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Bibliomysteries: Short Tales about Deadly Books

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The book of virtue / by Ken Bruen The book of ghosts / by Reed Farrel Coleman The scroll / by Anne Perry The book case / by Nelson DeMille Pronghorns of the Third Reich / by C.J. Box Death leaves a bookmark / by William Link An acceptable sacrifice / by Jeffrey Deaver Book club / by Loren D. Estleman The book thing / by Laura Lippman The long sonata of the dead / by Andrew The book of virtue / by Ken Bruen The book of ghosts / by Reed Farrel Coleman The scroll / by Anne Perry The book case / by Nelson DeMille Pronghorns of the Third Reich / by C.J. Box Death leaves a bookmark / by William Link An acceptable sacrifice / by Jeffrey Deaver Book club / by Loren D. Estleman The book thing / by Laura Lippman The long sonata of the dead / by Andrew Taylor The final testament / by Peter Blauner The Caxton Lending Library & Book Depository / by John Connolly Rides a stranger / by David Bell What's in a name? / by Thomas H. Cook It's in the book / by Mickey Spillane & Max Allan Collins. Copyright for all stories between 2011 and 2013.


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The book of virtue / by Ken Bruen The book of ghosts / by Reed Farrel Coleman The scroll / by Anne Perry The book case / by Nelson DeMille Pronghorns of the Third Reich / by C.J. Box Death leaves a bookmark / by William Link An acceptable sacrifice / by Jeffrey Deaver Book club / by Loren D. Estleman The book thing / by Laura Lippman The long sonata of the dead / by Andrew The book of virtue / by Ken Bruen The book of ghosts / by Reed Farrel Coleman The scroll / by Anne Perry The book case / by Nelson DeMille Pronghorns of the Third Reich / by C.J. Box Death leaves a bookmark / by William Link An acceptable sacrifice / by Jeffrey Deaver Book club / by Loren D. Estleman The book thing / by Laura Lippman The long sonata of the dead / by Andrew Taylor The final testament / by Peter Blauner The Caxton Lending Library & Book Depository / by John Connolly Rides a stranger / by David Bell What's in a name? / by Thomas H. Cook It's in the book / by Mickey Spillane & Max Allan Collins. Copyright for all stories between 2011 and 2013.

30 review for Bibliomysteries: Short Tales about Deadly Books

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Keeten

    ”If you open your dictionary, you will discover that there is no such word as ‘bibliomystery.’ However, most mystery readers knew that the word refers to a mystery story that involves the world of books: a rare volume, a bookshop, a library, a collector or a bookseller.” I do believe it is time that bibliomystery be recognized by every dictionary as...yes indeed...a word. There are a couple of stories in this anthology dealing with...death by bookcase. I do often wonder as I wander deep into the ”If you open your dictionary, you will discover that there is no such word as ‘bibliomystery.’ However, most mystery readers knew that the word refers to a mystery story that involves the world of books: a rare volume, a bookshop, a library, a collector or a bookseller.” I do believe it is time that bibliomystery be recognized by every dictionary as...yes indeed...a word. There are a couple of stories in this anthology dealing with...death by bookcase. I do often wonder as I wander deep into the bowels of my library if a falling bookcase might be my own demise. Colombo, in one story, is trying to trap a murderous bookseller, giving his trademark dumb act to be smart. One of my favorites is of a Mexican cartel drug lord who has a penchant for first editions. The tension for me ratchets up as I start to fear for his book collection as his enemies plot to kill him. Watch the fucking books, you philistines! There are stories dealing with hidden messages in the text of books and secrets buried deep in the vaults of libraries. A trail of clues might lead one to treasure or death. Sigmund Freud has an unexpected and insidious visitor who smells of sulphur and that very special cologne of fear that followed the SS wherever they went. I almost need a shower after reading that story. There is certainly something for everyone in this collection...what am I saying? Of course, there is. For after all, don’t we all like books, and don’t we all like murders most foul? Otto Penzler, who is the owner of The Mysterious Bookshop in New York, edited this volume of stories, and he called upon the top names in the field, writers who are very familiar with the bestseller list. It is sort of interesting to read them all in one place because I find, with a few exceptions, that really their writing styles are very similar. There does seem to be a certain formula of style to be a bestselling author. Regardless, the star of most of these stories is the clever plotting. I read these stories sort of scattershot. One here, one there, between long reading bouts in other books. They are like a cookie treat between bigger meals. The book finishes with a blast from the past for me. I have not read a story with Nelson Demille’s wisecracking John Corey in a long time and was pleasantly surprised that I still find his acerbic musings so entertaining. If you haven’t read Plum Island and need a book for a trip, although travel these days has become almost impossible, or the perfect beach read, although beaches have become very dangerous, virus-ridden places...is the concept of a beach read a relic of a bygone year? Well, if you could do those things, Plum Island would be the perfect companion. Maybe on second thought, it would be best if you just stay home in the safety of your favorite reading chair and let your mind do all the traveling. If you wish to see more of my most recent book and movie reviews, visit http://www.jeffreykeeten.com I also have a Facebook blogger page at:https://www.facebook.com/JeffreyKeeten and an Instagram account https://www.instagram.com/jeffreykeeten/

  2. 5 out of 5

    Karl

    Contents: xxx - Introduction by Ian Rankin 003 - "An Acceptable Sacrifice " by Jeffery Deaver 043 - "Pronghorns of the Third Reich" by C.J. Box 069 - "The Book of Virtue" by Ken Bruen 093 - "The Book of Ghosts" by Reed Farrel Coleman 121 - "The Final Testament" by Peter Blauner 151 - "What's In A Name? " by Thomas H. Cook 179 - "Book Club" by Loren D. Estleman 203 - "Death Leaves A Bookmark" by William Link 231 - "The Book Thing" by Laura Lippman 257 - "The Scroll" by Anne Perry 293 - "It's In the Book" by Contents: xxx - Introduction by Ian Rankin 003 - "An Acceptable Sacrifice " by Jeffery Deaver 043 - "Pronghorns of the Third Reich" by C.J. Box 069 - "The Book of Virtue" by Ken Bruen 093 - "The Book of Ghosts" by Reed Farrel Coleman 121 - "The Final Testament" by Peter Blauner 151 - "What's In A Name? " by Thomas H. Cook 179 - "Book Club" by Loren D. Estleman 203 - "Death Leaves A Bookmark" by William Link 231 - "The Book Thing" by Laura Lippman 257 - "The Scroll" by Anne Perry 293 - "It's In the Book" by Mickey Spillane & Max Allan Collins 333 - "The Long Sonata of the Dead" by Andrew Taylor 361 - "Rides A Stranger" by David Bell 413 - "The Caxton Lending Library & Book Depository"by John Connolly 471 - "The Book Case" by Nelson DeMille.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jill Hutchinson

