is that college is intended for learning, not merely job training, and that part of becoming a learner is taking responsibility for your own education. A necessary corrective for students who see themselves as consumers and college as a product. Though this might be one of those books that is only persuasive to people who already agree with it - I'm curious to see how students wi A straightforward (somewhat repetitive) and useful pamphlet for people about to start college. Sanders' main argument is that college is intended for learning, not merely job training, and that part of becoming a learner is taking responsibility for your own education. A necessary corrective for students who see themselves as consumers and college as a product. Though this might be one of those books that is only persuasive to people who already agree with it - I'm curious to see how students will respond.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nichola Gutgold

    Well this is a little gem for teachers and learners (that means all of us). Dr. Sanders makes the point that college is not to learn specific facts but to learn how to learn, something that will serve us forever. I highly recommend this book for everyone, but specifically all high school and college students and their parents, too! Take-Away: Learn how to LEARN and if you do, you will continue to learn for the rest of your life!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlyn

    I really wish I had read this book during high school. It focuses on the true purpose for gaining a college education but the principles are good for anyone in the education system. I related to a lot of the examples used. I’m planning on rereading it before each semester to refresh all of the ideas and help me to continue “realizing the opportunity of education”.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Lozano

    Largely what I try to convey in the classes I teach. Of course the topic and content varies, but the message often stays the same. A great read for anyone who is in the classroom, specifically in higher education.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Short, but excellent. He presented at a conference I attended. I enjoyed this.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kylie

    Loved the way this changed my perspective on higher education and the skills I learn as I experience learning.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    A good little book to give to it discuss with a college student

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nate Dewar

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Important for students to read - - but very boring

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Thalman

    Excellent overview of a great approach to reading.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Masood Akhtar

    A must read for university student. I was lucky to have the same approach unknowingly.,though I do not have good grades but I have been a successful learner. This book explains a very important and essential philosophy of education (learning) in a simple and lucid style. I finished the book in one sitting.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Great book for higher ed students and educators.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jeanie {coffeegirl.blog}

    A must read for every college student A must read for every college student College is more than the books one has read, the tests one has taken, and the grades that one will receive. If you have ever been frustrated by having to take another Math class that is full of formulas you will never use in the real world, this book is for you.

  19. 4 out of 5

    ✿◕‿◕✿Pao

    Required read for a college class. What started as required reading became an interesting and informative read. Must read for incoming freshmen, it will help with adjusting to higher education.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Petersen

    It was a great book to read just before college (although it is more like a well-written essay than a book). It made me think about the way I want to approach not only college and how I learn, but how I approach life.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sai-sai

    Sanders brought up ideas I already knew in the back of my mind and put them into perspective. Overall I nice quick and slightly inspiring read that made you think about yourself and your choices.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kylie Williams

    It was a helpful book. He makes good points that definitely make sense and I used a little in high school that were effective, but he could've written the book in 20 pages. He was very redundant.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  24. 4 out of 5

    Destinee Berry

  25. 4 out of 5

    Christine Clawson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michele

  27. 4 out of 5

    brie

  28. 5 out of 5

    Morgan Radley

  29. 4 out of 5

    Harlan Rose

  30. 5 out of 5

    Quincy May Stoffers

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.