    Otto Penzler, critic, editor, and owner of the Mysterious Book Store in NYC (which was one of the first places I visited on my initial trip to NYC) has gathered in this volume a group of short stories and novellas which involve books and bookstores. Some of the authors are unknown to me but many are contemporary writers such as Jeffrey Deaver, Anne Perry, and Nelson DeMille and the stories are set mostly in modern times. They vary in quality but that is to be expected in a collection. A good boo Otto Penzler, critic, editor, and owner of the Mysterious Book Store in NYC (which was one of the first places I visited on my initial trip to NYC) has gathered in this volume a group of short stories and novellas which involve books and bookstores. Some of the authors are unknown to me but many are contemporary writers such as Jeffrey Deaver, Anne Perry, and Nelson DeMille and the stories are set mostly in modern times. They vary in quality but that is to be expected in a collection. A good book to have on your bed side table for quick reading.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    I received a copy of this book to read and review from the publisher through NetGalley. BIBLIOMYSTERIES edited by Otto Penzler is an impressive collection of short stories written by well known mystery crime writers, and the editor has done a fine job of compiling this assortment into a book that flows from one story to the next with a common theme, being they are all centered around books. Most often when I read books that are a collection of short stories I will read a story at a time and can ta I received a copy of this book to read and review from the publisher through NetGalley. BIBLIOMYSTERIES edited by Otto Penzler is an impressive collection of short stories written by well known mystery crime writers, and the editor has done a fine job of compiling this assortment into a book that flows from one story to the next with a common theme, being they are all centered around books. Most often when I read books that are a collection of short stories I will read a story at a time and can take time off between each one and don’t finish the book in a short amount of time, however I read this book rather quickly due to both the quality of the stories themselves (not surprising considering the authors), and how well this was put together by the editor. Otto Penzler caught my attention as editor of the fine book “The Lineup” (recommended) that is made up of well known authors discussing the best known characters from their novels that I found very enjoyable. Also of interest and on my to-read list is “In Pursuit of Spenser” that is a collection of well known author’s insights into Robert B. Parker’s “Spenser”. I recommend this book to all fans of mystery>crime short stories, and followers of the authors who’ve written the stories included here. 5 stars.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Judy Lesley

    I received an e-ARC of this collection of short stories through NetGalley and Pegasus Books W.W. Norton & Company. Thank you. Each story in this collection was not a five star read for me but when taken as a whole I have to let the star rating indicate how interested I was in the collection and how eager I was to read each succeeding story. The stories are completely different - even though there was the same circumstance which happened in two stories the narratives themselves were so different i I received an e-ARC of this collection of short stories through NetGalley and Pegasus Books W.W. Norton & Company. Thank you. Each story in this collection was not a five star read for me but when taken as a whole I have to let the star rating indicate how interested I was in the collection and how eager I was to read each succeeding story. The stories are completely different - even though there was the same circumstance which happened in two stories the narratives themselves were so different it didn't seem to matter to me. All the stories center on books; some are individual books, some are collections of books, some are privately owned, some in libraries, one was not a book at all but a scroll found while unpacking a crate of books. There are stories with a tiny feeling of the paranormal and there is one which unashamedly moves to the fantasy/mystical realm. I got a real chuckle when one author was describing a display of books written by bestselling authors in the front window of a bookshop and he included his own name. These are the authors with stories in the collection in the order in which they appear: Jeffery Deaver, C. J. Box, Ken Bruen, Reed Farrel Coleman, Peter Blauner, Thomas H. Cook, Loren D. Estleman, William Link, Laura Lippman, Anne Perry, Mickey Spillane and Max Allan Collins, Andrew Taylor, David Bell, John Connolly, Nelson DeMille. There isn't much information given about original publication dates or whether stories have appeared previously in anthologies or collections, but there is an Introduction written by Ian Rankin and dated 2014. The C. J. Box is the only story I had read previously so 14 out of 15 stories being new for me was a great treat. The William Link story featured Columbo, if other stories featured an author's main series character I did not recognize the name - well, with the exception of the Mickey Spillane, of course. Otto Penzler has done a superb job of presenting fifteen themed stories by modern authors in modern settings. The only thing I had a little bit of a problem with was the title. When I saw that title along with the cover art I immediately thought about stories from the golden age of crime fiction, but I was totally wrong. I would absolutely recommend this collection to anybody who wants to read well written stories by great writers. Some of the authors I was familiar with and already know I enjoy reading but I'm thrilled to have six new names I can begin investigating for reading full length novels they've written. That classifies as a bonanza to me!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Thomas

    Otto Penzler, famed editor, publisher, anthologist, and owner of The Mysterious Bookshop in New York City has put together an impressive collection of crime short stories, all having something to do with the world of books. Murders taking place in bookstores or libraries, alternate histories involving specific books, supernatural infusions into the world of books, and even a couple of hitmen who use their target’s weakness for books to set their plan in motion, … you get the idea. But they all f Otto Penzler, famed editor, publisher, anthologist, and owner of The Mysterious Bookshop in New York City has put together an impressive collection of crime short stories, all having something to do with the world of books. Murders taking place in bookstores or libraries, alternate histories involving specific books, supernatural infusions into the world of books, and even a couple of hitmen who use their target’s weakness for books to set their plan in motion, … you get the idea. But they all feature a background of bookstores, libraries, rare books, manuscripts, priceless volumes and eccentric book collectors. I found them, by and large to be great reads. The authors represented are a veritable who’s who of crime/mystery works. John Connolly, Anne Perry, Thomas H. Cook, Ken Bruen, C.J. Box, Jeffery Deaver, and Nelson DeMille are but a few. There is even a Mike Hammer short story begun by Mickey Spillane and completed by Max Allan Collins. All were new to me except for the DeMille tale, “The Book Case” featuring the inimitable character of John Corey in his early days. I’d come across that one elsewhere but it’s hard to go wrong by re-reading a DeMille story. All told, this was a wonderful collection. Thankfully, there is a second volume already out and since these stories are written exclusively for and published by The Mysterious Bookshop every month, I suspect future volumes will continue to arrive. Fingers crossed.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Donna Davis

    "...Diaz realized he was stabbed by guilt at the thought that he'd just planted a bomb that would take the life of a man at his most vulnerable, doing something he loved and found comfort in: reading a book." (Jeffrey Deaver) Otto Penzler doesn’t mess around, and so when I saw this collection, I was all in. Many thanks go to Net Galley and Pegasus Books for the digital review copy, which I received free in exchange for this honest review. This title is now for sale. All of the stories included her "...Diaz realized he was stabbed by guilt at the thought that he'd just planted a bomb that would take the life of a man at his most vulnerable, doing something he loved and found comfort in: reading a book." (Jeffrey Deaver) Otto Penzler doesn’t mess around, and so when I saw this collection, I was all in. Many thanks go to Net Galley and Pegasus Books for the digital review copy, which I received free in exchange for this honest review. This title is now for sale. All of the stories included here are themed around books; we have bookstores of course, and libraries, both public and private, magical and actual. All of them are copyrighted between 2011 and 2013. In addition to the excellent name of the editor here, some of whose other collections I have enjoyed, I saw three authors that I knew I wanted to read right away: John Connolly, Thomas H Cook, and Max Allan Collins. Sure enough, all three of their contributions were excellent; I have to admit Connolly’s was my favorite--featuring book characters that had come to life, which made me laugh out loud—but the quality was strong throughout. The very first story is by Jeffrey Deaver; I had never read his work before and it is excellent, so now I have a new author to follow. I confess I didn’t like the second story, which is by C.J. Box; I found his writing style curiously abrasive and I bailed. The third story likewise didn’t strike a chord. However, that still gives me 12 or 13 outstanding stories, and the collection is thick and juicy, like a terrific steak. Or tofu burger, depending on the reader’s tastes. I can’t think of a more congenial collection than mysteries and books. For those that love the genre, this book is highly recommended.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Bibliomysteries is an anthology put together by Otto Penzler, a well-known advocate of the mystery genre, and features fictional stories written by famous mystery authors which all involve books in some fashion. If you are a bibliophile and especially if you are a devotee of the mystery genre like me, you will definitely enjoy this book. Here’s the lineup: – Introduction by Ian Rankin – “An Acceptable Sacrifice ” by Jeffery Deaver – “Pronghorns of the Third Reich” by C.J. Box – “The Book of Virtue” b Bibliomysteries is an anthology put together by Otto Penzler, a well-known advocate of the mystery genre, and features fictional stories written by famous mystery authors which all involve books in some fashion. If you are a bibliophile and especially if you are a devotee of the mystery genre like me, you will definitely enjoy this book. Here’s the lineup: – Introduction by Ian Rankin – “An Acceptable Sacrifice ” by Jeffery Deaver – “Pronghorns of the Third Reich” by C.J. Box – “The Book of Virtue” by Ken Bruen – “The Book of Ghosts” by Reed Farrel Coleman – “The Final Testament” by Peter Blauner – “What’s In A Name?” by Thomas H. Cook – “Book Club” by Loren D. Estleman – “Death Leaves A Bookmark” by William Link – “The Book Thing” by Laura Lippman – “The Scroll” by Anne Perry – “It’s In the Book” by Mickey Spillane & Max Allan Collins – “The Long Sonata of the Dead” by Andrew Taylor – “Rides A Stranger” by David Bell – “The Caxton Lending Library & Book Depository” by John Connolly – “The Book Case” by Nelson DeMille. I don’t want to give too much away by describing each story with any more detail than they do in the description (with how short each story is, I’d end up telling the whole thing!) but I will say that each story is very unique and it was fun seeing how different writers would work out completely different tales using the same prompt. I enjoyed all of the stories, with one exception, which is really good odds for an anthology. My favorite two stories were “The Book Thing” by Laura Lippman & “The Caxton Lending Library & Book Depository” by John Connolly (definite favorite!), with close runners up in “The Scroll” by Anne Perry & “Rides A Stranger” by David Bell. I’d highly recommend this anthology to anyone who loves mysteries, especially if they also love books. It’s not only a fun ride, it’s also a great introduction to authors you may not have read yet. I know I’m definitely going to be adding some of these authors to my “TBR” pile!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Denver Public Library

    Otto Penzler is the owner of the famous Mysterious Bookstore and founder of The Mysterious Press but one of the things he does and does well is compile books of short stories. With his connections to authors he is able to get some wonderful stories for his compilations. In this addition which are mysteries and thrillers that all have a connection to books, he has authors such as C.J. Box, Laura Lippmann, and Peter Blauner contribute. Every story is clever and well worth the time. If you only hav Otto Penzler is the owner of the famous Mysterious Bookstore and founder of The Mysterious Press but one of the things he does and does well is compile books of short stories. With his connections to authors he is able to get some wonderful stories for his compilations. In this addition which are mysteries and thrillers that all have a connection to books, he has authors such as C.J. Box, Laura Lippmann, and Peter Blauner contribute. Every story is clever and well worth the time. If you only have time for a few, try the Caxton Lending Library and Book Depository by John Connolly and Rides a Stranger by David Bell. Connolly’s story has a bit of magic realism to it and its plot may be a little familiar but it is wonderfully written and has a lovely ending. David Bell’s story is about an adult son who comes home to visit his dying father and finds that they had much more in common than he ever suspected. I’m looking forward to volume two which just came in 2018. Get Bibliomysteries: Stories of Crime in the World of Books and Bookstores from the Denver Public Library - Lisa B

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    In most short story collections, there are losers and winners. This one is a pretty even collection, in my opinion. Even my least favorite, "The Book Case" by Nelson DeMille, is not a badly written story. I just REALLY didn't like the narrator. He's an asshole and if he has his own series, I'll be passing on that one. (UPDATE: It's John Corey, and yes, he has his own series. And yes, GR reviews seem to indicate he's a jerk.) I think my favorite is David Bell's "Rides A Stranger," in which a grown In most short story collections, there are losers and winners. This one is a pretty even collection, in my opinion. Even my least favorite, "The Book Case" by Nelson DeMille, is not a badly written story. I just REALLY didn't like the narrator. He's an asshole and if he has his own series, I'll be passing on that one. (UPDATE: It's John Corey, and yes, he has his own series. And yes, GR reviews seem to indicate he's a jerk.) I think my favorite is David Bell's "Rides A Stranger," in which a grown son learns a lot about his deceased father. There are some established characters - a story featuring Columbo, and one with Mike Hammer. There are 2 or 3 stories that have supernatural elements; the rest are straight crime/mystery fiction. But all stories in this collection are centered around books: books, bookstores, libraries, book clubs, readers, authors. Truly enjoyable collection; I will be looking for the next compilation.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mr. Gottshalk

    I’m not sure why I picked up this book when I already knew it’d get three stars if I read it. There are a lot of big-name authors here, who wrote short stories between 25-50 pages, but, strangely enough, it was the authors whom I’d never heard of who wrote, in my opinion, the best mysteries about books and/or bookstores. After a while, it was tough to slog through, and, admittedly, I gave up on 4-5 of these. And, as always, there were scenes and ending plot twists in this collection that will st I’m not sure why I picked up this book when I already knew it’d get three stars if I read it. There are a lot of big-name authors here, who wrote short stories between 25-50 pages, but, strangely enough, it was the authors whom I’d never heard of who wrote, in my opinion, the best mysteries about books and/or bookstores. After a while, it was tough to slog through, and, admittedly, I gave up on 4-5 of these. And, as always, there were scenes and ending plot twists in this collection that will stick with me for a long time. But for goodness sakes, Mr. Penzler, get a second pair of eyes to assist you with the edits!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Nutting

    15 more short stories involving books and bookstores as compiled by Otto Penzler - didn’t like as well as Volume II but enjoyed most of the mysteries. Thomas H Cook had one of the best entries - “What’s in a Name?” He is one of my favorite authors and a great historian so I was very surprised to see him misquote the poem “In Flanders Field” - the poppies BLOW not GROW!! C’mon editors, wake up and smell the poppies or was that the problem???

  13. 5 out of 5

    Glen U

    Rarely do you come upon a collection of themed short stories that is filled with wonderful stories and excellent writing throughout. "Bibliomysteries..." is one such book. Being a bibliophile and a devotee of the mystery genre, this was a natural fit for me. With the likes of some of my favorite authors, Ken Bruen, Reed Farrell Coleman, Anne Perry, C. J. Box, Loren D. Estleman, Laura Lippman, John Connally, Thomas H. Cook, and as a special treat, a treatment of an unfinished Mickey Spillane stor Rarely do you come upon a collection of themed short stories that is filled with wonderful stories and excellent writing throughout. "Bibliomysteries..." is one such book. Being a bibliophile and a devotee of the mystery genre, this was a natural fit for me. With the likes of some of my favorite authors, Ken Bruen, Reed Farrell Coleman, Anne Perry, C. J. Box, Loren D. Estleman, Laura Lippman, John Connally, Thomas H. Cook, and as a special treat, a treatment of an unfinished Mickey Spillane story by Max Allan Collins, this book was bound to please. All the stories were commissioned by The Mysterious Bookshop in New York City. What is especially pleasing about these tales is that they are all of moderate length. Anywhere from 20 to 70 pages, there are no quick 2 page cop(forgive the pun)outs and all the plots and characters have time to develop and a finished product is delivered. Most of the writers are veterans of the mystery genre, some are acknowledged masters of the craft, and it shows. The quality of the writing is sublime and each author's unique style is maintained and showcased in these excellent tales. Some of the stories are whimsical, some of the stories are traditional but they are all original and compelling. My favorites -"Pronghorns of the Third Reich" by C. J. Box, "What's in a Name" by Thomas H. Cook, "It's In the Book" by Mickey Spillane and Max Allan Collins and "The Caxton Lending Library & Book Depository" by John Connolly. Highly recommended, an excellent read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    This is an immensely enjoyable anthology of short stories by some great writers such as John Connolly and Jefferey Deaver. Spanning different decades, the one thing all these tales have in common is books. That's right, books; books that are used as murder weapons, rare books that people will kill to get their hands on and, my personal favourite, first edition manuscripts whose characters come to life. I loved this anthology, it is a bookworm's dream.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nick Scott

    Bought this for cheap at Half Price Books not really expecting much from this collection of mystery stories by big time mystery authors featuring deaths involving books. Ended up enjoying all but maybe one of the stories more than I thought I would. Also, these are pretty easy, light reads and it's not hard to tear through it. Would recommend for book/mystery/crime lovers.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    It's always hard to rate a book of short stories, especially if they've been written by different authors. Inevitably there will be some stories or authors that you really like and others that you don't. Perhaps it's best to just rate each story separately, in the order they appear in the book. Having done so and looking over the results, I'm surprised that I actually kept reading this book to the end. Perhaps I kept going because I read one or two stories at a time in between reading other book It's always hard to rate a book of short stories, especially if they've been written by different authors. Inevitably there will be some stories or authors that you really like and others that you don't. Perhaps it's best to just rate each story separately, in the order they appear in the book. Having done so and looking over the results, I'm surprised that I actually kept reading this book to the end. Perhaps I kept going because I read one or two stories at a time in between reading other books. From what I remembered of the earlier stories (and at least one I couldn't remember at all), I only liked the last 3 stories of the 15 in the collection. *** Introduction by Ian Rankin ** An Acceptable Sacrifice by Jeffery Deaver -- Set in hot Mexico, two hit men on a mission to kill a man with a large private library of priceless books. * Pronghorns of the Third Reich by C.J. Box -- Similar to the previous story, but two men who kidnap a lawyer in Wyoming, a blizzard, something about inheritance, ranches and airlifting animals, and a private library of priceless books. * The Book of Virtue by Ken Bruen -- I flipped through the pages after finishing the whole book and can't remember even reading this one or anything about it. Unusual style -- mostly one sentence paragraphs. * (1.5?) The Book of Ghosts by Reed Farrel Coleman -- About a book that was smuggled out of a concentration camp. I was confused by something at the end. * The Final Testament by Peter Blauner -- Vienna, Nazis, Sigmund Freud and someone who wants to publish Freud's work under his own name in return for a favor. I'm generally not a fan of books at this time period or Nazis. * What's In A Name? by Thomas H. Cook -- NYC, 50 years after the end of WWI. After giving a presentation at the History Bookstore, the speaker (a wealthy man) is approached by an elderly gentleman wearing worn clothing, who claims they were in school together in Germany. I'm not sure I got the point of the ending. ** Book Club by Loren D. Estleman -- The owner of a dark bookshop with narrow passages in an old Mission building in New Mexico is friends with a local book collector, who gets murdered. The bookshop owner helps the police solve the case. Not memorable. ** Death Leaves A Bookmark by William Link -- Two more-or-less cousins decide to kill their rich elderly uncle so they can get their inheritance. They tip over a bookcase onto him. Colombo is the detective. ** The Book Thing by Laura Lippman -- Clever solution to thefts from bookstores that involves a real place in Baltimore where you can take whatever books you want for free. (view spoiler)[ The thief was a mentally ill man who cut up books and pasted them on the walls of his home "to save them." Although I know there are plenty of excess copies of many many books, I'm still uncomfortable with cutting up a potentially "rare" books. (hide spoiler)] * The Scroll by Anne Perry -- A scroll found in the bottom of a box of books delivered to an antiquarian bookshop. It can't be photocopied or photographed. A scholar and a bishop approach the owner of the bookshop to buy the scroll, which contains information that would have a big impact on society. * It's In the Book by Mickey Spillane & Max Allan Collins -- Mike Hammer, NYPD, a NY Senator, the mob, and a ledger recording all of the crimes. (view spoiler)[ Clever twist at the end, but (hide spoiler)] not my cup of tea. *** (2.5?) The Long Sonata of the Dead by Andrew Taylor -- Three friends from college, 20 years later the narrator discovers that the marriage between his two friends is breaking down and his male friend, a successful author, is writing a book on the same obscure author that he is writing about. **** Rides A Stranger by David Bell -- I was not familiar with this author, but liked this story about the murder of a bookstore owner and a young man who looks for the cause of the murder (view spoiler)[boxes of priceless books written by his deceased father and given to Goodwill by his mother. (hide spoiler)] **** The Caxton Lending Library & Book Depository by John Connolly -- A man sees a woman killed by a train and no one believes him. He discovers an unusual book depository that no one seems to know about. (view spoiler)[ Magical realism -- The depository contains first editions or manuscript copies of famous novels AND their most well-known characters. The women he saw was Anna Karenina. He learns that if he rewrites parts of a book, the changes will take place in every copy, all over the world. He takes over as the "librarian" of the depository. (hide spoiler)] **** The Book Case by Nelson DeMille. -- Very cleverly-named, well-written, and fast-paced detective story narrated by a wry New York detective who solves a murder that happened when a bookcase fell onto the owner of a bookstore while he is sitting at his desk.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dale

    Who knew the world of books could be so deadly? My thanks to my contacts at Pegasus Books, Iris Blasi, Katie McGuire, and Maia Larson, for my review copy of this book. You ladies rock! This is a volume of fifteen short tales that are mysteries that evolve bookstores, book collections, rare books, authors, etc. They vary in length but most have been written very well. I really enjoyed the book! I want to touch on each story briefly. I do not intend to give major spoilers but maybe a warning should b Who knew the world of books could be so deadly? My thanks to my contacts at Pegasus Books, Iris Blasi, Katie McGuire, and Maia Larson, for my review copy of this book. You ladies rock! This is a volume of fifteen short tales that are mysteries that evolve bookstores, book collections, rare books, authors, etc. They vary in length but most have been written very well. I really enjoyed the book! I want to touch on each story briefly. I do not intend to give major spoilers but maybe a warning should be given. • "An Acceptable Sacrifice" by Jeffery Deaver deals with a Mexican drug lord with a taste for rare books. • "Pronghorns of the Third Reich" by CJ Box deals with a man who believes himself wronged and seeks a book collection in order to square things. Kudos for being based on a single genuine historic photo! • "The Book of Virtue" by Ken Bruen is next. Told in the first person, it deals with an inheritance that consists of a single book. I didn't really get whatever the author was trying to say. I liked this one the least. Sorry, Ken… • "The Books of Ghosts" by Reed Farrell Coleman was a very interesting story. The Book of Ghosts is about a legendary book said to be written in a Nazi Concentration Camp. The historical part of this story is an insight into the horror of camps like Auschwitz… This story is the runner-up for "Best in Book…" • "The Final Testament" by Peter Blauner is a nice piece of historical fiction dealing with Sigmund Freud! • "What's in a Name?" by Thomas H Cook relates the story of a world where WWII never took place. In this alternate history, a man is trying to publish a controversial book. Excellent! • In the "Book Club" by Loren D Estleman, the prolific author's hero is a former detective turned bookseller! • "Death Leaves a Bookmark" by William Link deals with a certain Lieutenant Columbo, who likely needs no introduction! • In "The Book Thing" by Laura Lipton, the author writes about a real-world bookstore where all books are free. • "The Scroll" by Anne Perry deals with a scroll found inside an old volume from an estate sale, which has very strange properties… • The next story is "It's in the Book" by Mickey Spillane and Max Allen Collins. Max Allen Collins writes featuring Micky Spillane's character Mike Hammer… • "The Long Sonata of the Dead" by Andrew Taylor finds two old foes running into each other at the London Library… • In "Rides a Stranger" by David Bell, a man discovers that his father may have written a rare book… • "The Caxton Lending Library" by John Connolly deals with a most unusual library in a most unusual place. This story is most definitely worthy of the award of "Best in Book!" • "The Bookcase" by Nelson DeMille tells of a man who died when his heavy bookcase fell on him. Was it an accident, suicide, or murder? This book is a worthy addition to any mystery lover's collection! I give the volume five stars! Quoth the Raven…

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jill Elizabeth

    This was, without a doubt, the BEST short story collection I’ve ever read… I have a checkered past with shorts – I tend to get lured by interim writings from my favorite authors, only to routinely find myself disappointed (either at those tidbits from people I love or at the filler placed around them). Still, like any foolish optimist, I keep trying… I’m SO glad I did, because this was an incredible set of stories from a number of very talented authors. Normally, I list my particular favorites in This was, without a doubt, the BEST short story collection I’ve ever read… I have a checkered past with shorts – I tend to get lured by interim writings from my favorite authors, only to routinely find myself disappointed (either at those tidbits from people I love or at the filler placed around them). Still, like any foolish optimist, I keep trying… I’m SO glad I did, because this was an incredible set of stories from a number of very talented authors. Normally, I list my particular favorites in an anthology, because I think it’s interesting to see what people like/dislike, but perhaps more importantly because there are usually only a few redeeming graces for me. Not so this time! This time I actually liked – and read – nearly every story in the book. It was a rare exception (Pronghorns of the Third Reich or The Book of Ghosts, for example) that I did not finish one because I could not get into it. There were a surprising number that dealt Nazis/World War II – those are normally not genres that suit me, so there’s no great surprise that those stories were not my favorites. There were a few that I thought were good but not outstanding, but most importantly, there were multiple that I thought were simply fantastic. One of these I had read before (The Caxton Lending Library and Book Depository), but the others were new and absolutely delightful: What’s in a Name (an extraordinary concept!), Book Club, The Book Thing, The Scroll, and It’s in the Book – and one (The Book Case) of them has even sent me in search of its protagonist’s series, which now tops my To Be Read list… It’s not every day that you get an anthology that includes more big names than random ones, but this one featured a slew of very well known authors (Anne Perry, Jeffrey Deaver, Mickey Spillane), many of whom I really enjoy (Nelson DeMille, John Connolly, Jeffrey Arher, Laura Lippman). Perhaps that explains the book’s appeal for me. Perhaps it is because the collection was curated by the indomitable Otto Penzler, owner of the Mysterious Bookshop in New York City (and an eponymous online shop for those of us who don’t live NYC-adjacent), and a true lover of books and stories. Or perhaps it was serendipity and I found this one at just the right time, when I was in the right frame of mind to enjoy the stories for what they were – delicious snapshots of the importance of books, bookstores, and libraries. Regardless, this was a sheer delight and one I cannot recommend highly enough – even for those of you that, like me, don’t always love the shorts… My review copy was provided by NetGalley.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Andreia Nuno

    This collection is the perfect read for lovers of books and mysteries. What can be better than murders themes around books? These 15 short stories were written by distinguished mystery writers and they make every story count. The editor Otto Penzler put together an anthology of crime between books that fill fit the likes of most readers. From hidden messages inside old books, a deadly bookseller and the deep secrets a library might hide, make this book impossible to put down. Each storyline is d This collection is the perfect read for lovers of books and mysteries. What can be better than murders themes around books? These 15 short stories were written by distinguished mystery writers and they make every story count. The editor Otto Penzler put together an anthology of crime between books that fill fit the likes of most readers. From hidden messages inside old books, a deadly bookseller and the deep secrets a library might hide, make this book impossible to put down. Each storyline is different but they all have something in common: books. The title was definitely well picked and it describes perfectly its content. All the stories take place in modern times and they all involve different types of books or characters related to books like booksellers, book collectors, books privately owned, public displayed books and even an old scroll. Even though most of the stories can be classified as thriller/mystery, some of them have a fantasy touch to them and one fits in the fantasy genre completely. The authors with stories on this collection, by order of appearance, are: Jeffery Deaver - "An Acceptable Sacrifice " C.J. Box - "Pronghorns of the Third Reich" Ken Bruen - "The Book of Virtue" Reed Farrel Coleman - "The Book of Ghosts" Peter Blauner - "The Final Testament" Thomas Cook - "What's In A Name? " Loren D. Estleman - "Book Club" William Link - "Death Leaves A Bookmark" Laura Lippman - "The Book Thing" Anne Perry - "The Scroll" Mickey Spillane & Max Allan Collins - "It's In the Book" Andrew Taylor - "The Long Sonata of the Dead" David Bell - "Rides A Stranger" John Connolly - "The Caxton Lending Library & Book Depository" Nelson DeMille - "The Book Case" The editor Otto Penzler did a great job putting this anthology together. All the authors have different styles of writing, different ways of describing and interaction with the reader which is very refreshing when you’re jumping from story to story. Some of the authors I’m familiar with and it was a treat to read some short works from them, like Jeffrey Deaver, Thomas Cook and John Connolly. Additionally, discovering other authors just made my to-read list a bit longer for next year. I absolutely recommend this anthology to all the fans of murder mysteries and books. These great authors write great stories and getting to know other creators of this genre might help you discover some great books you haven’t read yet. Thank you NetGalley, the publisher Pegasus Books and the editor for allowing me to read and review a digital copy of this book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sally Sugarman

    Thanks to John Dunning and Lawrence Block with help from Vicki Delaney and her Sherlock Holmes bookstore and Carolyn Hart with her Death on Demand bookstore, I have become enthralled with mysteries about books, book sellers and book stores. I also like Otto Penzler anthologies, so what could be better than a collection of stories about books edited by Penzler. These fifteen stories are by many authors with whom I am familiar and some of whom are new to me. I suspect that Penzler took particular Thanks to John Dunning and Lawrence Block with help from Vicki Delaney and her Sherlock Holmes bookstore and Carolyn Hart with her Death on Demand bookstore, I have become enthralled with mysteries about books, book sellers and book stores. I also like Otto Penzler anthologies, so what could be better than a collection of stories about books edited by Penzler. These fifteen stories are by many authors with whom I am familiar and some of whom are new to me. I suspect that Penzler took particular pleasure with the last story by Nelson DeMille about the murder of a bookstore owner Otis Park who was killed by a bookcase falling on him as he sat at his desk. Both the owner and the bookstore seemed familiar to anyone who has frequented The Mysterious Bookshop, particularly in its original quarters before it moved to Tribeca. It is hard to pick out favorites although The Caxton Library and Book Depository is one that a book lover would like to visit, even if it were not possible to be a librarian there. There are a variety of stories, some focusing just on a particular book, others looking more at collections and the passions that collectors have about these treasures. Each story has the distinctive style of the particular author which is what makes a fine anthology such a pleasure to read. Each reader will have his or her favorite, but none of the stories is disappointing. The collection make you want to read more about books and those who love them, sometimes not wisely, but too well.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Steven Belanger

    Mostly just an okay collection of stories involving books, bookstores or libraries. The best ones are probably Loren Estleman's "Book Club," Reed Coleman's "The Book of Ghosts," John Connolly's "The Caxton Lending Library..." and Nelson DeMille's "The Book Case." By far the worst was William Link's "Death Leaves A Bookmark," one of the most inept stories I have ever read, by anyone, anywhere, for any reason. Flat-out terrible. Made me wince as I was reading it. It's a Colombo story that reads li Mostly just an okay collection of stories involving books, bookstores or libraries. The best ones are probably Loren Estleman's "Book Club," Reed Coleman's "The Book of Ghosts," John Connolly's "The Caxton Lending Library..." and Nelson DeMille's "The Book Case." By far the worst was William Link's "Death Leaves A Bookmark," one of the most inept stories I have ever read, by anyone, anywhere, for any reason. Flat-out terrible. Made me wince as I was reading it. It's a Colombo story that reads like a bad script for an episode that never got made. Truly bad. The stores above are reasons enough to read this, and the last one is reason enough not to. You're best just skipping over it. Estleman's writing is always amusing, but you'll figure this one out before too long. It reminded me of Hitchcock's "Lamb to the Slaughter" episode from his show. Coleman's story is so good you'll want to emulate it somehow if you're a writer. That's all I'll say about it. That one is worth the price of admission by itself. Connolly's story is an ingenious idea, but without anyplace to really take it. The novelty of its concept will stay with you awhile. DeMille's story is a little too neat and tidy. Very sparse, almost entirely dialogue. It's pretty clear who done it, but you'll want to read to see exactly who did what. So take this one from the library, is my advice. It's worth reading, but I'm not sure it's worth owning. Bookshelf space is too precious to waste on a sometimes-good book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cheryle

    If you open your dictionary, you will discover that there is no such word as “bibliomystery.” However, most mystery readers know that the word refers to a mystery story that involves the world of books: a bookshop, a rare volume, a library, a collector, or a bookseller. The stories in this unique collection were commissioned by the Mysterious Bookshop. They were written by some of the mystery genre’s most distinguished authors. Tough guys like Ken Bruen, Reed Farrel Coleman, Loren D. Estleman, an If you open your dictionary, you will discover that there is no such word as “bibliomystery.” However, most mystery readers know that the word refers to a mystery story that involves the world of books: a bookshop, a rare volume, a library, a collector, or a bookseller. The stories in this unique collection were commissioned by the Mysterious Bookshop. They were written by some of the mystery genre’s most distinguished authors. Tough guys like Ken Bruen, Reed Farrel Coleman, Loren D. Estleman, and Mickey Spillane and Max Allan Collins. Bestsellers like Nelson DeMille, Anne Perry, and Jeffery Deaver. Edgar winners such as C. J. Box, Thomas H. Cook, and Laura Lippman. Here you will discover Sigmund Freud dealing with an unwelcome visitor; Columbo confronting a murderous bookseller; a Mexican cartel kingpin with a fatal weakness for rare books; and deadly secrets deep in the London Library; plus books with hidden messages, beguiling booksellers, crafty collectors, and a magical library that is guaranteed to enchant you. The stories have been published in seven languages—one has sold more than 250,000 copies as an e-book (“The Book Case” by Nelson DeMille)—and another won the Edgar Allan Poe Award as the Best Short Story of the Year (“The Caxton Lending Library and Book Depository” by John Connolly). Who knew literature could be so lethal!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    This is a pot luck of what amounts to long short stories all involving books, many by writers we know and love and several by others that I have yet to read their books. Like any collection, some of these tales are excellent, some are predictable from the first page or so, and others lack the polish and finesse of the tried and true mystery writer. Of course this is all a matter of taste, and since your taste is far different than mine, I am sure you will relish some of these stories that I did n This is a pot luck of what amounts to long short stories all involving books, many by writers we know and love and several by others that I have yet to read their books. Like any collection, some of these tales are excellent, some are predictable from the first page or so, and others lack the polish and finesse of the tried and true mystery writer. Of course this is all a matter of taste, and since your taste is far different than mine, I am sure you will relish some of these stories that I did not, and dismiss others that called attention to their prowess as writers and my neglect, perhaps, of their many other offerings. So like any potluck, some of these you will taste and want to come back for more, and others you will consider that this tale is all you wish to sample of that particular writer. Given this, plunge into this smorgasbord of some delectable offerings and others that are, well, rather plain and pedestrian, like that casserole your mom cooked when you were a kid, and you complained that you were too sick to eat much.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    What a great idea: to collect stories with themes associated with books, bookstores and libraries and gather them into one! (Actually, two volumes, this being the first of the two.) I was a little disappointed with the first two stories in this collection of stories but, happily, the remainder were much more interesting and better written (to my taste, of course). I also must note that in a few of the stories gathered here the connection to the world of books is verrry tenuous! One of the appeals What a great idea: to collect stories with themes associated with books, bookstores and libraries and gather them into one! (Actually, two volumes, this being the first of the two.) I was a little disappointed with the first two stories in this collection of stories but, happily, the remainder were much more interesting and better written (to my taste, of course). I also must note that in a few of the stories gathered here the connection to the world of books is verrry tenuous! One of the appeals of a collection of shorter stories is that you can get a decent mystery "fix" in a short time without having to spend the hours of readings entire books require. Allow me to clarify that I love both novels and short stories, as each has their place, depending upon one's interest and, importantly, available time.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Subashini

    This was a lot more enjoyable than I expected it to be. A perfect book to dip into for light reading.I thought I'd only like one or two stories and the rest would be filler, as anthologies often are, but almost all of the stories were fun and interesting, if not exactly mysterious. Standouts were John Connolly (so good!) and Laura Lippman, both of whom I've not read before. The Anne Perry story was the only one I disliked but that would not come as a surprise to anyone who has read her books. A This was a lot more enjoyable than I expected it to be. A perfect book to dip into for light reading.I thought I'd only like one or two stories and the rest would be filler, as anthologies often are, but almost all of the stories were fun and interesting, if not exactly mysterious. Standouts were John Connolly (so good!) and Laura Lippman, both of whom I've not read before. The Anne Perry story was the only one I disliked but that would not come as a surprise to anyone who has read her books. A story that could have been weird and creepy is let down by utterly dull prose. Academic jealousy and secret writing dreams and ambitions are also nicely explored in the two stories by Andrew Taylor and David Bell.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Duffy

    A spectacular collection of stories -- granted as a retired librarian I love anything connected with books, book stores or libraries but this was excellent. One of my favorites C.J. Box has a story in here, as do Jeffrey Deaver, Loren Estleman, Laura Lippman, Ann Perry, Ken Bruen.... and several others and every story was thoroughly enjoyable. I will admit that my favorite in this collection was "The Caxton Lending Library & Book Depository" and although I read his Book of Lost Things, I will now A spectacular collection of stories -- granted as a retired librarian I love anything connected with books, book stores or libraries but this was excellent. One of my favorites C.J. Box has a story in here, as do Jeffrey Deaver, Loren Estleman, Laura Lippman, Ann Perry, Ken Bruen.... and several others and every story was thoroughly enjoyable. I will admit that my favorite in this collection was "The Caxton Lending Library & Book Depository" and although I read his Book of Lost Things, I will now be tracking down the Charlie Parker Series, I love the way he thinks. I own several Mystery anthologies but this is by far the best, I want to share it with some friends but I won't be lending this out of my house.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Susan Johnston

    Princess Fuzzypants here: I have often said how much I enjoy anthologies. There is something special about the short story form that is hard to beat. It is great when you don't have time for a long involved and complicated book. It can be consumed one story at a time or in small batches. It is perfect for vacations. THis is a really good book with some fabulous authors and stories that are entertaining and suspenseful. All the stories have something to do with books, which in a book is a rather wh Princess Fuzzypants here: I have often said how much I enjoy anthologies. There is something special about the short story form that is hard to beat. It is great when you don't have time for a long involved and complicated book. It can be consumed one story at a time or in small batches. It is perfect for vacations. THis is a really good book with some fabulous authors and stories that are entertaining and suspenseful. All the stories have something to do with books, which in a book is a rather whimsical common denominator. Even with the theme, there is a lot of variety in the stories and the only two things they have in common is they all centre around books and they are all enjoyable. I give this book five purrs and two paws up

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kate Potapenko

    I did really like the idea, crimes evolving around books, libraries, readers, authors etc. However it seems that if it's a collection of short stories, then don't expect much.. Every single time I pick up a collection of stories even authors I normally love to read seem to disappoint me. There were a couple of quite good stories, but the majority had that unfinished touch and I'm not a huge fan of it. What made it even worse for me, when I got to the longest of them all after reading the very fi I did really like the idea, crimes evolving around books, libraries, readers, authors etc. However it seems that if it's a collection of short stories, then don't expect much.. Every single time I pick up a collection of stories even authors I normally love to read seem to disappoint me. There were a couple of quite good stories, but the majority had that unfinished touch and I'm not a huge fan of it. What made it even worse for me, when I got to the longest of them all after reading the very first sentence I've realised I did read it before. It was published separately and under a different name. Also it is one of the best stories in that collection. Seems that it is just not my thing and I should stick to full sized novels..

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    I really enjoyed this book. Sometimes you're just in the mood for a short story with a good mystery. In this case there are 16 that vary in length, time period and crime. The author list is filled with some familiar names. The central theme is centered on a book or a book lover. Perfect gift for the reader in your family. Originally published in 2013 but still very timely. Some of the authors are Ken Bruen, Reed Farrel Coleman, Loren D. Estleman, and Mickey Spillane and Max Allan Collins. Bestse I really enjoyed this book. Sometimes you're just in the mood for a short story with a good mystery. In this case there are 16 that vary in length, time period and crime. The author list is filled with some familiar names. The central theme is centered on a book or a book lover. Perfect gift for the reader in your family. Originally published in 2013 but still very timely. Some of the authors are Ken Bruen, Reed Farrel Coleman, Loren D. Estleman, and Mickey Spillane and Max Allan Collins. Bestsellers like Nelson DeMille, Anne Perry, and Jeffery Deaver. Edgar winners such as C. J. Box, Thomas H. Cook, and Laura Lippman.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Adamson

    Whilst some of the short stories contained in this book only gave me a 2 or 3 * experience, the introduction by Ian Rankin and the second to last story ranked 5* and the last story a 4 1/2* so overall I’m going with a 4 for these alone to balance! A wonderful concept of crime stories related to books and bookstores. Some stories are dark and hard for me the lighter mystery reader to enjoy. Others, especially the last two, were absolutely wonderful stories which I would have loved to read as whol Whilst some of the short stories contained in this book only gave me a 2 or 3 * experience, the introduction by Ian Rankin and the second to last story ranked 5* and the last story a 4 1/2* so overall I’m going with a 4 for these alone to balance! A wonderful concept of crime stories related to books and bookstores. Some stories are dark and hard for me the lighter mystery reader to enjoy. Others, especially the last two, were absolutely wonderful stories which I would have loved to read as whole novels. Nice assortment - pick and choose your favorite!

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